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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
 
 

Coconino County Arizona – Historical Markers

Cameron Bridge and Marker image, Click for more information
By Bill Kirchner, May 17, 2016
Cameron Bridge and Marker
Arizona (Coconino County), Cameron — Cameron — Originally Tanner's Crossing
Named for one of Arizona's first U.S. Senators. A pioneer in development of trails and copper mines in Grand Canyon. Near here was the site of Tanner's Crossing of the Little Colorado River on the Mormon Trail from Utah via Lee Ferry to settlements . . . — Map (db m80764) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Flagstaff — "The Gandy Dancer"
Section crews were the laborers who built the railroads in the beginning and have continued throughout the years to maintain them. These crews were most efficient in moving heavy sections of rails when they all worked in unison. To accomplish this . . . — Map (db m33265) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Flagstaff — A Gathering Place
]Panel 1:] Between 1100 and 1200, more people lived in this area than ever before, or since. Located along routes linking large populations to the northeast and south, villages here were well situated for trade. As people, goods, and ideas . . . — Map (db m60079) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Flagstaff — A Legacy of the Past
Box Canyon and Lomaki ruins are a short 15-minute walk from here, along the edges of ancient earthcracks. The 1/4-mile trail will take you back in time over 800 years to the remnants of this once-thriving community. You will see the few native . . . — Map (db m60114) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Flagstaff — A Village/Abandonment
A Village You are entering the “Citadel,” a ruin from the late 1100s. Research has not been completed so it is important that we leave things as they are. Will there be extra storage spaces found, possible evidence for the . . . — Map (db m60089) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Flagstaff — Ancient Landscapes
Eight hundred years ago, a savannah-like grassland covered much of this high desert with abundant grasses. The residents would have collected and burned much of the nearby fuel, necessitating long walks to adjacent areas to gather wood. Sparse . . . — Map (db m60105) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Flagstaff — Aubineau / Andreatos Building — 1893/1952
Aubineau Building: The earliest buildings on this site were wood frame saloons, which burned in 1886 and 1888 and 1892. In 1892, ownership passed to Julius Aubineau, who later became Mayor of Flagstaff and is credited with installing the . . . — Map (db m33267) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Flagstaff — Aubineau Building — 1912
Because of its prime location, this corner, containing two lots, was one of the earliest in Flagstaff to be developed. Pioneer merchant J. R. Kilpatrick built New Town's sixth building here in December 1883. This wooden store building burned in the . . . — Map (db m33269) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Flagstaff — Babbitt Brothers Building — 1888
In 1888, David Babbitt, who had been running a lumber yard on this site, decided to construct a general store. Starting in late summer, he built a 35 X 70 foot structure on this corner, with the long side of the building running west along Aspen . . . — Map (db m59504) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Flagstaff — Beale Road
In 1857 Congress authorized Navy Lieutenant Edward F. Beale to survey a wagon road along the 35th parallel from Fort Defiance, New Mexico Territory, to the Colorado River. A secondary mission was to test the feasibility of using camels in the . . . — Map (db m33348) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Flagstaff — Beale Wagon Road — 1857 - 1882
From 1857-60, Lt. Edward F. Beale and a crew of 100 men completed the first federal highway in the southwest from Fort Smith, Ark. to Los Angeles, Calif. at a cost of $200,000. The wagon road was used extensively by immigrants en route to California . . . — Map (db m33346) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Flagstaff — Box Canyon Ruins
The Box Canyon ruins are typical of many pueblos found in this region. Early inhabitants constructed walls of nearby sandstone and limestone, and used local soils to cement the stones together. The flat roofs were built of timbers laid side-by-side, . . . — Map (db m60094) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Flagstaff — Buffalo Park
The City of Flagstaff purchased this land in 1959 from the United States Forest Service. In 1964, James Potter, Sr., long-time resident, entrepreneur and Flagstaff Chamber of Commerce President, led the effort to form a non-profit organization, . . . — Map (db m33347) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Flagstaff — Bushmaster Park
Bushmaster Park is named in memory of Flagstaff's Company I-158th Infantry Regiment, Arizona National Guard, and their sacrifices for freedom made in New Guinea, the Phillipine Islands and Japan from 1941 to 1945. "No greater fighting team ever . . . — Map (db m60932) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Flagstaff — Church of the Nativity — 1888-1930
In 1888, at the insistence of a group of Catholic Laymen, The First Catholic Church in Flagstaff was built of brick on the south side of town. It was moved in 1911 to a temporary site just west of and across the street from the present permanent . . . — Map (db m33336) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Flagstaff — Coconino Chop House — 1898
The Hoxworth family was the first to develop this lot, when H. H. Hoxworth built a hardware and furniture store here in January 1884. The property was owned by his father, George Hoxworth, a wounded Union veteran of the Battle of Shiloh. Like . . . — Map (db m33268) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Flagstaff — Daily Life
Plaza An open area in the pueblo near the rim of the earthcrack is known as the plaza. In pueblos, the plaza was the center for many daily activities including grinding corn, making pottery, working obsidian into arrowheads, processing other . . . — Map (db m60110) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Flagstaff — Donahue Building — 1888
This building for many years was the home of J. J. "Sandy" Donahue's famous Senate Saloon. After earlier frame buildings on the site had been destroyed by fire, Donahue built the present brick structure in 1888. An important figure in . . . — Map (db m33266) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Flagstaff — Downtowner — 1921 - 1935
The K.J. Nackard family came to Flagstaff in 1912 and opened a small general store at 106 E. Railroad Avenue. The store was successful. In 1921, Nackard built a home on this property, just a stone's throw from the store. Soon afterwards, . . . — Map (db m59499) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Flagstaff — Dry Land Farming
Volcanic activity to the south produced giant fissures or earthcracks throughout the Wupatki area in the Kaibab Limestone. This formation covers most of the western half of Wupatki National Monument. The Sinagua and Anasazi Indians who inhabited . . . — Map (db m60098) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Flagstaff — Flagstaff
Named for a pine tree stripped of its branches by a party of immigrants and used as a flagpole for a patriotic celebration on July 4, 1876. Nearby Antelope or Old Town Spring provided water and led to the establishment of a railroad construction . . . — Map (db m33330) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Flagstaff — Flagstaff Flag - Raising
Historians generally agree that Flagstaff derives its name from a flag-raising ceremony held July 4, 1876, by a group of settlers from New England who were camped within sight of this historic monument. In February and May of 1876, two groups . . . — Map (db m33365) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Flagstaff — Flagstaff Presbyterian, Federated Community, Mexican Methodist Mission and United Methodist Churches
Flagstaff Presbyterian Church 1892 - 1916 Flagstaff Federated Community Church 1916-1927 Mexican Methodist Mission – El Divino Redentor United Methodist Church 1927-present The First Presbyterian congregation of Flagstaff . . . — Map (db m33364) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Flagstaff — Flagstaff's Founding
Flagstaff was a name on a map before the area had any significant population. The first permanent settler was Thomas F. McMillan who arrived sometime in 1876. On July 4, 1876, a party of emigrants traveling from Boston to California was camped at . . . — Map (db m41717) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Flagstaff — Logging Wheels
Logging wheels were originally an integral part of the early lumber industry in Northern Arizona. Originally designed in 1870 by Silas Overpack, a Manistee, Michigan wheelwright, the wheels were used by a local farmer to help him clear his land. . . . — Map (db m33331) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Flagstaff — McMillan Building — 1887
Thomas F. McMillan (also spelled McMillon) was the father of Flagstaff. Born in Tennessee, he sought gold in California and raised sheep in Australia before moving to northern Arizona in 1876. Here he established a sheep ranch and farm just north of . . . — Map (db m33271) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Flagstaff — Methodist Episcopal Church — 1906-1916 — Flagstaff Federated Community Church 1916-Present
Flagstaff's first congregation was formed by the Methodists in 1883 and they raised the first church five blocks east of here in 1887. In 1906 they moved here and constructed this Gothic style building of locally quarried red sandstone. The . . . — Map (db m33337) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Flagstaff — Railroad Depot — 1926
The facility was originally constructed in 1925-1926 by the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad as the passenger station for the Flagstaff stop. The City of Flagstaff acquired the building in 1992 using city of Flagstaff Bed, Board & Booze tax . . . — Map (db m78739) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Flagstaff — Raymond Building — 1911
As the keystone shows, this building was constructed in 1911. Its owner was R.O. Raymond, M.D., one of Flagstaff’s first doctors. Raymond came west for his health. After a short stay in Williams, he moved to Flagstaff in 1906. He was the doctor . . . — Map (db m59511) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Flagstaff — Ricket & Brooks Bldg. — 1911
The first building on this site was a wooden structure located at 22 N. San Francisco Street dating from the early 1890s. It was the home of a saloon with a cute name, The Office. (“Honey I can’t come home just yet, I’m still at The . . . — Map (db m59510) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Flagstaff — Sunset Crater Volcano
The distant San Francisco Peaks would have looked much like they do today. To the east, however, Sunset Crater Volcano would still have been belching black smoke and cinders when the Sinagua and Anasazi lived here. The thick layer of cinders over . . . — Map (db m60107) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Flagstaff — Telephone Exchange — 1909
This building was constructed in 1909 by John W. Weatherford, the man who earlier built the adjacent Weatherford Hotel. It was the headquarters for the Arizona Overland Telephone Company, housing its offices and physical plant. Construction . . . — Map (db m59966) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Flagstaff — The Citadel / Natural Features
The Citadel It was a remarkable achievement, to use primitive mortar and local stones to build the walls above you straight up from the edge of the top of the rock. “The Citadel” is the modern name given to this ruin because . . . — Map (db m60087) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Flagstaff — The Historic Basque Handball Court
Historic Basque handball court (cancha) built in 1926 by Jesus Garcia, a Spaniard who migrated to Flagstaff in 1912. He owned and operated the adjacent Tourist Home. The Basque would reportedly herd sheep, drink, chase women, or play their beloved . . . — Map (db m59498) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Flagstaff — The Navajo Code Talkers
The original thirty-two Code Talkers were organized to develop codes based on their native language which were used extensively during World War II. These and many other Native Americans served bravely throughout the Pacific and other combat zones. . . . — Map (db m33344) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Flagstaff — The Old Tractor
This 1945 Model H International Farmall, purchased by the Zanzucchi Family after World War II, was used to plow the "Fields" at the Flagstaff Dairy. The Flagstaff Dairy operated from 1904 thru 1979 and was located 3 miles west of Flagstaff on Old . . . — Map (db m78740) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Flagstaff — Transcontinental Railroad Centennial
In 1866 the Atlantic and Pacific Railroad was formed to construct a railroad from Springfield, Missouri to the Pacific Ocean, a distance of 2,000 miles. In the summer and fall of 1882 the railroad was directly responsible for the founding and . . . — Map (db m33333) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Flagstaff — Two Spots — Arizona Lumber and Timber Company Steam Engine
Arizona Lumber and Timber Company purchased this Baldwin steam engine in 1917 for lumbering operations in and around Flagstaff, where the engine spent its entire working life. The City of Flagstaff purchased No. 25 in 1995. Canvas water bags . . . — Map (db m41720) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Flagstaff — Verkamp Building — 1899
John G. Verkamp came to Flagstaff in the 1890s. He first worked for the Babbitts (three of his sisters were married to Babbitt brothers), then succeeded in a number of businesses on his own, including lumber, livestock and merchandising. He is best . . . — Map (db m59505) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Flagstaff — Walkway of Flags — 1994
Flags have been important to the history of Flagstaff. It was a pine tree used as a flag staff that gave the town its name when Old Glory was flown at a spring (that later became the site of Flagstaff) on the occasion of the nation's . . . — Map (db m33338) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Flagstaff — Weatherford Hotel — 1898/1899
John Weatherford, who was raised in Weatherford, Texas, came to Flagstaff in 1886. He decided to stay here because he fell in love with the San Francisco Peaks at first sight. He tried his hand in several occupations, everything from saloon keeper . . . — Map (db m59507) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Flagstaff — Wukoki
Wukoki, a modern Hopi word for “Big House” was once home for two or three prehistoric Indian families. The inhabitants are believed to have been of the Kayenta Anasazi culture, judging from the types of artifacts found during excavation . . . — Map (db m60078) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Fredonia — Fredonia Centennial — 1885-1985
Fredonia Arizona 1885-1985 Settled in 1885 by few hardy Mormon pioneer families. Once the center of sheep and cattle grazing on the Arizona strip. The main industry is logging. Fredonia boasts one of the largest sawmills in Arizona. Other . . . — Map (db m94922) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Fredonia — Historic Log Cabin
Owned by Billie McMurry Griffiths Built about 1930 Donated by the McMurry Sisters — Map (db m94926) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Fredonia — 29 — Pipe Springs National Monument
Fifteen miles southwest is historic “Pipe Springs” early pioneer outpost and first telegraph station in Arizona. — Map (db m94921) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Fredonia — Prickly Pears and Pinion Nuts — Dominguez y Escalante Expedition 1776-1976
A worn and hungry band of Spanish explorers made camp at Johnson Wash, six miles to the east, on October 21, 1776. Fathers Dominguez and Escalante called it Santa Barbara. They found no water for horses or the men who were subsisting on meager . . . — Map (db m94920) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Fredonia — The Final Frontier
In a parched and rugged land, Fredonia is a welcome oasis for residents and travelers. Mormon pioneers drawn to area springs settled here to begin farming and ranching in 1885. But water, like many resources on the Arizona Strip, was scarce. . . . — Map (db m94923) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Grand Canyon National Park — 1956 Grand Canyon TWA-United Airlines Aviation Accident Site
1956 Grand Canyon TWA-United Airlines Aviation Accident Site has been designated a National Historic Landmark This tragic accident site represents a watershed moment in the modernization of America's airways leading to the . . . — Map (db m81861) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Grand Canyon National Park — Albright Training Center History
The Horace M. Albright Training Center is a National Park Service facility for employee development. Established in 1963 and named for the National Park Service's second director, the training center serves as an educational program center for . . . — Map (db m39602) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Grand Canyon National Park — Blacksmith Shop — Constructed in 1908
In the early days of Grand Canyon Village, the blacksmith shop served as a focal point of activity. The blacksmith was a highly skilled craftsman who welded the machinery, sharpened the tools, built water tanks, repaired the wagon wheels and shod . . . — Map (db m39582) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Grand Canyon National Park — Bright Angel Lodge
Bright Angel Hotel (below) was built around 1895 to serve stagecoach passengers. In 1905 the hotel became Bright Angel Camp, which eventually included cabins and an adjoining tent village. In 1935 the Fred Harvey Company replaced the camp . . . — Map (db m39510) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Grand Canyon National Park — Bright Angel Lodge — First Constructed in 1885
The Bright Angel Lodge, as it is known today, began as a cabin and several tents on this site in 1896. The central unit designed by Mary Jane Colter, was built in 1935. This lodge contains some of the oldest buildings in the Grand Canyon Village, . . . — Map (db m39565) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Grand Canyon National Park — Bright Angel Trail
Each year thousands of hikers enter Grand Canyon on the Bright Angel Trail. They follow a tradition - and a trail route - established by prehistoric people. For centuries humans have used this route for two key reasons: water and access. Water . . . — Map (db m39563) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Grand Canyon National Park — Buckey O'Neill Cabin
In the early 1890s (exact date unknown) Buckey O'Neill built a log cabin here on Grand Canyon's south rim. It stands in front of you; it is Grand Canyon's oldest surviving historic structure. Grand Canyon's modern era began with people like . . . — Map (db m39545) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Grand Canyon National Park — CCC Legacy
The nearby plaque commemorates an amazing feat achieved by members of the Civilian Conservation Corp (CCC) in the 1930s - construction of a telephone line spanning the entire width of Grand Canyon. One of the poles still stands behind this wall. . . . — Map (db m78836) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Grand Canyon National Park — El Tovar Hotel — Begun 1903, Completed 1905
Named for Don Pedro de Tovar, the first European to visit the Hopi Indian villages in 1540, the hotel was constructed by Hopi Indian craftsmen at a cost of $250,000 employing logs shipped by train from Oregon and native Kaibab Limestone. The El . . . — Map (db m39477) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Grand Canyon National Park — Grandview, 1898
"No language can fully describe, no artist paint the beauty, grandeur, immensity and sublimity of this most wonderful production of Nature's great architect. [Grand Canyon] must be seen to be appreciated." C.O. Hall, Grand Canyon visitor, . . . — Map (db m39659) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Grand Canyon National Park — Historic Kolb Studio
Established in 1904 by the Kolb Brothers as a photographic studio and operated by Emery Kolb until his death in 1976. Kolb is now operated as a book store and information center by the Grand Canyon Association, a non-profit organization. Proceeds . . . — Map (db m39546) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Grand Canyon National Park — Hopi House — Mary Elizabeth Jane Colter
Hopi House opened on January 1, 1905, the first Grand Canyon work of architect Mary Colter. To complement El Tovar, their new hotel, the Fred Harvey Company commissioned Colter to design a building to display and sell Indian arts and crafts. Colter . . . — Map (db m39478) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Grand Canyon National Park — Hopi House — Constructed in 1905
Designed as living quarters for Hopi artisans and as a place to sell Hopi crafts and souvenirs, this building represents the efforts of the Fred Harvey Company to revive Southwest Indian arts and crafts. Designed by Mary Jane Colter, the building . . . — Map (db m39509) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Grand Canyon National Park — Horace M. Albright
Albright's contributions to the National Park Service can hardly be overstated. While working with the agency's first director, Stephen Mather, in the early years of the National Park Service, Horace Albright played a decisive role in guiding the . . . — Map (db m39600) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Grand Canyon National Park — Kolb Studio
The Kolb Brothers: daring, persistent, Grand Canyon legends. Their studio stands before you. Ellsworth Kolb arrived here in 1901, Emery in 1902. First located in a tent, their photo business grew with Grand Canyon tourism. They eventually . . . — Map (db m39549) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Grand Canyon National Park — Lookout Studio
The Fred Harvey Company built Lookout Studio in 1914, in part to compete with the Kolb Brothers Studio located slightly west along the rim. Called "The Lookout," Fred Harvey's studio offered telescopic views, photographs, and books about the . . . — Map (db m39544) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Grand Canyon National Park — Mining on Horseshoe Mesa
In 1890 prospector Pete Berry staked the Last Chance copper claim 3,000 feet below you on Horseshoe Mesa. The Last Chance Mine began a 17-year flurry of activity here at Grandview Point. For a while the Last Chance Mine thrived. The ore was . . . — Map (db m39662) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Grand Canyon National Park — Mission 66
Responding to mounting political and public pressure, Congress authorized a ten-year program in 1955 to regenerate and modernize the national parks dubbed "Mission 66" for the target date of 1966, the National Park Service's 50th anniversary. The . . . — Map (db m39587) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Grand Canyon National Park — Mule Barns — Constructed in 1907
The mule barn and the nearby livery stable were two of the most important buildings in the original Grand Canyon Village. In the early 1900's, when all travel within the village was by horse-drawn carriage, these huge barns were the center of all . . . — Map (db m39585) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Grand Canyon National Park — Mules and the Canyon
Behind you is the Bright Angel mule corral, where each morning mules greet riders and another adventure begins. Mules have carried people into Grand Canyon since sightseeers first visited here in the 1890s. For many people - including those who . . . — Map (db m39551) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Grand Canyon National Park — Santa Fe Depot
"Won't you be one of the 25,000 visitors at the Grand Canyon of Arizona this summer? It is the world's scenic wonder - nothing like it." Santa Fe Railroad brochure, 1914. The Santa Fe train whistle that was heard here on September 17, . . . — Map (db m39569) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Grand Canyon National Park — The Watchtower — Mary Elizabeth Jane Colter
Build a structure that provides the widest possible view of Grand Canyon yet harmonizes with its setting: this was architect Mary Colter's goal when the Fred Harvey Company hired her in 1930 to design a gift shop and rest area here at Desert View. . . . — Map (db m39616) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Grand Canyon National Park — Trans-Canyon Telephone Line
Trans-Canyon Telephone Line, built in 1935 by CCC workers, maintained by Mountain Bell, has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places by the United States Department of the Interior. — Map (db m78832) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Grand Canyon National Park — Tusayan Museum and Ruin
Cohonina and ancestral Pueblo (Kayenta Anasazi) people lived in this area in prehistoric time. The ancestral Puebloans built Tusayan about AD 1185. A visit to the museum and a short walk through the remains of the village will furnish a glimpse of . . . — Map (db m39631) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Grand Canyon National Park — Tusayan Ruin Trail
Allow about 30 minutes to tour Tusayan Ruin. The 0.1 mile loop trail through the main ruin is paved and wheelchair-accessible; the side loop to a prehistoric farming site is not. Signs along the way explain the site's features. An interpretive . . . — Map (db m39633) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Grand Canyon National Park — Verkamp's Curios
John G. Verkamp rented a tent from the Bright Angel Hotel in 1898 and began selling curios and Indian crafts for Babbitt Brothers' Trading Company. After several slow weeks he closed and sold his stock to the hotel. But he sensed Grand Canyon's . . . — Map (db m39571) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Happy Jack — Battle of Big Dry Wash
Seven miles north of this point a band of Apache Indians were defeated by United States troops on July 17, 1882. A group of tribesmen from the San Carlos Apache reservation had attacked some ranches in the vicinity, killing several settlers. Cavalry . . . — Map (db m67424) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Happy Jack — General Crook Trail
Under the direction of General George Crook this trail was built in the early 1870's. Starting at Fort Whipple, it winds down to Fort Verde then eastward across the Mogollon Rim to Fort Apache covering 200 miles. It was used as a supply route by . . . — Map (db m67419) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Happy Jack — General Crook Trail
Under the direction of General George Crook this trail was built in the early 1870's. Starting at Fort Whipple, it winds down to Fort Verde then eastward across the Mogollon Rim to Fort Apache covering 200 miles. It was used as a supply route by . . . — Map (db m67420) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Jacob Lake — Jacob Lake Lookout Tower
This location has two markers This steel lookout tower is 80 feet tall and has a 7 foot by 7 foot steel cab on top. It was erected in 1934. As guardians of our nation's vast timber reserves, the U.S. Forest Service has always given fire . . . — Map (db m94919) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Jacob Lake — Jacob Lake Ranger Station
Built in 1910 Has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places By the United States Department of the Interior — Map (db m94918) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Jacob Lake — Kaibab Squirrel Area
Has been designated a National Natural Landmark This site possesses exceptional value as an illustration of the Nation's natural heritage and contributes to a better understanding of the environment. — Map (db m94912)
Arizona (Coconino County), Jacob Lake — Theodore Roosevelt
In memory of Theodore Roosevelt 1858 'Teddy' 1919 Est. Grand Canyon National Game Preserve ‘06 — Map (db m94913) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Marble Canyon — Charles H. Spencer “Paddlewheel” Steamboat
Spencer Paddlewheel Steamboat 1912 — Map (db m94910)
Arizona (Coconino County), Marble Canyon — Dominguez y Escalante Expedition — 1776 - 1976 — Treacherous Descent
Text from: Historical Markers with The Arizona Department of Transportation right of way. Prepared by: Roadside Development Section April 1, 1997 Fatigued by a thirty mile ride, the padres picked their way down the rocky north slope . . . — Map (db m39917) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Marble Canyon — Impossible Canyons — Dominguez y Escalante Expedition 1776-1976
In desperate search for a crossing of the Colorado River before the wild storms of winter might further weaken their starving bodies, Fathers Dominguez and Escalante led their expedition past this point on October 26, 1776. Five days were spent . . . — Map (db m94896) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Marble Canyon — Lee Ferry
From 1872 to 1929 principal route of travel across the Colorado River to Utah Settlements First crossing made at the mouth of Paria Creek in 1864 by Jacob Hamblin. Regular ferry established by John Doyle Lee in 1872. Purchased by . . . — Map (db m41998) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Marble Canyon — Lees Ferry
Because of long, deep canyons, Lees Ferry was the best crossing point along 500 miles (800 km) of the Colorado River. In 1873, Mormon Church members opened a wagon road from Kanab, Utah, and built a ferryboat here. John D. Lee was the first . . . — Map (db m41999) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Marble Canyon — 350 — Lee's Ferry
John D. Lee settled here in Dec. 1872 and established ferry service thirteen months later. After her husband's death, Warren M. Johnson ran the oar-driven ferry for Emma Lee, 1875 to 1879, when the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints . . . — Map (db m41997) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Marble Canyon — Lee's Ferry
Northern gateway to Arizona for 54 years - from 1873 to 1927 - is located six miles upstream from this bridge. This monument erected to the founder John Doyle Lee who, with superhuman effort and in the face of almost insurmountable . . . — Map (db m94892) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Marble Canyon — Marble Canyon Lodge
A tourist lodge and trading post have operated near this site since 1929. Without them, travel through this isolated region would have been far more difficult. Marble Canyon Lodge was already in operation when the historic Navajo Bridge was . . . — Map (db m94893) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Marble Canyon — Navajo Bridge
Has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places By the United States Department of the Interior August 31, 1981 — Map (db m94885) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Marble Canyon — Navajo Bridge
There are three markers on this end of the Navajo Bridge. (Marker on left:) National Historical Civil Engineering Landmark American Society of Engineers 1852 Designated by the American Society of Civil Engineers . . . — Map (db m94887) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Marble Canyon — Navajo Bridge Erection Toggle Screw/Navajo Bridge — State of Arizona — 1927/1928
This Erection Toggle Screw was used in the construction of the historic Navajo Bridge to maintain bridge vertical elevations and as a means of lowering bridge sections in place. [Plaque Mounted on Bridge]: State of Arizona Navajo . . . — Map (db m38469) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Marble Canyon — Vermilion Cliffs National Monument
Welcome to Vermilion Cliffs National Monument, an isolated and spectacular landscape. Tucked away in north-central Arizona, this Monument is a wonderland of geologic formations and rugged terrain that supports a rich array of desert wildlife and . . . — Map (db m94911) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Mormon Lake — Mormon Dairy
Between 1876 and 1886, Hyrum Judd, under the direction of Lot Smith, supervised a Mormon Dairy one mile northeast near Dairy Spring. Beginning with a herd of 115 cows, large quantities of butter and cheese were produced. During the 1880s the . . . — Map (db m35187) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Page — Bureau of Reclamation Memorial Fountain
This fountain is dedicated to the memory of our fellow employees who died October 8, 1997 in a plane crash near Montrose, Colorado. Their names encircle the fountain just as the accomplishments of their careers and lives encircle us. . . . — Map (db m40325) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Page — Colorado River Storage Project / Glen Canyon Dam — Reclamation: Managing Water in the West
Colorado River Storage Project In recognition of the vision of the Colorado River Storage Project Act of 1956 and the significant contributions the act has made to the development of the Upper Colorado River Basin states, this plaque . . . — Map (db m40350) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Page — Concrete Bucket / Concrete Core Sample — Reclamation: Managing Water in the West
Concrete Bucket This is one of several concrete buckets that poured the concrete in Glen Canyon Dam. Each bucket held 24 tons (22 metric tons) of concrete and it took over 400,000 buckets to complete the dam. The first pour of concrete . . . — Map (db m40342) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Page — Crossing of the Fathers — Dominguez y Escalante Expedition 1776-1976
Within sight of this place the Franciscan priests Dominguez and Escalante and their ten companions experienced two of the most difficult challenges among many along the 1,800 miles of their epic journey from the Spanish presidio at Santa Fe, New . . . — Map (db m40324) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Page — Dinosaur Tracks
The imprints were made by a one ton, twenty foot long, meat-eating dinosaur. The slab of sandstone came from a nearby side canyon. When Dilophosaurus tracked through the silt 170 million years ago, this was a different landscape. Shallow streams . . . — Map (db m40326) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Page — Emma Dean
A slightly larger, but reasonable replica of the 16 ft. pine rowboat in which Major John Wesley Powell first explored the canyons of the Colorado River in 1869. This craft was constructed by Walt Disney Productions and used in the river running . . . — Map (db m40323) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Page — Glen Canyon Dam — Colorado River Storage Project
Dedicated by the First Lady Mrs. Lyndon B. Johnson September 22, 1966 United States Department of the Interior Stewart L. Udall, Secretary Bureau of Reclamation Floyd E. Dominy, Commissioner [The following marker is inside the . . . — Map (db m40370) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Page — Hydroelectric Power - A Green and Renewable Energy Source — Reclamation: Managing Water in the West
Glen Canyon Dam and other dams along the Colorado River provide critical water and power resources for millions of Americans in the Southwest. Recreation at the reservoirs is enjoyed by visitors from around the world. Turbine Runner This . . . — Map (db m40344) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Page — Intake Structures — Reclamation: Managing Water in the West
The eight small "buildings" on the upstream face of the dam contain equipment to operate the penstock gates. Each penstock is 15 feet (4.6 meters) in diameter and carries water to one of the turbine generators in the powerplant. — Map (db m40349) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Page — Rock Bolts / High Scaling — Reclamation: Managing Water in the West
Rock Bolts Since Navajo sandstone tends to fracture vertically, rock bolts lock rock slabs together, thereby minimizing rock falls into the canyon. These bolts extend from 45 to 75 feet (14-23 meters) into the canyon wall. They are assembled . . . — Map (db m40346) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Page — Saurischia Dinosaur Tracks
These tracks were made by a three-toed dinosaur known as a Saurischia therapod. It lived here about 170 million years ago during the Jurassic era when the environment was tropical. The footprints are raised natural sandstone castings of the . . . — Map (db m40321) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Page — Turbine Runner
This stainless steel turbine runner was removed in 1989 from the Bureau of Reclamation's Crystal Dam Powerplant in Montrose, Colorado. Weighing about 8½ metric tons, it is the rotating part of a Francis-type reaction turbine (named after its . . . — Map (db m40371) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Parks — Beale Wagon Road — America’s Great Camel Experiment 1857-1858
In the summer of 1857 former Navy Lt. Edward F. Beale was chosen by the Buchanan Administration to develop a wagon road from Fort Defiance, New Mexico Territory (now Arizona) to the Colorado River along the 35th parallel. Secretary of War John B. . . . — Map (db m48347) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Sedona — Carl Richards' Garage
Carl Richards constructed this building in 1947 as his blacksmith shop. At the time, auto garage work was just a sideline. Richards is known as Sedona's first 'Fire Chief' because he kept the town's first fire truck in his garage. If there was a . . . — Map (db m78744) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Sedona — 19 — Chapel of the Holy Cross, 1956 — City of Sedona Landmark No. 19
It took decades of searching for a perfect location before Marguerite Brunswig Staude's inspiring modern Catholic church could be built. The Chapel of the Holy Cross is an extraordinary architectural achievement, designed by architects Anshen & . . . — Map (db m94811) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Sedona — 2 — Fruit Packing House — City of Sedona Landmark No. 2
In 1946, Walter Jordan's orchard business had expanded. This building was constructed to house an apple grading machine and other fruit packing operations. Walter Jordan operated the orchards until 1973. — Map (db m94848) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Sedona — Hart Pump House
A designated Sedona Historic Landmark built in 1932 by the Civilian Conservation Corps — Map (db m94814) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Sedona — Indian Gardens — Homesite of the First Settler in Oak Creek Canyon
In 1876 or 1877, Jim Thompson built a log cabin here and began cultivating the old Indian Gardens where the Indians had grown corn and squash long before Oak Creek was known to white men. Thompson remained here at his Indian Gardens Ranch until his . . . — Map (db m33203) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Sedona — 1 — Jordan Farmhouse — City of Sedona Landmark No. 1
This home of Walter and Ruth Jordan began as a one-room cabin in 1931. It grew by three rooms in 1937, and grew in 1947 to its present size. It was opened as the Sedona Heritage Museum in 1998. It exemplifies early Sedona red rock construction. — Map (db m94846) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Sedona — 5 — Jordan Sales Building — City of Sedona Landmark No. 5
Built circa 1938 by George Jordan as a co-op retail outlet for fruit produced and marketed by local orchard farmers, including George and his brother Walter. It was a key part in the early commercial development of Uptown Sedona and is a good . . . — Map (db m40921) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Sedona — 3 — Jordan Tractor Shed — City of Sedona Landmark No. 3
Built in c1929 by Walter Jordan to house tractors and other farm implements for use in the Jordan Orchards. — Map (db m94847) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Sedona — Orchards (1890 - 1970)
Fruit growing played a significant role in the early Sedona economy. Over time, settlers constructed ditches, flumes, pipelines, reservoirs, and water wheels to provide irrigation to their gardens and eventually to their larger orchards. Apples . . . — Map (db m54228) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Sedona — 15 — Pushmataha, 1960 — City of Sedona Landmark No. 15
Harold and Christine Strohm built their Old-West style building and opened 'Muuseum, Et Cetera.' to showcase their collection of antiques. The Strohms named the building 'Pushmataha' after a Choctaw Chief. It means “He has won all the honors . . . — Map (db m94831) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Sedona — Rollie's Camera — 1948 — 297 Hwy 89A
This was originally Bob Bradshaw's photo shop and living quarters. Bradshaw's photos appeared often in Arizona Highways, and he published several books of Arizona images. Bob was involved in Sedona's film-making business for 50 years. He sold . . . — Map (db m94834) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Sedona — No. 12 — The Hart Store, 1926
L.E. "Dad" Hart established Sedona's first real store in this building in 1926. The general store sold Oak Creek fruit and tourist supplies and was considered modern with gravity-drained gas pumps and the first commercial power in town. When the . . . — Map (db m33202) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Sedona — 7 — USFS Range House — City of Sedona Landmark No. 7
This house was built in 1917 and was the home of the Sedona District Ranger, Jesse I. Bushnell. It continued to serve as living quarters until 1996, when the structure was converted to office space for the USFS Sedona Ranger District. — Map (db m94829) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Sedona — Van Deren Ranch
Lee Van Deren, cattleman, arrived to put his children in the new Sedona school opened in 1910. Ranching was a major part of Sedona’s early economy. Round ups and cattle drives were a twice a year occurrence for ranchers when moving their herds from . . . — Map (db m54229) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Sunset Crater Volcano National Monument — "The Peaks"
They dominate the horizon, rising 12,633 feet (3851 m) to Arizona's highest point. Visible for miles from all directions, they stand guard over a land which has long sustained people in spirit and natural resources. All of the region's Native . . . — Map (db m41664) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Sunset Crater Volcano National Monument — As Powerful as a Volcano
Cinder cones erode easily and scars are slow to heal. In 1973, Sunset Crater was closed to climbing when 2-foot-wide trails eroded to 60-foot-wide swaths. Tons of cinder were shoveled back up the cone to fill hip-deep trenches. Notice the scars . . . — Map (db m41676) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Sunset Crater Volcano National Monument — Changes to Come
Buried under Sunset Crater's lava and cinders are perhaps dozens of pithouses. Those excavated revealed few artifacts; even building timbers had been removed. This suggests people had ample warning of the impending eruption. The changed . . . — Map (db m41693) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Sunset Crater Volcano National Monument — Geological Infant
Erupting less than 1,000 years ago, Sunset Crater is the youngest in an impressive field of volcanoes all around you. The 1,000-foot-high (305m) cinder cone we see today formed when basalt magma rose directly to the surface through a primary vent. . . . — Map (db m41665) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Sunset Crater Volcano National Monument — Life and Landscape Transformed
The landscape before you has existed on Earth for less than 1,000 years, less time than Romanesque architecture or paper money. Consequently, this environment has unique scientific value. Geologists come here to study weathering processes and . . . — Map (db m41691) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Sunset Crater Volcano National Monument — The Birth of a Mountain
About 1,000 years ago, something spectacular happened in the lives of local Native peoples. Perhaps they first observed a change in animal behavior. Maybe they noticed the ground warming. Then the tremors increased in number and intensity. By the . . . — Map (db m41689) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Sunset Crater Volcano National Monument — The Power to Symbolize
As a living ancestral homeland to the Hopi, Zuni, Yavapai, Havasupai, Navajo, Western Apache, and Southern Paiute, Sunset Crater is remembered, revered, and cared for. People return often, bringing prayers and engaging in timeless traditions. . . . — Map (db m41678) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Tuba City — Arizona's First Woolen Mill
Near here in 1879 Mormon Colonists Built Arizona's First Woolen Mill Hoping to utilize Hopi and Navajo wool and labor, the Mormons intended to build a new industry to supply the early settlers. The 192-spindle mill operated only a . . . — Map (db m94884) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Walnut Canyon National Monument — A Community Sharing the Land
This was a community of relatives and neighbors. Its members worked together to haul water, hunt animals, and gather plants. They likely assisted each other with large fields on the rims. They shared walls and resources, joy and sorrow, success . . . — Map (db m61366) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Walnut Canyon National Monument — A Complex Community
The Island Trail, visible below you, follows the sharp meander of Walnut Creek. Many cliff dwelling rooms, unique in this area, were built throughout the canyon at the level of this trail. On both rims are numerous pithouses and pueblos. On . . . — Map (db m61304) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Walnut Canyon National Monument — A Days Work
Puebloan traditions reach far back in time and are the basis for the social organization portrayed here. What responsibilities might you have had in this community, given your age and gender? [Photo captions read] Hopi men plant and tend . . . — Map (db m61350) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Walnut Canyon National Monument — A Ribbon of Life
Perhaps people living here 800 years ago called this place Wupatupqa ("long canyon"), as it is known to some of their descendants, the Hopi. It was no doubt known as a place of abundance, given its wealth of plant and animal life and the . . . — Map (db m61305) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Walnut Canyon National Monument — A Time of Change
When a volcanic eruption occurred near what is now Flagstaff, Arizona, people lost homes and lands they had cultivated for at least 400 years. A major life events for locals, the eruption was also visible to large population centers across the . . . — Map (db m61325) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Walnut Canyon National Monument — An Efficient Design
Overhanging ledges protected rooms from snow and rain, and shaded them during summer months. Thick walls of stone and mud insulated them from harsh winds and retained essential heat in winter. Small doors were covered with animal skins, mats, . . . — Map (db m61365) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Walnut Canyon National Monument — Cliff Homes and Canyon Life
As recently as the mid-1200s, families lived, worked, and played in Walnut Canyon. Tending crops on the rim, traveling to gather food, and collecting water from the canyon bottom were part of a daily routine. It may be difficult to imagine . . . — Map (db m61302) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Walnut Canyon National Monument — Departure
Despite all it had to offer, in time Walnut Canyon became a difficult place for farmers to live. Drier, colder conditions meant crop failures. More people and diminished resources meant nutritional stress, disease, and conflict. However, . . . — Map (db m61370) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Walnut Canyon National Monument — From Ocean to Alcove
Limestone forms the massive overhang above you and the ledge you are standing on. In between, softer layers of silty limestone have retreated, eroded away. All of the cliff dwelling rooms in Walnut Canyon — more than 300 — were built . . . — Map (db m61342) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Walnut Canyon National Monument — Migration is not abandonment.
Walnut Canyon was once filled with the sounds of a busy community as families hunted, planted, and harvested with the seasons. Children were born, grew up, and raised children of their own. They were neither the first nor the last to use and . . . — Map (db m61328) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Walnut Canyon National Monument — Problem Solving
Time has worn away details that once made these rooms complete. Still, bits of evidence tell us people devised ways to make their homes comfortable, durable, and suitable for changing circumstances. Rooms were added as families grew or . . . — Map (db m61341) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Walnut Canyon National Monument — Room Functions
Most rooms in this community did not house people. Archeologists think many rooms, like the one to your left, were used to store tools, food, and water. Residents could have stored a 100-day water supply without much difficulty, given large . . . — Map (db m61347) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Walnut Canyon National Monument — Tension and Harmony
With its steep and sheer walls, Walnut Canyon provided homebuilding advantages along with controlled access. Living here, people were situated to monitor their world. This was not uncommon; most villages of the time had some form of passive . . . — Map (db m61326) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Walnut Canyon National Monument — The Perfect Shelter
For each room tucked into this rock alcove, nature provided the back wall, floor, and leak-proof ceiling; no excavation was needed. Builders simply laid up unshaped blocks of limestone for side walls, enclosed the front, and opened their doorway . . . — Map (db m61340) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Walnut Canyon National Monument — The Quest for Water
During the spring thaw, snowmelt rumbled through the narrow passage below you. Water flowed again during the summer monsoon. Shaded pools held precious water after the flow ebbed. Walnut Creek was the lifeblood of the community. Still, people . . . — Map (db m61356) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Walnut Canyon National Monument — What Happened Here?
"It is very dusty work to dig for relics....We dug for an hour or more, and found...cornstalks, corncobs in abundance, beans, gourds, nuts, reeds, arrows, bowstrings,...coarse cloth, a child's sandal, a measuring stick with notches at regular . . . — Map (db m61368) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Williams — Adam's Grocery
In 1926, the Old Trails Highway was officially designated U.S. Highway 66, and it became the "Main Street of America." In 1984, Williams was the last Route 66 town in America to be bypassed by the interstate highway system. Built in 1907, this . . . — Map (db m33375) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Williams — Babbitt-Polson Building
The wood framed 1894 Polson Bros. General Store burned down in the 1901 fire and was replaced by this brick building in 1907. The Babbitt and Polson families were pioneer merchants in the area. In 1930 the building was stuccoed to create the only . . . — Map (db m33384) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Williams — Bill Williams Mountain — Elevation 9,264 Ft
This mountain was named for a colorful mountaineer, guide, and trapper who is generally credited with being the first American to explore northern Arizona – 1830 or earlier. Williams lived at different times among the Osage and Ute Indians, . . . — Map (db m33418) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Williams — Black and White Cleaners
Built by C. E. Boyce in 1907, this structure was a general merchandise and hardware store and shared a common wall with the Old Post Office to the west. In 1929 it became a dry cleaners with a huge array of belt driven machinery and an adobe . . . — Map (db m33366) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Williams — Citizens Bank
This Neo-Classical Revival style building opened with much fanfare on Armistice Day, November 11, 1918. The bank was the financial center of the lumber, ranching and railroad operations in the area until it closed in 1958. The extensive terra cotta . . . — Map (db m33381) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Williams — Dime Store
In 1901, a great fire swept through Williams, burning 36 business buildings, 2 hotels and 10 homes in less than an hour. Major fires in 1903 and 1908 further dictated the need for fire-resistant stone, concrete, and brick buildings. Many of those, . . . — Map (db m33392) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Williams — Duffy Brothers Grocery Store — Built 1912
Has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places by the United States Department of the Interior Cormick E. Boyce built this large brick structure intending it to be used as a bank, although it served as a grocery store during . . . — Map (db m33417) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Williams — Grand Canyon Drug Company
Bill Williams Mountain was named in 1851 after fabled mountain man William S. Williams, who is said to have trapped beaver in this area. In its shadow, this building circa 1912, served local needs with a pharmacy and soda fountain at the front of . . . — Map (db m33389) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Williams — Lebsch Confectionery
The Atlantic and Pacific Railroad arrived in 1882, starting a stampede of commercial enterprise. The development of Williams as a community is indicated in part, by this ice cream and confectionery store built by Albert Lebsch in 1914. For a number . . . — Map (db m33391) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Williams — Old Parlor Pool Hall — Circa 1910
Has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places By the United States Department of the Interior — Map (db m33390) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Williams — Old Post Office
Beginning in 1926, this vintage 1907 building served as the U.S. Post Office for 36 years. This was one of the many structures built by Cormick E. Boyce, who arrived in 1881 as a freight hauler and became one of the area's leading merchants and . . . — Map (db m33368) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Williams — Pollock Building
Built of locally quarried volcanic rock in 1901, this edifice housed a bank and many businesses displaced by the 1901 fire. These included the local newspaper, telegraph office, and eventually Arnold's, a famous Route 66 eatery. In 1928, the Masonic . . . — Map (db m33382) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Williams — Red Cross Garage
Built of native rock with brick facades, this 1913 garage served travelers at the end of the wagon age and beginning of the automobile era. By 1930, automobiles carried more people to the Grand Canyon than did the railroad. The opposite end of this . . . — Map (db m33380) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Williams — Rittenhouse Haberdashery
In 1901, a 60-mile long railroad spur line to the Grand Canyon secured Williams the title "Gateway to the Grand Canyon." Train tickets at that time cost $3.95 serving world travelers and locals alike, this pre-1910 structure was home to a men's . . . — Map (db m33388) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Williams — Santa Fe Railway Freight Depot
Built in 1901, this brick structure was the first train depot in Williams. After the Fray Marcos depot was built in 1908, this building took on freight arriving to and departing from Williams. It was moved here from across the railroad tracks in . . . — Map (db m33379) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Williams — Sultana Theater
This entertainment center opened in 1912 and boasted a theater and room for dances and other events. It featured silent movies until 1930 when the first "talkies" in northern Arizona were shown, drawing notadle visitors like Will Rodgers. The . . . — Map (db m33385) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Williams — Telegraph Office
Telegraph service came to Williams in 1894. The Postal Telegraph Co. was located here in 1910, when this office was built, until the 1940's. At some time the building was divided to share space with Ziriax Photo Shop. The town bandstand was located . . . — Map (db m33387) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Williams — Tetzlaff Building
This Victorian-Romanesque style building, designed as a saloon and bordello was built in 1897 by German tailor August Tetzlaff. Offering female company in eight cribs and an elegant parlor, it also boasted a two-story outhouse. Whiskey, pool tables . . . — Map (db m33377) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Williams — The "World Famous" Sultana
Constructed of formed concrete block in 1912, this saloon and billiard hall included a buffet for the townspeople who used it as a gathering place. Named for the famous Sultana Ruby of India. During prohibition the basement speakeasy provided . . . — Map (db m33386) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Williams — The Cabinet Saloon — Built 1893
Has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places by the United States Department of the Interior The Cabinet Saloon was a boisterous spot along "Saloon Row." Here railroaders, cowboys, loggers, and rowdy local residents came to . . . — Map (db m33378) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Williams — William Sherley Williams
Sculpture by B.R. Pettit "Old Bill" was born January 3, 1787 in North Carolina. He died March 24, 1849. In that 62 year life span he did a heap of living, most of it in the wilderness. In the late 1700's and early 1800's the mountain men . . . — Map (db m26456) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Williams — Williams, Arizona
The area around what now is Williams, Arizona, was first explored by a Mountain Man who came to this area in 1876, William Shirley Williams, who was called “Old Bill”. The town site was created by a cowboy named C.T. Rogers in 1879. . . . — Map (db m48351) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Wupatki National Monument — Community
This area seems quiet and lonely today - but not 800 years ago. This valley was used for farming and hunting by the people living in Citadel, Nalakihu, and other nearby pueblos, all inhabited at about the same time. (You can see the ruins of at . . . — Map (db m41716) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Wupatki National Monument — Nalakihu
Nalakihu - A modern Hopi name, "House Outside the Village" Farmers lived here about 800 years ago. (Roof beams gave tree ring dates in the late 1100s.) The way the walls join show this small pueblo was not built all at once, but was added onto. . . . — Map (db m41713) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Wupatki National Monument — The Ballcourt — A Mexican Idea at Wupatki
Ballcourts were common in southern Arizona from A.D. 750 to 1200, but relatively rare here in the northern part of the state. This suggests that the people of Wupatki intermingled with their southern Arizona neighbors - the Hohokam - who may have . . . — Map (db m41696) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Wupatki National Monument — The Blowhole
This blowhole - a crevice in the earth's crust that appears to breathe - is one of several found in the Wupatki area. It connects to an underground passage - size, depth, and complexity unknown - called an earthcrack. Earthcracks resulted from . . . — Map (db m41701) HM
Arizona (Coconino County), Wupatki National Monument — Where Were The Fields?
Farming then did not mean vast fields like we use today. Anasazi and Sinagua people modified these small terraces to grow hand-tended corn, cotton, beans, and squash. We know the climate was about what it is now, very dry for farming. The terraces . . . — Map (db m41715) HM

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