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Dawes County Markers
Nebraska (Dawes County), Chadron — 42 — Bordeaux Trading Post
From about 1846 until 1872, an Indian "trading house" occupied a site near here. Built by James Bordeaux, the trading station was once attacked and set afire by hostile Crow warriors. Fortunately, some friendly Sioux Indians came to the rescue and drove off the attacking Crow. James Bordeaux was from a French settlement near St. Louis and while yet a young boy, he went west with fur traders. Bordeaux was active in the fur trade in the vicinity of Fort Laramie from the 1830's until the . . . — Map (db m4529) HM
Nebraska (Dawes County), Chadron — 195 — Chadron Creek Trading Post
Employees of Lancaster P. Lupton built a trading post on the creek near here in 1841 to trade with the Sioux Indians. From 1842 until at least 1845 this post was managed by Louis B. Chartran, first for Sibille and Adams and later for Pratte & Cabanne. These companies were successively headquartered at Fort Platte about eighty-five miles southwest of here and competed aggressively with Pierre Chouteau Jr. & Co., which owned Fort Laramie. As a result of this competition, fur traders were very . . . — Map (db m89344) HM
Nebraska (Dawes County), Chadron — 465 — Fort Robinson - Camp Sheridan - Pine Ridge Indian Agency Road
Following the 1874 establishment of military posts near the Red Cloud and Spotted Tail agencies for the Oglala and Brule Sioux, the army laid out a forty-two-mile road to transport military and Indian supplies between the agencies and posts. Oglala leader Crazy Horse traveled the road on his final journey, when an army officer and Indian scouts escorted him from Camp Sheridan to Camp (later Fort) Robinson on September 5, 1877. Crazy Horse was killed that night while resisting imprisonment and . . . — Map (db m89346) HM
Nebraska (Dawes County), Chadron — Historic Northwestern Nebraska
The Pine Ridge Country of northwestern Nebraska is among the greatest historic places of the nineteenth-century American West. It was long the homeland and hunting grounds of the Lakota (Western Sioux). White fur traders began arriving during the 1830s and 1840s to exchange manufactured goods with the Indians in return for bison robes. In the 1870s many dramatic and tragic episodes played out across this landscape, sparked by the discovery of gold in the nearby Black Hills, and the . . . — Map (db m89354) HM
Nebraska (Dawes County), Chadron — Paha SapaThe heart of everything that is.
Paha Sapa is sacred land of the Lakota that the white man has named Black Hills. We never lived in this place. It is the womb of Mother Earth—the rightful home of birds and animals. We came here only for ceremonies, vision quests and burials. The lightning over the hills is the spirits of fallen warriors. We fought bravely to keep white settlers from taking our sacred land. Their army built forts to protect their people as they traveled through our lands. In 1868. the . . . — Map (db m89372) HM
Nebraska (Dawes County), Chadron — 331 — The Chadron-Chicago Cowboy Race
America’s longest horse race began here June 13, 1893. The 1,000 mile race ended June 27 in Chicago at Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show. The race apparently was the idea of Chadron jokester John G. Maher. Seven of nine riders finished, some traveling up to ninety miles a day. Nebraska badman “Doc” Middleton was an entrant. John Berry won, riding Sandy and Poison, but was disqualified for having prior knowledge of the route. Chadron officials declared Joe Gillespie the winner. Nebraska State Historical Society — Map (db m51693) HM
Nebraska (Dawes County), Chadron — 304 — The Fort Pierre-Fort Laramie Trail
From about 1837 until 1850, more than a quarter million buffalo robes bought from Indians and 27 tons of fur company trade goods were hauled over the 300 mile long Fort Pierre-Fort Laramie Trail that followed the White River through this area. First used by the American Fur Company, the trail had its origin as part of an earlier Spanish trade route from Santa Fe to the Missouri River in present South Dakota. During the 1840s the Fort Pierre-Fort Laramie Trail was the shortest overland . . . — Map (db m4530) HM
Nebraska (Dawes County), Crawford — 227 — Crawford
Crawford sprang up as a tent city on land owned by homesteader/newspaper correspondent William E. Annin in 1886 when the Fremont, Elkhorn and Missouri Valley Railroad pushed through the Nebraska Panhandle. To Incorporate the town, editor William Edgar supplemented civilian signatures with those of obliging soldiers stationed at nearby Fort Robinson. After the Burlington Railroad passed northward in 1887, Crawford became a supply depot and entertainment center for the Fort. Troops no longer man . . . — Map (db m44254) HM
Nebraska (Dawes County), Fort Robinson State Park — 392 — Buffalo Soldiers at Fort Robinson
Black soldiers of the Ninth and Tenth Cavalry regiments (called "buffalo soldiers" by the Plains Indians) garrisoned Fort Robinson for eighteen years and played an important role in northwestern Nebraska's history. Organized in 1866, the regiments first served in the Southwest. In 1885 the Ninth Cavalry arrived at Fort Robinson, which was regimental headquarters from 1887 to 1898. The black troopers helped build the new post during the fort's 1887 expansion and were the first cavalrymen sent . . . — Map (db m4134) HM
Nebraska (Dawes County), Fort Robinson State Park — 102 — Fort Robinson
In March, 1874, the U.S. Government authorized the establishment of a military camp at the Red Cloud Indian Agency on the White River. Home of some 13,000 Indians, many of whom were hostile, the Agency was one of the most troublesome spots on the Plains. The camp was named Camp Robinson in honor of Lt. Levi H. Robinson, who had been killed by Indians the previous month. In May, the camp was re-located on this site, and in January, 1878, was officially designated Fort Robinson. Fort . . . — Map (db m4489) HM
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