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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Lawrence Township in Mercer County, New Jersey — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

John Moore’s Tavern

1804 – 1817

 
 
John Moore’s Tavern Marker image. Click for full size.
By Gary Nigh, circa March 2008
1. John Moore’s Tavern Marker
Inscription.
 
Erected by Lawrence Historic & Aesthetic Commission.
 
Location. 40° 17.928′ N, 74° 43.714′ W. Marker is in Lawrence Township, New Jersey, in Mercer County. Marker is on Lawrenceville Road (Main Street) (U.S. 206) 0 miles from Gordon Avenue, on the right when traveling south. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2695 Lawrenceville Road, Lawrence Township NJ 08648, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Lawrence House, 1840 (a few steps from this marker); First Town Hall (within shouting distance of this marker); Maidenhead Church (within shouting distance of this marker); Revolutionary War Site (approx. 1.8 miles away but has been reported missing); Route of Washington’s March (approx. 2.4 miles away); Temple-Ryan Farmhouse (approx. 2.6 miles away); a different marker also named Route of Washington’s March (approx. 2.7 miles away); a different marker also named Route of Washington’s March (approx. 3 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Lawrence Township.
 
Also see . . .  Lawrence Township's guide to its historical landmarks. The Main Street Historic District. (Submitted on August 6, 2008.)
John Moore’s Tavern image. Click for full size.
By Gary Nigh, circa March 2008
2. John Moore’s Tavern
 
 
Additional comments.
1. 2695 Main Street - Cock and Bull Tavern
According to Lawrence Township's guide to its historical landmarks:

The first reference to this house as a tavern was in May 1789, when William Compton petitioned for a tavern license. He wrote that he had recently purchased a house in Maidenhead opposite the Presbyterian Church and, being encouraged by his neighbors and friends to keep a house of entertainment, solicited a license for the ensuing year. In 1804, John Moore applied for his first license at this location. This tavern was used for many years as a place to hold the annual township meetings. In 1816, a meeting was held here to petition for the township’s name change from Maidenhead to Lawrence. Dr. Gosman, a minister of the Lawrenceville Presbyterian Church, is said to have spoken of visits to the tavern by some of his congregants as “the thirst after righteousness.” In the 1890’s, Ed Conover kept his stage coach in a barn behind the tavern." Note To Editor only visible by Contributor and editor    
    — Submitted August 6, 2008.

 
Categories. Notable Buildings
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Gary Nigh of Trenton, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,023 times since then and 16 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Gary Nigh of Trenton, New Jersey. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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