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Burkesville in Cumberland County, Kentucky — The American South (East South Central)
 

Confederate Crossings at Neeley's Ferry

The Great Raid

 

—July 1-2, 1863 —

 
Confederate Crossings at Neeley's Ferry Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tom Bosse, October 13, 2016
1. Confederate Crossings at Neeley's Ferry Marker
Inscription. During late June 1863 Confederate Gen. John Hunt Morgan's scouts and portions of his nine regiments moved into Cumberland County preparing for the Great Raid in Kentucky, Indiana, and Ohio.

The 1st Brigade, numbering 1,450 cavalrymen under Col. Basil Duke, crossed the Cumberland River here at Neeley's Ferry, and at Burkesville, Scott's Ferry, Amandaville, and Bakerton. Col. Adam R. Johnson commanded the regiments of the 2nd Brigade, numbering 1,000. For the most part, Johnson's Brigade crossed the Cumberland at McMillan's Ferry. Salt Lick Bend, and other points west of here.

Due to heavy rains the river was out of its banks. In some places it was over one-half mile wide. Crossing the swollen river took Duke's men the better part of two days Curtis Burke, a member of Quirk's Scouts, described the scene at Neeley's Ferry in his diary:

"We had to make our horses swim as we did at Oby's river. We had to take our horses some distance above the regular entrance to the river, so that the swift current would not wash the horses too far below the landing on the other side.

We would unsaddle our horses, lead six or eight of them to the edge of the water, then let them loose, and the boys would get around them and driver them in (the river) with sticks, clods of earth, and rocks. If one (horse) started
Confederate Crossings at Neeley's Ferry Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tom Bosse, October 13, 2016
2. Confederate Crossings at Neeley's Ferry Marker
across, the others would follow, but most of the time we had to holler and pilt them a good deal before they would make the trip... Several canoe loads of the boys were over on the other side catching the horses as they crossed."

The Cumberland River ferries operated in the first half of the 20th century. Now, only McMillan's Ferry, which crosses the river at Turkey Neck Bend in Monroe County, remains in operation. It can be reached by traveling SR 100 to SR 214 between Burkesville and Tompkinsville.
 
Erected by Kentucky Heartland Civil War Trails Commission.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the John Hunt Morgan Heritage Trail in Kentucky marker series.
 
Location. 36° 44.817′ N, 85° 22.333′ W. Marker is in Burkesville, Kentucky, in Cumberland County. Marker is on Celina Road (Kentucky Route 61) 0.4 miles north of Cold Springs Road, on the right when traveling south. Click for map. Marker is located at the boat ramp at Traces on the Cumberland Boat Storage facility. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2687 Celina Road, Burkesville KY 42717, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 10 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Burkesville Ferry (approx. 2.7 miles away); Lincoln's Father Here
Cumberland River at Neeley's Ferry Site image. Click for full size.
By Tom Bosse, October 13, 2016
3. Cumberland River at Neeley's Ferry Site
(approx. 3 miles away); Raiders Entered Here (approx. 3 miles away); Morgan On To Ohio (approx. 3 miles away); Smith Pharmacy (approx. 3 miles away); Cumberland County (approx. 3 miles away); Skirmish at Norris Branch (approx. 4.5 miles away); Civil War Camp at Marrowbone (approx. 10 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Burkesville.
 
Categories. War, US CivilWaterways & Vessels
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Tom Bosse of Jefferson City, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 90 times since then and 5 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Tom Bosse of Jefferson City, Tennessee. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on October 19, 2016.
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