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Barnwell County Markers
South Carolina (Barnwell County), Barnwell — "The Jefferson Airplane"
Helicopter 17338 "The Jefferson Airplane" served in Vietnam from 1968-1972 with the 92nd Assault Helicopter Company (AHC) "Stallions"' with the 190th AHC, and the 17th Calvary, A Troop, 1st Aviation Brigade The US Army infantry units transported were the 173rd Airborne Brigade, 101 st Airborne Division, 1st Cavalry Division, 4th Infantry Division, 198th Light Infantry Brigade, 199th Light Infantry Brigrade, 5th Special Forces, and The United States Marine Corp. Areas of Operations . . . — Map (db m29391) HM
South Carolina (Barnwell County), Barnwell — “The Sundial”
The oldest known device for the measurement of time, a sundial indicates time by the position of the shadow of a gnomon cast by the sun on the face of a dial marked in hours. The gnonon is a flat piece of metal in the center of the dial with its back pointing towards the north pole when in the northern hemisphere and facing due south and with the upper edge slanting at an angle equal to the latitude of the location of the sundial. Obtained from Mr.D.B. Haselton, Ironmonger, . . . — Map (db m9000) HM
South Carolina (Barnwell County), Barnwell — 6-18 — Bank Of Barnwell / Edgar A. Brown Law Office
Bank Of Barnwell This building, constructed in 1887 as the Bank of Barnwell, was home to a succession of banks for 116 years. The bank occupied the first floor, and the law offices occupied the second floor, with additions in 1950 and 1961. This was the Bank of Barnwell 1887- 1909, Western Carolina Bank 1909-1932, the Bank of Barnwell 1932-1963, State Bank and Trust from 1963 to the late 1970s, then housed several bank branches until First Citizens . . . — Map (db m63199) HM
South Carolina (Barnwell County), Barnwell — 6-15 — Barnwell
Barnwell, originally called “Red Hill” and later “the Village,” was founded in 1800 when a courthouse was built on land donated by Benjamin Odom. Both Winton County and its new county seat were renamed for John Barnwell (1748-1800), a S.C. militia officer in the Revolution and afterwards. Barnwell was incorporated in 1829 with the town limits extending ĺ mi. from the courthouse. The heart of the city is the Circle, with its unique 1858 vertical sundial. . . . — Map (db m8524) HM
South Carolina (Barnwell County), Barnwell — Barnwell Army Airfield
Barnwell Army Airfield was built to serve as a satellite base to the Columbia Army Air Base during WWII. Construction of the Barnwell base began in September, 1942, with the first plane landing three weeks later. The base was completed in April, 1943. B-25 Bomber Crews trained here and at bases in Greenwood, North and Walterboro with bombing ranges located at Lake Murray, Pontiac and Poorman's located north of Charleston. After the war, the airport was released . . . — Map (db m28900) HM
South Carolina (Barnwell County), Barnwell — Barnwell Baptist Church Cemetery
Sometimes called the Red Hill Cemetery. Original site of Barnwell First Baptist Church. First Baptist Church is the oldest continual institution in Barnwell. Established in 1802. Both the 1850 building and the 1926 building stood on this site. Earlier church buildings were located nearby. The cemetery is one of the oldest in Barnwell. Another old Baptist cemetery located on the corner of Wall and Gilmore Streets across from Bethlehem Baptist Church location of the 1825 Baptist Church . . . — Map (db m72643) HM
South Carolina (Barnwell County), Barnwell — Barnwell County Confederate Monument ó 1900
Our Confederate Dead (West Face) Who throughout a long and bloody struggle dis- played a heroism and de- votion to duty unsurpass- ed. If ever equaled in the annuals of war. (South face) Who wrung from the great commander of the opposing armies the humiliating confession that they could be overcome only by attri- tion. And in the deadly con- teat in which they engaged their spirits were never broken. Their courage never quailed. Their . . . — Map (db m8657) HM
South Carolina (Barnwell County), Barnwell — 6-13 — Barnwell County Courthouse
(Marker Front) Barnwell County, originally Winton County, was created out of Orangeburgh District in 1785. Renamed Barnwell District in 1798 for John Barnwell (1748-1800), a S.C. militia officer in the Revolution and afterwards, it became Barnwell County in 1868. The first courthouse was built at Boiling Springs in 1789 and was replaced by a courthouse built here in 1800. Later courthouses here were built in 1819 and 1848. (Marker Reverse) The 1848 courthouse was . . . — Map (db m8717) HM
South Carolina (Barnwell County), Barnwell — 6-10 — Bethlehem Baptist Church
(Front text) This church, officially organized in 1868, had its origins in the antebellum Barnwell Baptist Church, which was located on this site until about 1854, when it built a new church on another lot. At that time several free blacks and slaves who were members of Barnwell Baptist Church asked to use the old 1829 sanctuary for worship and meetings. The congregation agreed, and the group met here informally until 1868. (Reverse text) In 1868 seven black members of . . . — Map (db m27582) HM
South Carolina (Barnwell County), Barnwell — Collins Park
This park was given to the City of Barnwell by the Robert O. Collins Family in 2000. It was once the site of the home of William Gilmore Simms and his wife, Emma Hertzog Simms. The property, purchased by Joseph Allen Porter in 1919, remained in the Porter family and was ultimately purchased by Robert O. Collins. During the first half of the 20th century, this corner of Main Street and Marlboro Ave. became a meeting place for neighborhood nurses and their young charges. The . . . — Map (db m8525) HM
South Carolina (Barnwell County), Barnwell — Edgar A. Brown ó 1888-1975
Court Stenographer Second Circuit 1908-1918 Member of House of Representatives 1921-1926 Speaker House of Representatives 1925-1926 South Carolina Senate 1929-1972 President Pro Tempore of Senate 1949-1972 Chairman Senate Finance Committee 1942-1972 Clemson Board of trustees: Member 1934-1947 Life Member 1948-1975 President of Board 1966-1975 President South Carolina Bar Association A career of public service dedicated to the people of Barnwell County and the state of . . . — Map (db m8797) HM
South Carolina (Barnwell County), Barnwell — 6-2F — Ellenton Agricultural Club
Established March 24, 1894, this agricultural club was organized to promote the welfare and interests of the Ellenton farmers and to improve conditions generally. The first clubhouse, built in 1904, was moved here in 1953 after the town of Ellenton was abandoned to make way for the Savannah River Plant. — Map (db m8701) HM
South Carolina (Barnwell County), Barnwell — 6-19 — Fuller Park
This park, built and opened in 1933 with funding from the Reconstruction Finance Corporation (RFC), was named for Cornell G. Fuller (1895-1972), mayor of Barnwell 1932-38 and chair of this and other New Deal- era public projects in Barnwell. The park included a swimming pool and bath- house, dance pavilion, tennis courts, and baseball stadium. The minor league Albany (N.Y.) Senators held spring training at Fuller Park for several years in the . . . — Map (db m63304) HM
South Carolina (Barnwell County), Barnwell — 6-5 — Morris Ford Earthworks ó 1780 & 1865
(Front text) Nearby earthworks at Morris Ford, on the Salkehatchie River, built in the spring 1780 by Loyalists under Ben John. In May, soon after Charleston fell to the British, Capt. John Mumford of the South Carolina militia was killed in action in a clash with Johnís Loyalists; he is buried at the site. In early 1865 Confederate cavalry under Maj. Joseph Wheeler rebuilt the old earthworks. (Reverse text) Wheeler delayed the advancing Federal cavalry under Brig. . . . — Map (db m8671) HM
South Carolina (Barnwell County), Barnwell — 6-20 — Red Hill At Turkey Creek
This high bluff was called Red Hill in the colonial era. It overlooks Turkey Creek, which flows into the Great Salkehatchie River. The Charleston-to-Augusta road, along an old Indian trail, crossed the creek nearby. The waters of Turkey Creek and White Oak Springs, just north of this site, were incentives for the early settlement and development of what would later become Barnwell. (Reverse text) McHeath's Tavern, the first business in what became . . . — Map (db m63305) HM
South Carolina (Barnwell County), Barnwell — Solomon Blatt, Sr. ó 1895-1986
Born in Blackwell, South Carolina on February 27, 1895, Soloman Blatt has unselfishly devoted a lifetime of remarkable service to all of the citizens of Barnwell County and the state of South Carolina while setting National and International records for length of distinguished service as a successful lawyer of outstanding ability, as a member and Speaker of the South Carolina House of Representatives Barnwell South Carolina Dedicated October 7, 1986 — Map (db m8801) HM
South Carolina (Barnwell County), Barnwell — The Police Station
Built by Charles C "Carl" Cheek in early 1944 with the assistance of German Prisoners of War who helped draw up the plan and worked on the construction. This police station was first used as a guard house at the prisoner of war camp where the Allendale and Barnwell Counties Disabilities and Special Needs Board is Now Located at the Corner of Hagood and Park Street. After the War when the camp was dismantled, the building was moved to the circle to serve as a police . . . — Map (db m50795) HM
South Carolina (Barnwell County), Barnwell — To Honor the Memory of those Soldiers
from Barnwell County who gave their services in the Revolutionary War — Map (db m8497) HM
South Carolina (Barnwell County), Barnwell — To the Veterans of All The Wars ó ( Barnwell County, South Carolina )
(West Face) [ US Army Emblem ] Dedicated To the Glory of God To the Veterans of all Wars Presented by Comrades in Arms American Legion Post and Auxiliary Units of Barnwell County ( South Face) [ Marine Corps Emblem ] Dedicated To the Glory of God To the Veterans of all Wars ( East Face ) [ Coast Guard Emblem ] Dedicated To the Glory of God To the Veterans of all Wars ( North Face ) [ US Navy Emblem ] . . . — Map (db m19790) HM
South Carolina (Barnwell County), Barnwell — 6-2R — Town of Ellenton
By 1873, a post office named Ellentown was located on the Port Royal Railroad, about 20 miles W. of here. In 1880, the town of Ellenton was incorporated. According to local tradition, the town was named for Ellen Dunbar, a local resident. Ellenton was abandoned in the early 1950s to make way for the Savannah River Plant. — Map (db m8495) HM
South Carolina (Barnwell County), Blackville — 6-12 — Barnwell County Courthouse
The county courthouse was on this site from 1871 to 1874. In 1869 Republican state senator Charles P. Leslie, a native of New York, sponsored an act to move the county seat from Barnwell to Blackville. Court was first held in a church until a two-story brick courthouse was built at a cost of $8000. After the county seat returned to Barnwell the courthouse housed Blackville Academy, later a public school. — Map (db m8704) HM
South Carolina (Barnwell County), Blackville — Blackville
A Glimpse into Blackville's Past The South Carolina Canal and Railroad Company began construction of what was to be the longest continuous rail for commercially operated steam locomotives in 1830. The track was to connect Charleston and Hamburg, near modern North Augusta. Mr. John Alexander Black was employed by the SCCRR to survey and establish locations for fuel and water stops for the train. He chose the locale of Blackville for the first overnight stop because it was about one day's . . . — Map (db m46791) HM
South Carolina (Barnwell County), Blackville — 6-5 — Blackville : Town Of The Phoenix / Battle of Blackville
(Front text) Blackville: Town of the Phoenix Blackville was founded in 1833 as the first overnight stop on the new railroad operated by the S.C. Canal & Railroad Co. It was also the scene of 4 major fires in the late 19th century (in 1865, 1876, 1887, and 1888), each of which almost destroyed the town. Editor A. E. Gonzales nicknamed Blackville “The Town of the Phoenix” in 1889 in honor of its ability to rise again and again from the ashes and rebuild. . . . — Map (db m8656) HM
South Carolina (Barnwell County), Blackville — 6-16 — Macedonia Baptist Church
(Front text) This church, the first African-American Baptist church in Barnwell County, was founded in 1866 when Rev. James T. Tolbert preached in Blackville under a brush arbor; the first sanctuary was built in 1868. The church hosted the first state convention of black Baptists, held here in 1875, and built its second sanctuary by 1887. The present sanctuary was built here in 1976. (Reverse text) This is the mother church of eight churches founded 1867-1922: Ebenezer, . . . — Map (db m28080) HM
South Carolina (Barnwell County), Blackville — Solomon Blatt Highway
Named In Honor Of "Mr. Speaker" who has traveled this road between Barnwell and Columbia thousands of times as member, House of Representatives since 1933 Speaker of the House 1937 — 47†††1951 —73 A record unequalled in U.S. Speaker Emeritus since 1973 His influence and leadership have contributed significantly to a sound and stable state government, to industrial development, to institutions of higher learning, and to the . . . — Map (db m55175) HM
South Carolina (Barnwell County), Blackville — Solomon Blatt, Sr.
Erected to honor Solomon Blatt Sr. who was born in Blackville February 27, 1825 The son of Nathan and Mollie Blatt A courageous gentleman and statesman who loves Blackville and all its citizens. No other Blackville citizen has been honored as has Mr. Blatt and for this he has shown his gratitude in many ways January 5 1986 This marker is on the site where Mr. Blatt's father ran a mercantile business for nearly 50 years. — Map (db m46977) HM
South Carolina (Barnwell County), Boiling Springs — 6-8 — Boiling Springs Academy
[Marker Front]: Boiling Springs Academy was founded by the Boiling Springs Academical Society in 1823, with trustees Hansford Duncan, John Fowke, James Furse, William Gillette, Gideon Hagood, Frederick Hay, Lawrence Hext, James Higginbottom, Jennings O'Bannon, and Angus Patterson. The academy building, along with its records, was burned by Federal troops in February 1865. [Marker Reverse]: The academy was reopened, and the present one-room school building constructed, in . . . — Map (db m8666) HM
South Carolina (Barnwell County), Boiling Springs — 6-9 — Boiling Springs Presbyterian Church
[Marker Front]: This church was organized by Rev. James H. Thornwell on authority from Charleston Presbytery; F.J. and W.A. Hay were its first elders. By 1846 Rev. Samuel H. Hay preached on alternate Sundays here and at a new church in Barnwell; this congregation soon merged with the new one as Barnwell Presbyterian Church. [Marker Reverse]: In 1896 Rev. F.L. Leeper and Dr. W.S.Hay, appointed by the Presbytery, reorganized Boiling Springs as a seperate . . . — Map (db m8715) HM
South Carolina (Barnwell County), Boiling Springs — 6-7 — Tarlton Brown (1757 - 1845)
(Front text) The grave of Tarlton Brown (1757 - 1845), militia officer, state representative, and state senator, is located here. Brown, a native of Virginia, moved to S.C. at an early age and settled in what was then Orangeburg District, near Briar Creek and Savannah River. He enlisted as a pvt. in the S.C. militia in 1776, was commissioned a lt. in 1778, and promoted to capt. in 1780. (Reverse text) Brown, who served in the Revolution under Gens. Francis Marion . . . — Map (db m8791) HM
South Carolina (Barnwell County), Healing Springs — Godís Acre Healing Springs
(Front text) By tradition, Healing Springs got its name during the Revolutionary War. In 1781 after a bloody battle at nearby Windy Hill Creek, four wounded Tories sent inland from Charleston by General Banastre (the Butcher) Tarleton were left in the care of two comrades who had orders to bury them when they died. Luckily, Native Americans found them and took them to their secret, sacred healing springs. Six months later the Charleston garrison was astonished by the reappearance of . . . — Map (db m8798) HM
South Carolina (Barnwell County), Healing Springs — Godís Acre Healing Springs
According to tradition the Indians reverenced the water for its healing properties as a gift from the great spirit. They led the British wounded to their secret waters during the American Revolution and the wounded were healed. This historical property has been deeded to God for public use. Please revere God by keeping it clean. — Map (db m8799) HM
South Carolina (Barnwell County), Healing Springs — Godís Acre Healing Springs
Deeded To Almighty God To Be Used By The Sick And Afflicted By L.P. Lute Boylston July 21, 1944 "The most precious piece of earth I have ever owned" Map (db m8800) HM
South Carolina (Barnwell County), Healing Springs — Healing Springs
God's Acre By tradition, Healing Springs got its name during the Revolutionary War. In 1781 after a bloody battle at nearby Windy Hill Creek, four wounded Tories sent inland from Charleston by General Banastre "The Butcher" Tarleton were left in the care of two comrades who had orders to bury them when they died. Luckily, Native Americans found them and took them to their secret, sacred, healing springs. Six months later the Charleston Garrison was astonished by the reappearance of the . . . — Map (db m46928) HM
South Carolina (Barnwell County), Hilda — 6-15 — Hilda
Hilda, in the "Sleytown" section of Barnwell County, was chartered in 1910. It grew up around a depot built here in 1903, soon after the Atlantic Coast Line R.R. extended its line through the area in 1897. H.C. Hutto was its first intendant, or mayor, and G.W. Delk, J.H. Delk, D.A. Dyches, and W.M. Dyches were its first wardens. According to tradition, Hilda was named for the friend or daughter of someone associated with the railroad. — Map (db m8501) HM
South Carolina (Barnwell County), Owens Crossroads — 6-1 — Winton County Court House Site ó 1.4 Miles Ľ—→
Originally Barnwell County was part of Granville County, later a part of Orangeburg District. Winton County was created by an act of the legislature on March 12, 1785. Justices William Robertson, John Parkinson, Thomas Knight, Richard Treadway, Daniel Green, William Buford, and James Fair were directed to erect a court house, gaol, pillory, whipping post, and stocks. These were built of pine logs. Winton County became Barnwell District in 1798 and Barnwell County in 1868. — Map (db m8749) HM
South Carolina (Barnwell County), Patterson Mill — 6-11 — Lower Three Runs Baptist Church
(Front text) This church, originally located 8/10 mi. W on the old Augusta-to-Charleston road, was founded in 1789 by twelve charter members, with Rev. Nathaniel Walker as its first pastor. Lower Three Runs was a mother church to at least five congregations organized in present-day Barnwell or Allendale Counties between 1802 and 1849. (Reverse text) The second sanctuary here, built in 1833, was demolished in 1865 by Federal troops who used the timbers to bridge Lower Three . . . — Map (db m27603) HM
South Carolina (Barnwell County), Williston — 6-17 — Ashley - Willis House
This Greek revival house was built between 1833 and 1850 and features a wide gable- front form unusual for the period. John Ashley and then Elijah Willis owned this land before 1850: the house was likely built by the Ashley family. Williston, chartered in 1858, was named for the Willis family, which gave land for a depot on the S.C. Rail Road, for a church (now First Baptist Church), and for a school. (Marker Reverse) The town's oldest house occupies a . . . — Map (db m19640) HM
South Carolina (Barnwell County), Williston — The Best Friend ó The Railroad
Throughout the ages, good transportation has been vital in setting one area apart from another. Whether for communication, industrial growth, or simply visitation, the people well knew the necessity of quick and easy travel. What began as a mere dream in 1825 soon escalated into a record- setting run of tracks finally completed in 1833, the railroad stretched 136 miles from Hamburg, S.C. to the city of Charleston. The railroad sparked the growth of Williston. Arising first as a water stop and . . . — Map (db m9674) HM
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