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Etowah County Markers
Alabama (Etowah County), Alabama City — Howard Gardner Nichols 1871-1896Scholar, Engineer, Industrialist, Naturalist, Humanitarian
Nichols came to Alabama City in 1894 to supervise construction of the Dwight Manufacturing Company. While serving as the mill's first agent, he planned and began a model mill village and was elected Mayor of Alabama City. — Map (db m18578) HM
Alabama (Etowah County), Attalla — “The Junction”Attalla
For thousands of years, two important Indian trade routes ran across what was to become Etowah County. The “High Town Path” ran from Charlestown, S.C. west to the Mississippi River, near Memphis, TN. The “Creek Path” begins at Pensacola, Fl. and runs northwest into the Ohio Country. Two miles west of this spot, on Big Wills Creek, the two routes formed a “Junction,” and became a combined path across Racoon (Sand) Mountain, where it again divided. By . . . — Map (db m39226) HM
Alabama (Etowah County), Attalla — Camp SibertWorld War II: 1942-1945
On 6/18/1942 the U.S. took possession of 36,300 acres in Etowah and adjoining St. Clair County to establish Alabama's first Chemical Warfare Center. The area was dedicated on 12/25/1942 and named for U.S. Army M/G William Luther Sibert, first Chief of Chemical Warfare Service and a native of Etowah County. The camp served as a Unit Training Center and a Replacement Training Center for the CWS and could accommodate up to 30,000 troops. Forty-seven percent of all CWS units of WW II were trained here. The camp was deactivated on 12/31/1945. — Map (db m33304) HM
Alabama (Etowah County), Attalla — Camp SibertWorld War II 1942-1945
On 6/18/1942 the U.S. took possession of 36,300 acres in Etowah and adjoining St. Clair County to establish Alabama's first Chemical Warfare Center. The area was dedicated on 12/25/1942 and named for U.S. Army M/G William Luther Sibert, first Chief of Chemical Warfare Service and a native of Etowah County. The camp served as a Unit Training Center and a Replacement Training Center for the CWS and could accommodate up to 30,000 troops. Forty-seven percent of all CWS units of WW II were trained here. The camp was deactivated on 12/31/1945. — Map (db m75194) HM
Alabama (Etowah County), Attalla — Camp Wills
Established as a supply camp by General Andrew Jackson, September 1813, on the banks of Big Wills Creek. It was here that Jackson directed the first campaign of the Creek War, and promoted Colonel John Coffee to Brigadier General and Captain Newton Cannon to Colonel, 24 September 1813. The victory of this army at Horseshoe Bend, in 1814, led the Creek Indians to cede thousands of acres of land to the United States and opened the way for the formation of the Alabama Territory in 1818, and the State of Alabama in 1819. — Map (db m73993) HM
Alabama (Etowah County), Attalla — Electricity for the City of Attalla
In the fall of 1902, Captain William Patrick Lay, of Gadsden, began construction of a small hydro electric generating plant at the site of Wesson Mill on Big Wills Creek, just southwest of Attalla. The plant was constructed, in Lay’s words, “First to supply the City of Attalla with electricity; second, to pump water into a tall stand pipe which would furnish Attalla with water; and third, to demonstrate the possibilities and economy of hydro electric power for which I had been contending . . . — Map (db m73994) HM
Alabama (Etowah County), Attalla — First United Methodist Church Of Attalla
In 1851 twelve Methodists meet in Newton (later Attalla) to plan a Methodist Episcopal Church. A crude log building on North Fifth Street served as the first church. In 1861 and again in 1882 the church relocated on Fifth to accommodate the growing membership. A full-time pastor was added in 1888. In 1896 Attalla was first reported at the North Alabama Methodist Annual Conference. Ground was broken for the present church home in 1903. On May 1, 1904, the congregation assembled for the first Sunday worship in the new sanctuary. — Map (db m73996) HM
Alabama (Etowah County), Attalla — William Patrick Lay(1853-1940)
William Patrick Lay (1853-1940), founder of Alabama Power Company, built his first hydroelectric plant on Big Wills Creek about 2 miles east on Simmons Lane. Lay purchased the Old Wesson Mill in 1902 and built a small hydroelectric generating plant which furnished electricity to the City of Attalla. Drawing on this success, Lay proposed building a large hydroelectric plant on the Coosa River at the Lock 12 site near Clanton and in 1906 organized the Alabama Power Company. Lock 12 Dam, . . . — Map (db m73995) HM
Alabama (Etowah County), Gadsden — Colonel Hood House
This stately Classic Revival house, built c. 1904, was the residence of Colonel Oliver Roland Hood (1867-1951), eminent Gadsden attorney and civic leaders. Colonel Hood was one of the three incorporators of Alabama Power Company in 1906 and author of its charter. For 35 years Hood was closely associated with William Patrick Lay in the development of electric power in Alabama. In 1954 the Gadsden Woman’s Club purchased the property to house their organization which was founded in 1923. . . . — Map (db m39135) HM
Alabama (Etowah County), Gadsden — Congregation Beth Israel“Love Thy Neighbor As Thyself" - Leviticus 19: 18
A religious school was organized in the Nadler home for the children of 10 Jewish families in 1903. From these roots came the first formal worship service in 1908. The cornerstone for the sanctuary was laid on March 8, 1922 with both Jewish and Masonic rites. The sanctification was celebrated on February 23, 1923. While the dedication of the Zemurray Social Hall on March 25, 1960 was marred by a fire-bombing, the Congregation has steadfastly remained committed to both its Jewish . . . — Map (db m51208) HM
Alabama (Etowah County), Gadsden — Dwight Mill Village
Dwight Manufacturing Company of Chicopee, Massachusetts selected this site in Alabama City for a cotton mill in 1894. The Mill and the village covering 240 acres was constructed under the direction of Howard Gardner Nichols. There were 160 New England style cottages in the original construction plan, each home had a distinctive architectural style and color scheme. Later construction brought the total number of homes in the village to 700. This model Village was designed with its own . . . — Map (db m18575) HM
Alabama (Etowah County), Gadsden — Eleventh Street School
The Eleventh Street School, built in 1907, was one of the earliest elementary schools in Gadsden. It is the only local surviving school building of that era. This two-story red brick structure has solid masonry exterior walls and an entrance which feature limestone columns, an entablature of the Ionic order, and a Palladian-style window. In 1926 the original architect, Alexander Duncan Simpson, designed an addition of eight classrooms and a lunchroom. After closing in December 1962, the . . . — Map (db m39133) HM
Alabama (Etowah County), Gadsden — Emma SansomMay 2, 1863
Here girl heroine led Forrest’s (CSA) men across Black Creek on way to capture Streight’s (USA) raiders. This saved the railroad supplying Confederate Army of Tennessee. — Map (db m39131) HM
Alabama (Etowah County), Gadsden — Emma Sansom
Here on the morning of May 2, 1863 Emma Sansom braved the fire of Colonel Streight’s sharpshooters as she guided General Nathan Bedford Forrest and his gallant cavalrymen to the ford at this spot where they crossed Black Creek, at that time a raging torrent. Her brave act enabled General Forrest to relentlessly pursue Colonel Streight and his army of raiders and force their surrender twenty one miles southwest of Rome. GA. This marker is lovingly dedicated to a woman worthy of being . . . — Map (db m39340) HM
Alabama (Etowah County), Gadsden — Emma Sansom Monument
In memory of the Gadsden Alabama girl heroine Emma Sansom, who when the bridge across Black Creek had been burned by the enemy, mounted behind Gen. Forest and showed him a ford where his command crossed. He pursued and captured that enemy and saved the city of Rome, GA. A grateful people took the girl into their love and admiration, nor will this marble outlast the love and pride that her deed inspired. Our heroes 1861-1865 The Confederate soldiers. These were men whom power could . . . — Map (db m12297) HM
Alabama (Etowah County), Gadsden — Etowah County War Memorial
World War I Ables, Crawford Aderholt, Carl Atwood, Joe I. Bagley, Hugh Battles, Fred Benton, Edwin J. Berry, C. Birchfield, Sam Brewster, Everett Buffington, Hugh G. Bullard, Leo Campbell, Earl C. Cason, Floyd Christenberry, Curn Cochran, Grady Coxwell, Elsie B. Faucett Lester C. Flemming, Joe Fletcher, Newman W. Garrison, Ed T. Gattis, Paul Gay, Margie Gentry, John Glenn, James E. Gray, Earnest E. Gray, Julius B. Gregory, Ben T. . . . — Map (db m53844) WM
Alabama (Etowah County), Gadsden — Etowah County, Alabama
Created by state legislature on December 1, 1868 from territory taken from Cherokee, DeKalb, Marshall, Blount, St. Clair and Calhoun Counties, having originally been formed December 7, 1866 as Baine County in honor of Confederate hero David W. Baine. Etowah is Cherokee. Area visited by DeSoto in 1541; Andrew Jackson in 1813; Hood’s Army of the Tennessee, CSA, October 1864; center of early steamboat navigation; home of John Wisdom, the “Paul Revere of the South,” 1863; and Emma . . . — Map (db m39138) HM
Alabama (Etowah County), Gadsden — Gadsden Amphitheater
Through the efforts of local citizens, Benny Dean and Floyd Beddingfield, the City of Gadsden obtained this facility from American Legion Post Number 5 in 1985. Built in 1935, the amphitheater seats 1600 persons. Designed by local architect, Paul W. Hofferbert, this beautiful open air arena is significant example of the rustic stone construction typical of the 1930s Works Progress Administration. The amphitheater and adjacent auditorium, both W.P.A. projects, was called Gadsden Civic Center . . . — Map (db m39308) HM
Alabama (Etowah County), Gadsden — Gadsden Municipal Amphitheatre(Legion Park Bowl)
Built of local sandstone in 1935 on land obtained from the American Legion Post No. 5 this municipal amphitheatre seating about 1600 was constructed for staging theatrical and sporting events. Gadsden architect Paul W. Hofferbert designed the open-air arena which is a significant example of the rustic stone construction work of the Works Progress Administration in the 1930s. The amphitheatre, the adjacent auditorium, and the swimming pool, all W.P.A. projects, comprised the Gadsden Civic Center . . . — Map (db m39140) HM
Alabama (Etowah County), Gadsden — Gadsden Times-News Building
This Italianate brick commercial structure with a cast-iron storefront on the first floor is significant for its 24 year association with Gadsden’s principal newspaper. It was constructed in 1904 to house The Gadsden Times-News, which was established in 1867 under the ownership of two Confederate veterans, Leonidas Grant and T. J. Cox. In 1871 it was purchased by William M. Meeks and merged with rival The Gadsden News in 1887. The Meeks family published the paper until 1927 when the . . . — Map (db m39217) HM
Alabama (Etowah County), Gadsden — Gadsden, Alabama
Side A: In the early 1840’s, John S. Moragne, along with Gabriel and Joseph Hughes, began surveying for a city on the banks of the Coosa River near the settlement of Double Springs. The new city would be located on 120 acres of land at the present site of the downtown business district. The fledgling town received a boost on July 4, 1845, when the piercing sound of a steamboat’s whistle along the banks of the Coosa River announced the beginning of a new era in Northeast Alabama. The . . . — Map (db m39139) HM
Alabama (Etowah County), Gadsden — Gunn-Bellenger House
Built in 1886 for Edward Tracy Hollingsworth, a prominent merchant and banker, this two-story Victorian - style house with mansard roof is one of the few surviving examples of late-nineteenth century architecture in Gadsden. The original complex included a detached kitchen, a well, a servant’s house and a barn. In 1901 Dr. and Mrs. Charles L. Gunn purchased the property. It remained in that family until the death of their daughter, Carolyn Gunn Bellenger in 1990, who had bequeathed the house . . . — Map (db m39134) HM
Alabama (Etowah County), Gadsden — John H. Wisdom
His courageous ride of warning from Gadsden to Rome, Ga. on May 2, 1863 is unsurpassed in history. — Map (db m39218) HM
Alabama (Etowah County), Gadsden — Paul Harvey Loyalty Day
On Loyalty Day this 30th day of April, 1967, we do pay honors and tribute to a great American - Paul Harvey - a man who has contributed much toward making this nation and especially Gadsden a better place to live. We salute a true champion of freedom. "God bless you" — Map (db m12301) HM
Alabama (Etowah County), Gadsden — Sisters Missionary Servants Of The Most Blessed Trinity
On January 25, 1925 the Sisters acquired the 25 - bed Gadsden General Hospital on Chestnut Street and renamed it Holy Name of Jesus Hospital. The Hospital grew under the leadership of the Founders, Father Thomas A. Judge, C. M. and Mother Mary Boniface Keasey, M. S. B. T. In 1931 a new 120 - bed hospital was constructed on this site on land purchased from the Moragne family. Other additions were made during the 1960s and 1970s and the capacity was increased to 281 beds. In 1991 the Sisters . . . — Map (db m39141) HM
Alabama (Etowah County), Gadsden — The Legend Of Noccalula
White settlers in the hills of Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, North Carolina, and South Carolina pushed the Cherokee Indian tribes into North Alabama. The Cherokee in turn encroached upon Creek Territory. There were sporadic battles between the tribes. Black Creek Falls had long been a trading station and ceremonial ground. Legend is that Noccalula, a beautiful daughter of a Cherokee Chief, had been promised by her father to a Creek sub-chief as an exchange for peace between the Nations. . . . — Map (db m37459) HM
Alabama (Etowah County), Gadsden — The North Alabama Conference of the United Methodist Church
The North Alabama Conference of the United Methodist Church was organized on this site in the Methodist Episcopal Church, South of Gadsden, Alabama November 16, 1870 Bishop Robert Pain, presiding The Centennial Convocation of the Conference was held here on November 16, 1970 Bishop W. Kenneth Goodson, presiding — Map (db m15436) HM
Alabama (Etowah County), Gadsden — Turkey Town MonumentChief Turkey-Turkey Town Valley Expedition-May We Never Forget
The surrounding area and this well was part of Turkey’s Town, once a capitol of the proud Cherokee Nation. Chief Turkey was the principal chief during the late 1700’s. On October 25, 1864, the Turkey Town Valley Expedition of the XV Corps Union Army led by Major General Peter J. Osterhaus was stopped by the Confederate Calvary led by Joseph Wheeler at this site. Total casualties: US 287 CS 92. May we never forget the men and women of Turkey Town Valley who labored and fought to . . . — Map (db m26837) HM
Alabama (Etowah County), Gadsden — William Luther Sibert Major General U.S. Army (Ret.)1860-1935
This is the site of the family home of Gadsden native General William Luther Sibert who played a major role in the construction of the Panama Canal. While serving in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, he was appointed chief engineer for the Atlantic Division of the Panama Canal. He designed and built the Atlantic locks, and constructed Gatun Dam, then the largest earthen dam in the world, to create Gatun Lake, the central operating feature of the Canal. During World War I General Sibert . . . — Map (db m39253) HM
Alabama (Etowah County), Hokes Bluff — John Henry Wisdom(The Paul Revere Of The Confederacy)
On the night of May 2nd and the morning of May 3rd, 1863, John Wisdom rode 67 miles, from Gadsden, Ala. To Rome, Ga. Under very harassing conditions, to warn the citizens of Col. A. D. Streight’s proposed march to burn and sack the city, Rome being a stronghold of the Confederacy, having an iron works and supply depot. Through this man’s efforts barricades were erected leading to the eventual surrender of Col. Streight to Gen. Bedford Forrest. John Wisdom lived his last day here and is buried nearby. — Map (db m41001) HM
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