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Quanah in Hardeman County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Quanah Parker

Last Chief of the Comanches

 

—Son of Chief Peta Nokoni and Cynthia Ann Parker - Naduah —

 
Quanah Parker Marker & Secondary Plaque. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, July 22, 2016
1. Quanah Parker Marker & Secondary Plaque.
Inscription. Quanah Parker, man of vision, fought against all odds to save the Comanche way of life. Then, he fought to survive and prosper in a white man's world. His mother, a white woman captured by Indians at age nine, was raised a Comanche. When Quanah was a young boy, Cynthia Ann was recaptured against her will by Texas Rangers on the Pease River in 1860. He never saw her again. As a warrior, Quanah showed great bravery leading Indian forces especially in the Battle of Adobe Walls, he was never routed and never captured. Facing the encroaching civilization of the white man, he chose to lay down his shield and arms in the spring of 1875 at Fort Sill, Oklahoma. As he approached the fort, he dismounted and turned his horse loose saying "There goes the spirit of the Comanche." However Quanah was never defeated. Acknowledged as a leader by the Comanches and whites alike, he became a Tribal Judge, cattleman, spokesman to Washington and friend of President Theodore Roosevelt. The town of Quanah was named for him. In 1890, on a visit to Quanah, he pronounced his blessing on the town he called "My Town" his epitaph reads: "Resting here until day breaks and shadows fall and darkness disappears is Quanah Parker, last chief of the Comanches."

(Circa 1845 – 1911)


Secondary plaque

Dedicated to the memory of the last great Comanche chief, Quanah Parker. He pronounced this blessing on "his" town Quanah, Texas. "May the great spirit smile on your little town, may the rain fall in season, and in the warmth of sunshine after the rain, may the earth yield bountifully. May peace and
Reverse side of Quanah Parker Marker. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, July 22, 2016
2. Reverse side of Quanah Parker Marker.
contentment be with you and your children forever."
 
Erected 1991 by Quanah Chamber of Commerce Monument Committee.
 
Location. 34° 17.852′ N, 99° 44.399′ W. Marker is in Quanah, Texas, in Hardeman County. Marker is at the intersection of South Main Street and West 3rd Street (Texas Highway 133), on the right when traveling south on South Main Street. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 300 South Main Street, Quanah TX 79252, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 5 other markers are within 12 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Hardeman County Courthouse (within shouting distance of this marker); Quanah Parker Trail Arrow (about 800 feet away, measured in a direct line); Hardeman County Jail (approx. 0.2 miles away); William Jesse McDonald (approx. 0.8 miles away); Medicine Mound Community (approx. 11.3 miles away).
 
More about this marker.
Sculptor: Morris & Linda Willis, Fabricator: Willis Granite Company, Granite, Oklahoma
 
Also see . . .
1. Inventories of American Painting and Sculpture, Smithsonian American Art Museum about this stele. (Submitted on August 13, 2016, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.)
2. Wikipedia article on Quanah Parker. (Submitted on August 13, 2016, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.)
 
Categories. Native AmericansWars, US Indian
 
Quanah Parker image. Click for full size.
By Public Domain. - circa 1890
3. Quanah Parker
Quanah Parker Marker at corner of Hardeman County Courthouse. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, July 22, 2016
4. Quanah Parker Marker at corner of Hardeman County Courthouse.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 302 times since then and 64 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page was last revised on August 13, 2016.
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