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Amelia County Markers
Virginia (Amelia County), Amelia Court House — Amelia Court HouseLee's Retreat — April 4-5, 1865
General Lee ordered all columns of his army from the Richmond and Petersburg trenches to rendezvous at this village on the Richmond & Danville Railroad. Here he hoped to obtain rations before continuing the march to North Carolina to join General Joseph Johnston's army. Next Stop Jetersville 7.4 miles — Map (db m18871) HM
Virginia (Amelia County), Amelia Court House — John Banister Tabb
Patriot Father John Bannister Tabb was born in Amelia County in 1845 at “The Forest”, the Tabb family plantation. A member of one of wealthiest families in Virginia, he was carefully schooled by private tutors until the age of 14, when his eyesight became to poor to read. In spite of his poor eyesight, shortly after the Civil War broke out he enlisted in the Confederate Navy and served aboard the blockade runner Robert E. Lee. Tabb was captured in 1864 and spent nine . . . — Map (db m35959) HM
Virginia (Amelia County), Amelia Court House — Lamkin’s Battery
This mortar belonged to the battery cammanded by Captain J.N. Lamkin. On July 30, 1864, at the “Crater”, the battery helped check the Union advance until Mahone came up. Four mortars were captured near Flat Creek in Lee’s Retreat, April 2, 1865. One of them blew up in saluting the remains of Jefferson Davis when bought through Amelia Court House. Placed by the Amelia Chapter of the U.D.C. 1940 — Map (db m18873) HM
Virginia (Amelia County), Amelia Court House — M 11 — Lee's Retreat
Lee's army, retreating toward Danville, reached this place, April 4-5, 1865, only to find that the supplies ordered here had gone on to Richmond. The famished soldiers were forced to halt to forage. The result was that Lee, when he resumed the march in the afternoon of April 5, found that Sheridan was at Jetersville blocking the way south. — Map (db m18874) HM
Virginia (Amelia County), Amelia Court House — M 28 — Marion Harland(12 Dec. 1830-3 June, 1922)
Born Mary Virginia Hawes at Dennisville about eight miles south, Harland was a prolific author, producing a syndicated newspaper column for women, many short stories, 25 novels, 25 volumes on domestic life, and 12 books on travel, biography, and Virginia history. Her Common Sense in the Household (1871) was the best-selling cookbook in America for more than fifty years, until the Fannie Farmer Cookbook and the Settlement Cookbook became popular after World War I. — Map (db m19029) HM
Virginia (Amelia County), Amelia Court House — 10 — Mrs. Samantha Jane NeilAmelia Court House, Virginia — Amelia County
Amelia County is largely indebted to one woman for bringing formal education and religion to African Americans after the Civil War. In 1865 Mrs. Samantha Jane Neil left her home in Pennsylvania to search for her husband’s body. He had been a Union army officer and had died somewhere in Amelia County only a few days before Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee’s surrender at Appomattox Court House. Though she never found her husband’s remains, she did discover a serious need for education for . . . — Map (db m20239) HM
Virginia (Amelia County), Amelia Court House — 9 — Russell Grove Presbyterian Church and SchoolAmelia Court House, Virginia — Amelia County
Russell Grove Presbyterian Church and the Russell Grove School were established as a result of the efforts of Mrs. Samantha Jane Neil, a Presbyterian missionary and teacher of African-American children after the Civil War. At first the school was primitive, with rough walls, boards painted black to act as chalkboards and no desks. Parents joined to pay the teachers and a man to cut wood for the woodstove, the school's only source of heat. The curriculum for the school from 1865 to well into . . . — Map (db m28927) HM
Virginia (Amelia County), Amelia Court House — M 31 — William Branch Giles
Noted lawyer and statesman William Branch Giles was born 12 Aug. 1762 in Amelia County and educated at Hampden-Sydney College, Princeton, and the College of William and Mary. Giles served Virginia in the United States House of Representatives (1790-1798 and 1801-1803) and in the U.S. Senate (1804-1815), where he was a chief Republican ally of Thomas Jefferson during the Republican and Federalist party debates of that era. Giles was elected governor by the General Assembly in 1827 and served . . . — Map (db m19039) HM
Virginia (Amelia County), Jetersville — Stop 7 — Amelia SpringsLee's Retreat — April 6, 1865
A portion of the Union army encountered Lee’s rearguard as the Southerners completed their night march around Grant's troops. This was also the scene of an April 5 engagement as Union cavalry returned from destroying a Confederate wagon train at Paineville. Next Stop Deatonville 3.3 miles — Map (db m28833) HM
Virginia (Amelia County), Jetersville — Amelia SpringsTwo Days of Action — Lee's Retreat
Union cavalry under Gen. Henry E. Davies, Jr. left Gen. Philip H. Sheridan’s column near Jetersville on April 5, 1865, on a reconnaissance mission against the Army of Northern Virginia. Davies swept by here, rode through Paineville, and four Miles further on encountered Gen. G.W. Custis Lee’s wagon train, which he attacked and destroyed. Gen. Fitzhugh Lee’s cavalry in turn attacked part of Davies’ command at Paineville and pursued it past this place through Amelia Springs. The next day, . . . — Map (db m28834) HM
Virginia (Amelia County), Jetersville — M-26 — Battle of Sailors (Sayler's) Creek
[Obverse]: This is the Hillsman House, used by the Unionists as a hospital in the engagement of April 6, 1865. From the west side of the creek the Confederates charged and broke through the Union infantry, but were stopped by the batteries along the hillside here. A mass surrender followed, including a corps commander, Gen. R. S. Ewell, several other generals, many colonels, about 7000 rank and file, and several hundred wagons. It was the largest unstipulated surrender of the . . . — Map (db m8284) HM
Virginia (Amelia County), Jetersville — Stop 8 — DeatonvilleLee's Retreat — April 6, 1865
During this day, the entire Confederate line would march west on the Rice-Deatonville Road toward Farmville. Constantly pressing Lee's rearguard, Union troops would fight a brief action at every turn. These delays would eventually lead to the Battle of Sailor's Creek. Next Stop Holt's Corner 3.5 miles — Map (db m28836) HM
Virginia (Amelia County), Jetersville — Hillsman HouseLee’s Retreat — April 6, 1865
Union forces assembled along this ridge while Confederate troops prepared on the opposite slope. Federal forces crossed Little Sailor’s Creek for a fierce battle which compelled many Southerners to surrender. The house served as a hospital for both armies. Next Stop Marshall’s Crossroads 1.3 miles — Map (db m11795) HM
Virginia (Amelia County), Jetersville — Holt’s CornerLee’s Retreat — April 6, 1865
While passing through this intersection, the Confederate column was attacked by Union cavalry. Consequently, part of Lee’s army, and the main wagon train, turned north onto the Jamestown Road while the main portion continued straight ahead to Rice’s Depot. Next Stop Hillsman House .9 miles — Map (db m11799) HM
Virginia (Amelia County), Jetersville — Stop 6 — JetersvilleLee's Retreat — April 5, 1865
Lee found Union cavalry and infantry across his line of retreat at this station on the Richmond and Danville Railroad. Rather than attacking the entrenched Federals, he chose to change direction and begin a night march toward Farmville where rations awaited the army. Next Stop Amelia Springs 3.3 miles — Map (db m18886) HM
Virginia (Amelia County), Jetersville — M 12 — Lee's Retreat
Near here Lee, moving south toward Danville, in the afternoon of April 5, 1865 found the road blocked by Sheridan. He then turned westward by way of Amelia Springs, hoping to reach the Southside (Norfolk and Western) Railroad. — Map (db m10215) HM
Virginia (Amelia County), Jetersville — M 13 — Lee's Retreat
After evacuating Petersburg and Richmond on 2-3 Apr. 1865, Gen. Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia retreated west to Amelia Court House to obtain supplies and then turn south to North Carolina. On 6 Apr., however, when Maj. Gen. Philip H. Sheridan's Union cavalry blocked his escape route on the Richmond and Danville R.R., Lee led his army west toward Farmville. Near here Maj. Gen. George G. Meade, commander of the Army of the Potomac, learned of Lee's new course. He ordered his army to . . . — Map (db m10216) HM
Virginia (Amelia County), Jetersville — M 14 — Lee's Retreat
Sheridan reached here on April 4, 1865 with cavalry and the Fifth Corps, and entrenched. He was thus squarely across Lee's line of retreat to Danville. On April 5, Grant and Meade arrived from the east with the Second Corps and the Sixth Corps. — Map (db m10217) HM
Virginia (Amelia County), Jetersville — M 15 — Lee's Retreat
From here Union cavalry moved north on April 5, 1865 to ascertain Lee's whereabouts. On the morning of April 6, the Second, Fifth and Sixth corps of Grant's army advanced from Jetersville toward Amelia Courthouse to attack Lee. — Map (db m10218) HM
Virginia (Amelia County), Jetersville — M 19 — Lee's Retreat
Three miles north is Amelia Springs, once a noted summer resort. There Lee, checked by Sheridan at Jetersville and forced to detour, spent the night of April 5-6, 1865. — Map (db m10219) HM
Virginia (Amelia County), Jetersville — Z 284 — Nottoway County / Amelia County
(Front): Nottoway County Area 310 Square Miles Formed in 1788 from Amelia, and named for an Indian tribe. Tarleton passed through this county in 1781. Here lived William Hodges Mann, Governor of Virginia 1910-14. (Reverse) Formed in 1734 from Prince George and Brunswick, and named for Princess Amelia, daughter of King George II. William B. Giles, Governor of Virginia 1827-30, lived in this county. (Back): Amelia County 371 Square Miles Formed in 1734 from Prince . . . — Map (db m10220) HM
Virginia (Amelia County), Jetersville — Z 48 — Nottoway County / Amelia County
(Obverse) Nottoway County Area 310 Square Miles Formed in 1788 from Amelia, and named for an Indian tribe. Tarleton passed through this county in 1781. Here lived William Hodges Mann, Governor of Virginia 1910-14. (Reverse) Amelia County Area 371 Square Miles Formed in 1734 from Prince George and Brunswick, and named for Princess Amelia, daughter of King George II. William B. Giles, Governor of Virginia 1827-30, lived in this county. — Map (db m18925) HM
Virginia (Amelia County), Jetersville — Overton / Hillsman HouseWar's Horror Knocks at the Door
As night began to fall here on, April 6, 1865, the hard fought battles of Little Sailor's Creek and the crossroads near the Marshall Farm draw to a close. Federal surgeons work by the little natural light that's still available. They are inside the main doorways trying to save as many of the wounded as possible from both armies. Hospital stewards prepare men for surgery and assist with the gruesome task of amputating limbs, bandaging wounds, and trying to comfort the wounded. This house, built . . . — Map (db m10274) HM
Virginia (Amelia County), Jetersville — W. R. Turner Memorial Trek
Erected in memory of W. R. Turner, historian of Blackstone, Virginia, for his work to preserve the historic battlefields and routes of General Robert E. Lee’s retreat Centennial Year 1961 Piedmont Area Explorer Scouts B.S.A. Erected by Blackstone Virginia Lions Club — Map (db m11800) HM
Virginia (Amelia County), Mannboro — OL 10 — Lee’s Retreat
Here Custer, commanding advance guard of an Army of the Potomac, struck and drove back Fitz Lee, left flank guard of Army of Northern Virginia, April 3, 1865. — Map (db m6156) HM
Virginia (Amelia County), Mannboro — Namozine ChurchPursuit Cathces Up — Lee’s Retreat
When Gen. Robert E. Lee evacuated the Army of Northern Virginia from Petersburg and Richmond on April 2-3, 1865, he ordered the army’s wings to unite at Amelia Court House, where trains would meet them with food and other supplies. The army would then march south to North Carolina and join forces with Gen. Joseph E. Johnston’s command. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, on the other hand, pursued Lee on two routes: directly in his wake and on parallel roads to the south, to prevent his escape into North . . . — Map (db m6049) HM
Virginia (Amelia County), Mannboro — Namozine ChurchLee's Retreat
April 3, 1865 As Lee's men continued their morning march toward Ameila Court House, cavalries skirmished around this church. Forced to withdraw, the armies continued a running battle that ended near Deep Creek. Namozine Church also served as a hospital for both armies. Next Stop Amelia Court House 19.7 miles. — Map (db m6071) HM
Virginia (Amelia County), Rice — Assaulting the Confederate Battle Line — Sailor's Creek Battlefield Historical State Park
"The men pressed forward, holding their fire with wonderful self control till they were in plain site of the enemy almost face to face." As the Federal troops realigned themselves after the creek crossing, and because of the shorter distance General Frank Wheaton’s 1st Division had to cover in doing so, they would be the first to make contact with General Richard S. Ewell’s entrenched Confederate forces along the ridge above you. As the Union soldiers neared their opponents, they . . . — Map (db m54473) HM
Virginia (Amelia County), Rice — Crossing Little Sailor's CreekThe Federal Army's Attack, 6:00 p.m. April 6, 1865 — Sailor's Creek Battlefield Historical State Park
"We found a stream of muddy water a dozen feet wide..." “The colonel’s clear voice sounded ‘ATTENTION’....Descending the hill; ‘Prepare to cross a marsh!’ was passed along the line....Three or four minutes later we found ourselves confronted by a hedge so high and so dense, it was impossible to see what was beyond. There was an involuntary pause-but only for an instant. Glancing around to find some available opening, I discovered the colors, some twenty paces on the left, had . . . — Map (db m54474) HM
Virginia (Amelia County), Rice — The Final Clash: With Fate Against Them — Sailor's Creek Battlefield State Park
"There goes a chivalrous fellow. Let's give him three cheers." Near this site were positioned Confederate forces commanded by General Joseph B. Kershaw. They were mainly from Mississippi and Georgia and were slightly dug in behind hastily built rail brestworks. In the final moments of the battle, Union cavalry, led by Colonel Peter Stagg, and Wheaton's infantry attacked Kershaw's right and rear. Retiring some 400 yards from this point to the rear, General Kershaw was eventually . . . — Map (db m54471) HM
Virginia (Amelia County), Rice — Victory or DeathThe Last Stand of the Savannah Volunteer Guard — Sailor's Creek Battlefield Historical State Park
The 18th Georgia Battalion, acting as a heavy artillery unit was originally formed in 1802 and served at the coastal defenses around Charleston, South Carolina. Moved to Virginia in May of 1864, it guarded the Richmond & Danville Railroad Bridge over the Appomattox River. Commanded by Major William S. Basinger at Sailor’s Creek, the unit mustered eighty-five men who would serve in General George Washington Custis Lee’s division. Placed on the right of his battle line and next to the . . . — Map (db m54475) HM
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