Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Pendleton in Anderson County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Richard W. Simpson

 
 
Richard W. Simpson Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, July 24, 2008
1. Richard W. Simpson Marker
Inscription.
Born in 1840, Colonel Simpson, lawyer, farmer, and legislator, drafted and executed Thomas Green Clemson's will, establishing Clemson Agricultural College in 1889. Simpson was first president of the college's board of trustees and once owned land which became part of the Simpson Experiment Station. He died in 1912 and is buried in the Simpson family cemetery here.
 
Erected 1988 by Clemson University. (Marker Number 4-21.)
 
Location. 34° 38.936′ N, 82° 43.698′ W. Marker is near Pendleton, South Carolina, in Anderson County. Marker is on Cherry Street Extension (State Road 115), on the right when traveling east. Click for map. Marker is located at the entrance of the Simpson Experiment Station, about four miles east of Pendleton. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1648 Cherry Street Extension, Pendleton SC 29670, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Joseph B. Douthit (approx. 1.9 miles away); Ashtabula (approx. 2.5 miles away); The Piazza (approx. 2.6 miles away); Barnard Elliott Bee (approx. 2.8 miles away); Clement Hoffman Stevens
Richard W. Simpson Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, July 24, 2008
2. Richard W. Simpson Marker
(approx. 2.8 miles away); Thomas Green Clemson (approx. 2.8 miles away); a different marker also named Thomas Green Clemson (approx. 2.8 miles away); Willis Chapel Methodist Church (approx. 2.9 miles away); Printer John Miller (approx. 3 miles away); Lebanon Baptist Church (approx. 3 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Pendleton.
 
Also see . . .
1. Thomas Green Clemson. Thomas Green Clemson, (July 1, 1807 – April 6, 1888) was an American politician and statesman, serving as an ambassador and the United States Superintendent of Agriculture. (Submitted on September 30, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

2. Clemson University. Clemson University is a public, coeducational, land-grant, research university located in Clemson, South Carolina, United States. (Submitted on September 30, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

3. Simpson Beef Cattle Farm. The mission of the Beef Cattle Farm is to provide cattle, facilities, support and technical assistance for the teaching, research and extension programs of the Animal and Veterinary Sciences Departments and The College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences. (Submitted on September 30, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. The Clemson Bequest
The political contest over the governorship, in the fall of 1888, developed a strong opposition to Mr. Richardson, which largely revolved around the Farmers' movements, still led by Captain Tillman. Especially was there much discussion over the advisability of accepting the bequest of the late Thomas G. Clemson to establish an agricultural college on the estate of John C. Calhoun at Fort Hill, in the southeastern corner of Oconee County and the extreme northwestern part of the State. Mr. Clemson, who had died in April 1888, was Calhoun's son-in-law and had inherited that property from his wife. Colonel Richard W. Simpson, a legislator and lawyer of Anderson County, had been Mr. Clemson's confidential lawyer and had written his will, himself having advocated the establishment of an agricultural college. Mr. Clemson had also conferred with the gifted W.H. Trescot. Provision was made for an agricultural college in Mr. Clemson's will and Colonel Simpson named as one of its trustees. Seven of the trustees who were to control the property, valued then at from $85,000 to $100,000, were named in the will, and not more than six were to be selected by the State. As the seven were to have the right to fill vacancies in their number, they constituted the permanent controlling force. Not long before his death, Mr. Clemson had consulted both Colonel Simpson and Captain Tillman about the establishment of such an institution so that the two stood as the official sponsors of the Clemson bequest as made under the terms of the will. The will was contested by a grand-daughter of Mr. Clemson, defended by Colonel Simpson, as executor of the estate, and its validity finally sustained by the United States Supreme Court. (Source: History of South Carolina, Vol. II by Yates Snowden, pgs 994-995.)
    — Submitted September 30, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

 
Categories. AgricultureEducationNotable Persons
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,210 times since then and 5 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   2. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement