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Franklin County Markers
Massachusetts (Franklin County), Bernardston — Burke Fort — 1630 - 1930
Six rods easterly stood Burke Fort the first and largest, and also the first building in Fall Town. Built in 1738/39 by John Burke it was six rods square and contained eight houses. Fifty persons took shelter here during the old French and Indian War. — Map (db m48254) HM
Massachusetts (Franklin County), Bernardston — Connable Fort — 1630 - 1930
Site of the second fort and building in Fall Town, erected in 1739 by Samuel Connable. Its original timbers are still in the house on a knoll to the northwest. — Map (db m48774) HM
Massachusetts (Franklin County), Bernardston — Deacon Ebenezer Sheldon's Fort — 1630 - 1930
The Lieutenant's son Ebenezer, later deacon of the church and first town treasurer, built a fort ten rods east of here in 1740/41. It was unsuccessfully attacked by Indians in 1746 during King George's War. — Map (db m48777) HM
Massachusetts (Franklin County), Bernardston — Lieut. Ebenezer Sheldon's Fort — 1630 - 1930
Built in 1740 on this site. The first Proprietor's Meeting in Fall Town was held here in 1741. The Lieutenant's son Eliakim was shot by Indians in 1747 while working west of the fort walls. — Map (db m48011) HM
Massachusetts (Franklin County), Charlemont — Shunpike
To the Thrifty Travelers of the Mohawk Trail who in 1797 here forded the Deerfield River rather than pay toll at the Turnpike Bridge and who in 1810 won the battle for free travel on all Massachusetts Roads. — Map (db m51444) HM
Massachusetts (Franklin County), Deerfield — Old Deerfield — 1630 - 1930
Indian land called Pocomtuck, settled by men from Dedham in 1671. Attacked by Indians, burnt, and abandoned in 1675. Reoccupied and attacked in 1704 by French and Indians, who took 47 lives, and carried off 112 captives to Canada, of whom 60 were later redeemed. — Map (db m48012) HM
Massachusetts (Franklin County), Deerfield — Old Deerfield — 1630 - 1930
Indian land called Pocomtuck, settled by men from Dedham in 1671. Attacked by Indians, burnt, and abandoned in 1675. Reoccupied and attacked in 1704 by French and Indians, who took 47 lives, and carried off 112 captives to Canada, of whom 60 were later redeemed. — Map (db m48773) HM
Massachusetts (Franklin County), Erving — The View from the French King Bridge
A special place designated by the Massachusetts Executive Office of Environmental Affairs because it exemplifies the unique qualities of the Commonwealth. — Map (db m2642) HM
Massachusetts (Franklin County), Gill — Captain William Turner
Captain William Turner with 145 men surprised and destroyed over 300 Indians encamped at this place May 19, 1676. — Map (db m65762) HM
Massachusetts (Franklin County), Greenfield — Capt. William Turner
A military commander during King Phillip's war. Capt. Turner was killed near here in a retreat after leading a massacre of Indians fishing at the Great Falls of the Conn. River in Gill on May 19, 1676. — Map (db m51133) HM
Massachusetts (Franklin County), Greenfield — Eunice Williams — 1630 - 1930
Eunice Williams, wife of the Reverend John Williams "The Redeemed Captive," was killed at this place on March 1, 1704, during the Deerfield massacre. — Map (db m29069) HM
Massachusetts (Franklin County), Greenfield — Factory Hollow
An original industrial area of Greenfield and site of mills from 1784. In four story granite factory buildings built in 1830 woolens were made for union army during Civil War. Operations ceased in 1872 and factory burned in 1933. The bell tower remains. — Map (db m65769) HM
Massachusetts (Franklin County), Greenfield — Leavitt-Hovey House 1797
Attributed to Greenfield resident Asher Benjamin who here, in 1797 published first American architectural book, adapting English Georgian architecture to American styles and craftsmen. Became Greenfield Public Library in 1909. — Map (db m59929) HM
Massachusetts (Franklin County), Greenfield — Town of Greenfield
Settled 1686 by Deerfield residents, incorporated 1753 & made county seat 1811. A major industrial & commercial center at crossroads of major North/South & East/West transportation routes. Home of first American cutlery factory & world's largest tap and die industry. — Map (db m59927) HM
Massachusetts (Franklin County), Hawley — First Church of Hawley
Site of the First Church of Hawley Erected 1793 Reverend Jonathan Grout 1st Pastor This memorial placed by the sons and daughters of Hawley August 10, 1935 — Map (db m25876) HM
Massachusetts (Franklin County), Northfield — Captain Richard Beers — 1630 - 1930
Grave of Captain Richard Beers, killed by Indians on September 4, 1675. His monument is on the mountain-side above. — Map (db m48779) HM
Massachusetts (Franklin County), Northfield — First Settlement — 1630 - 1930
Here, enclosed by a stockade, the first settlement was made in 1673. Nine rods to the westward a fort was built in 1685 and eight rods southeast stood the Indians' Council Rock. — Map (db m48015) HM
Massachusetts (Franklin County), Northfield — Indian Council Fires — 1630 - 1930
Two hundred and fifty yards eastward are the sites of three large Indian council fires. The Beers Massacre of September 4, 1675, took place in a gorge one-quarter mile to the northeast. — Map (db m48780) HM
Massachusetts (Franklin County), Northfield — King Philip's Hill — 1630 - 1930 — Sachem of the Wampanoag
Philip, second son and successor of Massasoit, Sachem of the Wampanoag, camped on this hill during the winter of 1675-6. The stump of a large look-out tree together with defence trenches are to be seen on top. — Map (db m48778) HM
Massachusetts (Franklin County), Northfield — Nathanial Dickinson House — 1630 - 1930
Nathaniel Dickinson lived here nineteen years in a fortified house but was scalped and killed by the Indians on April 15, 1747, at Pachaug Hill. — Map (db m42634) HM
Massachusetts (Franklin County), Orange — Orange Town Pound — Built Mid 1700s
Used to hold stray farm animals until claimed by their owners. A fee was paid for their release. Most colonial towns had a pound; this is one of very few still standing. — Map (db m73551) HM
Massachusetts (Franklin County), Shelburne Falls — First Permanent Settlement in Shelburne
Site of First Permanent Settlement in Shelburne, Mass. 1760 Martin Severance 1718 - 1810 Scout in French and Indian Wars Scout with Rogers Rangers Revolutionary soldier Marked by Dorothy Quincy Hancock Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution.In cooperation with the town of Shelburne. 1940 — Map (db m59639) HM
Massachusetts (Franklin County), South Deerfield — Bloody Brook Monument
Erected August 1838 — On this Ground Capt. Thomas Lathrop and eighty four men under his command, including eighteen teamsters from Deer field, conveying stores from that town to Hadley, were ambuscaded by about 700 Indians, and the Captain and seventy six men slain, September 18th 1675. (old style) The soldiers who fell, were described by a contemporary Historian, as “a choice Company of young men, the very flower of the County of Essex none of whom . . . — Map (db m37542) HM
Massachusetts (Franklin County), South Deerfield — Bloody Brook Stone Slab
Grave of Capt. Lathrop and Men Slain by the Indians 1675 — Map (db m37546) HM
Massachusetts (Franklin County), Turner Falls — Nature's Puzzle — Saving all the pieces
“When we try to pick out anything by itself, we find that it is latched to everything else in the Universe.” John Muir Biological diversity, or biodiversity, makes life on Earth possible. The soil where our food grows, the air we breathe, the flight of a hummingbird and the graceful bloom of a Blue Flag Iris---all of these are interconnected like the pieces of a puzzle. Plants are the basis of all life. Imagine the picture on the right with NO plants…How would the animals . . . — Map (db m65767) HM
Massachusetts (Franklin County), Turner Falls — Songbirds — Neotropical Migrants
“Over increasingly large areas of the United States, spring now comes unheralded by the return of the birds, and the early mornings are now strangely silent, where once they were filled with the beauty of bird song” Silent Spring, published in 1962 Rachel Carson Every spring and fall, birds we call neotropical migrants fly thousands of miles between breeding areas in North America and wintering grounds in Central and South America. They migrate following cues such as . . . — Map (db m65766) HM
Massachusetts (Franklin County), Turner Falls — Waterfowl Migration
Following an instinct many thousands of years old, millions of ducks and geese fly south every autumn. Waterfowl finds overwintering habitat in the southern United States, Mexico, and Central and South America. As spring arrives, the birds return to the lakes and marshes of North America, driven by a biological urge to nest. The Mystery of Migration How can birds find their way for thousands of miles each way during migration? Scientists believe that birds navigate using the sun and . . . — Map (db m65764) HM
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