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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Chincoteague Island in Accomack County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Welcome to Assateague Village

 
 
Welcome to Assateague Village Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox, July 14, 2013
1. Welcome to Assateague Village Marker
Inscription. In the 1800s, after the lighthouse was built, a small community grew up not far from here. By the early 1900s, about 225 lived in the village, which included a school, dry goods store, and a church. The residents harvested resources from the sea, hunted waterfowl and deer, gathered wild plants, and grazed livestock.

Watermen Followed the Seasons
in the fall and winiter, watermen braved freezing temperatures and winter gales to tong for Chincoteague's prized oysters. In spring and summer, they harvested clams and scallops, In the summer, they caught crabs. They ate some of their catch and sold the rest on Chincoteague Island.

Children Learned Their ABCs
Younger children were educated in a small schoolhouse in the village. Built in 1890, the one-room schoolhouse served students in grades one through six. Older children took the boat to Chincoteague to attend school.

Women Processed the Catch
Many of the village women processed menhaden into oil and fertilizer in a fish factory located in Toms Cove. Closely related to herring and sardines, menhaden spawn in the ocean and migrate into nearby bays and estuaries to feed on algae.

What Happened to the Village?
In 1922, Dr. Samuel B. Fields of Baltimore purchased most of the Virginia portion of Assateague
Welcome to Assateague Village Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox, July 14, 2013
2. Welcome to Assateague Village Marker
Island and fenced off the land. Villagers could no longer get to Tom's Cove, cutting them off from their livelihood. They gradually moved off the island, floating their houses on barges across the channel to Chincoteague. Today, all that remains of the village are a few building foundations and a cemetery.
 
Location. 37° 54.661′ N, 75° 21.373′ W. Marker is near Chincoteague Island, Virginia, in Accomack County. Marker can be reached from Beach Access Road north of Boat Ramp Access Road, on the right when traveling south. Click for map. Public access only via Lighthouse Trail footpath from Beach Access Rd. Marker is in this post office area: Chincoteague Island VA 23336, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Assateague Light House (a few steps from this marker); Still Shining...After All These Years (a few steps from this marker); The Wild Ponies (approx. half a mile away); Keeping the Forest Full of Life (approx. 1.1 miles away); Christ Sanctified Holy Church (approx. 2.5 miles away); Captain Timothy Hill House (approx. 2.5 miles away); Welcome to the NASA Visitor Center (approx. 5.8 miles away); NASA Wallops Flight Facility (approx. 5.8 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Chincoteague Island.
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceSettlements & SettlersWaterways & Vessels
 
Welcome to Assateague Village Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox, July 14, 2013
3. Welcome to Assateague Village Marker
Welcome to Assateague Village Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox, July 14, 2013
4. Welcome to Assateague Village Marker
Welcome to Assateague Village Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox, July 14, 2013
5. Welcome to Assateague Village Marker
Welcome to Assateague Village Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael C. Wilcox, July 14, 2013
6. Welcome to Assateague Village Marker
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Michael C. Wilcox of Winston-Salem, North Carolina. This page has been viewed 147 times since then and 14 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on , by Michael C. Wilcox of Winston-Salem, North Carolina. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on October 17, 2016.
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