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Charleston County Markers
575 markers matched your search criteria. The first 250 markers are listed. Next 325
South Carolina (Charleston County), Awendaw — 10-29 — Old Wappetaw Church
Congregationalists from New England built a church near here around 1700. Troops from both sides camped on the grounds during the American Revolution. Burned by the British in 1782, it was rebuilt in 1786. The building was abandoned during the Civil War and its members organized Presbyterian churches in Mount Pleasant and McClellanville. — Map (db m16308) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — “Brave & Happy Settlements”Charles Towne, 1670-80
You are on the site of the settlement of Charles Towne. In this place, Native Americans, English, Africans and Barbadians came together to create the first successful English colony in Carolina. Interacting with each other and the land, these groups each made important contributions and shaped the history of the region. As you walk through the park, see the places where the first settlers landed, lived and worked for the first 10 years. You’ll find archaeological sites, reconstructed . . . — Map (db m67877) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — “Thunderbolt”
This M4 Sherman Tank is similar to that used by Lieutenant Colonel Creighton W. Abrams, in World War II while commanding the 37th Tank Battalion – 4th Armored Division – Patton’s Third Army. General Abrams was Army Chief of Staff from 12 Oct 1972 until his death on 4 Sept 1974. Donated by those who learned from his dynamic leadership “Courage Conquers” 37 — Map (db m67976) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — 10-Inch Mortar, Model 1819
This 10-inch mortar, unearthed during the excavations in 1959, is similar to the one which fired the signal shot from Fort Johnson on April 12, 1861. Later in the war, the Confederate defenders of Fort Sumter mounted several of these weapons near this spot as added defense against the anticipated assaults of the Union Army and Navy. Range: 2225 yards (3035 M) — Map (db m30647) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — 113 Ashley AvenueBennett - Hayne House — circa 1800
This two-and-one-half-story Adam Style house was built circa 1800 by Thomas Bennett, Jr., (1781-1865). Bennett served as intendent of Charleston (1812-1813) and governor of South Carolina (1820-1822). The frame structure rests on a raised basement with a gable roof highlighted on both north and south elevations by a central pediment lunette and flanked by paired gabled dormers. The five-bay wide main facade has a central door framed by a transom and sidelights with decorative . . . — Map (db m50820) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — 123 Tradd StreetCharles Graves House — circa 1795
This three-story masonry single house with hipped roof and Federal style details was constructed for Charles Graves, a local factor. One of the oldest building along upper Tradd Street, the house is located on portions of Lots 226 and 227 of the "Grand Modell of Charles-Town," the earliest plan of the city. The Federal influence is evidenced by the narrow central entrance with a molded architrave and tall transom with delicate neoclassical tracery. A two-story piazza with paneled . . . — Map (db m48674) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — 125 Tradd StreetCaptain John Morrison House — circa 1805
This Adam style Single House was constructed circa 1805 by Captain John W. Morrison on the site of the circa 1790 garden of Robert Squibb, who brought many exotic plants to Charleston, exported rare species from Charleston to England, and published the Gardener’s Calendar in 1787. The Morrison House is noted for its handsome four bay facade facing Tradd Street, and for its expansive three-tiered piazzas which were added in the 1840’s. The house is also noted for its Adam style . . . — Map (db m48759) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — 126 Tradd StreetThe Dr. Peter Fayssoux House — circa 1732
Residence of the Surgeon General of the Continnetal Army and boyhood home of Confederate Generals Hamilton Prioleau Bee & Bernard Bee. One of only three South Carolina homes with early exposed interior corner post construction, a medieval English building style. — Map (db m48236) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — 14 George StreetMiddleton-Pinckney House — circa 1796
This three-story, masonry residence set on a raised basement was begun circa 1796 by Mrs. Frances Motte Middleton, daughter of Jacob and Rebecca Motte. The house was completed by Mrs. Middleton and her second husband and former brother-in-law, Major General Thomas Pinckney, whom she married in 1797. In addition to his military service, Pinckney served as President George Washington’s Minister to the Court of St. James and in 1796 made an unsuccessful bid for vice president of the United . . . — Map (db m51273) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — 15-Inch Rodman
Designed by Thomas J. Rodman, U.S. Army Ordnance Officer, this type of cannon was the largest gun used in combat during the Civil War. These two Rodmans were brought to Fort Sumter as part of the 1870's modernization program. Tube Weight: 50,000 pounds (22680 Kg) Maximum Range: 5579 yards (5101 M) — Map (db m30641) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — 17 Limehouse Street
This residence was built on the original Robert Limehouse farmlands. The house was definitely standing in 1855 and was occupied that year by Joseph Dawson, a druggist in business at 17 Broad St. — Map (db m51899) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — 18 Church Street
Earliest known deed recorded in 1789 This classic Charleston single house was once the home of Thomas Gadsden, distinguished Charleston lawyer and grandson of Revolutionary War hero General Christopher Gadsden. — Map (db m47870) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — 19 State StreetFrederick Wolfe House — circa 1796
This two-and-a-half story Charleston Single House is thought to be built by Frederick Wolfe after the fire of 1796, which destroyed much of the State Street area between Broad and Queen Streets. The house was moved back on its original lot at 21 State Street approximately 15 feet in 1813 when State Street was widened. Threatened by demolition in 1973 to provide access for a parking lot, the house was acquired by The Preservation Society of Charleston who moved the structure to its present location and restored it in 1974. — Map (db m50513) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — 23 Tradd StreetWilliam Bell House — circa 1797-1800
This three-story stucco house with a clay tile hip roof was built by Charleston merchant William Bell following the destruction of an earlier residence by fire in 1778. The fire, the second of five great Charleston fires between 1740 and 1860, destroyed approximately 250 houses in an area bounded by Water Street, Queen Street, Church Street, and Charleston harbor. The iron bolts were installed to reinforce the north and south walls damaged in the earthquake of 1886. The building was owned . . . — Map (db m47978) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — 26 Tradd StreetAdam Ewing House — circa 1783
This town house was constructed by Adam Ewing, a Scots merchant, for his residence and place of business. He and his partner Robert Ewing (who bore the same surname but was no relation) had their counting house in the front room of the ground floor. Adam Ewing's home occupied the remainder of the house. The Adam Ewing House was constructed after the Great Fire of 1778 which destroyed much of this neighborhood. It is notable for its simple and elegant design substantially built of . . . — Map (db m47977) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — 28 Chapel StreetVanderhorst Mansion — circa 1832
Built as a suburban villa by a member of the wealthy Vanderhorst family, owners of much of Kiawah Island, the stuccoed brick house stands two stories above a raised basement and has a piazza approached on the main floor by a double, semicircular, brownstone staircase with a wrought-iron balustrade. A dogtooth corniced pediment projects from the center of the gable roof. The house contains most of its original late federal woodwork and some of the finest wrought-iron in the city. — Map (db m51345) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — 300th Anniversary of the Settlement of Charles Towne
      On the occasion of the 300th Anniversary of the Settlement of Charles Towne, the South Carolina Tricentennial Commission acquired this original site for a permanent historic park and nature preserve.       Ten years after the original landing in April 1670. The town moved to the present location of Charleston, leaving this property in private hands until purchased by the state from its last owners, Dr. and Mrs. Joseph Ioor Waring.       Mrs. Waring, whose family, the Legares, owned . . . — Map (db m67934) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — 31 Savage Street   George N. Barnard Tenement — 1872
This two-story frame Greek Revival style residence was constructed in 1872 for Civil War photographer George N. Barnard. The house is distinguished by a one-story front porch supported by jigsaw-cut columns and Italianate style balustrades. In 1864, the Union Army hired Barnard, a 45-year-old photographer from upstate New York, to accompany General William Tecumseh Sherman in the battlefield. Working from his horse-drawn darkroom, Barnard photographed Sherman's "march to the sea," capturing . . . — Map (db m51397) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — 32 Legare StreetSword Gate House
Legare Street is named for goldsmith Solomon Legare “the Huguenot,” who built the first house on this property. Before the lot left the family in 1803, his descendants had become wealthy plantation owners and commission merchants. This large U-shaped house was built in at least four stages. The earliest section (front right) is part of the eighteenth century dwelling that replaced Legare’s original house. Merchants Jacob Steinmetz and Paul Lorent retained this three story, . . . — Map (db m47750) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — 36 Meeting Streetc. 1740
This Georgian Style residence is an early example of the "Charleston Single House." The original woodwork is noteable; the drawing room mantle is attributed to Charleston cabinet maker, Thomas Elfe. Unique in the kitchen building is the original cooking fireplace, intact. Many eminent South Carolina family names are associated with this property; DeSaussure, Vanderhorst, Brunch, Rivers, Kershaw and Pelzer. — Map (db m47763) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — 37 Meeting StreetJames Simmons House — circa 1760
Charlestonian James Simmons is believed to have built this Georgian style house circa 1760. It is located on Lot 278 of the "Grand Model of Charles Town", the earliest plan of the city. Otis Mills, the original owner of the Mills House bought the property in 1846. At the time of Mills' purchase, the Meeting Street facade had been altered with the addition of two projecting bays. The house served as "Executive Headquarters" and home to Confederate General Pierre T.G. Beauregard. He led . . . — Map (db m47837) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — 39 Meeting Streetc. 1766
Built for St. Michael’s Church Rectory by Miller & Fullerton. Sold in 1823 to Dr. William Read, who served in the Revolution as Surgeon General of the Colonial Army. Now a private residence. — Map (db m47875) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — 42 Church StreetBrailsford & Susan Jenkins House — circa 1905
This substantial house was built by J. Brailsford Jenkins, soon after they purchased the site in 1905. The lot previously had been part of the extensive grounds of present-day 38 Church Street, where Dr. Vincent LeSeigneur had a famous garden in the nineteenth century. J. Brailsford Jenkins, a prosperous salesman, and his wife, the former Susan Lining Dawson, were members of aristocratic Lowcountry families. The home they built is of late Victorian design, combining the Queen Anne and . . . — Map (db m47611) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — 42-Pounder, Banded and Rifled
Confederates rifled this cast iron cannon to improve its accuracy and effective range. Maximum Range: 3803 yards (3477 M) — Map (db m30934) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — 54 King StreetThe James Brown House Circa 1768
The James Brown House is situated on a portion of Lot Number 82 of the Grand Modell, the city plan for Charleston that was developed in 1670. The lot was originally granted by the Lords Proprietors on June 12, 1694 to John Frowman, a butcher, for an annual rent of one penny. This three and one-half story Georgian style Single House, and two story brick dependency building were constructed in 1768 by James Brown, a master carpenter. Brown represented St. Michael's and St. Philip's Parishes in . . . — Map (db m47899) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — 54 Queen StreetThe Workshop of Thomas Elfe
Erected circa 1760 in the old section of the city. A rare surviving example of its kind containing 4 finely paneled rooms and other trim which makes it exceptional for a house of its modest size. Medallion: Award 1967 Carolopolis Condita A.D. 1670 Preservation Society of Charleston (Lower plaque) This structure has been recorded by the Historic American Buildings Survey of the United States Department of the Interior for . . . — Map (db m51611) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — 55 Ashley Avenue   The Baker House
The Baker House was constructed in 1912 as the Baker-Craig Sanitarium. This sixty-bed hospital and nursing school was founded by Dr. Archibald E. Baker Sr. and Dr. Lawrence Craig. The Baker House was designed by John D. Newcomer and Ernest V. Richards, prominent architects of the period. The building is a rare example of early 20th-century Eclectic architecture in Charleston, with Mission Revival and Craftsman design features. The Baker Hospital relocated in 1981, and in 1983 the building . . . — Map (db m51630) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — 58 Tradd StreetCleland-Wells House — circa 1760
This three-story stuccoed single house was constructed circa 1760 by Charleston physician Dr. William Cleland as a residence for his son William. After William's death the property was purchased in 1778 by Scottish émigré Robert Wells, the largest bookseller and printer in the Southern colonies. Wells and his son John used the first floor and perhaps the cellar of this building to publish a Tory newspaper, the South Carolina and American General Gazette. The . . . — Map (db m48141) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — 6 Water Street - Francis Saltus Housecirca 1820s
Captain Francis W. Saltus, Sr., a Charleston ship owner and cotton factor built this two and one half story Federal style single house. The frame structure rests on a raised basement and features a closed return box cornice and a gable roof with an elaborate central pediment flanked by two dormer windows. Double piazzas supported by slender columns span the east façade, shallow arches highlight the first floor piazza, as does the central doorway which is capped with a semi-elliptical transom . . . — Map (db m50449) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — 6.4-Inch (100-Pounder) Parrott
Discovered during the excavations of Fort Sumter, these rifled guns were installed by Federal troops during the 1870's modernization program. Maximum Range: 6800 yards (6218 M) — Map (db m30679) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — 66 Bull Street The John Cart House
Built in 1817 by John Cart, a "measurer of lumber", this house is a typical Charleston single house with western exposure piazzas extending the length of the house, upstairs and down. Prior to the 20th century, a body of tidewater known as Bennett Pond came up to the back of the 210-foot lot. The original house, with two full stories and a dormer story included two rooms on each floor and a hallway landing at the top of the stairs between. Two second . . . — Map (db m53716) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — 69 Ashley Avenue    Eli Gedding House
circa 1860 This three story late Regency Style Single House was constructed circa 1860 by prominent Charleston physician Eli Geddings. In 1825, Geddings became the first graduate of the Medical College in Charleston, now known as the Medical University of South Carolina. He served as a Professor of Pathological Anatomy and Medical Jurisprudence as well as holding chairs of both Medicine and Surgery. Geddings gained a national reputation for his published work in the field of . . . — Map (db m51657) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — 72-74 Tradd StreetFotheringham-McNeil Tenements
circa 1740 Local merchant James Matthews constructed this three-story over raised basement, double tenement building circa 1740. The house features a Flemish bond brick pattern and nine over nine light windows. The gambrel roof with a jerkin-head gable is a rare surviving example of a roof form once common in 18th century Charleston. Charleston attorney James Grindley purchased the property in 1762. Grindley rented one half of the building and used the other half as his residence and . . . — Map (db m47902) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — 73 Church StreetBrewton-Dale-Pinckney House — circa 1716
Colonel Miles Brewton I, (1675-1745), was one of the original founding members of Charles Towne. A wealthy Charleston "goldsmith" (banker), provincial powder receiver, built this stucco-over brick house circa 1716-33 (near the center of the old walled city.) He gave this home as a wedding gift in 1733 to his daughter Mary on her marriage to Dr. Thomas Dale. Dr. Thomas Dale (1700-1750) was a British-trained physician, a judge, and author. Dale served as justice of the peace for Berkeley . . . — Map (db m50442) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — 8 Legare StreetCharleston Historic District
The National Register of Historic Places South Carolina Department of Archives And History 8 Legare Street Charleston Historic District — Map (db m50213) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — 8-10 Tradd StreetThe Lamboll Double Tenement
circa 1726 rebuilt 1781 The masonary structure of this double residence was constructed by Charleston merchant Thomas Lamboll circa 1726. The date of construction is based on surviving land grants showing the establishment of common use alleys on either side of the property. The original frame upper story and roof were heavily damaged by fires in the mid-eighteenth century and rebuilt circa 1781. The gambrel or "Dutch gable" roof is a rare surviving example of an architectural form once . . . — Map (db m62151) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — 83-107 East Bay Street   Rainbow Row
Rainbow Row represents the longest cluster of intact Georgian row houses in the United States. The earliest structures on this portion of East Bay Street, between Tradd and Elliott Street, were built by 1680. The buildings were constructed on lots 7 to 10 of the Grand Modell, a city plan developed between 1670-1680. Over the years, the buildings served as the shops and residences of notable merchants and planters, and fronted a cluster of wharves on the Cooper River waterfront. The . . . — Map (db m51737) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — 83-85 Church Street
The National Register of Historic Places 83-85 Church Street Charleston Old and Historic District South Carolina Department of Archives And History — Map (db m50451) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — 8-inch (200 Pounder) Parrott
Robert Parker Parrott designed the 6.4-inch, 8-inch and 10-inch Parrotts to serve on land or sea. These versatile rifled cannon were simple and inexpensive to construct. This gun, like many of the other weapons in Fort Sumter, was brought to the Fort in the 1870's. Maximum Range: 8000 yards (7315 M) — Map (db m30764) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — 8-Inch Columbiad
When the Confederates opened fire in April 1861, several 8-inch Columbiads were mounted in Fort Sumter. This weapon probably has remained here since then, weathering the Union bombardment of 1863 and the clean up of the 1870's. Archeological excavations uncovered this Columbiad in 1959. Maximum Range: 4800 yards (4389 M) — Map (db m30646) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — 90 East Bay StreetAncrum Wharf Building — Circa 1781, Altered circa 1855
The Ancrum Wharf Building was constructed by Parker Quince and John Ancrum, both North Carolina natives, who who married to Savannah and Mary Rhett. The Rhett sisters were heirs to Col. William Rhett. The Ancrum Wharf Building is one of the few wharf-related eighteenth structures surviving in Charleston and about one of the only remaining cobblestone streets. Originally constructed as a three-story building, the Ancrum Wharf Building was altered to function as a two-story building during . . . — Map (db m47934) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — 95 Ashley AvenueMayor William A. Courtnay House
circa 1840
The construction of this circa 1840 three-and-a half story single house is attributed to Charleston cotton planter and factor Theodore D. Jervey. The house was built in the Greek Revival style but was altered in 1886 by William Ashmead Courtenay who purchased the house in 1870. Courtenay added a two-story projecting bay and triple windows to the front facade. He also modified the parapeted gable roof to create an Italianate bracketed roof overhang. The original two-story piazza and . . . — Map (db m51725) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — 95 Lenwood BoulevardCirca 1867
This simply detailed two story wooden dwelling, and the neighboring dwelling at 93 Lenwood Boulevard, were originally one building. This building was located at the present intersection of Tradd Street and Lenwood Boulevard, and was used by the U.S. Government as a hospital. In 1874, it was separated to create two dwellings. These dwellings were moved by the U.S. Government to their present locations shortly after the 1911-1913 Murray Boulevard development. This development involved the . . . — Map (db m48144) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — A Common Lodging
Indentured servants and enslaved Africans were the backbone of the new colony, and their labor ensured its survival. Hundreds arrived in the years after 1670, and the new settlement must have included some sort of housing for this labor force. In 1674, one of the Lords Proprietors instructed his deputy to build a “common lodging” for his servants. The house before you, constructed in 2007, is a representation of this type of dwelling. Although archeologists have not yet found the . . . — Map (db m67891) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — A House in Mourning: Death of a SoldierEdmondston-Alston House
Sacred To the Memory of Lieut. John Julius Pringle Alston 1st Lieutenant South Carolina Artillery Born in Charleston December 4, 1836 Died in Greenville September 20, 1863 of Typhoid Contracted in the defense of his State At Fort Sumter and Battery Wagner Whilst his father was raising him in his bed, he said calmly “I am dying.” His father asked him if he wished his mother to pray for him at his bedside. He answered “Yes.” After joining with us in . . . — Map (db m70312) WM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — A Temporary Home?
A building of the 1670-80 settlement once stood at this spot. Its discovery by archaeologists raised many questions. What was its purpose? Who used it? What did I look like? One interpretation, based on the artifact types found here, is that it was a dwelling. Possibly it was occupied by indentured servants, slaves or militia soldiers. The relatively large number of military artifacts suggests that it might have been a temporary shelter for soldiers on duty within the palisade. The pottery, . . . — Map (db m67924) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — A Unique Find Brings Unanswered Questions
Native Americans built a ceremonial center here centuries before English colonists founded Charles Towne. Palisade walls surrounded sacred ground where religious rituals were conducted. Although pottery excavated here is similar to other finds from across the Southeast, this site is unique because the center did not include a ceremonial mound. Interpreting What Isn’t Here In front of you, four groupings of natural wood posts mark the outer corners of the ceremonial site. The smaller area . . . — Map (db m67893) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Affra Harleston Coming
In Memory Of Affra Harleston Coming Who epitomizes the courage of the woman who    pioneered the settling of this state. Coming by herself from England in 1670 as a    bonded servent and serving a two year indenture to pay for her passage, she afterwards married    John Coming, First Mate of the ship Carolina. While her husband was often at sea, Affra, despite danger    from disease and often hostile Indians, cleared lands, planted crops and . . . — Map (db m55171) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — AH – 1 “Cobra”
Combat attack helicopter developed by Bell Helicopter Textron, Inc. Flown in all United States combat actions from Vietnam to Somalia Dedicated to all Citadel aviators who courageously served their country. — Map (db m67978) WM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Alexander Christie Housec. 1805
Handsome Adam style single house and gabled carrage house was built on Lot 36 of Grand Model house. It has been rectory of St. Philip's Church since 1908. A successful Scot, Alexander Christie built the house as his residence and place of business. — Map (db m47906) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Anchor of the U.S.S. Coral Sea
      This monument honors sailors and marines who served aboard the U.S.S. Coral Sea in combat and Citadel men who served in the Navy and Marine Corps.       The vessel was awarded the Navy Unit Commendation and nine Battle Stars for operations in the Asiatic-Pacific theatre during World War II. — Map (db m67973) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite of Freemasonry / Solomon's Lodge No. 1
On this site stood the building in which the Supreme Council, 33°, Mother Council of the World, Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite of Freemasonry, was founded May 31, 1801, A.D., corresponding to Sivan 19, 5561, A.M. ————— Solomon's Lodge No. 1, Ancient Freemasons chartered by the Grand Lodge of England 1735 was organized on this site October 28, 1736 — Map (db m27535) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Ann Peacock HouseBuilt c. 1760
The front portion of this fine example of the Charleston single house was built on part of the original lot #37 of the plat of Charleston known as the "Grand Modell." The home was erected by Wm. Hall for Ann Peacock, a wealthy widow from St. George's Parish, Dorchester. After her death in 1769 the property changed owners several times and in 1877 the premises were left to St. Michael's Church. According to vestry minutes the house was in such disrepair that it was sold at . . . — Map (db m47911) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Arming the Fort
The row of cannon in front of you dates from the Civil War, when radical advances in technology increased power, range, and accuracy. Some large, old smoothbore cannon were "rifled and banded" to enhance firepower. Banding (heating and tightening bands of wrought iron around a cast iron barrel) strengthened a cannon to withstand increased pressure created by greater powder charges. Rifling (cutting spiral grooves in a weapon's bore) gave a stabilizing spin to a projectile, increasing accuracy. . . . — Map (db m30639) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — As Old as Charleston
The Tavern has been a spirited part of Charleston's history since the late 17th century. From the early seaport days, through pirate attacks, the Revolution and Civil War, earthquakes and hurricanes, Prohibition and the Great Depression, the Tavern and Charleston have not only survived these historical events, they stand as a living example of the Spirit of Self-reliance and the Resilience that is the United States of America — Map (db m47973) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Battery Huger
Battery Huger (ũ-jẽ) looms before you. Battery Huger, the black, concrete structure filling the center of Fort Sumter, was built in 1899 in response to the Spanish-American War. Named for Revolutionary War hero Isaac Huger, the battery was part of a seacoast defense system that protected Charleston Harbor. By 1945 installations like Battery Huger were obsolete, and Fort Sumter was transferred to the National Park Service. — Map (db m30552) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Battery Reed
Here stood Battery Reed commanded by Lt. Col. Ellison Capers, June 16, 1862. — Map (db m67361) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Benjamin Lucas HouseCirca 1858
Built by Benjamin Lucas a contractor, as his residence and owned by his family until the 1930's. It was extensively restored in 1960 by Richard H. Jenrette. — Map (db m53640) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Bethel Methodist Church
Bethel Methodist Church lot donated by Thomas Bennett A.D. 1795 Church dedicated 1798 Moved across street for use of colored people and present church dedicated Aug. 7, 1853 Parsonage once occupied by Bishop Francis Asbury 1st M. Church in city The Blue Meeting House was in [sic] Cumberland Street — Map (db m47663) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Bible Depository1828
Originally two stories, built as a depository by the South Carolina Bible Society on land purchased from the City for that purpose in 1828. In 1882 the South Carolina Art Association acquired the building and used it for an art school until 1908. The Confederate Home and College bought the structure in that year and added a third floor as dormitory rooms for young women. Severely damaged by the tornado of 1838, the building was purchased and repaired by the German Friendly Society . . . — Map (db m47869) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Black and White Worlds:The Varied Landscapes of a Town House Lot
This present day garden design differs substantially from that which existed during the occupation of the property by the Russell Family and their slaves (1808-1857). In 1819 the Russell garden was described by an English visitor: ...called on the venerable Nathaniel Russell, Esq., residing in a splendid mansion, surrounded by a wilderness of flowers, and bowers of myrtles, oranges and lemons, smothered with fruit and flowers living in a next of roses... I saw and ate rip figs, pears, apples . . . — Map (db m73186) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Blake Tenements
The National Register of Historic Places Blake Tenements South Carolina Department of Archives and History — Map (db m47767) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Blockade Runners
The Union Navy blockaded Charleston Harbor from 1861-65, but blockade runners continued to slip in and out, carrying cargo crucial to the economic and military survival of the South. Using neutral ports like Bermuda and Nassau, blockade runners brought food, medicine, weapons, ammunition, and manufactured goods from Europe. They left primarily with cotton, but also carried diplomats, dispatches, and various products and valuables. The risk of capture or sinking by Union warships was great, but . . . — Map (db m30691) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Bound For GloryThe Railroad Was A Nation Builder
There is no doubt that the railroad defined an American culture and personality that is distinct from its European roots. At its heart, the railroad was a nation builder - the personification of the brash, entrepreneurial spirit that the rest of the world saw in the United States. As early as 1827, William Aiken and Horatio Allen recognized the potential of the railroad to open new markets and to make travel faster and safer. Trains changed American perceptions of time, space, . . . — Map (db m39927) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Branford-Horry HouseA Private Residence — c. 1751
Outstanding Georgian House designated "of National Importance," was built by William Branford, planter and member of the Colonial Assembly. It is famous for its carved cypress paneling and drawing room which has been called "one of the most distinguished 18th century rooms in America." Piazzas added c.1826 by Branford's grandson, Elias Horry, twice mayor of Charleston, President of the College of Charleston and President (1831-1834) of the South Carolina Railroad when it was the longest in the world. — Map (db m39313) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Building a Nation
Between 1862 and 1885, the United States undertook construction of a railroad to connect the East with the West. The Central Pacific Railroad was built 742 miles eastward from Sacramento. The Union Pacific was built 1,038 miles westward from Omaha. Owners met at Promontory Summit, Utah on May 10, 1869 and hammered home the Golden Spike creating a new transportation network that revolutionized the West and the country. Completion of the transcontinental railroad created a boom in railroad . . . — Map (db m39958) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Buildings “All of Wood”?
This small shed represents the construction techniques that might have been used at early Charles Towne. It is not a reconstruction of a specific building, and as far as we know there was never an actual building or garden located on this exact spot. The shed is a blend of English and Caribbean building methods, adapted to locally available materials. Its frame consists of wooden posts set into the earth. The wall on one side is made of wattle (woven saplings) covered in clay daub and lime. . . . — Map (db m67927) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Burger's Tavern
[Masonic Emblem] This tablet erected by the members of Orange Lodge No. 14, A.F.M. marks the spot of Burger's Tavern in which the lodge was organized on May 28, 1789 It commemorates one hundred and thirty eight years of uninterrupted Masonic work A memorial of constancy and fidelity Founders James Allison, Worshipful Master William Stewart, Sr Warden    Alex Cameron, Jr. Warden George Taylor                          William Barre . . . — Map (db m39465) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — 10-67 — Burke High School
(Front text) This school, founded in 1910, was the first public high school for African-Americans in Charleston. It succeeded the Charleston Normal & Industrial School, a private school at Bogard & Kracke Streets, which had been founded in 1894 by Rev. John L. Dart. The new Charleston Colored & Industrial School, built here at President and Fishburne Streets by the City of Charleston, opened in January 1911 with 375 students. (Reverse text) David Hill became the first . . . — Map (db m39621) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Burke High School1910 - 2010
Founded as a private school for elementary students in 1894 by Rev. John Dart at the corner of Bogard and Krake Streets, Charleston Normal and Industrial School was approved to become a public school for "colored" children in 1910 and opened at the 244 President Street site on January 3, 1911. In 1921, the school was renamed J.E. Burke Industrial School and by 1929, Burke was serving fifth through eleventh graders. In 1954, Burke and Avery merged as Burke High School and became accredited by . . . — Map (db m39754) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Calhoun
This Monument was erected by the women of South Carolina in 1896 to John Caldwell Calhoun in commemoration of his eminent Statesmanship during the many years of his public life - it replaces one formerly on the same spot which proved unsatisfactory. The funds for its construction were raised soon after his death in 1850 by the Ladies Calhoun Monument Association. Its treasurer Mrs. M. A. Snowden having charge of all its assets secured them about her person and thus saved them . . . — Map (db m19133) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Calhoun
This marble for thirty four years covered the tomb of Calhoun in the Western Churchyard. It has been placed here by the Vestry near the spot there he remains were interred during the siege of Charleston from which spot they were afterwards removed to the original tomb, and subsequently deposited under the Sarcophagus erected on the same site in 1884 by the State. — Map (db m48142) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — 10-66 — Calvary Episcopal Church
This church, located on Beaufain Street for 91 years, was organized in 1847 to give free blacks and slaves in antebellum Charleston a separate Episcopal congregation of their own. The Rev. Paul Trapier was its first minister, and the church met in the St. Philip's Episcopal Church parsonage, then in Temperance Hall, before acquiring a lot at the corner of Beaufain and Wilson Streets. (Reverse text) A stuccoed brick church on Beaufain Street was completed and . . . — Map (db m50686) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Calvary Episcopal Church106 Line Street
Calvary Church was founded in 1847 to establish a special church for slaves in the Charleston community. Father Paul Trapier held services in March 1848 for the congregation in the basement of St. Philip's parsonage and in mid-July services were moved to temperance Hall on Meeting Street. By early 1849 approximately 30-40 "persons of color" attended in the morning, 100 in the afternoon and 276 in the Sunday school. As laws prohibited teaching a slave to read, all instructions in the church and . . . — Map (db m50924) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Camden Depot
Welcome to Camden Tower Courtyard. The two towers that flank this entrance and the two former warehouses along the walkway are associated with Camden Depot, built in the 1850s. The former depot is part of the William Aiken House and Associated Railroad Structures National Historic Landmark. The landmark includes some of the best extant antebellum buildings associated with early railroad development in the South. The most distinct features of Camden Depot are the tiered crenelated towers . . . — Map (db m30012) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Cameron House
Built in 1851 by Hugh P. Cameron, a crockery merchant, as his residence. In 1892, David Bentschner, a clothing merchant, purchased the home and changed the interior to Colonial Revival. The front gate, carrying his initials, was added at that time. — Map (db m53522) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — 10-68 — Cannon Street Hospital / McClennan Banks Memorial Hospital
Cannon Street Hospital Cannon Street Hospital, established here in 1897, served the African-American community of Charleston until 1959. Officially the Hospital and Training School for Nurses, it occupied a three-story brick building constructed ca. 1800. Dr. Alonzo C. McClennan (1855-1912), then one of only six black physicians in Charleston, was one of its founders and also edited The Hospital Herald 1898-1900. McClennan Banks Memorial Hospital By 1956 Dr. Thomas C. McFall, . . . — Map (db m46344) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Capers Motte House
Circa 1745 Built by Richard Capers Home of Jacob Motte, Treasurer of South Carolina Colony Dedicated 28 October 2010 by The Colonial Dames of America Founded 23 May 1890 Chapter XXXI - South Carolina (Upper plaque) Capers - Motte - Smith House Is protected by a Conservation Easement Donated to Historic Charleston Foundation 2000 — Map (db m51162) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Captain John Christie
Erected by The Grand Lodge Free and Accepted Masons of Michigan To the memory of Captain John Christie --- of the --- 60th OR Royal American Regiment Founder and First Worshipful Master of Lodge No. 1 at Detroit, Michigan. Warranted April 27, 1764 Died in Antigua, W.I., June 1782 Buried from St. Philip's Church, on Hampstead Hill, August 10, 1782. — Map (db m27504) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Casemates and Cannon
Load ... Ready ... Fire! A disciplined crew of five men could fire an accurate shot in less than one minute. Teamwork and timing during battle were essential to the crew of this 42-pounder smoothbore cannon, one of 27 guns that occupied these first-tier casemates. This casemate is an 1870 reconstruction, but the cannon, which rests on a 1961 reconstruction carriage, is one of Fort Sumter's original guns. Artillery crews drilled daily to increase speed and skill using a variety of specialized . . . — Map (db m30922) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Casper Christian Schutt House51 Easy Bay Street — Constructed 1800-1802
This large, three and one-half story masonry single house was constructed circa 1800-1802 by Caspar Christian Schutt, a Charleston merchant of German descent. As was the custom of the day, he operated his business activities on the first floor and used the upper floors as his residence. The exterior features a hipped roof and dormers, a dentil brick cornice, with stucco over brick, except for the north facade which is brick in the Flemish bond pattern. The deep lot also holds several . . . — Map (db m47964) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Cassique of the Kiawah1670
Seeking a place for establishing a settlement, the first colonists were directed to this site by the Chief of the Kiawah Indians. The friendly Cassique and his people greatly helped the struggling colony. This statue by Willard Hirsch commissioned in 1971 by the S.C. Tricentennial Commission — Map (db m67869) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Cathedral of St. John the Baptist
The cathedral parish was established in 1821 by Bishop John England, the first Bishop of Charleston. The cathedral was named for St. Finbar. A second cathedral church was erected on this site in 1856 under the names of Sts. John and Finbar. This fine gothic structure was destroyed in the 1861 fire. The present cathedral was completed in 1907. — Map (db m27465) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Charles Pinckney
October 26, 1757 – October 29, 1824 He was a delegate to the Continental Congress, 1784-5, 1785-6, 1786-7 He was a delegate to the Federal Convention in 1787 and on May 29, 1787 submitted thereto a plan for a Constitution and at least twenty-five provisions thereof were incorporated into the Constitution of the United States. Governor of South Carolina: 1789 – 1791 1791 – 1792 1796 – 1798 1806 – 1808 United States Senator December 6, 1798 – December 3, 1801 . . . — Map (db m67965) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Charleston Besieged
In 1861 the port of Charleston prospered. Keeping the city open to trade was crucial for Confederate survival. Confederate forts in Charleston Harbor - including Fort Sumter - protected Charleston throughout the war despite Union blockade, warship attack, and two years of bombardment and siege. Despite military conflict in the harbor, relative peace prevailed in the city until 1863, when Union forces captured nearby Morris Island and began shelling Charleston. This was a deliberate bombardment . . . — Map (db m30769) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Charleston City Market
On this site stands one of Charleston’s oldest public facilities in continuous use: the Charleston Market. Earlier markets, dating back to the city’s relocation to the peninsula, ca. 1680, offered meat, fish, and vegetables at different sites. After the American Revolution, however, the city sought to consolidate this activity in one location and chose the present site, which was then a creek and marsh extending from Meeting Street to the Cooper River, briefly designated Canal or Channel . . . — Map (db m67430) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — 1948 — Charleston Gas Light Company
This Building, erected in 1878 by the Charleston Gas Light Company, A pioneer in Public Service, was Designed by Edward Brickell White Soldier-Engineer-Architect The South Carolina Power Company is the outgrowth of the Charleston gas Light Company, The oldest member body in its corporate history, which was founded 102 years ago on December 18, 1846. Placed by the South Carolina Power Company 1948 Approved by The Historical Commission of Charleston, S.C. — Map (db m19218) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Charleston Harbor — Charleston Waterfront Park
[Panel 1:] Seventeenth Century Charles Town, named for Charles II, was settled in 1670, a few miles north of this site, on the west bank of the Ashley River It was the capital of the Colony of the Carolinas. In 1671, the Lords Proprietors ordered a fort nearer the sea be laid out on Oyster Point at the juncture of the Ashley and Cooper Rivers, where there was a “bold landing” for ships. Charles Town moved to its present site in 1680 as one of America’s . . . — Map (db m30528) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Charleston Waterfront
↑ Fort Moultrie 1776 First complete victory in Revolution ↑ Fort Sumter 1829 Longest Siege in warfare 1863-186 ↑ Fort Johnson 1704 First shot in Civil War ←   Castle Pickney 1794 ←   Cooper River Formerly Wando – Renamed 1672 ---------- English settled here       1670 Spanish-French Siege       1706 Stefe Bonnet, pirate and his crew buried here       1716 First Independent flag       1765 First victory over British       1776 Captured by British       . . . — Map (db m67961) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — 10 77 — Cigar Factory / “We Shall Overcome”
Cigar Factory This five-story commercial building, built in 1882 as a textile mill, was known as the Charleston Manufacturing Company, then Charleston Cotton Mills, in its early years. Leased to the American Tobacco Company in 1903, the plant was sold to that company in 1912. Popularly called “the Cigar Factory,” it produced cigars such as Cremo and Roi~Tan until it closed in 1973. The Cigar Factory was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1980. “We . . . — Map (db m67363) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Citadel Flag
This flag flies every day and night as a tribute to those great Americans who are Prisoners of War or Missing in Action and to remind each member of the South Carolina Corps of Cadets of the sacrifices made by Citadel alumni as well as all American servicemen and women in the cause of freedom. Dedicated this day 16 September 2005 The Citadel Class of 1964 — Map (db m67974) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — City Hall
This building, designed by Gabriel Manigault and built in 1801 for the Charleston branch of The First Bank of the United States, Stands upon the site which was set apart as a market place in 1672 and used for that purpose until 1796 when the old "Beef Market", as the place was then known, was destroyed by fire...purchased by the city in 1818, it has been occupied as the City Hall since that time. . . . . . . . . . . — Map (db m19539) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — City Market
Here was erected between 1788 and 1804 a public market on land ceded to City Council by Charles Cotesworth Pinckney Et Al...work of filling in low ground and creek completed in 1807; and six blocks of buildings constucted extending from Meeting Street to the Cooper River: in order, the beef market, three buildings for vegetables, fruit and other provisions, a market for small meats, and the fish market. . . . . . . . . . . Market Hall erected 1841, now houses the Confererate Museum — Map (db m19178) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Civil War Torpedo Boatmen Memorial
In Memory of The Supreme Devotion of Those Heroic Men Of the Confederate Army and Navy First in Marine Warfare To Employ Torpedo Board 1863 - 1865 Moved by The Lofty Faith That With Them Died Crew After Crew Volunteered For Enterprises of Extremest Peril In the Defenses of Charleston Harbor ————— Of More than Thirty Men Drowned in this Desperate Service The Names of but Sixteen are Known Lost in Charleston Harbor 15 October . . . — Map (db m47493) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Clark Mills Studio
Clark Mills Studio has been designated a Registered National Historic Landmark under the provisions of the Historic Sites Act of August 21, 1935. This site possesses exceptional value in commemorating or illustrating the history of the United States U.S. Department of the Interior National Park Service 1966 — Map (db m27516) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Col. Othneil Beale's House99 - 101 East Bay — C. 1723 - 1740
Othneil Beale, sea Captain from New England, Colonel of Provincial Troops, Engineer, Successful merchant, built this house about 1740, with ground floors for mercantile use, and living rooms above Finely Cypress Paneled. The previous owners, Justice and Mrs. Lionel K. Legge, who purchased it in 1931 were the Pioneers in Restoring this block of East Bay, then a slum, after a lapse of six years, others inspired by their example, carried the restoration forward, and house by house this degraded . . . — Map (db m19665) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Col. William Rhett House54 Hasell Street — circa 1712-1720
This residence was constructed by Col. William Rhett (1666-1722), a prominent Charleston merchant and colonial militia leader. In 1706 he led a small fleet of local ships that repulsed a combined French and Spanish invasion of the city. Rhett is perhaps best remembered for his capture of the pirate Stede Bonnet in 1718. Considered one of the oldest houses in Charleston, this two story stuccoed brick residence was originally squarish in plan, a layout typical of early Charleston houses. An . . . — Map (db m31849) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — College of Charleston
College of Charleston Has been designated a Registered National Historic Landmark Under the provisions of the Historic Sites Act of August 21, 1935 This site possesses exceptional value in Commemorating or Illustrating the History of the United States U.S. Department of the Interior National Park Service 1972 — Map (db m54752) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Colonel John Stuart Housecirca 1767
National Historic Landmark Born 1718, Inverness, Stuart was related to Scottish Royality. Educated in London, he circumnavigated the globe aboard Centurion, Adm. Lord Anson commanding, capturing the Spanish treasure galleon, De Cavodonga, in 1743; he arrived in Charleston 1748. Appointed Crown Superintendent of Indian Affairs in the South, he conducted the Congress of Augusta, 1763, and missions to the Florida tribes. As a Loyalist, he was forced to . . . — Map (db m48065) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Colonel William Rhett
Colonel William Rhett, born in London in 1666, arrived at Charles Towne in 1694. In 1712 he built and lived at 54 Hasell Street, thought to be Charleston's oldest dwelling. A capable military man and sea Captain, he was commissioned a Vice Admiral by the governor of Carolina to command a naval defense that repelled the Franco-Spanish invasion in 1706 and captured pirate Stede Bonnet in 1718. Rhett rose in the miltiia to Lt. General in 1719. Amoung numerous public . . . — Map (db m47931) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Confederate Defenders of CharlestonFort Sumter 1861-1865
To The Confederate Defenders Of Charleston — Fort Sumter 1861-1865 (Around bottom of base:) Count Them Happy Who For Their Faith And Their Courage Endured A Great Fight — Map (db m53879) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Controlling the Harbor
Confederate control of Fort Sumter, Fort Moultrie, and supporting fortifications kept Charleston Harbor open despite the blockade by Union ships. The main ship channel passed directly in front of you, between Fort Sumter and Fort Moultrie, within range of their powerful guns. Confederates built floating booms of timber and rope between the two forts, placed mines in the channel, and drove pilings into the channel bottom. Friendly ships could pass through a narrow opening in the barrier. . . . — Map (db m30702) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Convention on Ratification
South Carolina voted to ratify the Federal Constitution in this building on May 23, 1788. Among the 100 members of the Convention on Ratification were Charles Pinckney, Charles Cotesworth Pinckney, and John Rutledge, three of the four South Carolinians who had served as delegates to the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia. — Map (db m50479) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Cooper - O'Conner House
circa 1855 During the last months of the Civil War, several Union officers were confined by the Confederacy in this house. As retaliation for this imprisonment, President Lincoln moved six hundred Confederate prisoners from Fort Delaware to the stockade at Morris Island where they were under the fire of Confederate guns. Photographs taken after the occupation of Federal forces, show surrounding homes in ruin but not one shell fell on 180 Broad. — Map (db m51783) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — County of Charleston Historic Courthouse
Originally built in 1753 as statehouse of British Royal Government Partially destroyed by fire in 1788 Rebuilt in 1792 with third floor addition Restored to 1792 appearance in 2001 by Charleston County — Map (db m27454) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — County of Charleston Historic Courthouse
Originally built in 1753, the building was constructed as South Carolina's first and only colonial Statehouse. From 1756 to 1788, the Statehouse was the seat of the Royal British Governor, the Colonial Assembly and the central meeting place for South Carolina politics. Struck by fire in 1788, the two-story structure was partially destroyed. The foundation and some exterior walls were preserved and used in the rebuilding effort that begun in 1790. The structure was expanded to include a third . . . — Map (db m47994) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — County of Charleston Historic Courthouse
Originally built in 1753 as Statehouse of British Royal Government Partially destroyed by fire in 1788 Rebuilt in 1792 with third floor addition Restored to 1792 appearance in 2001 by Charleston County — Map (db m50431) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Crime & Punishment: “Tyed to the Usual Tree”
What constitutes a crime? In early Charles Towne, the majority of prosecuted crimes involved slander against the government, or actions that endangered the colony or threatened its profit. This differed from New England colonies, where religious or moral laws ruled daily life. A harsh, yet common, punishment was to tie the offender to “the usual tree” where lashes were “well laid on the naked back.” Lesser offenders received time in the stocks or pillory, while some . . . — Map (db m67892) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Daniel Huger Housec. 1760
Handsome Georgian "Double House" constructed of brick but covered by stucco after 1886 earthquake. Drawing room has handsome ceiling plaster work decorations and carved overmantel with ionic pilasters. Residence of last Royal Governor Lord William Campbell, whose flight ended era of Royal rule. Daniel Elliot Hugar aquired the house from his uncle in 1818, and it has ever since remained property of Huger family. LaFayette was entertained here in 1825. — Map (db m47909) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Daniel Ravenel II House
. . . — Map (db m27512) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — David Ramsay Housec. 1740
Notable for its fine Georgian paneling, this was home and office to Dr. David Ramsay, the distinguished patriot, Revolutionary Historian and physician. Dr. Ramsay introduced the Small Pox vaccine to Charleston and helped found the Medical Society of South Carolina. He lived and worked here from 1773 until his death in 1815. — Map (db m27447) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Dewar-Lee-Pringle HouseCharleston Historic District
The National Register of Historic Places South Carolina Department of Archives And History Dewar-Lee-Pringle House Charleston Historic District — Map (db m50212) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Dr. Henry WoodwardCa. 1646 - 1687
Henry Woodward played a vital role in the success of Charles Towne. He spoke several Indian languages, had lived with a Carolina tribe for almost two years and often acted as an ambassador for the colonists among the Native Americans. Without Dr. Woodward’s language and diplomatic skills, the fledgling colony of Carolina might not have survived. “That no body can be so helpful to our settlement in that part as you, and our planters till they have learnt the Natives language and get . . . — Map (db m67906) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Dr. Joseph Johnson House  56 Society Street
circa 1840 This substantial three-story Greek Revival Period Charleston single house is constructed of stucco-covered brick and features a two-tiered piazza with Tuscan columns and turned balusters, piazza screen and entrance door complete with pilasters, multi-pane rectangular transom, and entry hood surmounted on acanthus leaf brackets, and flat roof with parapet and corbelled brick cornice. By the late 19th century the kitchen building was connected to the main house with a hyphen. . . . — Map (db m51485) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Dr. Thomas Dale House73 Church Street
. . . — Map (db m47929) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Dr. Vincent Le Seigneur House38 Church Street — circa 1812
This three and one half story stuccoed masonry Adamesque single house with a two tiered piazza was constructed between September of 1811 and June of 1812 by George Keenan, a grocery merchant. The house was purchased in 1814 by Dr. Vincent Le Seigneur, a native of Caen, Normandy, who significantly improved the property. Dr. Le Seigneur emigrated to Charleston in 1793 as a refugee from the Santo Dominigan slave revolution. Dr. Le Seigneur was noted for operating a hospital for slaves known . . . — Map (db m47588) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Dr. William Cleland's Housecirca 1732
This early Georgian single house was apparently built by George Ducat, a shipwright, for his daughter Margaret, on her second marriage in 1732, to Dr. William Cleland, of Crail, Scotland. This section of Tradd Street is one of the few within the original fortified city which escaped the disastrous fires of the 18th-century, and it contains a notable group of early houses. — Map (db m39321) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — 10-14 — Drayton Hall / Drayton Family
Drayton Hall Seat of the Drayton family for seven generations, this land was acquired in 1738 by John Drayton (c. 1759~1779) as the center of his extensive indigo and rice planting ventures. One of the finest examples of Georgian Palladian architecture in America, this is the only surviving colonial plantation house on the Ashley River. Drayton Family This distinguished South Carolina family included among its members William Henry Drayton . . . — Map (db m13859) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — 71000749 — DuBose Heyward House
Has Been Designated a Registered National Historic Landmark Under the Provisions of the Historic Sites Act of August 21, 1935 This Site Possesses Exceptional Value in Commemorating or Illustrating the History of the United States U.S. Department of the Interior National Park Service 1972 — Map (db m50797) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Edgar Wells Housecirca 1730
In the 1780s, it was owned and occupied by Dr. George Hahnbaum, physician to the German fusiliers and later a founder of the Medical Society of South Carolina. The trajectory of a cannon ball can be traced through the timbers of the house. — Map (db m47970) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Edward Rutledge
Signer of the Declaration of Independence Placed by Descendants of the Signers of the Declaration of Independence, Inc. — Map (db m67962) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Electrical Engineering Milestone
First Central Station in South Carolina The United States Electric Illuminating Company of Charleston started up South Carolina's first central station for incandescent electric lighting in this building October 1882 . This was just one month after Thomas Edison opened his central station on New York City's Pearl Street. In the following years, the pioneering firm United States Electric was one of Edison's main competitors. — Map (db m49286) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Eleven - Inch Dahlgren Gun
This gun was salvaged from the wreck of the U.S.S. Keokuk. The Keokuk was part of a squadron of Federal ironclad ships that attacked Fort Sumter on April 7, 1863. — Map (db m19010) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Elizabeth Hutchinson Jackson
In memory of Elizabeth Hutchinson Jackson Mother of Andrew Jackson President of the U.S. 1829-1837 Who gave her life in the cause of independence while nursing Revolutionary soldiers in Charles Town and is buried in Charleston. — Map (db m27509) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Elizabeth Jackson
Near this spot is buried, Elizabeth Jackson, Mother of President Andrew Jackson, She gave her life cheerfully for the independence of her country, on an unrecorded date in Nov, 1781, and to her son Andy this advice: "Andy, never tell a lie, nor take what is not your own, nor sue for slander, settle those cases yourself." — Map (db m54621) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Elizabeth Timothy
On or near this spot “on the bay, near Vendue Range” Elizabeth Timothy in 1738, became the first woman newspaper publisher in America when she took control over publication of the South Carolina Gazette upon the death of her husband, Lewis Timothy. She continued to publish the paper until 1746 when her son, Peter Timothy, came of age and succeeded her. This plaque in her honor was erected March 14, 1981, by the Lowcountry chapter, Society of Professional . . . — Map (db m30019) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Emanuel A.M.E. Church
Founded 1818 by the Reverend Morris Brown Closed by State Law 1834. Reopened By The Reverend R.H. Cain 1865 Present Edifice Built By The Reverend L.R. Nichols 1891 Redecoration By The Reverend F.R. Veal 1949 The Right Reverend F.M. Reid, Bishop — Map (db m52077) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church
Bicentennal Historical Marker Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church Charleston, South Carolina Commemorating the unique ministry of South Carolina born bishops, elected in the first century of the Connection- Morris Brown, Daniel A. Payne, Henry M. Turner, Moses B. Salter, William D. Chappelle, William W. Beckett, with special recognition to Payne and Turner, two of the Bicentennial "Four Horsemen of the Liberation Church." Also remembering the 1822 . . . — Map (db m52010) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Emanuel AME Church110 Calhoun Street Constructed 1891
The oldest African Methodist Episcopal (A.M.E.) church in the south, Emanuel A.M.E. Church was organized as Hampstead Free African church in 1818 by Rev. Morris Brown. After seceding from the Methodist Church, Charlestonians organized three churches that were named collectively the "Bethal Circuit". Rev. Brown and other African-American ministers then sought to have the Hampstead Free African Church affiliated with Rev. Richard Allen's African Church movement in Philadelphia. In 1865 Bethel . . . — Map (db m51900) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Farmers and Exchange Bank
has been designated a National Historic Landmark This site possesses national significance in commemorating the history of the United States of America 1980 Heritage Conservation and Recreation Service United States Department of the Interior — Map (db m19673) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Fielding Home for Funerals(Formerly Julius P.L.Fielding, Undertaker)
In 1912, Julius P.L.Fielding established a funeral business on the northeastern corner of King and Queen Streets. In 1928, Julius acquired 122 Logan Street, a three-story Georgian style structure built in the 1700s with 12-inch thick exterior walls and unique Muntin Bar windows with 18 lite sash-nine/nine. The building was covered with stucco to cover the cracks in the bricks, equipped with earthquake rods and bolts and in 1948 or 1949, a seven-car garage was added. After his death on July 12, . . . — Map (db m51443) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Fireproof Building
The Fireproof Building has been designated a National Historic Landmark This site possesses National significance in commemorating the history of the united States of America 1974 National Park Service United States Department of the Interior — Map (db m27479) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — First Baptist Church1682 - 1982
Established September 25, 1682 Kittery, Maine Moved to this site, 1699 This building dedicated January, 1822 Designed by Robert Mills Time Capsule placed, 1983 to be opened, 2083 "To God be the Glory" — Map (db m47640) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — First Medical College of South Carolina Site
On this site stood the first building of the Medical College of South Carolina founded December 1823 by The Medical Society of South Carolina — Map (db m49282) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Flags of the Fort
The flags flying from the five shorter flagpoles that surround the American flag represent the flags flown over Fort Sumter during the Civil War. (Top Left): The First official flag of the Confederacy, known as the "Stars and Bars," or "First National," was raised in April 1861 when Southern forces occupied Fort Sumter at the start of the Civil War. (Lower Left): Flying at the far left, the United States flag with thirty-three stars was the flag of the Union garrison which . . . — Map (db m30817) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Fort Johnson
The First Shot Across the harbor directly in front of you lies Fort Johnson. From Fort Johnson came the shot that began the Civil War. If a Union soldier at Fort Sumter looked toward Fort Johnson at 4:30 a.m., April 12, 1861, he would have seen an ominous flash as a mortar fired. The shell arched high across the sky, and upon reaching Fort Sumter, burst almost directly overhead. That mortar shot from Fort Johnson was the signal for Confederate batteries around Charleston Harbor to open . . . — Map (db m30785) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Fort Moultrie
Fort Moultrie and Fort Sumter controlled Charleston Harbor. Fort Moultrie, on Sullivan's Island directly in front of you, had been an early harbor defense and was the site of Charleston's famous Revolutionary War palmetto-log fort. Fort Sumter was built here on a shoal opposite Fort Moultrie when America strengthened its seacoast defenses after the War of 1812. Charleston's narrow main ship channel passed between the two forts. Enemy ships venturing there would be trapped in a crossfire of . . . — Map (db m30856) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Fort Sumter 1861-65
On April 12, 1861, Confederate forces bombarded Fort Sumter and the Civil War began. The Federal garrison surrendered the next day and evacuated on the 14th, leaving the fort in Confederate hands. Throughout the Civil War Fort Sumter was the center of conflict as Union forces struggled to regain the fort and control of Charleston Harbor. Fort Sumter was subjected to a Union blockade, attacks by ironclad warships, and a twenty-two month siege, one of the longest in U.S. Military History. Heavy . . . — Map (db m30573) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Fort Sumter Bombarded
The lighthouse in the distance marks the southern tip of Morris Island. In July,1863, Union troops landed there and advanced two-thirds of the way up the island to a Confederate stronghold known as Battery Wagner. Unable to capture the battery by direct assault, they brought up heavy guns, and after two months drove the defenders out. Union artillerists then set up powerful siege batteries at Cummings Point (directly ahead of you) and from there shelled Fort Sumter at point-blank range, . . . — Map (db m30376) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Fort Sumter Bricks
Salvaged from the waters of the tidal zone around Fort Sumter, these bricks were placed in this wall 140 years after the beginning of the Civil War. April 12, 2001 — Map (db m67310) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Fort Sumter Today
The Fort Sumter that you see today bears little resemblance to the imposing, three tiered brick fort of 1861. The fort's present appearance is the result of more than 100 years of change. Bombardment, reconstruction, and renovation have reshaped the fort and extended its life. By the end of the Civil War in 1865, heavy shelling had reduced Fort Sumter to ruins. The fort was partially rebuilt in the 1870s, but many remnants of the original structure remain and can be seen throughout the fort . . . — Map (db m30624) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Fort Sumter Today
Fort Sumter, visible in the far distance of Charleston Harbor, looks very different today. Built after the War of 1812, its tow two tiers are gone, destroyed during the Civil War. The fort's center is now dominated by Battery Huger, a huge, black, concrete artillery emplacement, built in 1898-1899. The army used Fort Sumter for coastal defense until the end of World War II. Designated a National Monument in 1948, Fort Sumter today reflects one hundred years (1830s-1940s) of military activity. . . . — Map (db m47521) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Foundations of the Southern Plantation
The ruins of the Horry family home symbolize the Southern plantation system. Founded on this soil by the first colonists, the system flourished for generations, but ultimately crumbled. When the Lords Proprietors set up the colony, they copied the successful Barbadian plantation model. From Barbados to Carolina, large land-owners profited from the labor of enslaved Africans who built homes, cleared fields, planted seeds, and harvested crops. The Horry-Lucas mansion burned in 1865 near the . . . — Map (db m67878) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Foundations of the Southern Plantation
The ruins of the Horry family home symbolize the Southern plantation system. Founded on this soil by the first colonists, the system flourished for generations, but ultimately crumbled. When the Lords Proprietors set up the colony, they copied the successful Barbadian plantation model. From Barbados to Carolina, large land-owners profited from the labor of enslaved Africans who built homes, cleared fields, planted seeds, and harvested crops. The Horry-Lucas mansion burned in 1865 near the . . . — Map (db m67899) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Francis Salvador
Commemorating Francis Salvador 1747-1776 First Jew in South Carolina to hold public office and to die for American Independence He came to Charles Town from his native London in 1773 to develop extensive family landholdings in the frontier district of Ninety Six. As a deputy to the Provincial Congress of South Carolina, 1775 and 1776. He served with distinction in the creation of this state and nation, participating as a volunteer in an expedition against Indians and Tories, he was . . . — Map (db m27489) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Gedney Main Howe, Jr1914 - 1981
(Front) The man we honor and here remembered served his country in the time of war, his state in time of peace. In his beloved Charleston, he was the preeminent Trial Lawyer of the 20th Century, yet his reach was broader than the law. With his wit and charm, he was a loyal friend. With his genuine compassion, he was an eloquent counselor. With his tenacious courage, he was a lifelong champion of equal justice. With his generous heart, he made us . . . — Map (db m49760) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Genevieve Kanapaux McMahon"Aunt Gen" Playground
This playground is dedicated to the memory of "Aunt Gen" who lovingly coached and guided the boys and girls of the Hampton Park area for over twenty years. Her legacy exists in the children whose lives were forever enriched by her kindness and example. City of Charleston Playground Department Coach - Supervisor - Secretary 1942 - 1974 Hampton Park Alumni Association October 3, 1999 — Map (db m50261) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — George Eveleigh House
One of the few houses built about 1743 remaining in Charleston. It has the thick walls and finely paneled rooms typical of the period. The land on which it stands, granted in 1692, is in the area then known as White Point, bordering Vander Horst Creek (now Water Street). The property was conveyed to George Eveleigh in 1743. The house was bought in 1875 by R. Maynard Marshall in whose family it has remained. — Map (db m47612) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — George Washington Statue
George Washington was born in Virginia on February 22, 1732. As a boy, he excelled in field sports, and though his formal education was limited, he exhibited skill in mathematics and surveying. In the French and Indian War, though only 23, Colonel Washington demonstrated unflinching courage and extraordinary leadership while under fire. During the Revolutionary War, General Washington commanded the Continental Army against superior forces. He devised the strategy of . . . — Map (db m47791) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — German Confederate Soldier's Monument
(North face) In The Confederate Army the Soldiers Whom this Monument Commemorates Illustrated in Death as in Life The German's Devotion to Duty Beneath this monument, repose the remains of John A. Wagener, Born July 21, 1816, Died August 27, 1876 (South face) Names of Battles and Engagements, in which either the German Artillery- Company A, the German Arttillery Company B, The German Volunteers, Hampton Legion, or the . . . — Map (db m40748) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Ghost Structure
Often the details of the past are shrouded in mystery. Archeologists and historians have to weave together an interpretation based on limited evidence. In the case of this structure, archaeology revealed size but not appearance. The frame of timbers before you marks the outline, or “ghost” of the structure. The size and shape of the corner posts are based on archaeological evidence. The settlers raised this building by putting round corner posts directly into the ground, a . . . — Map (db m67923) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Glover - Sottile House
C. 1775 and 1826 This splendid mansion was built in 1826 by Dr. Joseph Glover, a noted Charleston physician, utilizing the service wing of an older house of about 1775. In 1906 it was purchased by the Cavaliere Giovanni Sottile, Consul for ltaly, whose family served it. It is an impressive example of the Regency style of architecture. (Upper Plaque) This structure has been recorded by the Historic American Buildings Survey of the United States . . . — Map (db m51308) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Gorge Wall
Fort Sumter was designed with its strength toward the sea. The gorge, the lightly-armed rear wall facing inland, was vulnerable to attack from Morris Island. Early shelling left the gorge wall in ruins. Continued bombardment reduced the gorge to rubble, but Confederate soldiers and slaves reinforced the debris with sandbags and cotton bales, creating an earthwork that made the fort stronger than ever. — Map (db m30919) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — H.L. Hunley
On the night of February 17, 1864, the H.L. Hunley set out from Sullivan's Island, directly in front of you, with a torpedo attached to a seventeen-foot spar on her bow. Her target was the U.S.S. Housatonic, anchored four miles offshore. A Union lookout spied the suspicious object moving toward the ship and sounded the alarm. Engines started, but before the ship could move away an explosion ripped through the Housatonic's wooden hull and she quickly sank. The H.L. . . . — Map (db m30699) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — H.M.S. Seraph
The submarine memorialized by this monument, has a uniquely distinguished record, and many of her most fascinating exploits involved Americans. Embodied in this memorial are the Seraph's fore hatch, steering and plane wheels, her ship's bell and badge, and her periscope. Seraph is well remembered for her role in the secret entry into North Africa of Gen. Mark W. Clark when he headed a spy team which made a clandestine rendezvous with Free French leaders there in the critical days of 1942 . . . — Map (db m6898) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — 10-70 — Hampstead Cemetery
(Front) A cemetery established here in 1841, also known as “God’s Acre” and later “the German Cemetery,” was maintained by St. Matthews Evangelical Lutheran Church until about 1860. That church, founded in 1840 by the rapidly-growing community of Germans in Charleston, was originally the German Evangelical Church of Charleston. Its founders purchased land here for a cemetery shortly before they built their church at the corner of Anson and Hasell Streets. . . . — Map (db m44096) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — 10-71 — Hampton Park Terrace
(Front text) Hampton Park Terrace, an early 20th-century planned suburb, was laid out in 1912 along Huger Street between Rutledge and Hagood Aves. Its success coincided with the economic boom that following the opening of the Charleston Navy Yard in 1901. It was also aided by its location immediately south of Hampton Park, a large municipal park built on the site of the 1901-02 Charleston and West-Indian Exposition. (Reverse text) Developers praised “the . . . — Map (db m56564) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Harleston Boags Funeral Home
The National Register of Historic Places South Carolina Department of Archives And History Charleston Old E. Historic District Harleston Boags Funeral Home (Lower Plaque) Harleston - Boags Funeral Home (Formerly Harleston Funeral Home) Celebrating 100 Years Founded in 1896 by Edwin Gailliard Harleston and Robert Harleston as Harleston Brothers Funeral Home at 255 Meeting Street. In 1914 Edwin Gailliard Harleston moved his Funeral Home to 121 . . . — Map (db m51484) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Harnessing the Wind
The “motor” of a sailing ship is its masts and rigging, which hold canvas sails to catch the power of the wind. Skilled captains manipulated different sails to harness any available breeze. A favorable tailwind would fill the large main sails and propel the boat over the sea. A less desirable crosswind required the angled jib and staysails for conversion into forward progress. Because shallow, rounded hulls traded speed and maneuverability for shallow-water access, the . . . — Map (db m67959) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Harth-Middleton Housec. 1797
John Harth, planter and lumber merchant, built this handsome house at his lumber yards, then at the end of the south bay, in 1797. In 1816, he sold the house to Henry Augustus Middleton, who enlarged it, and whose family continued to own it until 1917. The notable garden was created after the extension of South Battery by the boulevard land fill. — Map (db m39312) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Henry Timrod
[South side]: Born in Charleston, S.C. December 8, 1829, Died in Columbia, S.C., October 6, 1867. [East side]: This memorial has been erected with the proceeds of the recent sale of very large editions of the author's poems by the Timrod Memorial Association of S.C. "Genius like Egypt's monarch timely wise erects its own memorial ere it dies." [North side]: Sleep sweetly in your humble graves Sleep martyrs, of a fallen cause Though yet no marble . . . — Map (db m27511) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Heyward-Washington House
[Upper Marker]: During His Visit to Charleston May 1791 the Guest of the Citizens President George Washington Was Entertained in This House ————— • ————— This Memorial Erected by a Daughter of the American Revolution A Charter Member Mrs Edward Willis May 1901 [Lower Marker]: Heyward-Washington House Has Been Designated a Registered National Historic Landmark . . . — Map (db m50452) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Hibernian Hall
Hibernian Society Founded March 17, 1801 Met in Corbett's Tavern until construction of this hall dedicated 1841. Long a civic life in disasters as in prosperity. Its presidents alternate Protestant and Catholic. — Map (db m27475) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Hints of Slave Row
In the clearing before you – although no visible signs remain – a row of six slave cabins may have stood. Written records reveal little about the slaves’ lives, but all plantations demanded hard field labor. Perhaps this row of small houses offered the comfort of community, if the overseer didn’t interfere. Despite their status, the slaves retained elements of their African culture, comprising distinct customs, language and religion. Slaves listed in the landowner’s will from . . . — Map (db m67903) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Historical Sketch
This site was the home of the Episcopal Church of the Redeemer. In 1745, Chief Justice of South Carolina Charles Pinckney purchased the property known as Collenton Square. In 1853 Miss Pinckney donated property for a chapel to be built where visiting sailors of all faiths could worship. In 1915, the chapel and the home for seaman were erected with funds donated by the Charleston Port Society and the Episcopal Church. The Episcopal Church of the Redeemer was consecrated in 1916 by Bishop Guercy. . . . — Map (db m19177) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Holding the Fort
Imagine being here in 1863, surrounded by Fort Sumter's ruins, when this shell (photo below) explodes on the parade ground. Throughout the Civil War the fort was the center of the bitter conflict to control Charleston Harbor. For nearly two years (1863-65) Confederate soldiers braved a night-and-day pounding from Union cannons. The Union guns reduced most of Fort Sumter to rubble, but the Confederate garrison refused to surrender. Daily dispatches from Fort Sumter in 1863 tell of the struggle: . . . — Map (db m30627) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Home of Doctor John Lining
Who made the first systematic weather observations with instruments in America January 1738-February 1753 In this building, which probably ante-dates the year 1715...Dr. Lining lived...made observations of the weather...and may have conducted his apothecary shop...It is certain that is has been used for this last purpose since 1780.... — Map (db m27473) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Home of Robert Limehouse
Built Circa 1820 Originally this area was Limehouse farmland. The small scale and sturdy appearance denote that it is older than its neighbors. The bold colonade of piazza columns give the house dignity and permanence. The exceptionally fine brickwork is laid in Flemish bond. The Egyptian design reflects interest in Napoleon’s Egyptian campaign. — Map (db m48870) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Huguenot Church
. . . — Map (db m27542) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Hurricane Hugo
On the night of September 21, 1989, Hurricane Hugo struck the South Carolina Lowcountry. During that night winds reached 125 miles per hour and a storm surge of 15 feet swept over nearby McClellanville. The eye of Hugo passed over Charleston at midnight. This devastating hurricane caused more than six billion dollars damage in South Carolina and left thousands homeless. The greatest cost was the twenty-six lives lost to the storm and its aftermath. This plaque is dedicated to their . . . — Map (db m19171) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — I. Jenkins Mikell Housec. 1854
This is one of the last grand antebellum houses of Charleston built by Edisto Island cotton planter, I. Jenkins Mikell. He adopted design sophistication and colour of an Italian villa unusual in Charleston. Notice the Jupiter or rams heads on capitals of columns. It served as Charleston County Library for many years. The present owner has carefully restored it to the grandeur it deserves. — Map (db m54714) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — In Need of an Ally
The Kiawah chief, or Cassique, invited the new English settlers to build their village here at Albemarle Point. The arrangement had immediate benefits for both the Kiawah and the English. The Kiawah often fought against the Westos, an aggressive tribe who lived along the Savannah River. The Westos used European guns to raid other tribes’ coastal villages. With help from the English settlers – and their English guns – the Kiawah could better defend themselves against their longtime . . . — Map (db m67873) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — In Search of the Walled City
Rediscovering the Old Wall The old city wall remained buried and forgotten until traces of Granville Bastion were discovered at 40 East Bay Street in the 1920s. In the 1960s a portion of the Half Moon Battery was discovered in the basement of the Old Exchange Building. This is the only section of the wall on view to the public. Today, thanks to increased public awareness, underground wall “sightings” are reported regularly by road and utility crews and homeowners. The . . . — Map (db m67434) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — In Trust
We don’t own any land and we don’t own any house. God has given it to us in trust, to make into something better during our lifetime.” – Ferdinanda Waring, upon selling this property to the state. Ferdinanda Legare Waring transformed Old Towne Plantation into a place of magnificent beauty. She inherited a portion of Old Town and bought out family members by the late 1930s. Employees from her flower business and egg farm helped her cultivate the beautiful . . . — Map (db m67931) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — 10-69 — Institute Hall / "The Union Is Dissolved!"
Institute Hall Institute Hall, built here in 1854, stood until 1861. An Italianate building, it was designed by Jones and Lee for the South Carolina Institute, a progressive organization promoting "art, ingenuity, mechanical skill, and industry." The Grand Hall, Charleston's largest public space, seated 3,000 and hosted fairs, exhibits, concerts, and conventions. It hosted the 1860 Democratic convention, which split over the mention of slavery in the party platform. "The Union is . . . — Map (db m39371) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Ironclads Attack
On April 7, 1863, the Union Navy sent its new force of ironclad warships - eight monitors and the frigate New Ironsides - to attack Fort Sumter. The ironclads attacked from the water directly in front of you. As the Union fleet approached, Confederate shots poured onto the ironclads. Pounded by Forts Moultrie and Sumter, and batteries on Morris Island and Sullivan's Island, the fleet retreated after two hours. Union commander Rear Admiral Samuel Du Pont decided not to renew the attack: . . . — Map (db m30708) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Jacob Motte Housecirca 1731
Standing on land bought from Robert Tradd, which was part of lot 60 of "Grand Modell" of 1672. Early Georgian house built by Jacob Motte, prominent Huguenot and one time royal treasurer of province. Original paneling from second floor living room is in city arts museum of St. Louis. Remainder of house has original paneling. — Map (db m39320) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — James Francis Byrnes1879 – 1972
Charlestonian by birth, this great statesman served his country as Congressman (1911-25); Senator (1931-41); Supreme Court Justice (1941-43); Head of WWII Office of Economic Development (1942-43); Director of War Mobilization where he was generally regarded as Special Assistant to the President (1943-45): Secretary of State (1945-47); and finally, Governor of South Carolina (1951-55). Dedicated May 1995 — Map (db m68305) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — James Verree Housec. 1754
This Pre-Revolutionary single house is one of a group of three dwellings including 56 and 60 Church Street built c. 1754 by James Verree, a house carpenter. The Verree House was purchased in 1784 by Thomas Heyward, a signer of the Declaration of Independence. The garden was designed by noted landscape architect Loutrel Briggs in 1942 and was considered his favorite garden. — Map (db m47614) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Jenkins Orphanage
In 1891 the Reverend Daniel J. Jenkins established a home and school for poor, black orphans and for children of poor, distressed and disabled parents. It was his desire "to train the minds and hands of young, black boys and girls so that they could better equip themselves to be productive." Originally located at 660 King Street, in 1885 it was removed here to the Marine Hospital to make space for an enrollment that soon reached 536. During its history the orphange operated a 100 acre farm, a . . . — Map (db m48701) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — John Caldwell Calhoun
Born March March 18, 1732; Died March 32, 1850. ---------- Representative in the Legislature; Member of Congress; United States Senate Secretary of War; Vice President; Secretary of State. Erected by the State of South Carolina A.D. 1884. — Map (db m67970) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — John Cordes Prioleau House68 Meeting Street — circa 1810
This property, originally known as Town Lot Number 54 of the Grand Modell of Charles Town, was granted by the Lords Proprietors to William Jones March 23, 1682. In 1808, the property was purchased by John Cordes Prioleau, a wealthy planter. Madame Rosalie Acelie Tongo’s School for Young Ladies was located here from 1855 to 1862. After 1882, it was the home of Dr. Charles U. Sheppard, who is noted for his efforts to establish tea production in the Lowcountry. The current appearance of this . . . — Map (db m27461) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — John Fullerton House
Architect - Builder - Owner c. 1772 Georgian period Built of Cypress, Charleston single house design. Drawing room Mantle by Thomas Elfe. Quarters for British junior officers of Clinton's and Cornwallis staffs. Legends: Ghost which continues to appear: Duel with pistols from upstairs window to upper porch of 14 Legare St.: Indian peering in first floor window attracted by sound of spinet. — Map (db m47766) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — John McCall House66 Church Street — Circa 1784
First granted to Thomas Rose by the Lords Proprietors in 1681 and delineated as Lot 64 of the Grand Modell, this lot was part of the early walled city of Charleston. A brick house was initially built on the property that survived the fire of 1740 but was lost in the Great Fire of 1778. The present house, built circa 1784, was owned by John McCall (1741-1800), a Revolutionary War captain who commanded the Grenadier Company of the Charles Town Regiment. After the war he worked as an . . . — Map (db m47632) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — John McKee HouseCC 1796
Built on Lot No. 213 as shown on the "Grand Model" was owned and occupied in the late 18th century by John McKee, early Charleston brick mason. — Map (db m47966) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — John P. Grace Tower
The John P. Grace Memorial Bridge Named to Commemorate The former Mayor of Charleston And President of the Cooper River Bridge CO. The Grace Bridge (Modeled Here) Spanned Charleston from 1929 to 2005. Built by the Cooper River Bridge Company Designed by Waddell and Hardesty Constructed by McClintic-Marshall Co. Demolished by Jay Cashman Inc / Testa Corp. Steel for this model Came from the old Bridge — Map (db m19216) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — 10-12 — John Rutledge Home
This house, built before the American Revolution, was the residence of John Rutledge (1739-1800), first Governor of the State of South Carolina. He was President of South Carolina, 1776-78, and Governor, 1779-82, signer of the U. S. Constitution, 1787, Chief Justice of South Carolina 1791-95, and Chief Justice of the United States, 1795. The house was altered in 1853 by P. H. Hammarskold, who added the ornamental iron. — Map (db m27466) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Johnson's Row22-28 Queen Street — circa 1803
These notable stuccoed brick tenements were constructed as rental property in 1803 by the William Johnson family. William Johnson, Sr., originally from New York, was a blacksmith and planter revered at his death as a patriot having served in the Continental Congress. His son, Johnson, Jr., born in Charleston and educated at Princeton, was, at his death, an associate justice of the U.S. Supreme Court. Johnson's Row, as originally constructed, had a door and two windows at ground level. Queen . . . — Map (db m27544) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Jonathan Jasper Wright"First African American Supreme Court Justice In The United States"
(Left panel) Born in Luzerne County Pennsylvania - Son of Runaway Slaves - Grew up in Springfield, Pennsylvania and was privately tutored and mentored by a Presbyterian minister who was active in the anti-slavery movement. Educated in Common Schools of Pennsylvania and Lancasterian Academy, Ithaca, N.Y. Read Law in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania for years in local law office and the office of a judge, and was later admitted to the practice of law in August of 1866, making him the . . . — Map (db m52037) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Joseph Verree House47 Church Street — circa 1767
Joseph Verree, a prosperous Charleston master carpenter, constructed this two-and-one-half story Georgian single house circa 1767. It occupies the southernmost part of Town Lot No. 77 of the "Grand Modell of Charles Town," the original plan of the city. The house is noted for its two-story curved piazza and finely detailed door surround at the main entrance. The rear addition was added in 2000. Verree, an active participant in the American Revolution, was one of 26 "mechanicks of the city" . . . — Map (db m47613) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Josiah Flagg1763~1816
In this Churchyard is Buried Josiah Flagg 1763~1816 First native born American to make dentistry his life work and the first to carry to any foreign land evidence of American Dental Progress. Soldier in the American Revolution, sailor in the War of 1812, died in Charleston September 16, 1816. — Map (db m49764) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Judge Robert Pringle House
1774 A Private Residence The builder of this outstanding handsome "single" house was a native of Scotland, an eminent merchant of Charleston, and a provincial lay judge who helped to open the Revolution by resisting the Stamp Act. His residence situated on Lots 87 and 88 of the Grand Model of 1672 is remarkable for its fine proportions and beautiful decorations; also because in its long history it has belonged to only two family connections besides his. The current owner's . . . — Map (db m47950) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Kahal Kadosh Beth Elohim( Holy Congregation House of God )
Founded 1750 The Cradle of Reformed Judaism In The United States, 1824 Jews who settled in Charleston as early as 1695 worshipped informally until the founding of this congregation in 1750. First synagogue on this site, 1780-1792, was a converted cotton gin. A second built 1793, was burned in 1838. The Sunday School begun in 1838 was the second Jewish Sunday School in the United States. The The present synagogue, designed by C.L. Warner and built by David Lopez, 1840, is the . . . — Map (db m52396) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — #78002499 — Kahal Kadosh Beth Elohim
. . . — Map (db m52964) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Kornahrens-Guenveur House
C. 1884 Built by John H. Kornahrens, soda water manufacturer who used timber from an original house on the lot built circa 1772 by John Delke', a tanner. Owned and occupied since 1925 by Edward Leon Guenveur, Sr., a plumbing contractor and his family. Restored in 1972 by his daughter, Louise and her husband, Wm. A. Streat, Jr. Architect. Map (db m54433) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Laurens - Rutledge House117 Broad Street
This Georgian style residence was built for James Laurens (1728-1784) by Charleston architect-builders Miller & Fullerton on property once part of Dr. Samuel Carne's 18th century orange garden. Laurens was a Charleston merchant and the brother of Henry Laurens, President of the Continental Congress from 1777-1778. Edward Rutledge (1749-1800) purchased the property in 1788. Rutledge, a prominent Charleston lawyer, was a representative from South Carolina to the First and Second Continental . . . — Map (db m27467) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Lee Cohen Harby
In Memory of Lee Cohen Harby 1849 - 1918 Who by Her Patriotic and Untiring Efforts Secured This Building for The Daughters of the American Revolution of South Carolina As a Gift from the United States Government May 9, 1917 ——— — Map (db m50454) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Lucius Mendel Rivers
(Left Panel) South Carolinian Born in Berkley County September 28 1905 Died at Birmingham Alabama December 28 1970 He spoke for his neighbors and strove to keep his country strong (Right Panel) Statesman and Patriot S.C. House of Representatives 1933  1936 U.S. House of Representatives 1941  1970 Chairman House Armed Services Committee 1965  1970 — Map (db m47803) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Magnolia Plantation — 1676
Fountainhead of the Drayton family, which played so important a part in America's Colonial, Revolutionary, and Independence history. Its original plantation house, credited by contemporary historians as having been the earliest in the Carolina colony, along with its famous garden, now America's oldest, were built by Thomas Drayton in the 1680's. It remains a working plantation utilizing scores of workers, and is still owned and operated by a direct family descendent. — Map (db m14853) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Major General Charles Cotesworth Pinckney
One of the Founders of the American Republic Born February 25, 1746, Charleston Member of Provincial Assembly 1769 District Attorney General for South Carolina 1773 Member of Provincial Congress 1775 Officer of the Continental Army 1775 Prisoner of War 1780-82 Delegate to the Constitutional Convention 1787 Signatory of the United States Constitution Minister to France during the XYZ Affair 1796 "Millions for defense not a cent for tribute" A Founder of South . . . — Map (db m47718) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Major Peter Bocquet's Housec.1770
Peter Bocquet the younger built this house shortly after the lot was given to him in July, 1770, by his father Peter Bocquet, senior, a Huguenot immigrant. The younger Bocquet became a major in the Revolutionary forces, a member of the General Assembly, a Privy Councilor and later State Treasurer and Commissioner of Sequestrated Estates. He planted in St. Paul's Parish. The superbly handsome Georgian decoration of the interior is notably like that of Col. John Stuart's . . . — Map (db m27446) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Major Robert Anderson
In honor of Major Robert Anderson and the one-one-hundred-twenty-eight men of his command who for thirty-four hours April Twelve-Thirteen, Eighteen-hundred-sixty-one withstood the destructive bombardment of Fort Sumter and withdrew with the honors of war • the War of Secession began here. Erected under the bequest of E.M.C.A. Lawton A daughter of Major Anderson accepted by Act of Congress Approved May 11, 1928 — Map (db m30760) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Marion SquareNamed in Honor of — General Francis Marion
At the time of the Revolution the town-gates stood near this spot across what is now King Street, originally the high way into Charles Town and formerly called the "Broad Path". In 1780 these gates were enclosed in the "Horn-Work", the post of honor in the city's land defenses extending from river to river and known as "The Lines". The "Tobacco Inspection" - warehouses established for the inspection and storage of tobacco before exportation - stood north of the square between Tobacco and Hutson . . . — Map (db m30197) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — 10-33 — Maryville
The town of Maryville, chartered in 1886, included the site of the original English settlement in S.C. and the plantation owned by the Lords Proprietors 1670-99. When the old plantation was subdivided into lots and sold to local blacks in the 1880s, they established a town named for educator and community leader Mary Mathews Just (d.1902). Though Maryville was widely seen as a model of black "self-government," the S.C. General Assembly revoked the town charter in 1936. — Map (db m16283) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — McDonnell F-4C Phantom II
This gallant aircraft served with the 12th tactical fighter wing stationed at Cam Ranh Bay Air Base, South Vietnam. In the 1968-69 time frame it was assigned to Captain E.G. Shuler, Jr. (now Major General), Citadel Class of 1959 and First Lieutenant J.W. Reed. They flew the aircraft on many combat missions and General Shuler’s wife’s name adorns the nose. The aircraft’s last assignment was with the Texas Air National Guard’s 149th Fighter Interceptor Group at Ellington Air Force Base, Texas. . . . — Map (db m67977) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Miles Brewton House
Outstanding example of Georgian architecture in America. Built between 1765 and 1769 by Miles Brewton, Revolutionary patriot, with designs of Ezra Waite, architect. Inherited 1775 by Brewton’s sister, Rebecca Motte, Revolutionary heroine, in whose family it has remained. British headquarters 1780-1782 under Clinton and Rawdon. Federal Headquarters 1865. — Map (db m47969) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Mining Casemate
This concrete casemate was added to the fort in 1891. It was was the control room for an electrically operated minefield, which was placed in the main shipping channel to prevent the entrance of enemy vessels into the harbor. Long cables connected the mines to an electrical panel mounted inside. On orders from the observation officers, any number of the powerful mines could be detonated. — Map (db m30935) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Mixed Results
Carolina was meant to make money for the Lords Proprietors who received this land from England’s King Charles II. Across the creek from where you stand, forty acres were cleared and experimental crops were planted in a quest for agricultural wealth. Badly misjudging the climate, the Lords hoped to raise exotics like sugarcane, which was enriching landowners in Barbados. However, profitable crops proved elusive and the Proprietors soon focused on trade with native peoples, abandoning the . . . — Map (db m67882) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Moore-Trapman-Wragg HouseCharleston Historic District
The National Register of Historic Places South Carolina Department of Archives And History Moore-Trapman-Wragg House Charleston Historic District — Map (db m50209) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Morris Island — 3/4 Mile South
Site of three Confederate batteries in the initial attack, 1861. Confederate forces evacuated the island September 7, 1863, after a 58-day siege. Federal batteries on Morris Island bombarded Fort Sumter from 1863 to 1865. — Map (db m19498) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Morris Island
Confederate batteries hidden in the dunes of Morris Island, directly in front of you, commanded the approach to Charleston Harbor. Union forces needed Morris Island, a key location from which to attack Fort Sumter, less than one mile away. On July 18, 1863, a direct assault failed against Fort Wagner, a Confederate stronghold near Morris Island's north end. The Union then changed tactics, subjecting Fort Wagner to a two-month siege. The Confederates finally evacuated, abandoning Morris Island . . . — Map (db m30811) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Moultrie
(West Face): This Monument represents the high esteem in which all who love freedom hold Charleston's native son, William Moultrie Born November 23, 1730, Moultrie served in the Royal Assembly from 1752 until 1773. He was Aide-de-Camp to Governor William Lyttleton in the 1759 offensive on the southern frontier to suppress pillaging by the Cherokee Nation. In 1760, Moultrie was promoted to captain in Colonel Thomas Middleton's Provincial Regiment and rose to further . . . — Map (db m19212) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Mountain Howitzer
Confederates used several field pieces like this 12-pounder mountain howitzer to defend against a surprise landing by Union forces. — Map (db m30739) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Nathaniel Russell House
Nathaniel Russell House has been designated a National Historic Landmark This site possesses national significance in commemorating the history of the United States of America 1974 National Park Service United States Department of the Interior — Map (db m39319) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Night Attack
This corner of the fort was the site of the only attempt by Union forces to storm Fort Sumter during the Civil War. On the night of September 8, 1863, a Union tugboat towed 500 sailors and marines in small boats to within 400 yards of Fort Sumter, then cast them loose to assault the fort. But the Confederates expected the attack. As the leading boats landed, the defenders opened fire, hurling grenades and bricks down upon the assailants. Guns of Fort Moultrie and the Confederate gunboat . . . — Map (db m30725) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Nine College Way
  For ninety-five years, five generations for the Follin family, including John A. Zeigler, Jr. the last member of the family to own the house, lived at Nine College Way. Mr Zeigler and Edwin Peacock operated The Book Basement, Charleston's only bookstore for many years, on the ground floor from 1946 until 1971. The College of Charleston acquired the home in 1971. This plaque is installed on this house in grateful recognition for the contributions of the Follin family and in . . . — Map (db m54417) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — 10-4 — Old Bank Building
Construction having begun in 1797, this building was occupied by the Bank of South Carolina on December 10, 1798, making it one of the oldest bank buildings in the U.S. It served as a bank until 1835. The Charleston Library Society used it 1835-1916. It was owned and occupied for the next fifty years by the Charleston Chamber of Commerce. In 1967 it reverted to its first use and became a bank again. — Map (db m27517) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — 10-72 — Old Bethel Methodist Church
(Front text) This church, built in 1797 in the meeting-house form, was dedicated in 1798 and completed in 1809. It is the oldest Methodist church standing in Charleston. Originally at the corner of Pitt and Calhoun Streets, Bethel Methodist Church was a congregation of white and black members, both free blacks and slaves. Many blacks left the church in 1833 during a dispute over seating. Though some later returned, many did not. (Reverse text) In 1852 the . . . — Map (db m49375) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Old Bethel United Methodist Church
Old Bethel United Methodist Church, the third oldest church building surviving in Charleston, had its beginnings on February 14, 1797 as Bethel Methodist Episcopal Church. Bethel was constructed in the gabled meeting house style with white clapboards after a design by Francis Asbury, the first Methodist bishop in the United States and was dedicated in 1798. The church was built forty feet by sixty feet and was named Bethel, the Hebrew word for the "house of God." It stood at the corner of Pitt . . . — Map (db m50297) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — 73001690 — Old Marine Hospital
Has Been Designated a National Historic Landmark This Site Possesses National Significance in Commemorating the History of the United States of America 1974 National Park Service United States Department of the Interior — Map (db m48278) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — On the Edge of an Empire
War between Spain and England ended 10 years before the founding of Charles Towne, but the hatred and mistrust between the two empires remained. In an era of empire building, Charles Towne’s existence directly challenged Spain’s claim on the land they called Chicora. The colonists implored the support of Lord Ashley against the Spanish threat: “We are here settled in the very chaps of the Spaniard . . . ” Aware of this eminent threat, the settlers prepared themselves for the . . . — Map (db m67887) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — One Broad Street
This building is one of America's finest crafted Italianate structures. First opened in 1853 as State Bank of South Carolina, it has survived Bombardment, Hurricanes and a Major Earthquake, and Twice been restored along its original plans - First in an extensive rebuilding after Civil War damage and second in a 1978-80 restoration. It has served as the Main Charleston Office of Bankers Trust since 1969. This site has been almost continuously occupied since the city's founding over . . . — Map (db m19668) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — One North Adger's Wharfcirca 1735-1750
In the 18th century the wharves along this area of the Cooper River served as a center of Charleston's important shipping industry, playing a vital role in the city's economic growth until early in the 20th century. North Adger's Wharf was originally known as Greenwood's Wharf. William Greenwood, a British merchant living in Charles Town, was one of the official consignees of tea taxed by Parliament under the Tea Act of 1773. Under pressure, Greenwood and other consignees allowed the hated . . . — Map (db m47927) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Ordinance of Secession
This Building stands on the site formerly occupied by S.C. Institute Hall where, on December 20, 1860, was signed and ratified the Ordinance of Secession Which withdrew the state of South Carolina from the Union and led to the formation of the Confederate States of America and to four years of war between the north and the south. The building was totally destroyed in the Conflagration of December 1861. — Map (db m19240) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — P.G.T. Beauregard
P.G.T. Beauregard General Commanding Confederate forces Charleston South Carolina Held this city and harbour inviolate against combined attacks by land and water 1863 1864 1865 — Map (db m27490) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Parker Drayton Housecirca 1800
Isacc Parker built the original house about 1800 when the waterside of the Ashley River lay along the garden. Colonel William Drayton greatly enlarged the house after 1816, and decorated in the Adam style from 1837 to 1899. Home of the notable family of Charles Manigualt. — Map (db m50240) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Passengers and Products
Welcome to Camden Tower Courtyard. This space and the warehouses you see along the walkway are a part of the William Aiken House and Associated Railroad Structures National Historic Landmark. This landmark includes the William Aiken House, located at 456 King Street, Camden Depot, Deans Warehouse, the South Carolina Railroad Warehouse located across Ann Street, Line Street Car and Carpenter Shops, and the Tower Passenger Depot. These structures are nationally important because of their role in . . . — Map (db m40001) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Philip Porcher House
Built about 1765 by Philip Porcher, loyalist. Confiscated during the Revolution, his property afterwards was returned and he was allowed to remain in this country because of his "Universal" good character. — Map (db m49008) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity
The first meeting of the Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity was held in this building then the home of Simon Fogarty on December 10, 1904. Founded by Simon Fogarty Andrew A. Krogg L. Harry Mixson All natives of Charleston and at the time students of the College of Charleston. — Map (db m47841) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Poinsett Tavern28 Elliott — circa 1732
Elisha Poinsett ———— Builder His descendant, Joel Roberts Poinsett one time Ambassador to Mexico, introduced the Poinsettia to the United States — Map (db m50482) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — 10-49 — Pollitzer House
(Front text) This was the home of sisters Carrie (1881-1974), Mabel (1885-1979), and Anita Pollitzer (1894-1975), longtime activists for women’s rights. Anita, an artist and wife of press agent Elie C. Edson, played a pivotal role in the passage and ratification of the 19th Amendment, which allowed women to vote. She was national secretary, then chair of the National Woman’s Party (the forerunner of the National Organization for Women) from 1921 to 1949. (Reverse text) In 1918 . . . — Map (db m39448) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Port of Charleston
Since 1670 this well-protected harbor has persisted as a center for shipping and trade. By 1770 Charleston was America's third busiest port; Gadsden's Wharf, located here, became its largest pier. Along this waterfront ships loaded cargo and departed for Europe, Africa, the Caribbean, and other American ports. Exports included timber bound for the Caribbean. Ships returned with imports that included rum, sugar, slaves, and luxury items. By the 1850s cotton replaced rice as Charleston's dominant . . . — Map (db m47522) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Postponed Aspirations
Settlers came to Carolina seeking land and fortune. But fear of Spanish and Native American attacks made cautious businessmen out of them. For ten years, they postponed their dream of having a flourishing settlement at Oyster Point across the marsh from here, where deeper water was ideal for trade. They opted instead for the relative safety of Albemarle Point because the creek and marsh provided greater defense. These natural elements, however, limited their capacity for trade. Once the . . . — Map (db m67885) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Powder Magazine
Fort Sumter's powder was stored in these specially constructed rooms in the corner (angle) of the gorge wall. Protecting gunpowder was critical; the gorge, at the rear of the fort, was considered a safe location. But Fort Sumter was designed to face the sea, and was vulnerable to attack from the land. When Confederate batteries bombarded the fort in April 1861, the resulting fire threatened the magazine, causing Major Robert Anderson to surrender rather than endanger his men. — Map (db m30920) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Powder Magazine Flags
When the Powder Magazine was built in 1712, South Carolina was a proprietary colony owned by eight British aristocrats. Seven years later, the colonists peacefully overthrew the Lords Proprietor and South Carolina became a royal colony. The flags flying in front of the Powder Magazine symbolizes Charles Towne's connection to the British Empire. The Cross of St. Andrew The Cross of St. Andrew is the national flag of Scotland. The white diagonal cross on a blue background . . . — Map (db m47962) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Poyas-Mordecai HouseA Private Residence — c. 1788
Dr. Jean Ernest Poyas built this classic Charleston single house in elegant Adamesque style of architecture. It was purchased in 1837 by Moses Cohen Mordecai, an important historic figure, who added the piazzas and connected the main house to the kitchen house. Mr. Mordecai, originally opposed to secession, became a blockade runner in support of the Confederacy and lost his entire fortune. Forced to flee to Baltimore after the war, he was again very successful in business. In 1870 Mr. . . . — Map (db m27458) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Prayer Composed By Ellison CapersEpiscopal Bishop - Confederate Soldier
"Almighty God, our heavenly Father, we adore thy love and providence in the history of our country, and especially would we thank thee for our Confederate history "We thank thee for its pure record of virtue, valor and for the inspiring reflection that despite its bitter disappointments and sorrows it proclaims for us to all the world that we came through its years of trial and struggles with our battered shields pure, and nothing to regret in our defense of the rights and honor of our . . . — Map (db m27502) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — President's HouseCirca 1770 — (College of Charleston)
Built as the parsonage of St. Philip's Church and home of the Reverend Robert Smith, The College of Charleston's first president (1790~1797). The College's initial classes were held in 1785 on the ground floor. The house is the official residence for College of Charleston presidents. — Map (db m54794) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Protecting the Colony – The Palisade Wall
We have with much adoe, our people being weake by reason of scarcity of provisions, pallisadoed about 9 acres of land . . . ”- Council to the Lord Proprietors, 21 March 1671 The colonists were aware that the Spanish, hostile Native Americans and predatory animals threatened their safety. Well-supplied by the Lords Proprietors, they came to Carolina prepared to defend themselves. Neglecting crops and homes, the entire community labored to build a wall of defense. They . . . — Map (db m67879) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Quaker Burial Ground
The following people were buried at the Quaker meeting house graveyard on King Street and were reinterred at this site in 1974. (Left Column) John Allen - 1720 Bena Austin - 1735 John Cooper - 1715 Mary Fisher Bayly Crosse - 1699 John Denton - 1721 Capt. James Doughty - 1749 John Essex - 1736 Viz Dan Fleming - 1730 and Sarah Fleming -1730   Children of Thomas and Sarah Fleming Edward Halliday - 1715 William Howell - 1838 Benjamin Ireland - 1821 . . . — Map (db m47770) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Quaker Cemetery
On this site stood two successive meeting houses and the burial ground of the Society of Friends or Quakers. The site was deeded to the Quakers circa 1681 by South Carolina Governor John Archdale, a prominent Charleston Quaker and owner of a large section of the Grand Modell known as Archdale Square. The original meeting house, constructed circa 1696, was destroyed to prevent the spread of fire in 1838. It was replaced in 1856 with a brick building which burned in the fire of 1861. . . . — Map (db m47876) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Rearming the Fort
The fort wall before you, called the right face, sustained the least damage of any of Fort Sumter's walls (scarps) during the Union bombardment of 1863-65. After the Civil War, the fort's first-tier casemates including those before you, were rearmed with 100-pounder rifled Parrott cannon. These guns came from Morris Island, about one mile south of here, and could be the same guns the Union fired on Fort Sumter during the Civil War. Eleven Parrott guns occupy these right face casemates today. — Map (db m30673) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Remnant of Horn Work
Remnant, of Horn Work. May 1780 Siege of Charleston — Map (db m67437) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Revolutionary ArtilleryThe Cannon Yard
It is believed that these two 12-pound British naval cannons were transported to Charles Town during the American Revolution (1775-1783). During the 19th century they stood vertically with their muzzles in the ground on Ann Street — near the present-day Charleston Visitor Center. The cannons were relocated to the Powder Magazine yard in 1904. — Map (db m70313) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Richard Hutson1745 - 1795
Herein Lie the Remains of Richard Hutson 1747 - 1795 son of Rev. William and Mary Woodward Hutson South Carolina Patriot, Statesman and Jurist Graduated Princeton 1765 Founding Body The College of Charleston 17-72 - 1794 Member S.C. general Assembly and Legislative Council 1776 - 1790 Served in Militia and Imprisoned by The British during The Revolutionary War Delegate to Continental Congress 1778 - 1779 Signer Articles of Confederation Lieutenant Governor 1782 - 1783 Author of Act . . . — Map (db m19238) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Riviera Theatre
The Riviera Theatre was constructed in 1939 by Albert Sottile, President of Pastime Amusement Company. The Art Deco architecture is in the Egyptian style. It served the Charleston community as a motion theatre until 1978. The theatre is situated on the site of the Academy of Music which opened in 1869 and was one of America's best known theatres. It was noted for the perfection of its acoustics. At the Academy of Music appeared such famous artists as Theodore Thomas' . . . — Map (db m40015) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Robert Brewton HousePrivate Residence
. . . — Map (db m47642) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Robert Gibbes1644-1715
Early Barbadian supporter of the settlement of South Carolina Colonial Governor 1710-1712 Proprietor's Deputy Chief Justice of South Carolina Member of 1st Assembly Colonel South Carolina Militia Sent South Carolina Militia to aid North Carolinians against the Tuscarora Indians — Map (db m27505) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Royal Judge John Drayton
Born at Magnolia Plantation in 1713, but failing to inherit Magnolia, he purchased an adjoining tract and built Drayton Hall in 1740, but later acquiring Magnolia from his nephew. In a will hastily drawn the night he died while fleeing the British, he willed Magnolia to his son Thomas, and the smaller Drayton Hall tract to his son Charles. For reasons not know understood, though reputed the colony's richest man, he left nothing to his oldest and most illustrious son, William Henry . . . — Map (db m14515) HM
South Carolina (Charleston County), Charleston — Sally Port
Fort Sumter's original sally port (entrance) was located in front of you, in the center of the three-tiered gorge (rear) wall. The lightly armed gorge wall was vulnerable to attack by batteries on Morris Island, and as the war progressed Union shelling reduced it to ruins. At the base of the gore wall some flat stone pavers still exist from the esplanade that joined the sally port to the fort's 171-foot-long granite pier. — Map (db m30936) HM
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