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Near Big Piney in Sublette County, Wyoming — The American West (Mountains)
 

Rising to the Challenge of the New Fork River

 
 
Rising to the Challenge of the New Fork River Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, June 2, 2016
1. Rising to the Challenge of the New Fork River Marker
Inscription. The water runoff from nearby mountains changes seasonally and from year to year. Emigrants used a variety of methods for crossing, depending on how much water flowed in the New Fork River.

Fording the New Fork: Low Water Crossing
Green River (New Fork) is a pretty large swift deep stream we forded however and camped in the bottom - James Brown, New Fork River, July 30, 1859
Forded the stream which was very swift & up to the other wagon bed. - Hamet Case, New Fork River, July 17, 1859.

Raising Wagon Boxes: Medium Water Crossing
All the wagon beds were blocked up... A rope was tied to the rear axel of each wagon manned by a dozen men, eased down by a like number, and when afloat, to hold it from drifting down the current, another rope was attached to the tongue and carried between the lead mules, handled by a crew of twelve on the opposite shore. When the lead mules were out of sight under water, with the aid of the ropes the men on the west shore hauled them to a sand bar where they found their footing. The leaders towed the wheelers along to the sand bar, and the wagons followed to the shore in safety. - John Collins, New Fork River, May 16, 1864

Creating a Makeshift Ferry: High Water Crossing
(E)xamined
Rising to the Challenge of the New Fork River Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, June 2, 2016
2. Rising to the Challenge of the New Fork River Marker
This marker is on the right.
all our wagon-beds, selected two of the tightest and best made, took them off the axels, caulked them as tight as possible, and otherwise made them fit for boating, and then put them in the water.
The next morning they were soaked tight... A wagon was taken in pieces and put in one boat, and baggage was taken in the other, and rowed over... nearly forty wagons were taken over that day.
- Sherlock Bristol, New Fork River, July 30, 1862 42.6138, -109.85
 
Erected by Sublette County Historical Society.
 
Location. 42° 36.828′ N, 109° 50.994′ W. Marker is near Big Piney, Wyoming, in Sublette County. Marker can be reached from Paradise Road near Wyoming 351 (Wyoming Highway 351), on the right when traveling north. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1398 Paradise Road, Big Piney WY 83113, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 10 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Crossing the New Fork River (a few steps from this marker); The First Engines: Oxen, Mules, and Horses (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); "We Busy Ourselves in Various Ways" (approx. 0.2 miles away); "Hear Was Hundreds of Emigrants" (approx. 0.2 miles away); Building the Lander Trail (approx. 0.2 miles away); 19th Century Interstate Highway (approx. mile away); Sand Spring - A Stop on the Oregon Trail (approx. 9.8 miles away); “The Best Mountain Road in the West” (approx. 9.8 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Big Piney.
 
Regarding Rising to the Challenge of the New Fork River. This marker is located in Lander Trail New Fork River Crossing Historic Park.
 
Categories. Roads & VehiclesSettlements & Settlers
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 99 times since then and 14 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page was last revised on December 10, 2016.
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