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Berkeley County Markers
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Cainhoy — 8-12 — Brabant Plantation
Residence of Rt. Rev. Robert Smith, who was born in Norfolk, England, in 1732. He was consecrated in Philadelphia in 1795, as the first Episcopal Bishop of South Carolina. He died in 1801, and is buried in St. Philip's Churchyard, Charleston, S.C. On this plantation, on January 3, 1782, an engagement took place between Americans under Col. Richard Richardson, and British under Maj. Coffin. — Map (db m23801) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Cainhoy — 8-13 — St. Thomas Church
The Parish of St. Thomas was established by Act of Assembly Nov. 30, 1706. The first church was erected in 1708 and destroyed by forest fire in 1815. The present ediface was erected in 1819. — Map (db m23368) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Carnes Crossroads — 8-43 — Varner Town Indian Community
Varner Town (or Varnertown) is a distinct Native American community including descendants of the Etiwan, Catawba, Cherokee, Edisto and other area tribes. This community, located near Goose Creek, was named for William Varner (d. 1927) and his wife Mary Williams Varner (d. 1924). (Reverse text) Several Indian schools served this community. The Varner School, also called the Varner Indian School, was built here in 1939 and closed in 1963. The church nearby has been the center of the . . . — Map (db m23515) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Charleston — Star of the West
In the early dawn of January 9, 1861, the first shot of the War Between the States was fired from Morris Island by Citadel cadets under the command of Major Peter Fayssoux Stevens. The cadets opened fire with 24 pound siege guns on a Federal ship, The Star of the West. The ship was driven off and prevented from relieving Union forces on Fort Sumter in Charleston Harbor, and the defense of the South became real. This monument is erected by the Class of 1961 and by friends and loyal alumni of . . . — Map (db m67853) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Charleston — The Citadel Bulldog
In memory of Major Sam M. Savas, Jr., CE, USA Citadel 1951 Died in Vietnam, 1965 In memory of Lt. Sam M. Savas, III, USN Naval Aviator Citadel 1979 Died in the service of his country October, 1985 — Map (db m67855) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Cordesville — 8-25 — Francis Marion
Acording to family information, Francis Marion, brigadier general of the S.C. Militia during the American Revolution, was born near here on Goatfield Plantation. He was a member of the First Provincial Congress, fought in the battles of Parker's Ferry and Eutaw Springs (both in 1781), and served eight years in the S.C. Senate. Marion died in 1795. — Map (db m22968) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Cordesville — 8-8 — Mepkin Plantation
Home of Henry Laurens, born in Charleston in 1724, died at Mepkin in 1792. President of the First and Second Councils of Safety, 1775-76. President First Provincial Congress of S.C. 1775. Vice President of S.C. 1776. President of Continental Congress 1777-78. Elected Minister Plenipotentiary to Holland 1779. Confined 14 months in Tower of London, exchanged for Lord Cornwallis. Signed in Paris, with Adams, Jay and Franklin, Preliminaries of Peace, 1782. — Map (db m23174) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Cordesville — 8-20 — Strawberry Chapel
Chapel of Ease to St. John's (Biggin's Church), built about 1725 on land bequeathed by James Child, founder at this place, of the Town of Childbury. Strawberry Ferry was established here by Act of Assembly in 1705. — Map (db m22977) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Cross — Barnet's Tavern
Near this spot stood Barnet's Tavern, called the Forty Five Mile House, indicating its distance from Charleston. Here was the muster ground of the Eutaw State Volunteers, a company raised in 1833, to support the Ordinance of Nullification. From this tavern, on Sept. 11, 1781, Gen. Green sent to the president of Congress, dispatches announcing the Battle of Eutaw Springs. — Map (db m23200) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Cross — 8- 22 — Berkeley County
This county was designated a court and land conveyance district in 1682, and an election district in 1683. It was named for two brothers, Lord John and Sir William Berkeley, both Lord Proprietors of Carolina. Over the years, functions of this early county have changed. Modern Berkeley was created in 1882. Several boundary changes occurred 1893-1921. — Map (db m21958) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Cross — 8-24 — Cherokee Path
The main Cherokee Path, which extended from the overhill towns of the Cherokee Indians in present Tennessee to Charleston, passed near here. In existence before 1730, this early trade and transportation route played a significant role in the expansion of the North American frontier. — Map (db m22852) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Cross — 8-26 — Cross Post Office
This post office, originally named Cross Mill, was established in 1879. Adam Cross, a local storekeeper & Civil War veteran, was first postmaster. — Map (db m22745) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Cross — 8-34 — Moss Grove
John J. Cross (1810~1890) bought 500 acres here in 1844 and soon expanded Moss Grove into one other most productive cotton plantations in antebellum Berkeley District. This house was built ca. 1880 for Cross's son Adam (1844~1906), who farmed here and served as postmaster while also operating a store, cotton gin, grist mill, rice mill, saw mill and turpentine still. — Map (db m22563) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Cross — 8-15 — Thomas Sumter's Store
About 1765-1767 Thomas Sumter, future hero of the American Revolution, kept a country store near this spot where the stream of colonial traffic to the Up Country divided in the fork where the Nelson's Ferry Road branched off from the Road to Congarees. — Map (db m22247) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Goose Creek — 8-45 — Boochawee Hall
Marker Front: Boochawee Hall, created in 1683 by a 2,400-acre grant, was owned by two colonial governors, father and son. James Moore (d. 1706), a trader and planter, served on the Grand Council and later led “the Goose Creek Men,” an anti-proprietary faction. Appointed governor in 1700, Moore commanded an expedition to Florida, burning St. Augustine in 1702. Moore, replaced as governor by Sir Nathaniel Johnson in 1703, returned to the council and held a seat there until . . . — Map (db m29492) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Goose Creek — 8-55 — Broom Hall Plantation
(Front text) Broom Hall Plantation, later called Bloom Hall and still later Bloomfield, was first granted to Edward Middleton in 1678. By 1710 this property passed to Benjamin Gibbes (d. 1722), who named it for Broom House, his ancestral home in England. Gibbes’s widow Amarinthia later married Peter Taylor (d. 1765), a longtime member of the Royal Assembly and rice planter, who built a large two-story brick house here. (Reverse text) Broom Hall passed to Thomas Smith . . . — Map (db m28558) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Goose Creek — 8-46 — Button Hall
Marker Front: This plantation was once part of Boochawee Hall, owned by Governor James Moore (d. 1706). Moore left 615 acres to his daughter Rebecca, who married Thomas Barker (d. 1715) in 1709. Barker, who planted inland rice here, served one term in the Commons House of Assembly. In 1715, at the outset of the Yemassee War, Barker raised and commanded a company defending Goose Creek. That spring Capt. Barker and 26 of his men were killed in a Yemassee ambush. Marker . . . — Map (db m29493) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Goose Creek — 8-38 — Casey (Caice)
Marker Front: This African-American community grew up around a Methodist church founded during Reconstruction by a freedman named Casey or Caice. Its early services were under a tent, but a log cabin served as its first permanent church. In 1868 T.W. Lewis and other trustees bought a 25-acre tract between S.C. Hwys. 176 and 52. After a frame church replaced the cabin, Rev. William Evans (1822-1887) became the first permanent ordained minister at Casey Methodist Church. Marker . . . — Map (db m29486) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Goose Creek — 8-56 — Crowfield Plantation
(Front text) Crowfield Plantation, on the headwaters of Goose Creek, was originally granted to John Berringer in 1701. John Gibbes (1696-1764), a member of the Royal Assembly, sold it in 1721 to Arthur Middleton (1681-1737), also a member of the Royal Assembly. Middleton’s son William (1710-1785) built a large two-story brick house here ca. 1730, naming it for Crowfield Hall, his great-aunt’s English manor. (Reverse text) William Middleton grew rice and indigo, raised . . . — Map (db m28504) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Goose Creek — 8-57 — Early Indian Trading Paths / The Goose Creek Men
Early Indian Trading Paths One of the earliest major trading paths in the Carolina colony, dating from the first decade of English settlement 1670-1680, ran nearby. The colonists traded guns and ammunition, cloth, rum, and other goods for furs and skins, trading with the Catawbas, Coosas, Westos, and Yamasees in the lowcountry and the Cherokees, Creeks, Choctaws, and Chickasaws farther in the backcountry. The Goose Creek Men The “Goose Creek Men” were English . . . — Map (db m27351) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Goose Creek — 8-63 — French Huguenot Plantation / Freedman's Plantation
French Huguenot Plantation Abraham Fleury, sometimes called Abraham Fleury Sieur De La Plaine, settled here about 1680. He was one of the first French Huguenot planters in Carolina. The Huguenots, Protestants who escaped the persecution of Catholic France, immigrated with encouragement from the Lords Proprietors, who promised them opportunity and religious freedom. They later assimilated into the predominantly Anglican society of the lowcountry. Freedman's Plantation This tract . . . — Map (db m41935) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Goose Creek — 8-50 — Goose Creek / City of Goose Creek
(Front text) Goose Creek This area has been called Goose Creek since the late 17th century. For almost 200 years after the Lords Proprietors granted large tracts to English, French Huguenot, and other planters, their plantations dominated the landscape. After the Civil War most plantations were subdivided into small farms, many of them owned by freedmen and their descendants. Rural farming communities grew up around area crossroads from the late 19th century to the mid-20th . . . — Map (db m27360) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Goose Creek — 8-59 — Goose Creek Bridge
[Front] The first bridge here, in use by 1680, had a raised road at either end and was built from split logs with the flat sides up, covered by sand or clay. Traffic over Goose Creek increased significantly after St. James, Goose Creek Church was built 200 yds. S in 1714-19. By the 1750s the bridge had to be replaced every few years. In 1780 British troops occupying The Oaks Plantation nearby guarded the bridge, a strategic point on the road to and from Charleston. Continued . . . — Map (db m29502) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Goose Creek — 8-6 — Goose Creek Church
The Parish of St. James was founded by Act of Assembly in 1706. The present edifice was begun in 1714, and completed in 1719. The Royal Arms of Great Britain can still be seen over the chancel, and here is preserved the Izard Hatchment, said to be one of the only two in America. — Map (db m39091) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Goose Creek — 8-41 — Howe Hall Plantation / Howe Hall
[Front] Howe Hall Plantation, an inland rice plantation, was established here by Robert Howe, who came to S.C. in 1683. His first house here was later described as “tolerable.” Howe’s son Job (d. 1706) built a brick plantation house here once described as “commodious” but spent most of his time in Charleston. Howe served in the Commons House of Assembly 1696-1706 and was Speaker 1700-05. He died of yellow fever in 1706. [Reverse] Howe Hall . . . — Map (db m29524) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Goose Creek — 8-42 — Howe Hall Plantation / Howe Hall Elementary School
(Front text) Howe Hall Plantation Howe Hall Plantation was established here by Robert Howe about 1683 and passed to his son Job Howe (d. 1706), Speaker of the Commons House of Assembly 1700-05. Later owned by such prominent lowcountry families as the Middletons and Smiths, it was owned by James Vidal before the Civil War. During Reconstruction Vidal sold parcels to African American societies and individual freedmen for small farms. (Reverse text) Howe Hall Elementary . . . — Map (db m28079) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Goose Creek — 8-44 — Liberty Hall Plantation
Marker Front: This inland rice plantation has its origins in a 1683 grant. In 1726 Nathaniel Moore and his wife sold a 900-acre parcel to Isaac Mazyck (d. 1736). Mazyck’s son Benjamin (d. 1800), a rice planter, cattleman, and merchant, consolidated several nearby plantations and lived here until his death, when his son Stephen (1787-1832) inherited the plantation. Stephen’s widow Mary sold it to Dr. Charles L. Desel in 1834. Marker Reverse: Dr. Charles Lewis Desel . . . — Map (db m29490) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Goose Creek — 8-53 — Mount Holly Station • Mount Holly
(Front text) Mount Holly Station Mount Holly Station, a depot on the Northeastern Railroad between Florence and Charleston, was built here about 1853. It was named for nearby Mount Holly Plantation, carved out of Thorogood Plantation shortly before the American Revolution by John Deas, Jr. ( 1761-1790), a planter and state representative. The railroad tracks crossed the main oak avenue to the plantation, just south of the station and platform. (Rear text) Mount Holly . . . — Map (db m23583) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Goose Creek — 8-29 — Otranto Indigo Vat
Built 1750-1790 at Otranto Plantation and used to process dye from indigo, an important S.C. crop from 1747 to 1796. Moved here 1979. — Map (db m29485) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Goose Creek — 8-27 — Otranto Plantation
Originally known as "Yeshoe," this plantation was granted in 1679 to Arthur Middleton, great-granduncle of the signer of the Declaration of Independence. Called "Otranto" after 1771, when it was bought by Dr. Alexander Garden, noted physician and botanist, for whom the "Gardenia" was named. In recent times, the estate was used as a hunt club — Map (db m29484) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Goose Creek — 8-40 — Springfield Plantation
Marker Front: Springfield Plantation, an inland rice plantation, was established here by Paul Mazyck (d. 1749), a planter and merchant who combined two large tracts on Foster Creek, a branch of Back River. His father Isaac, a French Huguenot planter, had come to S.C. in 1686. Paul Mazyck, who owned more than 40 slaves by the time of his death, grew rice and other crops here and also owned several businesses in Charleston. Marker Reverse: A two-story house once stood here, . . . — Map (db m29489) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Goose Creek — 8-47 — St. James, Goose Creek
Marker Front: St. James, Goose Creek was one of the first Anglican parishes in the lowcountry, created by the Church Act of 1706. The first church here , built in 1707, was a frame building. This Georgian brick church, covered in stucco, was completed in 1719. Described in 1855 as “a romantically situated ancient church,” it was restored after the Charleston Earthquake of 1886, in 1907, and in 1955. Marker Reverse: Exterior features include a hipped roof and a . . . — Map (db m29495) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Goose Creek — 8-54 — The Oaks
Marker Front: The Oaks, an inland rice plantation, was established here by Edward Middleton (d. 1685) on a 1678 grant from the Lords Proprietors. Middleton, a planter who came to S.C. from Barbados, received 1,630 acres on Yeaman’s Creek, later renamed Goose Creek. Middleton served in several colonial offices, including as a member of the Grand Council. The Oaks passed to Middleton’s son Arthur (1681-1737), also on the Council, later President of the first Royal Council. Marker . . . — Map (db m29497) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Goose Creek — 8-61 — The Yamasee War At Goose Creek, 1715
Marker Front: In April 1715 Yamasee warriors killed government agents and traders who had come to meet with them at Pocotaligo, in present-day Beaufort County. Others killed colonists and raided plantations and farms at Port Royal, initiating the Yamasee War. Catawbas and Cherokees soon launched raids on other white towns and settlements, and many whites in Goose Creek fled to Charleston or barricaded themselves in their houses. Marker Reverse: Capt. Thomas Barker, who . . . — Map (db m29505) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Hanahan — 8-58 — Bowen’s Corner
Marker Front: Bowen’s Corner, an African-American farming community from the mid-19th century through the late-20th century, was originally part of a rice plantation established along Goose Creek in 1680. That tract was granted by the Lords Proprietors to Barnard Schenckingh (d. 1692). It was later owned by Benjamin Coachman (d. 1779), member of the Royal Assembly. By 1785 it passed to John Bowen (d. 1811), a state representative, for whom Bowen’s Corner is named. Marker . . . — Map (db m29500) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Hanahan — 8-65 — Steepbrook Plantation
(Front text) This plantation was established in 1701 by a grant of 500 acres near Goose Creek to Lewis Lansac from the Lords Proprietors. In 1757 the original grant, with an additional 1,000 acres that had been owned by the Wilson and Godin families, was acquired by rice planter and legislator Peter Manigault (1731-1773). Manigault named his plantation for a stream that ran through his rice fields down to Goose Creek. (Reverse text) Peter Manigault’s two-story house sat on a . . . — Map (db m41608) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Hugar — 8-11 — Pompion Hill Chapel
One quarter mile north, the first Church of England ediface outside of Charleston, was erected of Cypress in 1703, largely through the efforts of Gov. Sir Nathaniel Johnson. The present brick structure was erected in 1763. The Parish of St. Thomas, of which this was a chaoel of ease, was established by Act of Assembly, Nov. 30, 1706. — Map (db m24463) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Huger — 8-10 — Quenby Bridge
At this bridge, on July 17,1781, British forces under Col. Coates, who was retreating from Moncks Corner, encountered pursuing Americans under Gen. Thomas Sumter. After the destruction of the bridge, Col. Coates sought refuge under cover of the buildings at Quenby Plantation, where, that afternoon, he defeated an attack by the Americans. Those who fell in this engagement are said to have been buried near the road. — Map (db m41914) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Huger — Quinby Bridge & Shubrick’s Plantation: The Disastrous “Raid of the Dog Days”
In the summer of 1781, with the British hold on the interior of South Carolina significantly weakened, Continental commander Maj. Gen. Nathaniel Greene sent Brig. Gen. Thomas Sumter, with Brig. Gen. Francis Marion and Lt. Col. Henry “Light Horse Harry” Lee, to force the British to abandon the area around Charleston and retreat into the city. As Sumter led a force of nearly a thousand men from Orangeburg, British Col. James Coates evacuated the post at Monck’s Corner and began moving . . . — Map (db m53889) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Huger — 8-21 — Silk Hope Plantation
Home and burial place of Sir Nathanial Johnson, born in the County of Durham, England, in 1644. Knighted in 1680, was a member of Parliament, and Governor of Leeward Islands. He came to South Carolina in 1683 and settled at Silk Hope, from here he sent, in 1699, samples of silk to England. He was Governor of South Carolina from 1702 to 1709. Lord Cornwallis had his headquarters here for several months during the American Revolution. — Map (db m23548) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Jamestown — 8-7 — Battle of Lenud's Ferry
Here, on May 6, 1780, Col. A.M. White was routed by Tarleton with the loss of two officers and thirty-six men killed and wounded and seven officers and sixty dragoons taken; Tarleton lost 2 men. Two boys, Francis Deliesseline and Samuel Dupre, recaptured fourteen of White's horses and delivered them to Maj. Jamison, Georgetown, refusing reward. — Map (db m23249) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Jamestown — 8- 22D — Berkeley County
This county was designated a court and land conveyance district in 1682, and an election district in 1683. It was named for two brothers, Lord John and Sir William Berkeley, both Lord Proprietors of Carolina. Over the years, functions of this early county have changed. Modern Berkeley was created in 1882. Several boundary changes occurred 1893-1921. — Map (db m23175) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Jamestown — Jamestown Veterans Monument
For all who proudly serve in our armed forces — Map (db m55056) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Jamestown — 8-17 — Old Jamestown
After receiving a proprietary landgrant of 370 acres in 1705. French settlers laid out the town of Jamestown, c. 2 mi. N. By 1706, a church had been built known as the parish church of St. James, Santee. Jamestown never prospered and a number of settlers left before the Revolution, moving to the nearby parishes of St. Stephen's and St. John's, Berkeley. — Map (db m23149) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Macbeth — 8-35 — Rehoboth Methodist Church
(Marker Front) This church grew out of services held as early as 1811, at first in a brush arbor and later at a campground nearby. Ministers riding the Cooper River and Berkeley circuits served this congregation for many years. The first sanctuary here was given to the Methodists by area Episcopalians in 1847. Called Black Oak, it had been built in 1808 as a chapel of ease for Biggin Church. (Marker Reverse) In 1852 Charles Macbeth (1805-1881), the planter and politician for . . . — Map (db m29335) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Moncks Corner — “Sojer Grave”
When the South Carolina Public Service Authority was clearing the lands for the Santee Cooper Lakes, and removing buildings and other things man had erected during his two and a half centuries in upper Berkeley, there were numerous small items of a semi-public nature that had to be disposed of. Among these was the tombstone at the grave of a soldier who appears to have died at the forty-five mile house and been buried on the west side of and near the Congaree River Road at a spot commonly . . . — Map (db m54776) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Moncks Corner — Berkeley County Confederate Monument
Front Honoring Berkeley County Confederate Soldiers “Deo Vindice” J B Adkins, S Adkins, S Alexander, J Armstrong, J F Avinger, E Ball, I Ball, J M Ball, J Ball, W J Ball, A Ballentine, J J Ballentine, L E Ballentine, W J Bates, D F Baxter, J J Blanton, W R Brailsford, J C C Brandon, D G Brown, W J Brown, W M Brown, J T Browning, T S Browning, W P Brunson, E C Bunch, R B Bunch, J W Burbage, W E Burkett, B A Byrd, L G Cain, J C Cain, J P Cain, W H Cain, S Cales, G . . . — Map (db m54848) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Moncks Corner — 8-66 — Berkeley Training High School
(Front text) Berkeley Training High School, located here from 1955 to 1970, replaced a four-room wood school 1 mi. S at Main St. and Old U.S. Hwy. 52. That school, built in 1918-1920 at a cost of $6,700, had been partially funded by the Julius Rosenwald Foundation. The new brick school, built here in 1955 at a cost of almost $400,000, opened with an enrollment of more than 500 students in grades 8-12. (Reverse text) Joseph H. Jefferson, Sr. (1919-1983) was the only principal . . . — Map (db m41606) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Moncks Corner — 8-9 — Biggin Church
Parish Church of St. John's Berkeley, founded by Act of Assembly November 30, 1706. Church erected in 1712. Burned by forest fire in 1775 and restored. Burned by Col. Coates of the British Army in 1781 and again restored. Burned again by forest fire about 1886. Gen. William Moultrie and Henry Laurens were among the vestrymen of the parish. — Map (db m23453) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Moncks Corner — C.S.S. David
This Confederate vessel revolutionized the concepts of war at sea with a torpedo attack on the new ironsides in Charleston Harbor on October 5, 1863. Constructed on Stoney Landing Plantation, Berkeley County, on which lands this full scale replica is exhibited. — Map (db m23012) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Moncks Corner — Colleton House: “Unmanly Practices” or Legitimate Target?
After Eutaw Springs, the British retreated to their post at Fair Lawn Plantation. In November 1781, Brig. Gen. Francis Marion sent Col. Hezekiah Maham with 180 horsemen and Col. Isaac Shelby with 200 mountain riflemen to eliminate British foraging parties in the area. When the Whigs moved against the hospital and armory at Colleton House, the outnumbered garrison at nearby Fort Fairlawn did not interfere. Maham and Shelby’s forces captured about 150 British soldiers, officers, and doctors . . . — Map (db m53885) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Moncks Corner — 8-39 — Dixie Training School / Berkeley Training High School
[Front] Berkeley Training High School, first called Dixie Training School, stood here from 1920 until the 1980s. The first public school for blacks in Moncks Corner was founded in 1880. It held classes in local churches until its first school was built in 1900. The three-room school built here 1918-1920 at a cost of $6,700 was one of almost 500 in S.C. funded in part by the Julius Rosenwald Foundation 1917-1932. [Reverse] Rev. James Van Wright led a local effort to fund . . . — Map (db m29133) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Moncks Corner — 8-68 — Fairlawn Plantation / Fort Fairlawn
Fairlawn Plantation Fairlawn Barony, sometimes called “Fair-Lawn,” was granted to Peter Colleton, whose father John had been one of the original Lords Proprietors of the Carolina colony. John’s grandson John (1679-1754), known as “The Honorable,” was a planter and member of the Grand Council and the first Colleton to live in S.C. He built a large brick house here, later described by his granddaughter as “of course very magnificent.”

Fort . . . — Map (db m53881) HM

South Carolina (Berkeley County), Moncks Corner — First Site of Moncks Corner
First site of Monck's Corner, where the road to the Congarees branched off from this road. Founded by Thomas Monck in 1735. Relocated on the railroad about 1856. Here about 3:30 A.M. April 13, 1780, Col. Wm. Washington's Light Dragoons were surprised by a superior force of the British under Lt. Cols. Webster and Tarleton and Maj. Ferguson. Maj. Vernier, of Pulaski's Legion, and 25 men were killed and the Americans routed. The British fortified the place, but in July 1781, abandoned the . . . — Map (db m33664) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Moncks Corner — Fort Fair Lawn: An Archeaological Treasure
Fair Lawn Plantation was an enormous property granted to Sir Peter Colleton, oldest son of Sir John Colleton, one of the original eight Lords Proprietors of the Carolina colony. During the Revolutionary War, the British army first occupied the plantation in July 1781, turning the mansion, known as Colleton House, into a hospital and armory. Over the course of the summer, British troops (and probably black slaves from the area) fortified Colleton House with an abatis ~ a row of sharp . . . — Map (db m53883) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Moncks Corner — 8-16 — Lewisfield Plantation
This land, part of Fairlawn Barony and known as Little Landing, was bought in 1767 by Sedgwick Lewis. His daughter Sarah married Keating Simons. They acquired the land in 1774 and are presumed to have built the present plantation house. Tradition has it that during the Revolution, Col. Wade Hampton took seventy-eight British prisoners and burned two boats with supplies and plunder at the nearby river landing. — Map (db m29132) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Moncks Corner — 8-4 — Mulberry Plantation
Originally granted to Sir Peter Colleton in 1679. Acquired in 1712 by Thomas Broughton, who erected the present mansion, said to be modeled after Seaton Hall in England, in 1714. Thomas Broughton was speaker of the Commons House of Assembly from 1726 to 1730 and Governor from 1735 to 1737. — Map (db m29130) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Moncks Corner — 8-2 — Old Moncks Corner
Here was located the provincial town of Moncks Corner, deriving its name from Thomas Monck, an Englishman, who in 1735 purchased Mitten Plantation, and upon whose land the town was settled. It became an important commercial center prior to the Revolution. Upon the completion of the northeastern Railroad in 1857, the new railroad station was called Moncks Corner after the old town. — Map (db m23312) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Moncks Corner — Rembert C. Dennis Boulevard
Named in 1980 in honor of a distinguished South Carolininian Member, South Carolina House of Representatives, 1938-42 Member South Carolina Senate, 1943 - Chairman, Senate Finance Committee, 1972 - Because of his outstanding contributions to the general welfare of the state and to the quality of life of its citizens — Map (db m23901) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Moncks Corner — 8-3 — Santee Canal
This canal, twenty-two miles in length, connects the Santee and Cooper Rivers. Chartered in 1786, construction was commenced in 1793, and completed in 1800, under the direction of Col. John Christian Senf, a native of Sweden, as Chief Engineer. The canal was in operation until about 1850. — Map (db m23577) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Moncks Corner — 8-36 — Santee Canal
This canal, twenty-two miles in length, connects the Santee and Cooper Rivers. It was chartered by Act of March 22,1786, with capital of £100,000 sterling. Construction began in 1793, and the canal was completed in 1800, under the direction of Col. John Christian Senf, a native of Sweden, as Chief Engineer. The canal was in operation until about 1850. (Reverse text) The Santee Canal was opened to traffic from the Santee River to the Cooper River in 1800. It was 22 miles long, 20 feet . . . — Map (db m23657) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Moncks Corner — 8-48 — St. James, Goose Creek Chapel of Ease / Bethlehem Baptist Church
Marker Front: St. James, Goose Creek Chapel of Ease One of two chapels of ease for St. James, Goose Creek Parish stood here on the road to Moncks Corner, about 7 miles from the 1719 parish church. The chapel of ease was a brick building with a cruciform plan. It was completed by 1725, during the tenure of the Rev. Richard Ludlum, but was already in ruins by 1820. Marker Reverse: Bethlehem Baptist Church Bethlehem Baptist Church, founded in 1812, built a frame church . . . — Map (db m26255) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Moncks Corner — Stony Landing HouseCirca 1840-1850
The Stony Landing House was built on land which was once part of the 12,000 acre Fairlawn Barony. Fairlawn was granted to Sir Peter Colleton, son of Lords Proprietor John Colleton, on September 7, 1678. John H. Dawson purchased 2,319 acres on March 20, 1839 from the Colleton Estate. He built this house as a planter's secondary home facing the Congaree Road, a major trade route of the early Carolinas. In comparison to the more elegant river homes of the time, Stony Landing was small and noted . . . — Map (db m23088) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Moncks Corner — 8-1 — Stony Landing Plantation
Here in 1863, was constructed the Confederate semi-submersible torpedo boat, "Little David", the first of its type. It was designed by Dr. St. Julien Ravenel, and built with funds raised by Theodore D. Stoney. — Map (db m23048) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Moncks Corner — 8-23 — Wadboo Barony
Near this point was the SW corner of Wadboo Barony, a 12,000 acre tract about 4 miles square, granted in 1683 to James Colleton, son of an original Lord Proprietor, as part of the land due him as a landgrave of Carolina. Colleton's heirs were Loyalists during the Revolution; the Barony was confiscated, divided, and sold to Patriot citizens. — Map (db m23066) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Moncks Corner — Wadboo Barony: Francis Marion’s Last Headquarters
Wadboo was a Native American name given to the enormous landholding of James Colleton, a son of Sir John Colleton, who was one of the original eight Lords Proprietors of the Carolina colony. Called a barony according to the Proprietors’ plan for an American nobility, Wadboo remained in the hands of James Colleton’s descendants from the original land grant in 1683 until after the Revolutionary War. On August 29, 1782, a British foraging party, made up of white and black troops and . . . — Map (db m53891) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Moncks Corner — 8-62 — Wassamassaw
[Front] Wassamassaw, with several variant spellings during the colonial era, is a Native American word thought to mean “connecting water.” It first referred to the large cypress swamp here, but eventually referred to the community that grew up nearby in the Anglican parish of St. James, Goose Creek. Plantations laid out by the English and later by the Huguenots flourished before the Revolution. [Reverse] The swamp was almost impassible for most of the colonial . . . — Map (db m29135) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Mount Holly — 8-19 — Medway Plantation
In 1686 Medway Plantation was granted by the Lords Proprietors to Jan Van Arrsen,seigneur de Weirnhoudt. In 1689 the property came into the possession of Landgrave Thomas Smith, Governor of South Carolina November 1693 to October 1694. He died in November 1694 and is buried at Medway. — Map (db m23473) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Mt. Holly — 8-49 — Thorogood Plantation / Mount Holly Plantation
(Front text) Thorogood Plantation In 1682 the Lords Proprietors granted 3,000 acres here, on a branch of the Back River, to Joseph Thorogood (d. 1684). Though Thorogood only owned the plantation two years and his widow Jane sold it after his death, it was called “Thorogood” for most of the 19th century. By the 1720s Andrew Allen owned Thorogood, established a profitable rice plantation here, and was also engaged in the local fur trade. (Reverse text) Mount . . . — Map (db m27401) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Mudville — 8- 22B — Berkeley County
This county was designated a court and land conveyance district in 1682, and an election district in 1683. It was named for two brothers, Lord John and Sir William Berkeley, both Lord Proprietors of Carolina. Over the years, functions of this early county have changed. Modern Berkeley was created in 1882. Several boundary changes occurred 1893-1921. — Map (db m22541) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), near Cross — 8-67 — Friendship Methodist Church
(Front text) This church, one of the oldest Methodist organizations in Berkeley County, was formally organized about 1825. Circuit riders had preached in the area for more than forty years, and services held under a brush arbor here inspired participants to form a congregation and build their first church, a pole building. (Reverse text) By 1843 the church built a large frame sanctuary, later remodeled in 1914-16. During Reconstruction its black members left to . . . — Map (db m55867) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Nelson Hill — Gen. William Moultrie1730-1805
Commander of Fort Sullivan and the S.C. 2nd Regiment Jun. 17, 1775 to Sept. 16, 1776. Governor of South Carolina 1785-1787 and 1792-1794. Defeated the British ships in 1776 in the invasion of the Charleston Harbor. The fort's name was later changed to Fort Moultrie in honor of his victory and courage. — Map (db m29432) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Pineville — 8-18 — Francis Marion / Francis Marion's Grave
( Front Text ) Francis Marion Brigadier General of S.C. militia during the American Revolution, Francis Marion, was one of the partisan leaders who kept the war alive during the British occupation of the state. His elusive disappearances after surprise attacks against superior forces harassed and demoralized the enemy, earning for him the name, "Swamp Fox." ( Reverse Text ) Francis Marion's Grave Francis Marion Died Feb. 27, 1795, in his 63rd year, and was . . . — Map (db m22549) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Pineville — Francis Marion’s Grave
(North face) Sacred to the Memory of Genl. Francis Marion, Who departed his life, on the 27th of February, 1795, in the sixty-third year of his age Deeply regretted by all his fellow-citizens. History will record his worth and rising generations embalm his memory as one of the most distinguished Patriots and Heroes of the American Revolution which elevated his native country to honor and independence and secured to her the blessings of liberty and peace.This . . . — Map (db m23902) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Pineville — Maham Plantation
Burial place of Col. Hezekiah Maham A native of St. Stephen's Parish Berkeley County, South Carolina Born 1739 Died 1789 He was a distinguished soldier and patriot of the American Revolution — Map (db m54777) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Pineville — The Elusive Francis Marion: Guerrilla Commander
Disastrous American defeats during the Revolutionary War at Charleston and Camden in the summer of 1780 led many South Carolinians to give up the fight for independence. But Francis Marion carried on the struggle, waging a guerrilla war in the forest and swamps of the Lowcountry with a varying number of poorly equipped volunteer soldiers. For more than two years Marion and his brigade attacked enemy columns, captured isolated outposts, and fought alongside American forces in pitched battles. . . . — Map (db m53957) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Pineville — The Elusive Francis Marion: The Stuff of Legend
For what he did in less than three years during the Revolutionary War, Francis Marion won enduring fame. By the nineteenth century he was remembered as the Swamp Fox, the partisan commander who always eluded the British and their Loyalist allies. Marion's achievements are significant and real, but some of his fame rests upon exaggerated stories in a biography by Mason Weems, the biographer of George Washington who fabricated the famous story of Washington chopping down a cherry tree. Much . . . — Map (db m53956) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Pineville — Village of Eadytown
“The Village of Eadytown is the site of the last known Indian tribe in Upper St. John’s Parish. In early 1700 American Settlers, moving inland, settled here and eventually became a vital part of the Community. Fort Schinkin, located on the Santee River, North of this marker, was the scene of a bloody battle in 1715 between the Yemassee Indians and 23 local settlers, 22 of whom died. Residents have served America honorably and well during the many wars that have been fought to keep our . . . — Map (db m54974) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Pineville — 8-52 — Village of Pineville
(Front text) Pineville, established in 1793-94, was one of the first planters' retreats in the South. James Sinkler built the first summer house here in 1793. Pineville, named for its "religiously preserved" pines and known for its "sweet and balmy air," became a village in 1794 after John Cordes, Peter Gaillard, John Palmer and Peter, Philip, and Samuel Porcher built houses here as well. (Rear text) By 1830 Pineville had more than 60 houses, a chapel, an academy, a library, . . . — Map (db m23199) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Pinopolis — 8-31 — Pinopolis
Plantation owners began this pineland village in 1830s to escape lowcountry plantation summer nights, thought to cause "country fever" (malaria). By 1844 Pinopolis comprised about 12 homes. The village served as a shelter for refugees during the Civil War. The post office began in 1894 with Elizabeth Ravenel as postmaster. Pinopolis has two Historic Districts listed in the National Register of Historic Places. — Map (db m23422) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Pinopolis — 8-28 — St. John's Church
This baptist Church, constituted 1851, constructed the present building here in 1881 on land donated by A.D. Hare, a church trustee. — Map (db m23900) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Santee Circle — Site of Huguenot Church of Saint John's Berkeley
Eastern face: Site of the Huguenot Church of Saint John's Berkeley Constructed prior to 1701 Western face: Erected A.D. 1928 by the Huguenot Society of South Carolina — Map (db m40121) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Spring Hill — 8- 22C — Berkeley County
This county was designated a court and land conveyance district in 1682, and an election district in 1683. It was named for two brothers, Lord John and Sir William Berkeley, both Lord Proprietors of Carolina. Over the years, functions of this early county have changed. Modern Berkeley was created in 1882. Several boundary changes occurred 1893-1921. — Map (db m30738) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Spring Hill — 8-14 — Spring Hill Methodist Church
According to tradition, Methodists worshiped here under a brush arbor as early as 1800. On August 2, 1814, Phillip Keller deeded one acre for a Methodist Church and burying ground. Eden and Rebecca Green Thrower deeded an additional acre in 1839. A new wooden structure replaced the original building in 1846-47. The present church was built in 1958. — Map (db m29703) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), St. Stephen — 8-22A — Berkeley County
Area 1238 square miles established by order of the Lord Proprietors, May 10, 1682. Named for John (Lord) Berkeley and Sir William Berkeley. The largest county in the state, and part of the middle coastal district. This highway and markers were financed by Berkeley and Charleston Counties with the cooperation of the S.C. Highway Commission, Charleston Chamber of Commerce and through the Board of Commissioners. The inscriptions on the highway historical markers in Berkeley County were . . . — Map (db m33448) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), St. Stephen — DeWitt Williams Bridge
Named in honor of St. Stephen Native Teacher and Principal For Over 30 Years Member St. Stephen Town Council 1970-1979 Mayor Pro Tem 1974-1979 9th District member S.C. Highway Commission 1972-1982 Member House of Representatives 1983- (1996) Dedicated in 1983 — Map (db m29419) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), St. Stephen — 8-37 — L. Mendel Rivers House
(Marker Front) Lucius Mendel Rivers (1905-1970), state representative 1933-36 and U.S. Representative 1940-70, was born in nearby Gumville and grew up on the family farm on Bonneau Road (now Mendel Rivers Avenue). Rivers attended the College of Charleston and the University of S.C. School of Law, practicing law in Charleston before winning a special election to the S.C. legislature in 1933. (Marker Reverse) Rivers served as a lawyer for the U.S. Justice Dept. 1936-40 before . . . — Map (db m29330) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), St. Stephen — 8-51 — St. Stephen Colored School / St. Stephen High School
(Marker Front)St. Stephen Colored School St. Stephen Colored School, the first public African American school in St. Stephen, was built here in 1924-25. A three-room frame building, it was one of almost 500 schools in S.C. funded in part by the Julius Rosenwald Foundation 1917-1932. It opened with grades 1-7, but burned in 1935. A brick elementary and high school with grades 1-10 replaced it. Grades 11 and 12 were added in 1936-37 and 1948-49. (Marker Reverse)St. Stephen . . . — Map (db m29334) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), St. Stephen — 8-34 — St. Stephen's Episcopal Church
(Marker Front) St. Stephen’s, built 1767-69, is a fine example of the rural churches built in the S.C. lowcountry before the Revolution. “The Church is one of the handsomest Country Churches in So. Ca. and would be no mean ornament in Charleston,” the Rev. Frederick Dalcho wrote in his 1808 history of S.C. Episcopalians. (Marker Reverse) Essentially Georgian in style, St. Stephen’s features a gambrel roof with curvilinear gables and ornate interior woodwork such . . . — Map (db m29329) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), St. Stephen — 8-30 — Thomas Walter
The grave of Thomas Walter (c. 1740-1789), pioneer botanist, is 9 mi. W at his Santee River plantation. A native of England, Walter came to S.C. by 1769. He collected and catalogued many plants native to the lowcountry. His catalog Flora Caroliniana, was the first botany of an American region to use the Linnaean classification system. — Map (db m39003) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), St. Stephens — St. Stephens Veterans Monument
Dedicated in grateful tribute to those who served in the armed forces of the United States May 26, 1986 — Map (db m54991) HM
South Carolina (Berkeley County), Summerville — 8- 22E — Berkeley County
This county was designated a court and land conveyance district in 1682, and an election district in 1683. It was named for two brothers, Lord John and Sir William Berkeley, both Lord Proprietors of Carolina. Over the years, functions of this early county have changed. Modern Berkeley was created in 1882. Several boundary changes occurred 1893-1921. — Map (db m22948) HM
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