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Albemarle County Markers
Virginia (Albemarle County), Afton — Z-20 — Nelson County / Albemarle County
Nelson County. In the foothills of Virginia’s Piedmont, Nelson County was formed in 1807 from Amherst County. The county was named for Thomas Nelson, Jr., governor of Virginia from June to November 1781. The county seat is Lovingston. The Nelson County courthouse was built under the supervision of George Varnum in 1809, according to the plans submitted by Sheldon Crostwait, one of the justices. Though the courthouse has been modified and enlarged over the years, it is one of Virginia’s . . . — Map (db m4030) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Batesville — GA-40 — Staunton and James River Turnpike
The Staunton and James River Turnpike ran through here at Batesville and stretched for 43½ miles from Staunton to Scottsville. Construction began in 1826 and was completed by 1830. The turnpike provided a direct route for Shenandoah Valley farmers to transport agricultural products to Scottsville, then to Richmond via the James River and Kanawha Canal. Because the turnpike became impassable during wet weather, it was converted to a plank road (wooden boards laid crosswise to the . . . — Map (db m21696) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Brownsville — The Rothwell Family ... / Elisha Wm. Robertson ...
The Rothwell Family of Albemarle County Virginia. Claiborne one of the first of the Rothwells to live in this county, was born about 1741 as reported in The Virginia Advocate, Saturday Oct. 11, 1828 and “died on Oct. 6 in his 87th year... He was a kind and affectionate husband and father, a good neighbor and a humane master ... a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.” He was buried in the family cemetery, remains of which may be seen near the home of Wm. D. Ballard, . . . — Map (db m3996) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — W 165 — Advance Mills
Villages such as Advance Mills were once common features of rural Virginia, serving as economic and social centers. Advance Mills grew around a single mill that John Fray constructed in 1833 on the north fork of the Rivanna River. By the twentieth century, Advance Mills had expanded to include facilities to process corn, flour, wool, sumac, and lumber for local farmers. A general store also sold goods to nearby residents. Industrialization, electricity, and the increasing efficiency of . . . — Map (db m55785) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — Albemarle Barracks Burial Site
"In 1779 4,000 prisoners, British and their German auxiliaries, captured at the Battle of Saratoga in 1777, marched over 600 miles to quarters, called 'The Barracks', situated a half mile north of this site. Traditionally, some of these prisoners who died were buried near this memorial marker, which was placed here by the Albemarle County Historical Society in 1983 to mark the presence of the British and 'Hessian' prisoners during our American War of Independence." — Map (db m37586) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — Z-15 — Albemarle County / Greene County
Albemarle County. Albemarle County was formed in 1744 from Goochland County and named for William Anne Keppel, the second Earl of Albemarle, titular governor of Virginia from 1747 to 1754. A portion of Louisa County was later added to Albemarle County. In 1761, part of Albemarle County was divided to form Buckingham and Amherst Counties. President Thomas Jefferson (1743–1826) was born in this county at Shadwell and here he built his home Monticello. The city of Charlottesville is the . . . — Map (db m21585) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — Ash Lawn - Highland
Ash Lawn - Highland Home of James Monroe from 1799-1823 Dedicated on July 20, 1985 by Virginia Daughters of the American Revolution State Regent Mrs. G.E. Honts, Jr. — Map (db m63671) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — W-199 — Clark’s Birthplace
A mile north was born George Rogers Clark, defender of Kentucky and conqueror of the Northwest, November 19, 1752. — Map (db m17271) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — W 166 — Convention Army The Barracks
In Jan. 1779, during the American Revolution, 4,000 British troops and German mercenaries (commonly known as “Hessians”) captured following the Battle of Saratoga in New York arrived here after marching from Massachusetts. It was called the Convention Army after the instrument of its surrender. Most prisoners lived in primitive huts spread out over several hundred acres of the barracks camp, where they endured great hardships. Supplying and guarding the Convention Army taxed the . . . — Map (db m55784) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — Ice House — Thomas Jefferson's Monticello
Master carpenter James Dinsmore oversaw construction of this Ice House to Jefferson's design in 1802. Enslaved and hired workers filled it each year between November and February with ice cut from the nearby Rivanna River, shallow ponds, or snow collected from mountaintop. The ice usually lasted through the summer and was mainly used to preserve meat and butter and to chill wine, while snow was used to make ice cream. The circular Ice House, 16 feet across and 16 feet deep, was . . . — Map (db m68174) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — Kappa Sigma Fraternity
Here on December the tenth MDCCCLXIX the Kappa Sigma Fraternity was founded by William Grisby McCormick • George Miles Arnold • John Covert Boyd • Edmund Law Rogers • Frank Courtney Nicodemus. Manet Mansuraque Est. Map (db m8812) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — G-29 — Monacan Indian Village
Near here, on both sides of the Rivanna River, was located the Monacan Indian village of Monasukapanough. This village was one of five Monacan towns that Captain John Smith recorded by name on his 1612 Map of Virginia, though many more existed. Monasukapanough was a chief’s village and was occupied for several centuries until it was abandoned in the late seventeenth or early eighteenth century. Monacan descendants still reside throughout the central Virginia area. The tribe’s headquarters today is on Bear Mountain in Amherst County. — Map (db m45497) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — Mulberry Row — Thomas Jefferson's Monticello
Every article is made on his farm; his negroes are cabinet makers, carpenters, masons, bricklayers, smith, etc. Duc de La Rochefoucauld Liancourt, 1796 You are standing on Mulberry Row, a road once lined with more than 20 dwellings, workshops, and sheds. It was the constantly-changing hub of the entire 5,000-acre plantation. Here, enslaved people, indentured servants, free blacks, and free white workmen lived and worked as weavers, spinners, blacksmiths, tinsmiths, nail-makers, . . . — Map (db m68171) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — Piney River Cabin
Virginia's virgin forest provided materials for the settlers' most basic shelter. Centuries ago, first growth trees were felled and the wood hewn to form this single-room log cabin in Piney River, Virginia, 45 minutes south of here. The structure is being reconstructed on this site and will be used to highlight 18th-century trades. — Map (db m53613) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — W-163 — Revolutionary Soldiers Graves
Jesse Pitman Lewis (d. March 8, 1849), of the Virginia Militia, and Taliaferro Lewis (d. July 12, 1810), of the Continental Line, two of several brothers who fought in the War for Independence, are buried in the Lewis family cemetery 100 yards south of this marker. — Map (db m3994) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — Rio HillArtifacts Found at Rio Hill
Civil War relic collectors found Stuart’s winter camp and skirmish site (shaded area of map) long before the Rio Hill Shopping Center opened in 1989. Metal detectors were used to search the area and artifacts—bullets, buttons, belt and harness buckles, shell fragments, camp equipment and personal items—were found. Photo (A) shows a recovered Confederate officer’s two-piece “CS” belt buckle, while a Virginia state seal and Confederate block and script . . . — Map (db m7692) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — Rio Hill 1864 SkirmishGeorge A. Custer Attacks a Confederate Winter Camp
In December 1863, Confederate troops established winter quarters here. The approximately 200 soldiers, under the command of Capt. Marcellus N. Moorman, were from Stuart’s Horse Artillery Battalion and were equipped with 16 cannons. The men built huts and their horses grazed on surrounding fields during the encampment. While the artillery troops rested through the early months of 1864, Union Generals Ulric Dahlgren and Judson Kilpatrick raided Richmond in an unsuccessful attempt to free . . . — Map (db m7690) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — G-26 — Rio Mills
The 19th-century mill village of Rio Mills stood 600 yards west of here, where the former Harrisonburg-Charlottesville Turnpike crossed the South Fork of the Rivanna River. Following the Battle of Rio Hill on 29 February 1864, Union General George Armstrong Custer burned the covered bridge and gristmill at Rio Mills. Immediately rebuilt under the direction of Abraham L. Hildebrand, the gristmill continued to grind wheat and corn for the Confederacy. The milling operation apparently closed down soon after 1900. — Map (db m19836) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — Site of Viewmont
Built before 1744 by Col. Joshua Fry 1699-1754 Surveyor, Mathematician, Pioneer Commander-in-Chief of Virginia Forces French and Indian War George Washington Inscribed over his Grave “Here lies the good, the just and the noble Fry. — Map (db m23244) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — W-197 — Skirmish at Rio Hill
On February 29, 1864, General George A. Custer and 1500 cavalrymen made a diversionary raid Into Albemarle County. Here, north of Charlottesville, he attacked the Confederate winter camp of four batteries of the Stuart Horse Artillery commanded by Captain Marcellus N. Moorman. Despite the destruction to the camp, 200 Confederates rallied in a counterattack which forced Custer’s withdrawal. Few casualties were reported. — Map (db m7685) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — GA-46 — Southern Albemarle Rural Historic District
Bounded by the James River to the south and the Rivanna River to the north, this nationally significant district encompasses 83,627 acres. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2007, it includes buildings influenced by Jefferson’s Classical Revival ideals. The beauty of the Piedmont landscape is revealed in the panoramic vistas, farmlands, and vineyards. The district reflects the architectural and cultural influences of former residents Thomas Jefferson and James Monroe. The . . . — Map (db m23240) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — Textiles — Thomas Jefferson's Monticello
Panel 1 Jefferson introduced mechanized cloth production to his plantation when trade embargoes and looming war cut off the supply of imported British cloth. In 1811, he hired William McLure, a free white artisan and "a very ingenious man," to build textile machinery and train enslaved people at Monticello in its use. McLure set up more efficient spinning jennies and looms with flying shuttles in what Jefferson called "my little factory." the Herns, Gillettes, and other enslaved . . . — Map (db m68175) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — The Levy Legacy — Thomas Jefferson's Monticello
After Jefferson's death in 1826, his heirs sold his property, including his slaves, to pay his debts. Naval officer Uriah Phillips Levy, who admired Jefferson for his support of religious liberty, purchased Monticello in 1834 to preserve it. This is the grave of his mother, Rachel Phillips Levy, who died here in 1839. uriah Levy bequeathed Monticello to the United States in 1862, but the government refused it. After litigation, his nephew Jefferson monroe Levy gained title to Monticello in . . . — Map (db m68172) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — The Meadow Run Grist Mill
Not far from the Tavern, the Michie family owned and operated a mill and general store. At the turn of the century the mill fell from decay. In order to recreate the Michie's Tavern-plantation (which stretched for several miles) Historic Michie Tavern relocated The Meadow Run Grist Mill from nearby Laurel Hill, Va. The 18th-century mill was painstakingly reconstructed to ensure the preservation of milling operations of that time. The General Store, housed on the first floor, offers visitors a mercantile atmosphere of the 1800s. — Map (db m53611) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — The Monticello Graveyard
This graveyard had its beginning in an agreement between two young men, Thomas Jefferson and Dabney Carr, who were school-mates and friends. They agreed that they would be buried under a great oak which stood here. Carr, who married Jefferson's sister, died in 1773. His was the first grave on this site, which Jefferson laid out as a family burying ground. Jefferson was buried here in 1826. The present monument in not the original, designed by Jefferson, but a large one erected by the . . . — Map (db m53614) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — These Willow Oaks
These willow oaks were planted by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II & Prince Philip in ceremonies honoring the royal visit to the Western Virginia Bicentennial Center July 10, 1976. — Map (db m21950) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — Thomas Jefferson
Here was born Thomas Jefferson April 13, 1743 Lover of Liberty Map (db m68666) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — Tobacco Barn ca.1790
This barn was once a place to hang and dry harvested tobacco plants. Tobacco was the primary cash crop in early Virginia. Many large landholders, including the Michies, grew tobacco as their principal money-making crop. However, in time, these same planters cursed tobacco for depleting the soil. Furthermore, as the 19th century approached, tobacco became less profitable. Farmers switched to wheat, corn and other “small grains” which allowed the Old Dominion to be more self . . . — Map (db m53612) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — Q-22 — Union Occupation of Charlottesville
On 3 Mar. 1865, Maj. Gen. Philip H. Sheridan’s Union Army of the Shenandoah entered Charlottesville to destroy railroad facilities as the 3rd Cavalry Division led by Bvt. Maj. Gen. George A. Custer arrived from Waynesboro. Mayor Christopher H. Fowler, other local officials, and University of Virginia professors Socrates Maupin and John B. Minor and rector Thomas L. Preston met Custer, just east of here. Fowler surrendered the town, and the professors asked that the university be protected, . . . — Map (db m3990) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — Vanguard of FreedomUnited States Army — Bicentennial 1775–1975
Citizens of central and western Virginia have contributed significantly to national defense and to the U.S. Army throughout its 200-year history. During the Revolutionary War, Virginians fought valiantly as members of the militia and the Continental Army under Washington. Noteworthy is Captain Jack Jouett’s all-night ride to Charlottesville in 1781 to warn Jefferson of the impending arrival of British cavalry. John Peter Muhlenbert, a Lutheran clergyman in the Shenandoah Valley, became a . . . — Map (db m21890) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — Viewmont
Birthplace of Lottie Moon Baptist Missionary to China 1873-1912 — Map (db m23041) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — William Holding Echols — 1859–1934
William Holding Echols (1859–1934), Professor of Mathematics, lived in this pavilion. By precept and example, he taught many generations of students with ruthless insistence that the supreme values are self respect, integrity of mind, contempt of fear and hatred of sham. The Eli Banana Order, by this tablet, honours Reddy Echols and his unique place in the history of the Order. — Map (db m62645) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Covesville — GA-44 — Covesville Apple Industry
In 1866 Dr. William D. Boaz established the first commercial apple orchard in Covesville. These orchards specialized in the Albemarle Pippin, which became one of the most prized and profitable apple varieties grown in Virginia. By 1890 the success of this variety, shipped as far away as England and France, helped the Boaz orchards become one of the most productive commercial orchards in Virginia. As the business grew, it spurred the development of many of Covesville's buildings, including . . . — Map (db m25473) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Covesville — Z-21 — Nelson County / Albemarle County
Nelson County. In the foothills of Virginia’s Piedmont, Nelson County was formed in 1807 from Amherst County. The county was named for Thomas Nelson, Jr., governor of Virginia from June to November 1781. The county seat is Lovingston. The Nelson County courthouse was built under the supervision of George Varnum in 1809, according to the plans submitted by Sheldon Crostwait, one of the justices. Though the courthouse has been modified and enlarged over the years, it is one of Virginia’s . . . — Map (db m44042) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Crozet — W-170 — Crozet
The town grew around a rail stop established on Wayland’s farm in 1878. It was named for Col. B. Claudius Crozet, (1789–1864)—Napoleonic Army officer, and Virginia’s Engineer and Cartographer—he built this pioneer railway through the Blue Ridge. The 4273 foot tunnel through the rock-solid mountain below Rockfish Gap carried traffic from 1858–1944. His talents were tested in solving safety, drainage and ventilation problems posed by the construction of this tunnel. — Map (db m1798) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Earlysville — GA-41 — Earlysville Union Church
Earlysville Union Church is a rare surviving early-19th-century interdenominational church constructed in Albemarle County. Built in 1833, this frame structure served as a meetinghouse for all Christian denominations on land deeded by John Early, for whom Earlysville is named. This building provided an early home for several local congregations of the Baptist, Methodist, and Presbyterian faiths. The church is an excellent example of the 19th-century public architecture of . . . — Map (db m21650) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Earlysville — First Buck Mountain Church
This tablet placed here by the Colonial Dames of America in the State of Virginia in the year 1930, commemorates the founding of the First Buck Mountain Church established under the authority of The Church of England and builded one mile west of here A.D. 1747. — Map (db m21690) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Esmont — Ballenger Church
Shortly after the formation of St. Anne's Parish in 1745, this established church stood on a knoll 100 yards north on nearby Ballenger Creek. Not used regularly after the old parish was dissolved in 1785, the building was in ruins by 1820 and was totally abandoned. — Map (db m29953) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Esmont — The Glebe
In 1762 the vestry of St. Anne's Parish purchased from William Burton 400 acres here for the residence and lands of the rector of the parish, established in 1745. This glebe was so used almost until the dissolution of the old parish. It was sold in 1779 to Joseph Cabell. — Map (db m29951) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Gordonsville — Z-151 — Albemarle County/Louisa County
ALBEMARLE COUNTY Albemarle County was formed in 1744 from Goochland County and named for William Anne Keppel, the second Earl of Albemarle, titular governor of Virginia from 1737 to 1754. A portion of Louisa County was later added to Albemarle County. In 1761, part of Albemarle County was divided to form Buckingham and Amherst Counties. President Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826) was born in this county at Shadwell and there he built his home Monticello. The city of Charlottesville is the county . . . — Map (db m22780) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Gordonsville — G-25 — General Thomas Sumter
Thomas Sumter was born on 14 Aug. 1734 in this region. Sumter, a member of the Virginia militia during the French and Indian War, moved to South Carolina in 1765. He served as a lieutenant colonel in the Continental Army (1776–1778); in June 1780 he came out of retirement. In Oct. 1780, he became a Brigadier General, and was instrumental in defeating the British in the Carolinas. He served in Congress (1789–1793; 1797–1801) and was an U.S. senator (1801–1810), He died on . . . — Map (db m17501) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Greenwood — W-164 — Mirador
Nearby stands Mirador the childhood home of Nancy, Viscountess Astor, the first woman member of Parliament. Born Nancy Witcher Langhorne in 1879, she lived here from 1892 to 1897. In 1906 she married Waldorf Astor and moved to England permanently. Mirador also was home to her sister Irene, wife of Charles Dana Gibson and model for the Gibson Girl of the 1890s. New York architect William Adams Delano remodeled Mirador in the 1920s for Lady Astor’s niece, Mrs. Ronald (Nancy Perkins) Tree. Later, . . . — Map (db m1535) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Greenwood — Mirador
This was the girlhood home of Viscountess Nancy Astor, first woman member of the British Parliament. She was a daughter of Chiswell Dabney Langhorne, who bought “Mirador” in 1892. The house was built sometime after 1832 for James M. Bowen. — Map (db m1536) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Greenwood — VDOT Workers’ Memorial
The monument before you honors Virginia state highway workers who lost their lives while serving the Commonwealth’s travelers. No public funds were used to build this memorial. It was built entirely with donations from Virginia Department of Transportation employees and retirees, family members, businesses and organizations throughout the state. The profiles reflect VDOT’s diverse workforce and the “missing worker.” The memorial was dedicated on September 17, 2004. — Map (db m26332) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Grottoes — Shenandoah’s Deer
“Look! There’s a deer!” Visitors often exclaim these words in Shenandoah national park-an amazing fact since deer were not here in 1926 when Congress authorized Shenandoah. Years of hunting and other human activity had eliminated them. In 1934, thirteen white-tailed deer were released in the park. Today Shenandoah’s estimated 5,000 deer are descended from those thirteen or others that migrated from surrounding forests.

Shenandoah’s deer illustrate the “recycled” . . . — Map (db m46006) HM

Virginia (Albemarle County), Grottoes — Skyline DriveThe High Road Through Shenandoah National Park
Among the scenic roads of America’s national parks, the Skyline Drive may be the most famous. For decades the Drive has given millions of visitors easy access to the mountains and sky of Shenandoah National Park. The Skyline Drive follows the winding backbone of the Blue Ridge for 105 miles, sometimes losing itself among the clouds. In fair weather, views are dramatic. To the east you can see the rolling Piedmont plateau with its patchwork of farms; on the west there’s the Shenandoah Valley . . . — Map (db m46008) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Ivy — W-161 — Birthplace of Meriwether Lewis
Half a mile north was born, 1774, Meriwether Lewis, of the Lewis and Clark Expedition, sent by Jefferson to explore the far west, 1804–1806. The expedition reached the mouth of the Columbia River, November 15, 1805. — Map (db m1795) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Ivy — W-162 — Jackson’s Valley Campaign
Late in April 1862, Maj. Gen. Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson marched his army out of the Shenandoah Valley through the Blue Ridge Mountains to deceive Union Maj. Gen. John C. Fremont into thinking he was headed for Richmond. On 3 May, Jackson bivouacked at nearby Mechum’s Station on the Virginia Central Railroad. The next day, part of the army entrained for the Valley while the rest followed on foot. At the Battle of McDowell on 8 May. Jackson defeated the advance of Fremont’s army . . . — Map (db m1797) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Keswick — W-204 — Castle Hill
The original house was built in 1765 by Thomas Walker, explorer and pioneer. Tarleton, raiding Charlottesville to capture Jefferson and the legislature, stopped here for breakfast, June 4, 1781. This delay aided the patriots to escape. Castle Hill was long the home of Senator William Cabell Rives, who built the present house. — Map (db m22439) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Keswick — W-205 — Revolutionary War Campaign of 1781Mechunk Creek
After reinforcements from Brig. Gen "Mad" Anthony Wayne arrived on 10 June 1781, the Marquis de Lafayette moved south from his camp on the Rapidan River to prevent further raids by Gen. Charles Cornwallis British troops encamped at Elk Hill. By 13 June, Lafayette had occupied a position along the Mechunk Creek to challenge any British advance toward Charlottesville and Staunton. Lafayette and his troops reached this position by secretly repairing an abandoned road and were able to travel . . . — Map (db m22617) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Keswick — GA-43 — Southwest Mountains Rural Historic District
Extending from the Orange County line on the north to the outskirts of Charlottesville with the Southwest Mountains forming its spine, this historic district encompasses more than 31,000 acres and contains some of the Piedmont’s most pristine and scenic countryside. Thomas Jefferson often traveled along the eastern side of the Southwest Mountains to Philadelphia and Washington, D. C. and referred to the mountains as the “Eden of the United States.” The district includes a broad . . . — Map (db m17447) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Lindsay — JE-6 — Maury’s School
Just north was a classical school conducted by the Rev. James Maury, rector of Fredericksville Parish from 1754 to 1769. Thomas Jefferson was one of Maury’s students. Matthew Fontaine Maury, the “Pathfinder of the Seas,” was Maury’s grandson. — Map (db m17459) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Midway — W-225 — Miller School
W 225 A bequest of Samuel Miller (1792–1869) provided funds to found the Miller School in 1878. Miller, a Lynchburg businessman born in poverty in Albemarle County, envisioned a regional school for children who could not afford an education. The school was a pioneer in combining the value of hands on labor with a liberal arts education. Coeducational from 1884 until 1928, then all male, the school became coeducational again in 1992. Built on property once owned by Miller, the principal . . . — Map (db m21699) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Proffit — G-22 — Proffit Historic District
Ben Brown and other newly freed slaves, who founded the community after the Civil War, first named the settlement Egypt and then Bethel. About 1881, the community became known as Proffit when the Virginia Midland Railway placed a stop here, stimulating further development between 1890 and 1916 by white landowners who bulit along Proffit Road. Prominent reminders of Proffit’s black heritage are Evergreen Baptist Church, built in 1891, and several houses constructed by the Brown and . . . — Map (db m16946) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Scottsville — GA-35 — Barclay House and Scottsville Museum
Here stands the Barclay House, built about 1830, later the home of Dr. James Turner Barclay, inventor for the U. S. Mint and missionary to Jerusalem. He founded the adjacent Diciples Church in 1846 and served as its first preacher. It is now the Scottsville Museum. — Map (db m17995) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Scottsville — Ferries In Virginia/TheHatton Ferry/Heritage
Ferries In Virginia The James, York, Rappahannock and smaller rivers were the primary means of commercial transportation in Virginia until the advent of railroads in the mid-1800’s. In most locations ferries provided the only way to cross these rivers. As early as 1641, the General Assembly directed county courts to provide a system of ferries and bridges. Authorized ferries increased from 34 in 1702 to 140 in 1786, reflecting the expansion of 18th century commerce. These ferries were . . . — Map (db m14527) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Scottsville — GA 37 — Hatton Ferry
James A. Brown began operating a store and ferry at this site on rented property in the late 1870’s. In 1881 he bought the land from S. P. Gantt at which time the store became a stop on the Richmond and Alleghany Railroad. Two years later, Brown was authorized to open a post office in his store, which was named Hatton for the young federal postal officer who signed the authorizing documents. The ferry is one of only two poled ferries still functioning in the continental United States. — Map (db m12882) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Scottsville — GA-38 — Hatton Ferry
Five miles southwest of here is the Hatton Ferry on the James River which began operating in the 1870s. James A. Brown established the ferry and a store on land first rented and then purchased from S.P. Gantt in 1881. In 1883 when a post office was approved for the store, it was named Hatton for the young federal postal official who signed the authorizing documents. The ferry is one of the only two poled ferries still functioning in the continental United States. — Map (db m17975) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Scottsville — GA-36 — Historic Scottsville
In 1745 old Albemarle County was organized at Scott’s landing, its first county seat, here on the great horseshoe bend of the James River. In 1818 the town was incorporated as Scottsville, beginning in 1840 it flourished as the chief port above Richmond for freight and passenger boats on the James River and Kanawha Canal. It played a vital role in the opening up of the west. The 1840s and ’50s were its golden era. — Map (db m17894) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Scottsville — Hurricane Camille
On August 20, 1969, flood waters of the James River rose to this point as an aftermath of Hurricane Camille causing great loss to the people of Scottsville. This plaque was erected to remind all who read it of the vulnerability of mortal man to the elements and of the indomitable spirit of men who work together to rebuild. — Map (db m17948) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Scottsville — ScottsvilleWhen War Came
At 3 p.m. on Monday, March 6, 1865, the first of Union Gen. Philip H. Sheridan’s 10,000 cavalrymen under Gens. Wesley Merritt, Thomas Devin, and George A. Custer entered Scottsville unopposed. To accomplish their mission—destroy the James River and Kanawha Canal as a Confederate supply and communication line—officers occupied private homes, and soldiers pitched tents in yards and fields. They “burned a woolen factory with large quantity of cloth, candle factory with . . . — Map (db m17844) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Scottsville — Scottsville Confederate Cemetery
In memory of the soldiers who died in the Confederate General Hospital in Scottsville 1862-1863 Beattie, F.M. Co. H 23 NC Boyle, Andrew Co. D 41 VA Brashear, Denis P. Co. E 4 AL Clark, Henry Co. E 15 AL Clark, Hosey L. Co. F 2 MS Clayton, John C. Co. E 12 AL Copland, J.A. Co. I 17 GA Cox, Robert W. Co. H 19 VA David, J.W.V. Co. 24 GA Garrett, Theophilius Co. G 31 GA Garrison, W.C. Co. E 47 AL Giles, William B. Co. I 53 VA Goggins, Jackson Co. E 5 TX Gunn, . . . — Map (db m22784) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Scottsville — GA-45 — Wilson Cary Nicholas1761-1820
Just to the south was Mount Warren, the home of Wilson Cary Nicholas. He served in the Continental army, represented Albemarle County in the General Assembly (1784–1789, 1794–1799), and was a delegate to the Virginia Convention of 1788 that approved the United States Constitution. Nicholas was a member of the U. S. Senate (1799-1804), served in the House of Representatives (1807-1809), and was governor of Virginia (1814-1816). A close personal friend and political ally of Thomas Jefferson, Nicholas is buried at Monticello. — Map (db m19406) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Shadwell — W-203 — Edgehill
The land was patented in 1735. The old house was built in 1790; the new in 1828. Here lived Thomas Mann Randolph, governor of Virginia 1819–1922, who married Martha, daughter of Thomas Jefferson. — Map (db m17335) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Shadwell — W-202 — Shadwell, Birthplace of Thomas Jefferson
Thomas Jefferson—author of the Declaration of Independence, third president of the United States, and founder of the University of Virginia—was born near this site on 13 April 1743. His father, Peter Jefferson (1708–1757), a surveyor, planter, and officeholder, began acquiring land in this frontier region in the mid-1730s and had purchased the Shadwell tract by 1741. Peter Jefferson built a house soon after, and the Shadwell plantation became a thriving agricultural estate. . . . — Map (db m17306) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Simeon — FL-8 — Ash Lawn – Highland
This estate was the home of James Monroe, fifth president of the United States. In 1793, James and Elizabeth Kortright Monroe purchased 1,000 acres adjoining Jefferson’s Monticello. Called Highland, the plantation, eventually totaling 3,500 acres, was their principal residence from 1799 to 1823. Known in foreign affairs for the Monroe Doctrine, James Monroe also served as governor of Virginia for four one-year terms; U.S. minister to England, France, and Spain; U.S. senator; and secretary of . . . — Map (db m23437) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Simeon — W-201 — Colle
The house was built about 1770 by workmen engaged in building Monticello. Mazzei, an Italian, lived here for some years adapting grape culture to Virginia. Baron de Riedesel, captured at Saratoga in 1777, lived here with his family, 1779–1780. Scenes in Ford’s novel, Janice Meredith, are laid here. — Map (db m21952) HM
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