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Charlottesville Virginia – Historical Markers

Henry Martin Marker at University Chapel image, Click for more information
By William Fischer, Jr., June 23, 2014
Henry Martin Marker at University Chapel
Virginia, Charlottesville — Albemarle Confederate Monument
. . . — Map (db m25955) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — Q-28 — Buck v. Bell
In 1924, Virginia, like a majority of states then, enacted eugenic sterilization laws. Virginia’s law allowed state institutions to operate on individuals to prevent the conception of what were believed to be “genetically inferior” . . . — Map (db m10128) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — 'Burying' Ground

The Foster family kept their ancestors close. Sheltered on a portion of their 2 1/8-acre plot purchased in 1833 by free black Catherine Foster, this burial ground still contains several dozen graves.

Rediscovered in 1993, the Foster . . . — Map (db m81599) HM

Virginia, Charlottesville — Q-28a — C. B. Holt Rock House
African American Charles B. Holt owned a carpentry business in Charlottesville’s Vinegar Hill neighborhood. The son of former slaves, Holt built this Arts and Crafts-style house in 1925-1926, during the era of segregation when blacks were . . . — Map (db m30541) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — CharlottesvilleConfederate Heroes Remembered
Lee and Jackson Parks contain two of Charlottesville's fine examples of public sculpture, gifts of benefactor Paul Goodloe McIntire (1860-1952). The Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson statue was dedicated in 1921,the Robert E. Lee statue in 1924. . . . — Map (db m497) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — Q-1d — Charlottesville
The site was patented by William Taylor in 1737. The town was established by law in 1762, and was named for Queen Charlotte, wife of George III. Burgoyne’s army, captured at Saratoga in 1777, was long quartered near here. The legislature was in . . . — Map (db m8643) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — Q-1b — Charlottesville
The site was patented by William Taylor in 1737. The town was established by law in 1762, and was named for Queen Charlotte, wife of George III. Burgoyne’s army, captured at Saratoga in 1777, was long quartered near here. The legislature was in . . . — Map (db m19843) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — Q-1a — Charlottesville
The site was patented by William Taylor in 1737. The town was established by law in 1762, and was named for Queen Charlotte, wife of George III. Burgoyne’s army, captured at Saratoga in 1777, was long quartered near here. The legislature was in . . . — Map (db m19844) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — Q-23 — Charlottesville General Hospital
During the Civil War, the Rotunda at the University of Virginia, the Charlottesville town hall and the courthouse, as well as nearby homes and hotels were converted into a makeshift hospital complex called the Charlottesville General Hospital. It . . . — Map (db m8664) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — Q-24 — Charlottesville Woolen Mills
As early as 1795, several types of mills operated here. In 1847, Farish, Jones, and Co., opened a cotton and woolen factory. John A. Marchant gained control of it by 1852 and renamed it the Charlottesville Manufacturing Company. His son, Henry Clay . . . — Map (db m86175) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — Claude Moore, M.D.1892–1991
A native of Radford, Virginia, Dr. Moore was a 1916 graduate of the School of Medicine and a gifted player on the University’s football team. He served in the Army Medical Corps in France during World War I. Dr. Moore began his career in radiology . . . — Map (db m8823) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — Dedicated to You, A Free Citizen in a Free Land
This reproduction of the Liberty Bell was presented to the people of Virginia by direction of The Honorable John W. Snyder Secretary of the Treasury As the inspirational symbol of the United States Savings Bonds Independence Drive from May . . . — Map (db m73013) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — Q-29 — Edgar Allan Poe
Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849)—writer, poet, and critic—was born in Boston, Mass. Orphaned at a young age, Poe was raised by John and Frances Allan of Richmond. He attended schools in England and Richmond before enrolling at the . . . — Map (db m8765) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — Fernando Símon Bolívar1810–1898
Fernando Bolívar, a native of Venezuela, attended the University of Virginia in 1827. He was the nephew and adopted son of Símon Bolívar, The Liberator, who sent him to study in the “Republic of Washington and Jefferson.” A friend of . . . — Map (db m8820) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — Q-16 — First Baptist Church, West Main Street
The Charlottesville African Church congregation was organized in 1864. Four years later it bought the Delevan building, built in 1828 by Gen. John H. Cocke, and at one time used as a temperance hotel for University of Virginia students. It became . . . — Map (db m8824) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — Q-25 — Gen. Alexander Archer Vandegrift
Gen. Alexander Archer Vandegrift was born in Charlottesville on 13 Mar. 1887. He entered the U.S. Marine Corps in 1909 and served on posts in the Caribbean, Central America, China, and the United States. General Vandegrift led American forces in . . . — Map (db m18547) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — Q-26 — Georgia O’Keeffe
Georgia O’Keeffe was born in Wisconsin in 1887. Her mother moved to Charlottesville in 1909 and rented the house here. Beginning in 1912, O’Keeffe intermittently lived with her mother and sisters. She took a summer drawing class taught by Mon . . . — Map (db m19092) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — Historic Courthouse Square
This building, in continuous use as a courthouse for over 200 years, is one of America’s most historic. No other courthouse has been used by three early American Presidents at the same time, The original wood frame courthouse was erected on a . . . — Map (db m19723) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — History Underfoot

Traces of those who came before are all around us. This spot, for example, holds clues to the life of Catherine Foster, a free black seamstress and laundress, who purchased 2 1/8-acres here, in 1833, for herself and her family.

As this . . . — Map (db m81593) HM

Virginia, Charlottesville — Q-17 — Jack Jouett’s Ride
On 4 June 1781, John “Jack” Jouett Jr. arrived at the Albemarle County Courthouse to warn the Virginia legislature of approaching British troops. The state government under Governor Thomas Jefferson had retreated from Richmond to . . . — Map (db m18549) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — G-23 — James Monroe’s First FarmSite of the University of Virginia
In 1788 James Monroe purchased an 800-acre farm here to be close to his friend Thomas Jefferson and to establish a law office. In 1799 the Monroes moved to their new Highland plantation adjacent to Monticello and sold the first farm. In 1817 the . . . — Map (db m8762) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — Q-30 — Jefferson School
The name Jefferson School has a long association with African American education in Charlottesville. It was first used in the 1860s in a Freedmen's Bureau school and then for a public grade school by 1894. Jefferson High School opened here . . . — Map (db m19834) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — Meriwether Lewis and William Clark1774–1809, 1770–1838
Bold and farseeing pathfinders who carried the flag of the young republic to the western ocean and revealed an unknown empire to the uses of mankind. A territory of 385000 square miles was added to the country by the efforts of these men, an . . . — Map (db m8353) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — W-200 — Monticello
Three miles to the southeast, Thomas Jefferson began the house in 1770 and finished it in 1802. He brought his bride to it in 1772. Lafayette visited it in 1825. Jefferson spent his last years there and died there, July 4, 1826. His tomb is there. . . . — Map (db m65069) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — Q-31 — Monticello Wine Company
The Monticello Wine Company’s four-story brick building was located on the middle of Perry Drive on the north side. Founded in 1873 using grapes from local vineyards, it operated until about the time Prohibition began in Virginia in Nov. 1916. . . . — Map (db m17993) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — Paul Goodloe McIntire1860–1952 — Jackson Park
Paul Goodloe McIntire (1860–1952) commissioned in 1921 the statue of General Thomas Jonathan (“Stonewall“) Jackson from Charles Keck. He gave the statue and this park to Charlottesville, the city of his birth, for the pleasure of . . . — Map (db m19753) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — President Monroe’s Local Homes
In 1789 James Monroe moved to Charlottesville and for one year his home was located in the first block west of this site. Then he lived for nine years in the home he built on what is now called “Monroe Hill” at the University of . . . — Map (db m19808) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — Robert Edward Lee Sculpture1807 - 1870 — Charlottesville, Virginia
Robert Edward Lee 1807 - 1870 — Map (db m85955) WM
Virginia, Charlottesville — Roosevelt “Rosey” Brown, Jr.
Roosevelt Brown, Jr. (1932-2004) was born In Charlottesville and played football at Jefferson High School, the City’s only African-American High School. Following a stellar career he attended Morgan State University where he was named to the . . . — Map (db m30546) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — Sacajawea
This plaque is dedicated to Sacajawea, whose contribution of traditional and cultural knowledge, with courage and bravery, earned her recognition in the chronicles of American History. Sacajawea was a Lemhi Shoshone (Agaidika) born in Salmon, . . . — Map (db m21757) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — Shadow Catcher

At this place, on the site of Catherine Foster's home, this "shadow catcher" links the visible with the unseen even as it pulls the eyes upward to the sky. It creates a shadowy, gridlike outline of the house that once stood at this . . . — Map (db m81598) HM

Virginia, Charlottesville — Site of Old Swan Tavern
Site of old Swan Tavern where lived and died Jack Jouett, whose heroic ride saved Mr. Jefferson, the Governor, and the Virginia Assembly from capture by Tarleton June 1781. — Map (db m18552) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — Q-20 — Stone Tavern and Central Hotel
George Nicholas, Albemarle County’s Virginia General Assembly delegate in 1783, built a stone house here in 1784. James Monroe occupied it 1789-1790, while improving the dwelling at his nearby farm, later the site of the University of Virginia. Here . . . — Map (db m19830) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — G-27 — Technical Sergeant Frank D. Peregory
Born at Esmont on 10 April 1915, Frank D. Peregory enlisted in May 1931 in Charlottesville’s Co. K (Monticello Guard), 116th Inf. Regt., 29th Inf. Div. On D-Day, 6 June 1944, T. Sgt. Peregory landed in the assault on Omaha Beach, Normandy, France. . . . — Map (db m18584) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — Q-27 — The Farm
The Farm stands on a 1020-acre tract acquired by Nicholas Meriwether in 1735 and later owned by Col. Nicholas Lewis, uncle of Meriwether Lewis. A building on the property likely served as headquarters for British Col. Banastre Tarleton briefly in . . . — Map (db m19582) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — Q 21 — The Three Notch’d Road
Also called Three Chopt Road, this colonial route ran from Richmond to the Shenandoah Valley. It likely took its name from three notches cut into trees to blaze the trail. A major east-west route across central Virginia from the 1730s, it was . . . — Map (db m5576) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — The University “Corner”A Student Rendezvous Since the Mid-1800s
In the early 1900s “The Corner,” so named by the University crowd, was but a sparse collection of businesses at the entrance to the University Grounds—literally just a corner. In the intervening years “The Corner” has . . . — Map (db m86177) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — Thomas Jefferson Monument
  Proclaim Liberty throughtout the land unto the inhabitants thereof —Leviticus XXIV. This monument to Thomas Jefferson was presented to the people to perpetuate the teachings and examples of the Founders of the . . . — Map (db m8805) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — Thomas Jonathan Jackson Sculpture1824 - 1863 — Charlottesville, Virginia
Thomas Jonathan Jackson 1824 1863
Chancellorsville • Manassas • The Valley Campaign 1919 — Map (db m85954) WM
Virginia, Charlottesville — Triumph of “The Charlottesville Twelve”
Lane High School. French Jackson, Donald Martin, John Martin. Venable Elementary School. Charles E. Alexander, Raymond Dixon, Regina Dixon, Maurice Henry, Marvin Townsend, William Townsend, Sandra Wicks, Roland T. Woodfolk, Ronald E. . . . — Map (db m64024) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — Triumph of “The Charlottesville Twelve”
Venable Elementary School. Charles E. Alexander, Raymond Dixon, Regina Dixon, Maurice Henry, Marvin Townsend, William Townsend, Sandra Wicks, Roland T. Woodfolk, Ronald E. Woodfolk. Lane High School. French Jackson, Donald Martin, John . . . — Map (db m65187) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — I-3 — University of Virginia
Thomas Jefferson founded the University of Virginia. The cornerstone of its first building was laid on October 6, 1817, in the presence of three presidents of the United States—Jefferson, James Madison, and James Monroe. In 1825, the . . . — Map (db m61101) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — Walter “Rock” Greene Albert “AP” Moore Gymnasium — Architects of Success
Washington, DC native, Walter “Rock” Greene, began his coaching career in 1957 as an assistant football and basketball coach under legendary Coach “Bob” Smith. Coach Greene became head coach to the Burley Bears basketball . . . — Map (db m65229) HM
Virginia, Charlottesville — Watering Fountains
During the late 1800’s, the City of Charlottesville installed four watering fountains in the downtown area. The fountains were designed to provide water to the citizens, their horses and other domesticated animals. Water was provided by the City . . . — Map (db m19739) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — W 165 — Advance Mills
Villages such as Advance Mills were once common features of rural Virginia, serving as economic and social centers. Advance Mills grew around a single mill that John Fray constructed in 1833 on the north fork of the Rivanna River. By the twentieth . . . — Map (db m55785) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — Albemarle Barracks Burial Site
"In 1779 4,000 prisoners, British and their German auxiliaries, captured at the Battle of Saratoga in 1777, marched over 600 miles to quarters, called 'The Barracks', situated a half mile north of this site. Traditionally, some of these prisoners . . . — Map (db m37586) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — Z-15 — Albemarle County / Greene County
Albemarle County. Albemarle County was formed in 1744 from Goochland County and named for William Anne Keppel, the second Earl of Albemarle, titular governor of Virginia from 1747 to 1754. A portion of Louisa County was later added to Albemarle . . . — Map (db m21585) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — Ash Lawn - Highland
Ash Lawn - Highland Home of James Monroe from 1799-1823 Dedicated on July 20, 1985 by Virginia Daughters of the American Revolution State Regent Mrs. G.E. Honts, Jr. — Map (db m63671) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — W-199 — Clark’s Birthplace
A mile north was born George Rogers Clark, defender of Kentucky and conqueror of the Northwest, November 19, 1752. — Map (db m17271) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — W 166 — Convention Army The Barracks
In Jan. 1779, during the American Revolution, 4,000 British troops and German mercenaries (commonly known as “Hessians”) captured following the Battle of Saratoga in New York arrived here after marching from Massachusetts. It was called . . . — Map (db m55784) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — Discovering Mulberry Row
Mulberry Row’s buildings have all but disappeared—only the remains of four survive. Before re-creating lost buildings and roads, we look at information from many sources. How do we know about this important place and the history of its people, . . . — Map (db m80863) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — Ice House — Thomas Jefferson's Monticello
Master carpenter James Dinsmore oversaw construction of this Ice House to Jefferson's design in 1802. Enslaved and hired workers filled it each year between November and February with ice cut from the nearby Rivanna River, shallow ponds, or snow . . . — Map (db m68174) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — Kappa Sigma Fraternity
Here on December the tenth MDCCCLXIX the Kappa Sigma Fraternity was founded by William Grisby McCormick • George Miles Arnold • John Covert Boyd • Edmund Law Rogers • Frank Courtney Nicodemus. Manet Mansuraque Est. Map (db m8812) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — G-29 — Monacan Indian Village
Near here, on both sides of the Rivanna River, was located the Monacan Indian village of Monasukapanough. This village was one of five Monacan towns that Captain John Smith recorded by name on his 1612 Map of Virginia, though many more . . . — Map (db m45497) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — Mulberry Row — Thomas Jefferson's Monticello
Every article is made on his farm; his negroes are cabinet makers, carpenters, masons, bricklayers, smith, etc. Duc de La Rochefoucauld Liancourt, 1796 You are standing on Mulberry Row, a road once lined with more than 20 dwellings, . . . — Map (db m68171) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — Nail-Making
Jefferson set up a nail-making operation in 1794 to provide income until he could “put my farms into a course of yeilding profit.” He calculated the nailers’ daily output, the waste of nailrod, and profits. In its first years, the . . . — Map (db m80862) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — Piney River Cabin
Virginia's virgin forest provided materials for the settlers' most basic shelter. Centuries ago, first growth trees were felled and the wood hewn to form this single-room log cabin in Piney River, Virginia, 45 minutes south of here. The structure is . . . — Map (db m53613) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — W-163 — Revolutionary Soldiers Graves
Jesse Pitman Lewis (d. March 8, 1849), of the Virginia Militia, and Taliaferro Lewis (d. July 12, 1810), of the Continental Line, two of several brothers who fought in the War for Independence, are buried in the Lewis family cemetery 100 yards south . . . — Map (db m3994) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — Rio HillArtifacts Found at Rio Hill
Civil War relic collectors found Stuart’s winter camp and skirmish site (shaded area of map) long before the Rio Hill Shopping Center opened in 1989. Metal detectors were used to search the area and artifacts—bullets, buttons, belt and . . . — Map (db m7692) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — Rio Hill 1864 SkirmishGeorge A. Custer Attacks a Confederate Winter Camp
In December 1863, Confederate troops established winter quarters here. The approximately 200 soldiers, under the command of Capt. Marcellus N. Moorman, were from Stuart’s Horse Artillery Battalion and were equipped with 16 cannons. The men built . . . — Map (db m7690) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — G-26 — Rio Mills
The 19th-century mill village of Rio Mills stood 600 yards west of here, where the former Harrisonburg-Charlottesville Turnpike crossed the South Fork of the Rivanna River. Following the Battle of Rio Hill on 29 February 1864, Union General George . . . — Map (db m19836) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — Site of Viewmont
Built before 1744 by Col. Joshua Fry 1699-1754 Surveyor, Mathematician, Pioneer Commander-in-Chief of Virginia Forces French and Indian War George Washington Inscribed over his Grave “Here lies the good, the just and the noble . . . — Map (db m23244) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — W-197 — Skirmish at Rio Hill
On February 29, 1864, General George A. Custer and 1500 cavalrymen made a diversionary raid Into Albemarle County. Here, north of Charlottesville, he attacked the Confederate winter camp of four batteries of the Stuart Horse Artillery commanded by . . . — Map (db m7685) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — GA-46 — Southern Albemarle Rural Historic District
Bounded by the James River to the south and the Rivanna River to the north, this nationally significant district encompasses 83,627 acres. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2007, it includes buildings influenced by Jefferson’s . . . — Map (db m23240) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — Textiles — Thomas Jefferson's Monticello
Panel 1 Jefferson introduced mechanized cloth production to his plantation when trade embargoes and looming war cut off the supply of imported British cloth. In 1811, he hired William McLure, a free white artisan and "a very ingenious man," . . . — Map (db m68175) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — The Levy Legacy — Thomas Jefferson's Monticello
After Jefferson's death in 1826, his heirs sold his property, including his slaves, to pay his debts. Naval officer Uriah Phillips Levy, who admired Jefferson for his support of religious liberty, purchased Monticello in 1834 to preserve it. This is . . . — Map (db m80808) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — The Meadow Run Grist Mill
Not far from the Tavern, the Michie family owned and operated a mill and general store. At the turn of the century the mill fell from decay. In order to recreate the Michie's Tavern-plantation (which stretched for several miles) Historic Michie . . . — Map (db m53611) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — The Monticello Graveyard
This graveyard had its beginning in an agreement between two young men, Thomas Jefferson and Dabney Carr, who were school-mates and friends. They agreed that they would be buried under a great oak which stood here. Carr, who married Jefferson's . . . — Map (db m80807) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — These Willow Oaks
These willow oaks were planted by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II & Prince Philip in ceremonies honoring the royal visit to the Western Virginia Bicentennial Center July 10, 1976. — Map (db m21950) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — Thomas Jefferson
Here was born Thomas Jefferson April 13, 1743 Lover of Liberty Map (db m68666) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — Tobacco Barn ca.1790
This barn was once a place to hang and dry harvested tobacco plants. Tobacco was the primary cash crop in early Virginia. Many large landholders, including the Michies, grew tobacco as their principal money-making crop. However, in time, these . . . — Map (db m53612) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — Q-22 — Union Occupation of Charlottesville
On 3 Mar. 1865, Maj. Gen. Philip H. Sheridan’s Union Army of the Shenandoah entered Charlottesville to destroy railroad facilities as the 3rd Cavalry Division led by Bvt. Maj. Gen. George A. Custer arrived from Waynesboro. Mayor Christopher H. . . . — Map (db m95140) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — Vanguard of FreedomUnited States Army — Bicentennial 1775–1975
Citizens of central and western Virginia have contributed significantly to national defense and to the U.S. Army throughout its 200-year history. During the Revolutionary War, Virginians fought valiantly as members of the militia and the . . . — Map (db m21890) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — Viewmont
Birthplace of Lottie Moon Baptist Missionary to China 1873-1912 — Map (db m23041) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — William Holding Echols — 1859–1934
William Holding Echols (1859–1934), Professor of Mathematics, lived in this pavilion. By precept and example, he taught many generations of students with ruthless insistence that the supreme values are self respect, integrity of mind, contempt . . . — Map (db m62645) HM
Virginia (Albemarle County), Charlottesville — Wood Trades
This chimney and foundation are all that remain of the “joiner’s shop”, one of the first structures on Mulberry Row. From about 1775, free and enslaved workmen produced some of the finest woodwork in Virginia. Sawyers and carpenters . . . — Map (db m80860) HM
Virginia (Charlottesville), University of Virginia — Henry Martin1826 - 1915
Born in slavery at Monticello on July 4, 1826, the day of Thomas Jefferson's death, Henry Martin worked at the University in various capacities from about 1847 until his retirement in 1910. In late 1868 or early 1869, he was employed as head . . . — Map (db m75526) HM

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