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Hermitage in Davidson County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
Abandonment and Preservation
Stories Lost, Then Found Again
 
Abandonment and Preservation Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Sandra Hughes, September 25, 2010
1. Abandonment and Preservation Marker
 
Inscription. In the years after Andrew Jackson’s death, the Jackson’s financial situation changed for the worse. The log farmhouse/slave cabin slowly fell into ruin. In 1889, the state of Tennessee entrusted the property to the Ladies’ Hermitage Association. They immediately restored the one-story remains of the farmhouse as a monument to Andrew Jackson. Because the history of this building as a slave cabin went untold, visitors to The Hermitage for many years mistakenly believed that the Jackson lived in a crude one-story frontier log cabin.

Since the early 1970’s, historical and archaeological research on the farmhouse has revealed a wealth of new information. This information tells much about the enslaved African Americans who lived here, as well as the appearance of the house during Jackson’s residency. This research guided the restoration of the buildings to the period after 1821 when the enslaved occupied both buildings. Although restored as slave cabins, we now tell both stories-that of Andrew Jackson’s life here, and that of his enslaved workers.
 
Location. 36° 13.014′ N, 86° 36.657′ W. Marker is in Hermitage, Tennessee, in Davidson County. Marker can be reached from Rachel's Lane. Click for map. Marker on path near slave cabins/Jackson's first Hermitage Home. Marker is in this post office area: Hermitage TN 37076, United States of America.
 
Abandonment and Preservation Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Sandra Hughes, September 25, 2010
2. Abandonment and Preservation Marker
 

 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Belted Galloway (here, next to this marker); A home for Jackson’s Slaves (a few steps from this marker); The Hermitage Landscape (a few steps from this marker); Land Conservation at The Hermitage (within shouting distance of this marker); Growing Cotton (within shouting distance of this marker); A Future President's Home (within shouting distance of this marker); The First Hermitage (within shouting distance of this marker); The Springhouse (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line). Click for a list of all markers in Hermitage.
 
Abandonment and Preservation Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Sandra Hughes, September 25, 2010
3. Abandonment and Preservation Marker
 
 
Archaeological Fieldwork Photo, Click for full size
By Sandra Hughes, September 25, 2010
4. Archaeological Fieldwork
Six seasons of archaeological fieldwork, both inside and outside the building, has fostered a better understanding of how all of the different inhabitants used the area around the farmhouse and nearby kitchen.
 
 
Print of Jackson’s “First Residence” Photo, Click for full size
By Sandra Hughes, September 25, 2010
5. Print of Jackson’s “First Residence”
Prints like this that identified the one-story farmhouse/slave cabin as Jackson’s “First Residence” supports the popular belief that Jackson lived in a rough-hewn log cabin on the Tennessee frontier.
 
 
Abandonment and Preservation Photo, Click for full size
By Sandra Hughes, September 25, 2010
6. Abandonment and Preservation
By 1889, the chimney and south wall of the farmhouse/slave cabin had begun to collapse and much of the daubing and chinking had fallen out. This 1898 photograph shows the results of the Orginial restoration of the farmhouse and kitchen one of the earliest historic preservation projects in America. Since then, numerous repairs to these building have been undertaken. Surprisingly the farmhouse retains much of its original material.
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on February 10, 2012, by Sandra Hughes of Killen, Usa. This page has been viewed 196 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on February 10, 2012, by Sandra Hughes of Killen, Usa. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
 
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