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Beaver County Markers
Utah (Beaver County), Beaver — N-404 — Beaver Opera House
The Beaver Opera House, built between 1908 and 1909, helped mark the beginning of the local citizens’ desire to build a “New Beaver” that would be the envy of other communities. The board of directors of the opera house were quoted as saying “...nothing is too good for the people of Beaver...” It was designed and built by the architectural firm of Liljenberg and Maeser, and is an impressive example of a Classical Renewal Style building constructed of tuff, the pink stone . . . — Map (db m1429) HM
Utah (Beaver County), Beaver — N-603 — Beaver Relief Society Hall — Utah Historic Site
Built in 1896, the Beaver Relief Society Hall is one of only two buildings in Beaver associated with the Relief Society, the organization for women in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. The building was used for general gathering purposes by the Relief Society and was later used by the Beaver Board of Education and a feed and grain firm. Today, the building has been renovated and is now the home of the Beaver City Fire Department. — Map (db m75580) HM
Utah (Beaver County), Beaver — 64 — Beaver Stake Tabernacle
On this site in 1865-66 a tabernacle was erected by the pioneers. Built of local brick, lumber and stone. It was of pioneer architecture with a large assembly hall, gallery, full basement, a tower and large bell. This building was used for church and public gatherings. Later a church school was conducted in the basement. After 76 years of service it was torn down and on this historic spot now stands the home of Daughters of Utah Pioneers. — Map (db m75614) HM
Utah (Beaver County), Beaver — 570 — Beaver Territorial Courthouse
Beaver Territorial Courthouse is considered one of the finest examples of Pioneer architecture. The architect, K.A. Kletting, designed the building in the Queen Ann style with Victorian overtones. The courthouse was constructed under the direction of William Stokes, a soldier of the Union army, stationed at nearby Fort Cameron. Constructed of local materials, the courthouse was built between 1877 and 1882, twenty-one years after Beaver was settled. The original cost of construction was $10,900. . . . — Map (db m75581) HM
Utah (Beaver County), Beaver — Enoch E. Cowdell House — Utah Historic Site
The Enoch E. Cowdell house, named after the original owner, was constructed around 1873 with a hall parlor type floor plan. Although the hall parlor was one of the earliest housing types in Utah, it continued to be a popular floor plan (particularly with an "L" addition off the rear) into the twentieth century. The black rock construction materials and the nearly unimpaired architectural integrity of this house make it a good example of pioneer architecture in Beaver. The house has received . . . — Map (db m75572) HM
Utah (Beaver County), Beaver — 67 — Fort Cameron — (Located 2 miles east)
Established as the post of Beaver, May 15, 1872, by the 8th U.S. Infantry, Major John D. Wilkins, commanding. The military reservation, declared May 12, 1873, comprised two and two-thirds square miles. The name was changed July 1, 1874, to Fort Cameron, in honor of Colonel James Cameron who fell at Bull Run, July 21, 1861. The post was abandoned May 1, 1883, and the improvements sold to John R. Murdock and Philo T. Farnsworth. The L.D.S. Church conducted there the Beaver Branch of the Brigham Young Academy (later University) from 1898 to 1922. — Map (db m75575) HM
Utah (Beaver County), Beaver — 327 — Fort Cameron - Murdock Academy
In 1872-73 a two and two-thirds mile square, protective military reservation was established following the request of C.M. Hawley, Associate Justice, Utah Territory. Built of native rock and lumber, it received 250 troops Sept. 7, 1873, Major John B. Wilkins, Commander. Fort abandoned May 1883. L.D.S. Church purchased one-half. J.R. Murdock, P.T. Farnsworth gave the other half as a site for the B.Y.U. Beaver Branch. Murdock Academy opened Sept. 26, 1898. Closed 1922. — Map (db m75578) HM
Utah (Beaver County), Beaver — Beaver-1 — Grimshaw Home — Utah Historic Homes
Built By: Duckworth Grimshaw, 1877 Registered By: The Harley Fotheringhams, 1/12/72 Construction Notes Original Portion Built of Black Volcanic Rock — Map (db m75574) HM
Utah (Beaver County), Beaver — Joseph Tattersall House — Utah Historic Site
The house was built c. 1877 for Joseph Tattersall, an early settler of Beaver City. It is a one-and-a-half-story tall building constructed of black rock--a hard, dense volcanic stone that is commonly found in the nearby foothills in small outcroppings; it was a fairly common historic building material used in Beaver. The house features a steeply pitched roof, end-wall chimneys, two dormer windows, center gable with a door, and two bay windows that are located on the main facade. The home is the . . . — Map (db m75573) HM
Utah (Beaver County), Beaver — 68 — Lee’s Ranch Indian Raid
Hostile Indians raided a small settlement in this vicinity Oct. 27, 1866, centering their attack on the house where Mr. and Mrs. J.P. Lee, their two daughters, and eight year old son, a young Miss Hall and Joseph Lillywhite were barricaded, fighting desperately. During the day long battle, Lillywhite was seriously wounded. Lee killed three Indians, and the house was badly damaged, partly by fire brands. Miss Hall and the eight year old son escaped and secretly journeyed by separate trails to . . . — Map (db m75616) HM
Utah (Beaver County), Beaver — Philo T. Farnsworth
Philo Taylor Farnsworth was born August 19, 1906 in a log cabin near Beaver, Utah. At an early age, he became familiar with the various components of the telephone and the gramaphone. By age 12, he had a thorough understanding of electronics. In 1922, at age 15, now living in Rigby, Idaho, he developed the concept of the electronic transmission of images, and drew mathmatical diagrams to show how this could be done. In 1927, in San Francisco, California, after having invented and . . . — Map (db m1421) HM
Utah (Beaver County), Beaver — 147 — Pioneer First Camp Ground
Near this site, Feb. 6, 1856, in zero weather, Beaver pioneers made their first camp. Prior to this, the land had been rejected as unfit for cultivation, but the amount of water available gave courage. At a mass meeting in Parowan some of the more venturesome families were selected. Led by Captain Simeon F. Howd, Wilson G. Nowers, James P. Anderson, John Henderson, Ross G. Rogers, J.M. Davis, Lorin W. Babbit, William Wanlass and James Low they faced the seemingly impossible and redeemed the valley. — Map (db m75615) HM
Utah (Beaver County), Beaver — Pioneer Park
Dedicated to the memory of the valiant pioneers who erected the first woolen mills in Southern Utah in 1870. It was a busy mecca, with wagons coming and going from all over the State with their goods to trade. — Map (db m75576) HM
Utah (Beaver County), Beaver — 31 — The Beaver Woolen Mills — (Incorporated 1869)
On this site in 1870, in a three story building, 60 x 120 feet, the first Woolen Mills in Southern Utah operated. Machinery was brought here from New England by railroad and wagon. John Ashworth and others schooled in England in the art of wool manufacturing formed the corporation. For many years this mill was the main factor in the growth and prosperity of Beaver and surrounding territory. It was destroyed by fire in 1920. — Map (db m75577) HM
Utah (Beaver County), Beaver — N-211 — Thomas Frazer House — Utah Historic Site
This house was constructed in three sections by Thomas Frazer, the local stonemason, as his own home. The middle section (1870) and the east section (1872) are built of black basalt. The west section (c. 1890) is constructed of pink tuf. Thomas Frazer, born in 1821, was a native of Scotland who came to Utah as a convert to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. He arrived in Beaver in 1868 with his family, where he and his apprentices built many of the stone structures which are found in the community. — Map (db m75570) HM
Utah (Beaver County), Cove Fort — 6 — Cove Fort
Completed April 12, 1867, by direction of Brigham Young, with L.D.S. Church funds, as a travelers way station and refuge from Indians. Ira N. Hinckley built and maintained it as a hostelry and residence until 1877. A well within the fort provided culinary water. Cove Creek supplied irrigation. One of its 12 original room s was used as a telegraph station. Early in 1861 Charles Willden built 3 rooms and a dugout, known as Willden's Fort. This was a convenient campsite for President Young and . . . — Map (db m75519) HM
Utah (Beaver County), Cove Fort — Fort Willden — A Farm and Way Station
The first settlers in this area were the family of Charles W. and Eleanor Willden. They were English converts to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints who had come to Utah in 1849. Because Charles was an iron worker, Brigham Young called him to work in the Cedar City iron mission in the 1850s. Willden, like many others, camped here at Cove Creek on the way to his assignment. After the iron works closed down, Charles acquired 160 acres here to establish a farm and way station. The . . . — Map (db m75518) HM
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