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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Farson in Sublette County, Wyoming — The American West (Mountains)
 

Parting of the Ways

 
 
Parting of the Ways Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, June 2, 2016
1. Parting of the Ways Marker
Inscription. This point on the trail is called the Parting-of-the-Ways. The trail to the right is the Sublette or Greenwood Cutoff and to the left is the main route of the Oregon, Mormon, and California Trails. The Sublette Cutoff was opened in 1844 because it saved 46 miles over the main route. It did require a 50 mile waterless crossing of the desert and therefore was not popular until the gold rush period. The name tells the story, people who had traveled a thousand miles together separated at this point. They did not know if they would ever see each other again. It was a place of great sorrow. It was also a place of great decision to cross the desert and save miles or to favor their livestock. About two-thirds of the emigrants chose the main route through Fort Bridger instead of the Sublette Cutoff.
 
Erected by U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Mormon Pioneer Trail, and the Oregon Trail marker series.
 
Location. 42° 15.456′ N, 109° 13.614′ W. Marker is near Farson, Wyoming, in Sublette County. Marker is on Oregon Trail near Squaw Road (Federal Route BLM4106). Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Farson WY 82932, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least
Parting of the Ways and Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, June 2, 2016
2. Parting of the Ways and Marker
5 other markers are within 9 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Little Sandy Crossing (approx. 7.5 miles away); a different marker also named The Parting of the Ways (approx. 8.8 miles away); a different marker also named "Parting of the Ways" (approx. 8.8 miles away); a different marker also named Parting of the Ways (approx. 8.8 miles away); The Oregon Trail (approx. 8.8 miles away).
 
More about this marker. To access the true Parting of the Ways, from Wyoming Highway 28, between mile posts 16 and 17, take Squaw Road (BLM #4106) north about 3 1/2 miles until you located a concrete Oregon/California/Mormon Pioneer/Pony Express post on the left. At this point turn west and take the Oregon Trail for approximately 4 miles.
 
Regarding Parting of the Ways. This is the TRUE Parting of the Ways. Other Parting of the Ways markers next to Wyoming Highway 28 make reference to the Parting of the Ways, but are mistakenly taken to represent the location of the Parting of the Ways. They do not, they are generally referred to as being False Parting of the Ways monuments.

While Farson, in Sweetwater County, is the nearest town, the Parting of the Ways is located in Sublette County.
 
Also see . . .  Parting of the Ways - Wyoming State Historical Preservation Office
Parting of the Ways image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, June 2, 2016
3. Parting of the Ways
. This may well be one of the most subtly dramatic sites remaining on the emigrant trails. Here, in the middle of an open, sagebrush plain, the trails diverge. Emigrants had to decide whether to stay on the main route and head southwest towards Fort Bridger or veer right and cross the Little Colorado Desert on the Greenwood or Sublette Cutoff. (Submitted on August 10, 2016, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.) 
 
Categories. Roads & VehiclesSettlements & Settlers
 
Parting of the Ways image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, June 2, 2016
4. Parting of the Ways
← F Bridger; → S Cutoff
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 165 times since then and 38 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page was last revised on August 10, 2016.
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