Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Oak Ridge in Cooke County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

The Cross Timbers

 
 
The Cross Timbers Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, July 21, 2016
1. The Cross Timbers Marker
Inscription. Two long, narrow strips of timber extending parallel to each other from Oklahoma to Central Texas; form a marked contrast to adjacent prairie. The more fertile East Cross Timbers begin here in Cooke County. Area was famous pioneer landmark as well as obstacle to travel because of its dense growth. It divided the hunting grounds of the Plains and East Texas Indians. Until 1870s it marked boundary of settlement, for Plains Indians avoided the timber. Forests' most important function was (and is) causing soil to retain water.
 
Erected 1970 by State Historical Survey Committee. (Marker Number 5316.)
 
Location. 33° 38.996′ N, 97° 2.36′ W. Marker is in Oak Ridge, Texas, in Cooke County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of U.S. 82 and Pauls Lane when traveling east. Click for map. Located in the eastbound roadside rest area. Marker is in this post office area: Gainesville TX 76240, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 7 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Gainesville (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); Butterfield Overland Stage Line (approx. 5.5 miles away); The Great Hanging at Gainesville, 1862
The Cross Timbers Marker looking east towards US Highway 82. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, July 21, 2016
2. The Cross Timbers Marker looking east towards US Highway 82.
(approx. 6 miles away); Gainesville-Fort Sill Road (approx. 6.1 miles away); Santa Fe Passenger Depot (approx. 6.1 miles away); Barbed Wire in Cooke County (approx. 6.3 miles away); Cooke County Courthouse (approx. 6.4 miles away); The Old California Trail (approx. 6.4 miles away).
 
Categories. AgricultureHorticulture & ForestryNative Americans
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 88 times since then and 4 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page was last revised on September 8, 2016.
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