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Fauquier County Markers
Virginia (Fauquier County), Atoka — B 25 — Mosby’s Rangers
Here at Atoka (Rector’s Crossroads) on June 10, 1863, Company “A”, 43rd Battalion of Partisan Rangers, known as “Mosby’s Rangers”, was formally organized. James William Foster was elected Captain; Thomas Turner, First Lieutenant; W. L. Hunter, Second Lieutenant; and G. H. Whitescarver, Third Lieutenant. Shortly after, Brawner’s Company of Prince William Cavalry joined the command. — Map (db m1467) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Atoka — Rector House
Here at Rector's Crossroads on June 10, 1863 Major John S. Mosby officially established Company A, 43rd Battalion Virginia Cavalry, known as Mosby's Rangers. It was here on June 23, 1863 that General J.E.B. Stuart set up headquarters and received orders from General Lee concerning the cavalry's route in what would become the Gettysburg Campaign. — Map (db m2786) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Atoka — Rector’s CrossroadsThey Did Their Job — Gettysburg Campaign
(Preface): After Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee's stunning victory at Chancellorsville in May 1863, he led the Army of Northern Virginia west to the Shenandoah Valley, then north through central Maryland and across the Mason-Dixon Line into Pennsylvania. Union Gen. George G. Meade, who replaced Gen. Joseph Hooker on June 26, led the Army of the Potomac in pursuit. Their armies collided at Gettysburg on July 1, starting a battle that neither general planned to fight there. Three days later, . . . — Map (db m2785) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Atoka — B 34 — Welbourne
One mile northwest stands Welbourne (ca. 1770), which has housed members of the same family since the 1830s. It is a significant example of a late-18th-century stone farmhouse that evolved into an imposing mansion. Welbourne was the home of Col. Richard H. Dulany, C.S.A., who founded the nation’s oldest foxhunting club (Piedmont) in 1840, and the oldest horse show (Upperville) in 1853. Visitors during the Civil War included Stuart and Mosby. In the 1930s F. Scott Fitzgerald and Thomas Wolfe . . . — Map (db m1470) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Auburn — CL-9 — Battle of Coffee Hill (Second Battle of Auburn)
During the early morning of 14 Oct. 1863, just northwest of here, Maj. Gen. J.E.B. Stuart and two cavalry brigades, cut off from the Army of Northern Virginia by Federal infantry, attacked Union Brig. Gen. John C. Caldwell’s forces as they brewed coffee and prepared breakfast on the hill. Confederate Maj. Robert F. Beckham’s Horse Artillery fired on Caldwell’s troops to begin Stuart’s attempted breakout. This surprised Caldwell’s men, but the Federals turned their artillery around and . . . — Map (db m2437) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Auburn — G 21 — Grapewood Farm Engagement
Pursued by Union detachments after raiding a train north of Catlett Station on 30 May 1863, Confederate Col. John S. Mosby and 50 of his Rangers (43rd Battalion Virginia Cavalry) made a stand on a hill just to the north. The Rangers used a howitzer to break a charge by the 5th New York Cavalry. The New Yorkers regrouped, however, and with troopers of the 1st Vermont and the 7th Michigan overran Mosby's position. After a hand-to-hand struggle, Mosby and the Rangers fled, abandoning the cannon . . . — Map (db m4563) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Auburn — Neavil’s Mill
The Eighteenth Century Mill was operated by George Neavil. It was still in use in 1932, and was restored in 1962 by the Antiquarian Society as a memorial to the early settlers of Fauquier County. — Map (db m2401) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Auburn — BX 7 — Neavil's Ordinary
Near here stood George Neavil's Ordinary, built at an early date and existing as late as 1792. George Washington and George William Fairfax on their way to the Shenandoah Valley stopped here in 1748. — Map (db m4357) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Auburn — CL 8 — Stuart's Bivouac
Reconnoitering on 13 Oct. 1863, Maj. Gen. J.E.B. Stuart found himself and two cavalry brigades cut off from the Army of Northern Virginia by the Union II Corps. The Confederates concealed themselves all night just north of here in a ravine only half a mile from the Federals. The next morning, as Lt. Gen. Richard S. Ewell's infantry corps marched to aid him, with seven pieces of horse artillery Stuart open fire on Union Brig. Gen. John C. Caldwell's division on a nearby hill and scattered it. . . . — Map (db m4354) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Bristersburg — BX-2 — Brent Town
In 1687, King James II granted 30,000 acres of land here as a sanctuary for Roman Catholics to George Brent, of Stafford County, and London residents Robert Bristow, Richard Foote, and Nicholas Hayward. Brent established a fortified outpost the next year that overlooked an Indian path later called the Carolina Road; the Indians cut a new path farther west. In 1742, when the Prince William County seat was moved from Woodbridge, Brent Town, as the settlement on the Brent tract was known, was . . . — Map (db m2734) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Broad Run — FA-1 — Campaign of Second Manassas
Lee and Longstreet, moving eastward to join Jackson at Manassas, found this gap held by a Union force, August 28, 1862. They forced the gap, after some fighting, and moved on toward Manassas, August 29, 1862. — Map (db m607) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Broad Run — C-50 — Thoroughfare Gap
Just west is Thoroughfare Gap where Union and Confederate armies clashed during Civil War. In July 1861, Gen. Joseph E. Johnston marched eastward through the gap to join Brig. Gen. P.G.T. Beauregard in the First Battle of Manassas. Maj. Gen. Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson passed by here on 26 Aug. 1862 to attack the Federal supply depot at Manassas Junction. Two days later, Gen. Robert E. Lee and Maj. Gen. James Longstreet surprised and repelled Union cavalry under Col. Sir Percy . . . — Map (db m608) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Catlett — Catlett’s StationStuart’s Revenge
Second Manassas Campaign August 22, 1862, was a day of surprises in Fauquier County, most of which were provided by Confederate Gen. J.E.B. Stuart and his 1,500 cavalrymen. Their target was the lightly guarded Union supply depot here at Catlett’s Station, thirteen miles behind Gen. John Pope’s Union army on the Rappahonnock River. Citizens of nearby Warrenton were pleasantly surprised as Susan Emeline Caldwell described in a letter to her husband the following day: ”Our town was . . . — Map (db m2750) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Catlett — Z-170 — Fauquier County / Prince William County
Fauquier County Fauquier County was named for Francis Fauquier, lieutenant governor of Virginia from 1758-1768. It was formed in 1759 from Prince William County. The county seat is Warrenton. United States Supreme Court Chief Justice John Marshall was born in this county. Col. John Singleton Mosby and his 43d Battalion Partisan Rangers were active here during the Civil War. Prince William County Prince William County, named for William Augustus, duke of Cumberland and third . . . — Map (db m2210) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Catlett — B-35 — Mosby’s Raid at Catlett’s Station
To halt the flow of supplies to Union forces on the Orange & Alexandria R.R., Maj. John S. Mosby, C.S.A., destroyed a train near here on 30 May 1863. Removing a rail to stop the train, Mosby’s Rangers disabled the engine with a recently acquired howitzer, described as “too big to fit in a holster, but too small to be a cannon.” Alerted by the firing, nearby Union troops (N.Y., Mich., & Vt.), commanded by Col. William D. Mann, attempted to capture the Confederates. Mosby set fire to . . . — Map (db m2246) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Catlett — B-36 — Stuart and Mosby
Here on the evening of August 22, 1862, General J. E. B. Stuart raided General Pope’s headquarters. Unable to burn the railroad bridge because of a heavy thunderstorm, Stuart withdrew his troops as well as 300 Federal prisoners and Pope’s dispatch case. At nearby Warrenton Junction (Calverton) on May 3, 1863, Colonel John S. Mosby attacked the Federal 1st West Virginia Regiment, but was forced to flee when surprised by 1st Vermont and 5th New York Cavalry. — Map (db m2244) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Delaplane — B-40 — Death of 2d Lt. James “Big Yankee” Ames
Sergeant James F. Ames of the 5th New York Cavalry deserted the Union army in Feb. 1863 and joined Lt. Col. John S. Mosby’s Partisan Rangers (later 43d Cavalry Battalion). Nicknamed “Big Yankee” Ames rose to the rank of 2d lieutenant. On the night of 8 Mar. 1863 he guided Mosby’s Rangers on the Fairfax Court House raid in which Mosby captured Union Brig. Gen. Edwin Stoughton. On 9 Oct. 1864 a Federal soldier shot and killed Ames on the road leading to Benjamin “Cook” . . . — Map (db m643) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Delaplane — B-21 — Delaplane(Formerly Piedmont Station)
On July 19, 1861 Stonewall Jackson’s brigade of General Joseph E. Johnston’s corps marched to this station from Winchester. They crowded into freight and cattle cars and travelled to the 1st Battle of Manassas. The use of a railroad to carry more than ten thousand troops to the Manassas battlefield gave striking demonstration of the arrival of a new era in military transport and contributed significantly to the Confederate victory there. — Map (db m642) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Delaplane — Emmanuel Episcopal ChurchPiedmont Parish
Some time before 1858, the Methodists and Episcopalians of the Community of Oak Hill, who had shared a church at Cool Spring since 1816, decided to build separate churches. Piedmont Parish raised $1,000; John Thomas Smith and his wife Margaret Lewis Marshall of Ashley gave land Mrs. Smith had inherited from her father, Thomas Marshall, son of John Marshall, the fourth Chief Justice of the United States. Ground was broken in September, 1858, and Emmanuel Church consecrated on July 23, 1859, . . . — Map (db m11492) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Delaplane — Piedmont StationBy Train to Manassas — First Manassas Campaign
Here at Piedmont Station (now Delaplane) trains were used for the first time in history to move troops to impending battle. On July 19, 1861 the fields surrounding this stop on the Manassas Gap Railroad—which appeared then almost exactly as they do today—were filled with thousands of volunteer soldiers, members of Gen. Joseph E. Johnston’s Confederate Army of the Shenandoah. A single steam locomotive was on hand to move the army to Manassas Junction, then threatened with Federal . . . — Map (db m41648) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Elk Run — B-39 — Elk Run Anglican Church Site
Settlers began moving into this region of Fauquier County in the early 1700s. By the 1740s, a wooden church structure served Anglican communicants in Elk Run. It provided pastoral care as well as secular administration for this active frontier community. The first permanent minister, the Reverend James Keith, grandfather of Chief Justice John Marshall, served this church and the rest of Hamilton Parish from the 1740s until his death in 1752. A brick cruciform structure replaced the first church . . . — Map (db m2736) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Elk Run — Elk Run Village
Settlers began to arrive in Elk Run during the early 1700s, and when Hamilton Parish was established in 1730, there were several hundred persons living in this frontier village. A wooden Chapel existed at this site by 1740, when Prince William County Minute Books made note of road repairs in front of Elk Run Chapel. A large Brick Church in the shape of a Greek cross, whose foundation outline can be seen here, replaced the Chapel in the 1750s. The Church served respectively as a . . . — Map (db m2738) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Goldvein — F-18 — Goldvein
Thomas Jefferson stated in NOTES ON THE STATE OF VIRGINIA (1782) that he found gold bearing rock weighing approximately four pounds near this site. Among the 19 gold mines that have been in operation since then in the area, the Franklin and the Liberty were the most productive with the Franklin producing 6259 ounces of gold as recently as 1936. — Map (db m2730) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Goldvein — Monroe Park
In honor of H.P. ‘Pat’ & Thelma Monroe The original dreamers who generously donated the land for Monroe Park S.W. Rodgers Co., Inc. The community minded people who moved the earth to form Monroe Park Ruppert Landscape Co. The visionary landscape experts who enhanced the beauty of Monroe Park Dedicated October 31, 1998 Map (db m2258) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Markham — FF 10 — Brig. Gen. Turner Ashby, C.S.A.
Turner Ashby, Stonewall Jackson’s cavalry commander during the brilliant 1862 Shenandoah Valley campaign, was born on 23 Oct. 1828 just north at Rose Bank. From 1853 to 1858, Ashby operated a mercantile business in a large frame building just to the south, at the foot of the hill on which stands his home, Wolf’s Crag. An unsuccessful candidate for the House of Delegates in 1858, he left his home in April 1861 to serve the Confederacy as a captain of his Mountain Rangers. Ashby was killed in . . . — Map (db m1399) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Markham — In Memory of Officers of the C.S.A.Leeds Episcopal Church
In Memory of Officers of the C.S.A. who were associated with this parish Gen. Turner Ashby Col. Robt. M. Stribling Col. Jas. Keith Marshall Maj. John Ambler Capt. Richard Ashby Capt. Wm. C. Marshall Capt. J.C. Little Lt. Jas. M. Marshall Lt. Gray Carroll Lt. H.C. Stribling Lt. Wm. N. Green Adjt. J. A. Marshall — Map (db m25726) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Markham — FF 4 — Lee’s Bivouac, Gettysburg Campaign
Gen. Robert E. Lee established his headquarters here on the evening of 17 June 1863 as the Army of Northern Virginia marched north. Lt. Gen. Richard S. Ewell, who had replaced Stonewall Jackson as corps commander after Jackson’s death on 10 May, had cross the Potomac River into Maryland after defeating Union Maj. Gen. Robert H. Milroy on 15 June at Winchester. The way was then clear for Lt. Gen. James Longstreet’s corps to enter the Shenandoah Valley at Snicker’s Gap and Lt. Gen. A.P. Hill’s at . . . — Map (db m1400) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Markham — FF-12 — The Hollow
In 1765, John Marshall, then nine, moved with his family from his birthplace 30 miles southeast to a small, newly constructed frame house one-quarter mile east known as The Hollow. The house built by his father, Thomas Marshall, was his home until 1773, when the family moved five miles east to Oak Hill. After the American Revolution began, Thomas Marshall and his sons, John Marshall, James Markham Marshall, and Thomas Marshall Jr. fought in numerous Revolutionary War battles including Great . . . — Map (db m23940) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Marshall — FF-6 — Birthplace of Lt. Presley Neville O’Bannon, USMC
Just north stood the home of William and Ann (Neville) O’Bannon, where their son, Lt. Presley Neville O’Bannon, was born about 1776. O’Bannon, a Marine, was the first American to command U.S. forces on foreign soil and the first to raise the American flag over a fortress in the Old World. His success at the Battle of Derne, Tripoli (present day Libya) on 27 Apr. 1805, ended a four-year war against the Tripoli pirates, and inspired the phrase “to the shores of Tripoli” in the Marine . . . — Map (db m1359) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Marshall — FB-4 — Campaign of Second Manassas
Near here Stonewall Jackson, after a march of twenty-six miles on his way to Bristoe Station, halted for a few hours to rest his men, August 25-26, 1862 — Map (db m1358) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Marshall — FF-5 — Lee’s Narrow Escape
(Six miles southwest of this location), on the morning of 27 Aug. 1862, Gen. Robert E. Lee rested at the head of Lt. Gen. James Longstreet’s corps as it marched toward Thoroughfare Gap to join Lt. Gen. Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson’s corps near Manassas Junction at the Second Battle of Manassas. The 9th New York Cavalry covering the left flank of Maj. Gen. John Pope’s army on its march from Warrenton to Manassas nearly overran (overtook) Lee’s position between Ada and Vernon Mills. . . . — Map (db m1357) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Marshall — FF-8 — McClellan Relived From Command
At Rectortown, four miles North, General George B. McClellan received the order relieving him from command of the Army of the Potomac, November 7, 1862. As Burnside, his successor was present, McClellan immediately turned over the command to him. — Map (db m1170) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Marshall — FF 7 — Mosby’s Rangers Disband
Unable to extend a truce with the Union army, Col. John S. Mosby assembled his command, the 43rd Battalion Virginia Cavalry, in a field just west of here on 21 Apr. 1865. As Mosby sat astride his horse, his final order was read aloud. It stated in part: “I have summoned you together for the last time. The vision we cherished of a free and independent country has vanished, and that country is now the spoil of a conqueror. I disband your organization in preference to surrendering to our . . . — Map (db m1174) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Marshall — Mosby’s Rangers Disband Site
Here, April 21, 1865, Col. John S. Mosby disbanded his gallant partisan rangers—the Forty-Third Battalion Virginia Cavalry. — Map (db m1325) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Marshall — FF-11 — Number 18 School
After the Civil War, the constitution of 1869 established a statewide system of free public schools in Virginia. Several new schools in Fauquier were identified by an assigned number. Number 18 was built on land donated by Samuel F. Shackleford. From the time of its construction in 1887 until 1910, this one-room schoolhouse served local white children. When they moved to a newer school in the nearby village of Marshall in 1910, Number 18 then served African American students until it closed in . . . — Map (db m20645) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Marshall — FB-2 — Oak HillJohn Marshall’s Home
Thomas Marshall, the father of future Chief Justice John Marshall, built Oak Hill about 1773 and relocated his family there from The Hollow, their former home nearby. John Marshall resided at Oak Hill for two years until he entered the Continental army in 1775 at the age of twenty. He became the owner of the property in 1785 when his father moved to Kentucky. Although Marshall resided mostly in Washington, D.C. and Richmond, he improved Oak Hill and used it as a retreat. In 1819 his son Thomas, . . . — Map (db m1362) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Marshall — SalemLee’s Narrow Escape — Mosby's Confederacy, First and Second Manassas Campaign
The Village of Salem (renamed Marshall in 1882) was in the heartland of Col. John Singleton Mosby’s Confederacy. His 43rd Battalion of Partisan Rangers was summoned by the grapevine when needed and executed successful raids, often under the cover of darkness. One such action occurred October 5, 1864, one mile southwest of here on Stephenson’s Hill. Mosby’s men wreaked havoc on Federal soldiers by lobbing artillery shells upon them as they attempted to repair the Manassas Gap Railroad just east . . . — Map (db m1183) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Midland — CL-7 — German Town
About 1719, five years after they immigrated to Germanna in present-day Orange Co., twelve German families moved here as lot owners of 1,805 acres on Licking Run claimed a year earlier by their trustees, John Fishback, John Hoffman, and Jacob Holtzclaw. Melchoir Brumback, Joseph Coons, Harman Fischback, Peter Hitt, John Kemper, John Joseph Martin, John Jacob Rector, John Spilman, and Tilman Weaver headed the other families. With their pastor, the Rev. Henry Hager, they constituted the first . . . — Map (db m1754) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Midland — CL 3 — John Marshall’s Birthplace
About one half mile southeast, just across the railroad, a stone marks the site of the birthplace, September 24, 1755. He died at Philadelphia, July 6, 1835. Revolutionary office, Congressman, Secretary of State, he is immortal as Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court. During his long term of office his wise interpretation of the U. S. Constitution gave it enduring life. — Map (db m1779) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Midland — John Marshall’s Birthplace
Near this spot on September 4, 1755 was born John Marshall, Fourth Chief Justice of the United States. This marker erected by Marshall Inn of the Legal Fraternity of Phi Delta Phi, 1928. A marker erected by Marshall Chapter of Phi Delta Phi in 1902 is enclosed herein. — Map (db m2207) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Midland — John Marshall’s Birthplace Park
JOHN MARSHALL, Chief Justice of the United States, and principal founder of judicial review and of the American system of constitutional law was born in a log cabin just east of here on September 24, 1755. At that time, this location was near Germantown, a frontier mining settlement in the western portion of Prince William County, which became a part of Fauquier County in 1759. JOHN MARSHALL first served his country as one of the . . . — Map (db m2208) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Orlean — CB-1 — Campaign of Second Manassas
Here Lee and Longstreet, on their way to join Jackson, then at Bristoe Station, camped on August 26, 1862. — Map (db m23945) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Paris — B 20 — Jackson’s Bivouac
After a day’s march from Winchester on 19-20 July 1861, Brig. Gen. Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson halted his lead brigade of Gen. Joseph E. Johnston’s Valley army near here. At 2:00 A.M. his 2,500 men sank down to rest. When told that no sentries had been posted, Jackson stated “Let the poor boys sleep. I will guard the camp myself.” Relieved of his duty an hour before daybreak, Jackson slept briefly, rising at dawn to march to Piedmont Station (now Delaplane), where . . . — Map (db m1401) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Paris — Mount Bleak FarmThe Settles Anticipate War
Mosby's Confederacy and First Manassas Campaign In the early morning hours of July 19, 1861, thousands of campfire lights burned in the camp of Col. Thomas J. Jackson's brigade which occupied the fields surrounding nearby Paris. Many thoughts must have raced through the minds of Abner and Mary Kyle Settle, who resided here at Mount Bleak. Those fires may have been a reminder that war was now imminent and perhaps it would leave them mourning the loss of one of their sons. The First Battle . . . — Map (db m4976) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Rectortown — RectortownMcClellan’s Demise, Mosby’s Raffle — Mosby's Confederacy
On November 5, 1862, several weeks after a tainted victory at Antietam, the Army of the Potomac's Commander-in-Chief Gen. George Brinton McClellan established his headquarters here. That same day President Abraham Lincoln wrote the orders relieving McClellan of command. On the snowy evening of November 7, Gen. C.P. Buckingham arrived at McClellan’s tent with Gen. Ambrose Burnside. Buckingham handed McClellan the dispatch. When he finished reading, McClellan declared, “General Burnside, . . . — Map (db m1173) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Remington — "Chestnut Lawn" — (3.6 Mi. S.E. of Remington, Va.)
So named for a grove of some of the largest chestnut trees in America, formerly located in these fields and around the house. They were killed by the blight of 1910 - 1930. This land was originally patented with adjoining lands, by one Allen in the middle 17th century. The frame home, which he built on the center field, was destroyed by fire. Captain James Payne, of the War of 1812, bouth the land after his marriage in 1815 to Mary Isham Randolph Keith, daughter of Captain Thomas Keith of the . . . — Map (db m12901) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Remington — Kelly’s FordCavalry and Coffee
Pickets of the opposing armies frequently exchanged gunfire over the Rappahannock River and occasionally swapped Yankee coffee for Rebel tobacco. On St. Patrick’s Day, 1863, they did both here at Kelly’s Ford, about 100 yards downstream from the bridge. On this day the cavalry commands of two friends and former West Point classmates, Union Gen. William Averell and Confederate Gen. Fitzhugh Lee, clashed for nearly twelve hours in this vicinity. Averell crossed the ford into Culpeper County . . . — Map (db m41653) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Remington — Rappahannock StationA Rare Night Attack on the River — Mosby’s Confederacy
The hamlet of Mill View, present-day Remington, became known as Rappahannock Station to the Civil War armies which campaigned in this area. Here the vital Orange & Alexandria railroad (to your left) crossed the Rappahannock River just behind the low hills you are facing, near a grist mill. This stretch of the Rappahannock frequently was used as a strategic line of defense by the opposing armies. The most significant action here occurred Nov. 7, 1863, when Gen. George Meade’s Union Army of . . . — Map (db m2525) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Remington — The Battle of Brandy StationThe Crossing at Kelly's Ford
Civil War cavalry battles could be huge, shifting, sprawling engagements, spread across miles of countryside. For instance, the Battle of Brandy Station, named for a railroad town eight miles away, began at historic Kelly’s Ford in front of you. On the morning of June 9, 1863, two Union cavalry divisions and an infantry brigade crossed the Rappahannock River here. This force of about 6,000 men and 18 cannon — half of an 11,000-man force hunting for Confederates in the Culpeper area . . . — Map (db m2222) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Remington — The Battle of Kelly's Ford
Near this spot, at dawn on March 17, 1863, Brig. Gen. William W. Averill and his 2,100-man division closed on Kelly's Ford. Included in Averill's column was 22 year-old Sgt. Truman Reeves of Orwell, Ohio. Alerted to the Federals' approach, 130 Confederates sheltered by a mill-race held the bluecoats at bay for two hours. Finally, the Buckeyes, close on the heels of a detachment of the 1st Rhode Island, gained the west bank. The 7-foot depth of the ford and Averill's innate caution slowed his . . . — Map (db m64210) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), The Plains — F-9 — Campaign of Second Manassas
Here Jackson, on his march around Pope to Bristoe Station, turned to the Southeast, August 26, 1862. — Map (db m1250) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), The Plains — The PlainsThe Death of a “Jessie Scout” — Mosby’s Confederacy, First Manassas Campaign, Second Manassas Campaign
The Plains, situated on the Manassas Gap Railroad between Piedmont Station and Manassas Junction, was frequently traversed by troops from both sides. Throughout the war, local resident Edward (Ned) Carter Turner kept a detailed diary. Ned’s son, who died while in service, served with Mosby’s Rangers while Ned’s brother was a Rear Admiral in the U.S. Navy. On August 30, 1862, following the Battle of Second Manassas, Turner wrote: “The fighting portion of the army [Confederate Army of . . . — Map (db m1237) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Upperville — Battle of UnisonFoiling the Trap
(Preface): After the Battle of Antietam in September 1862, Gen. Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia escaped to Virginia. President Abraham Lincoln repeatedly urged Union Gen. George B. McClellan to pursue and attack. Following a plan that Lincoln devised to trap Lee's army in the Shenandoah Valley, McClellan finally got his Army of the Potomac moving. On November 1, Union cavalry Gen. Alfred Pleasonton began leading the advance from Philomont toward Upperville. Gen. J.E.B. Stuart's . . . — Map (db m42491) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Upperville — Battle of Upperville“Thus Passes a Sunday in War” — Gettysburg Campaign
(Preface): After Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee's stunning victory at Chancellorsville in May 1863, he led the Army of Northern Virginia west to the Shenandoah Valley, then north through central Maryland and across the Mason-Dixon Line into Pennsylvania. Union Gen. George G. Meade, who replaced Gen. Joseph Hooker on June 28, led the Army of the Potomac in pursuit. The armies collided at Gettysburg on July 1, starting a battle that neither general planned to fight there. Three days later, . . . — Map (db m3754) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Upperville — Battle of UppervilleA Swirling Cavalry Fight — Gettysburg Campaign
(Preface): After Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee's stunning victory at Chancellorsville in May 1863, he led the Army of Northern Virginia went into the Shenandoah Valley, then north through Maryland and across the Mason-Dixon Line into Pennsylvania. Union Gen. George G. Meade, who replaced Gen. Joseph Hooker on June 28, led the Army of the Potomac in pursuit. The armies collided at Gettysburg on July 1, starting a battle that neither general planned to fight there. Three days later, the . . . — Map (db m41655) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Upperville — Lee Moves North AgainScreening Lee's Infantry — Gettysburg Campaign
(Preface): After Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee's stunning victory at Chancellorsville in May 1863, he led the Army of Northern Virginia west to the Shenandoah Valley, then north through central Maryland and across the Mason-Dixon Line into Pennsylvania. Union Gen. George G. Meade, who replaced Gen. Joseph Hooker on June 28, led the Army of the Potomac in pursuit. The armies collided at Gettysburg on July 1, starting a battle that neither general planned to fight there. Three days later, . . . — Map (db m3753) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Upperville — UppervilleDrama at Vineyard Hill — Gettysburg Campaign
This site, known during the war as Vineyard Hill, commands a clear view of the road, stone walls, and fields in front of you where 10,000 cavalry and infantry clashed in the Battle of Upperville on June 21, 1863. It was the fifth day of attack and counterattack along present-day U.S. Route 50 and in the towns of Aldie, Middleburg, and Upperville. Union Gen. Alfred E. Pleasonton pushed west towards the Blue Ridge Mountains while Confederate Gen. J.E.B. Stuart fought to delay the Northerners long . . . — Map (db m1550) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Warrenton — CB 2 — Ashland Farm
The Holtzclaw family acquired Ashland through a grant issued by Lt. Gov. Alexander Spotswood in 1724, and lived on this land until the 1920s. While a portion of the house dates to about 1725, the main residence was completed by 1889, and was remodeled and enlarged by architect William Lawrence Bottomley in 1929. Between 1861 and 1864, the Union army stationed pickets at Ashland, as it was used as a Federal medical dressing station. Legend claims that a Union army payroll was hidden by a . . . — Map (db m7748) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Warrenton — C-57 — Black Horse Cavalry
The Black Horse Cavalry was conceived at a gathering of Warrenton lawyers in 1858 and was among the local militia companies called to active duty by Governor Henry Wise in 1859. The Black Horse led a successful charge against Union forces at the First Battle of Manassas, winning the special praise of Confederate President Jefferson Davis. Known as Company H of the 4th Virginia Cavalry, the unit served as bodyguard, escort, and scout for generals Joseph E. Johnston and Stonewall Jackson. . . . — Map (db m71039) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Warrenton — BrentmoorSpilman-Mosby House
Judge Edward M. Spilman of the Fauquier County Circuit Court constructed this house in 1859-61. James Keith, who served in the Black Horse Cavalry and later became president of the Supreme Court of Appeals of Virginia, acquired it in 1869. John Singleton Mosby bought the house from Keith in 1875. Mosby gained fame during the Civil War for his daring exploits behind Union lines. His Partisan Rangers (43rd Battalion, Virginia Cavalry) used guerilla tactics - swift, nighttime attacks and . . . — Map (db m7750) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Warrenton — C 92 — Brentmoor: The Spilman-Mosby House
This classic Italian Villa-style house was completed in 1861 for Fauquier County Judge Edward M. Spilman. James Keith, who later served as president of the Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals (1895-1916), acquired it in 1869. John Singleton Mosby purchased the dwelling in 1875. Mosby, a Confederate colonel, commanded the Partisan Rangers (43rd Battalion, Virginia Cavalry), which raided Union outposts, communications, and supply lines in Northern Virginia from 1863 to 1865. Eppa Hunton, a . . . — Map (db m1262) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Warrenton — Buckland RacesAn Inglorious Skedaddle
For Gen. J.E.B. Stuart and his Confederate cavalry, the 1863 campaigns brought fewer victories against the improving cavalry corps of the Union Army of the Potomac—that is, until October 19, 1863. Here on Chestnut Hill the wily Confederate had set a trap for Gen. Judson Kilpatrick’s Union cavalry division. Using Gen. Wade Hampton’s cavalry division as bait, Stuart had lured one of Kilpatrick’s brigades here by retreating from Buckland Mill (5 miles east of here) along the . . . — Map (db m784) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Warrenton — C-29 — Colonial Road
This crossroad is the ancient Dumfries-Winchester highway. Over it William Fairfax accompanied George Washington, then a lad of sixteen, on his first visit to Lord Fairfax at Greenway Court. It was on this occasion that Washington assisted in surveying the Fairfax Grant. — Map (db m785) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Warrenton — Executions in the YardThe Gallows
It is possible that early executions were carried out here in the exercise yard, however it is equally probably that they occurred in front of the jail, close to the courthouse or at another public location. Hangings were public in Virginia before the General Assembly passed the Criminal Punishment Law in 1879. In Fauquier County, the first executions under the new law were the hangings of John Williams and Winter Payne in the early hours of July 11, 1879. The two men were sentenced for the . . . — Map (db m61394) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Warrenton — C 55 — Fredericksburg Campaign
Because he had moved too slowly to attack Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia, Maj. Gen. George B. McClellan was relieved of his command of the Army of the Potomac by President Abraham Lincoln. McClellan was replaced by Maj. Gen. Ambrose E. Burnside. Determined to act boldly, Burnside reorganized his army and marched it to Fredericksburg, where he planned to strike South around Lee’s right flank toward Richmond. Delays in crossing the Rappahannock River enabled Lee to confront . . . — Map (db m1179) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Warrenton — John Singleton Mosby
(front face) Image of Col. Mosby. (right side) This tribute is affectionately dedicated to Col. John S. Mosby, whose deeds of valor and heroic devotion to state and southern principles are the pride and admiration of his soldiers, comrades, and fellow countrymen. (left side) He has left a name that will live till honor, virtue, courage all shall cease to claim the homage of the heart. (back) John Singleton Mosby - Lawyer Soldier Patriot - Dec. 3. 1833 - May 30. 1916 — Map (db m1292) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Warrenton — Lafayette’s Stepping Stone
During his 1825 visit to Warrenton, General Lafayette is said to have stood upon this stone. Courtesy: The Bartenstein Family — Map (db m1294) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Warrenton — G 2 — Leeton Forest
Half a mile east is the site of Leeton Forest, latter-day home of Charles Lee, Attorney General in Washington's and Adams' cabinets, 1795-1801. The tract was patented by Thomas Lee, of Stratford, in 1718 and descended to his son, Richard Henry Lee, Revolutionary leader. The latter's daughter Anne married Charles Lee, who obtained title to the property in 1803, and who died here in June, 1815. — Map (db m19359) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Warrenton — C 9 — McClellan’s Farewell
After President Abraham Lincoln relieved Maj. Gen. George B. McClellan of command of the Army of the Potomac on 7 Nov. 1862, the general composed a farewell order. It was read to the army by divisions on 10 Nov. when the new commander, Maj. Gen. Ambrose E. Burnside, held a grand review of the army about half a mile north of here. Both Burnside and McClellan attended, and the three-mile-long line of soldiers cheered McClellan heartily, many weeping. This closed McClellan’s military career. He . . . — Map (db m1178) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Warrenton — Norris Tavern / The Warren Green
Norris Tavern. On this site stood the Norris Tavern built by Thaddeus Norris in 1819. It was the scene of a banquet tendered to General Lafayette by the citizens of Fauquier on his visit to the United States in 1825. The Warren Green. In 1843 the Norris Tavern was converted into an academy and later again into the Warren Green Hotel. Here General McClellan bade farewell to his officers November 11, 1862, on being relieved of command of the Army of the Potomac. — Map (db m1175) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Warrenton — C 54 — Second Manassas CampaignManassas Junction Operations
Eight miles southeast, at Bristoe (then Bristoe Station), Maj. Gen. Ambrose P. Hill's division of Maj. Gen. Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson's corps destroyed the Orange & Alexandria Railroad bridges over Kettle Run and Broad Run on 27 Aug. 1862. The evening before, Jackson had captured Bristoe Station, derailed three trains bound for Manassas Junction, and then, in a rare night attack, seized the huge Federal supply depot at the junction. When Union Maj. Gen. John Pope's army approached from . . . — Map (db m4799) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Warrenton — C 58 — Second Manassas CampaignStuart's Catlett Station Raid
On 22 Aug. 1862, Maj. Gen. J.E.B. Stuart led his cavalry on a raid behind Maj. Gen. John Pope's army. Stuart crossed the Rappahannock River at Waterloo Bridge, two miles west, then rode around Pope's right flank just north of here to attack Catlett Station on the Orange & Alexandria Railroad after dark. The raid did little damage but Stuart captured Pope's colorful dress uniform coat. Stuart, who earlier had lost his plumed hat to Union cavalry, soon wrote Pope suggesting an exchange of . . . — Map (db m7747) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Warrenton — C-60 — Second Manassas CampaignStrategic Rappahannock River Crossings
A mile northwest stood Waterloo Bridge, where on 22 Aug. 1862 Maj. Gen. J. E. B. Stuart crossed the Rappahannock River to threaten the rear of Union Maj. Gen. John Pope’s army 14 miles southeast at Catlett Station on the Orange & Alexandria Railroad. Pope’s men guarded several downstream crossings, including Fauquier White Sulphur Springs (3 miles south), Freeman’s Ford, Beverly’s Ford, Rappahannock Bridge, Norman’s Ford, and Kelly'’s Ford (16 miles). Gen. Robert E. Lee sent Maj. Gen. Thomas J. . . . — Map (db m36792) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Warrenton — Warrenton
The first court house for Fauquier County was built in 1760 on two acres of land belonging to Richard Henry Lee. The settlement that sprang up in its vicinity was first known as Fauquier Court House and under that name was laid off as a town to contain eight acres, in a survey made by James Routt, Dec. 4, 1790. Reverse side: The court house settlement was established as a municipality under the name of Warrenton, Jan. 5, 1810, and a survey was made May 8, 1811, by which seventy-one acres . . . — Map (db m1268) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Warrenton — WarrentonHome of the “Gray Ghost.”
Although Warrenton was spared the ravages of major battles during the war, control of the town changed hands 67 times and many homes and churches housed soldiers or were used as hospitals. Warrenton was the home of several notable Confederates including Col. John Singleton Mosby, the “gray ghost of the Confederacy.” He is honored by the statue at this site. The Old Jail in use during the war, includes a Mosby exhibit. Other Points of Interest: 1. The Warren Green . . . — Map (db m41657) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Warrenton — Q-9 — Warrenton
Chosen as county seat in 1759, and first called Fauquier Court House, Warrenton was laid out as a town in 1790. John Marshall began law practice here. In the War Between the States it was the center of operations north of the Rappahannock and many wounded were hospitalized here. Union General Pope headquartered here in the Second Manassas campaign. Seizing the local press, the Unionists edited the newspaper as “The New York Ninth.” Mosby, The Ranger, made forays in this vicinity. — Map (db m58995) HM
Virginia (Fauquier County), Warrenton — Warrenton CemeteryNotable Confederate Resting Place
The gate to your right opens to Warrenton Cemetery, the final resting place of 986 Confederate soldiers, of every Southern state, about 650 casualties of the Civil War. Many wounded Confederates were evacuated to Warrenton and vicinity after the First and Second Battles of Manassas, and 585 died and are buried here. Their identities were lost when Union soldiers burned the wooden grave markers for firewood in the winter of 1863. Their remains were reburied here in 1877. The memorial wall . . . — Map (db m57286) HM
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