“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Manassas in Prince William County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)

U.S. Infantry Battalion


—First Battle of Manassas —

U.S. Infantry Battalion Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, July 12, 2008
1. U.S. Infantry Battalion Marker
Inscription. July 21, 1861
11:00 a.m.

1st Brigade (Porter), Second Division (Hunter)
Army of Northeastern Virginia, USA

U.S. Infantry Battalion
Maj. George Sykes

"As soon as we were formed, we commenced firing, and the rebels did not like the taste of our long range rifles. Our men fired badly; they were excited, and some of the recruits fired at the stars. There was some confusion, but we formed line of battle and marched across the field in splendid order. We went through some woods, which were full of dead bodies, and formed line again. We were here fired on by two regiments, and many of our men fell."
-Lt. Eugene Carter
Location. 38° 49.622′ N, 77° 31.833′ W. Marker is near Manassas, Virginia, in Prince William County. Marker can be reached from Sudley Road (State Road 234) when traveling north. Click for map. Located in the Manassas National Battlefield Park, along the Matthews Hill trail. Marker is in this post office area: Manassas VA 20109, United States of America.
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. 2nd New Hampshire Infantry (within shouting distance of this marker); 2nd Rhode Island Infantry (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); 4th Alabama Infantry
U.S. Infantry Battalion Trail Stop image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, July 12, 2008
2. U.S. Infantry Battalion Trail Stop
(about 500 feet away); 71st New York State Militia (about 500 feet away); 8th Georgia Infantry (about 600 feet away); George T. Stovall (about 700 feet away); Rhode Island Battery (approx. 0.2 miles away); First Contact (approx. 0.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Manassas.
Also see . . .  Major George Sykes' Report. In his official report, Sykes wrote, "For more than an hour the command was here exposed to a concentrated fire from the batteries and regiments of the enemy, which seemed doubled when the guns of the Rhode Islanders opened. Many of my men assisted in working the latter battery." Later in the day, the regulars formed as a rear guard as other elements of the Federal army retreated from the field. (Submitted on July 30, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
Categories. War, US Civil
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 762 times since then and 62 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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