Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
 
 

Frederick County Maryland Historical Markers

263 markers matched your search criteria. The first 200 markers are listed. Next 63
 
Carroll's Mill Marker image, Click for more information
By Craig Swain, August 9, 2008
Carroll's Mill Marker
Maryland (Frederick County), Adamstown — Carroll's Mill
Stone structure nearby was flour mill built in 1812 by Charles Carroll of Carrollton (1737-1832), wealthy landowner and signer of the Declaration of Independence. Site was within his 17,000-acre wilderness tract called "Carrollton Manor." He deeded . . . — Map (db m10449) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Adamstown — Carrollton ManorGreen Corn March — Antietam Campaign 1862
On Saturday, September 6, 1862, the Army of Northern Virginia was spread along the entire length of Buckeystown Turnpike all the way to Frederick. The soldiers camped in the fields on either side of the road on the evenings of September 5-6, and by . . . — Map (db m1738) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Bolivar — 1862 Antietam CampaignLee Invades Maryland
Fresh from victory at the Second Battle of Manassas, Gen. Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia crossed the Potomac River on September 4-6, 1862, to bring the Civil War to Northern soil and to recruit sympathetic Marylanders. Union Gen. George . . . — Map (db m1520) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Bolivar — 19th Century BackpackerThe Civil War Soldier — Antietam Campaign 1862
An unnamed citizen of Frederick City said the following of the Confederates he had beheld marching through his hometown: “I have never seen a mass of such filthy strong-smelling men. Three in a room would make it unbearable, and when marching . . . — Map (db m1521) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Bolivar — Battle at South MountainA Natural Barrier — Antietam Campaign 1862
The Battle of South Mountain erupted on September 14, 1862, when elements of the Union army tried to drive the Confederate rear guard from Crampton’s, Fox’s, and Turner’s Gaps and break through to the western side of the mountain to attack . . . — Map (db m1519) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Bolivar — Civil War Hospital SiteHenry Shoemaker House
Civil War Hospital Site The Henry Shoemaker House was used as a hospital site during the Maryland Campaign 1862. Private Property courtesy of S.H.A.F — Map (db m4953) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Bolivar — John Collins
Native of Frederick County, skilled hunter and a superintendent of provisions with the Lewis and Clark expedition, John Collins was the first Marylander to cross the North American continent. Meriwether Lewis and William Clark were charged by Thomas . . . — Map (db m1904) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Bolivar — Maryland Campaign of 1862 / The Lost Orders
(Left Side) On September 4, 1862, General Robert E. Lee, hoping to shorten the war by winning a decisive victory on Northern soil, crossed the Potomac River into Maryland. Lee planned to draw the Army of the Potomac through South Mountain into . . . — Map (db m2040) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Bolivar — South Mountain SummitWhat an Ideal Location for a Break!
As early as 1750, Robert Turner bought land here on the top of South Mountain. The date of construction is unknown, but by 1790 a full-fledged inn was in operation at “Turner’s Gap.” Since then, the building has been in almost continuous . . . — Map (db m1600) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Bolivar — T.P. 1 — Turner's Pass Tablet T. P. 1
Between September 4th and 7th, 1862, the Army of Northern Virginia, General Robert E. Lee, commanding, crossed the Potomac near Leesburg and occupied Frederick, Maryland. On the 10th a movement was made to surround and capture the Union forces at . . . — Map (db m1594) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Bolivar — T. P. 2 — Turner's Pass Tablet T. P. 2
In the advance of the Union forces to repel the invasion of Maryland by the Confederates, the Army of the Potomac commanded by Major General Geo. B. McClellan, moved northward from Washington with its front extending from near the Baltimore and Ohio . . . — Map (db m1595) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Bolivar — T. P. 3 — Turner's Pass Tablet T. P. 3
Hill's five brigades were encamped at and around Boonsboro to prevent the escape of the Union forces at Harper's Ferry, through Pleasant Valley. Informed that two Union brigades were approaching Turner's Pass, Hill, on the evening of September 13, . . . — Map (db m1596) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Bolivar — T. P. 4 — Turner's Pass Tablet T. P. 4
Cox’s Division of the Ninth Corps moved from Middletown at 6 A. M., September 14, by the Frederick and Hagerstown Pike, turned to the left at Koogle’s Mill, on the Catoctin, nearly four miles southeast of this, and, marching on the old Sharpsburg . . . — Map (db m1597) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Bolivar — T. P. 5 — Turner's Pass Tablet T. P. 5
During the contest at Fox's Gap, Hooker's (First) Corps was operating east and northeast of this point. The First Corps left the Monocacy at daybreak, passed through Frederick and Middletown and between 3 and 4 P. M., leaving Gibbon's Brigade on the . . . — Map (db m1598) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Bolivar — T. P. 6 — Turner's Pass Tablet T. P. 6
When Hooker moved to the right at Bolivar by way of the Hagerstown road, Gibbon continued on the main road and attacked Colquitt, in position about 700 yards southeast of this point. He drove Colquitt's skirmishers and reached the bend in the road . . . — Map (db m1599) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Braddock Heights — Hagan’s TavernIf walls could talk..
The National Road has borne witness to many notorious comings and goings. The quiet atmosphere you’ll find at Hagan’s Tavern today is quite different from the raucous bawdiness of yesteryear. This tavern was a “place where the old bloats of . . . — Map (db m2247) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Braddock Heights — The Braddock-Washington Monument
In April 1755, Frederick Town was a planning center for a major campaign in the French and Indian War (175-1763). General Edward Braddock arrived from England and later 1,400 British Troops joined him to stop the French from taking land claimed by . . . — Map (db m68946) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Brunswick — Berlin
First called Berlin, later Barry, and finally named Brunswick in 1890, the town's fortunes fluctuated with the times. The canal was built here in 1834 and a large gristmill, powered by canal water, was built on the canal across from the towpath. . . . — Map (db m4333) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Brunswick — BrunswickFormerly Berlin — Gettysburg Campaign
Union troops pursuing the Confederate army to Virginia after the Battle of Gettysburg in July 1863 crossed the Potomac River here. Called Berlin at the time of the Civil War, this town truly experienced the challenges of life on the border. Both the . . . — Map (db m1863) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Brunswick — Brunswick
The area now known as Brunswick was prime for growth for over a century before the C&O Canal reached this location in 1834. Originally the site of a trading post and ferry, the water crossing here provided a route for settlers heading west into . . . — Map (db m61864) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Brunswick — M-5 "JEB Stuart" Tank
In 1921, a group of Veterans built and dedicated this park to honor WWI Veterans. Originally, a WWI Howitzer Cannon was located on this concrete pedestal. The citizens of Brunswick were called upon to donate the cannon for the WWII scrap drive. The . . . — Map (db m26716) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Brunswick — One Time RivalsB&O Railroad and C&O Canal
The Brunswick Railroad Museum and the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historic Park Visitor Center exist side by side today, just as the transportation modes did when first arriving here in 1834. However, the early relationship between canal and . . . — Map (db m60881) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Brunswick — Train No. 286 Bell Memorial
(below the window) Preserve the memory of train crew by ringing this bell for Ricky, Jimmy and Jim. (above the window) The bricks which make up the base of the bell memorial came from the B & O roundhouse that once stood in . . . — Map (db m1981) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Brunswick — Water Power
Canal water was an important ingredient in the production of "C.F. Wenner's Choice Family Flour." Brunswick businessman Charles F. Wenner drew surplus water from the canal near Lock 30 to power the wheels and turbines of his flour mill. Wenner was . . . — Map (db m4334) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Buckeystown — “Carrollton”
Patented for 10,000 acres to Charles and Daniel Carroll, Mary and Ellinor Carroll 1st April 1724. It was from this tract that Charles Carroll assumed the title “Charles Carroll of Carrollton” when signing the Declaration of Independence. — Map (db m90487) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Buckeystown — Buckeystown
This street scene photo taken on the bridge crossing Rocky Fountain Creek around 1870, clearly shows the three white tannery buildings on the east side of Buckeystown Pike. The tanning of animal hides was the town's earliest industry. The red brick . . . — Map (db m19385) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Buckeystown — Buckeystown ParkSoldiers’ Shortcake — Antietam Campaign 1862
On the south end of this park, the road from Urbana to Buckeystown crossed the Monocacy River over a stone bridge. Some of the Confederate troops camped here on September 6, 1862, while some crossed the bridge to bivouac on a knoll overlooking the . . . — Map (db m1737) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Buckeystown — Site of Buckeystown Methodist Episcopal Church
To your left is a street scene of the intersection in Buckeystown around 1899. The house immediately on your left was built around 1898 as the residence for the superintendent of the Buckingham School for Boys, located south of town (now . . . — Map (db m90488) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Burkittsville — “Sealed With Their Lives”
Just before the Confederate line along Mountain Church Road gave way, Brigadier General Howell Cobb arrived in Crampton’s Gap with his Georgia and North Carolina troops. After meeting with Colonel Thomas Munford, who had been directing the battle, . . . — Map (db m2060) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Burkittsville — 1862 Antietam CampaignLee Invades Maryland
Fresh from victory at the Second Battle of Manassas, Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia crossed the Potomac River on September 4-6, 1862, to bring the Civil War to Northern soil and to recruit sympathetic Marylanders. Union Gen. George . . . — Map (db m1958) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Burkittsville — Bartlett Leads the Way
Colonel Joseph J. Bartlett, the Commander of the Second Brigade of Franklin’s First Division, found himself in a curious position. As a brigade commander, Bartlett chose both the field across which Franklin’s Corps would attack and the formation for . . . — Map (db m2151) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Burkittsville — Battle for Crampton’s Gap“Sealed With Their Lives” — Antietam Campaign 1862
The Battle of South Mountain struck Crampton’s Gap late in the afternoon of September 14, 1862, when Union Gen. William B. Franklin finally ordered an attack against Confederate Gen. Lafayette McLaws’s force here. As the Confederate defensive line . . . — Map (db m1909) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Burkittsville — Brownsville Pass: Semmes’ Gamble
General Robert E. Lee directed Major General Lafayette McLaws to close in on the Federal garrison at Harper’s Ferry via Elk Ridge, west of South Mountain. McLaws’ route from Frederick took him through Middletown, where he turned southwest on the . . . — Map (db m2159) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Burkittsville — Burial: A Most Disagreeable Task
The treatment of soldiers killed in action depended on which army held the battlefield after the guns fell silent. At South Mountain a few men from each Union regiment were assigned to burial details. To prevent the spread of disease, they lined up . . . — Map (db m2145) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Burkittsville — BurkittsvilleHouses of Worship Become Houses of Misery — Antietam Campaign 1862
Union surgeons turned Burkittsville, a quiet rural village of some 200 people, into a hospital complex after the September 14, 1862, Battle of Crampton’s Gap. The building in front of you, the German Reformed Church, was Hospital D. Twenty-year-old . . . — Map (db m1864) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Burkittsville — Burkittsville: Henry Burkitt’s Town
The first settlers in this area cleared their farm land and raised their families along two Indian trails that crossed here. Joshua Harley, one of these pioneers and a veteran of the American Revolution, started the settlement’s first dry goods . . . — Map (db m2051) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Burkittsville — Chew’s Ashby Artillery
Captain R. Preston Chew organized Chew’s Ashby Artillery, the first “horse artillery” in the Confederate army, in November 1861. He named it for Colonel Turner Ashby. Chew’s battery bosted a 3 in ordinance rifle, a 12-pounder smoothbore . . . — Map (db m2055) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Burkittsville — Cobb’s Brigade McLaw’s Division C.S.A.Lt. Col. Jefferson M. Lamar & Cobbs Georgia Legion
Cobb’s Brigade McLaw’s Division C.S.A. ———— At 1 P.M. on September 14, 1862, Cobb’s Brigade under Gen. Howell Cobb of Athens, GA. marched from Sandy Hook to Brownsville at the west foot of . . . — Map (db m1964) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Burkittsville — C.P. 5 — Confederate ForcesMunford’s Brigade and Mahone’s Brigade
Confederate Forces Col. T. T. Munford, 2nd Virginia Cavalry, Commanding, Munford’s Brigade, 2nd & 12th Virginia Cavalry. Mahone’s Brigade, Lt. Col. Wm. A. Parham, 41st Virginia, Commanding. 6th, 12th, 16th, 41st, and 61st Virginia Infantry . . . — Map (db m2045) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Burkittsville — C.P. 1 — Crampton’s Pass Tablet C.P. 1
Between September 4th and 7th, 1862, the Army of Northern Virginia, General Robert E. Lee, Commanding, crossed the Potomac near Leesburg, and occupied Frederick, Maryland. On the 10th a movement was made to surround and capture the Union forces at . . . — Map (db m2020) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Burkittsville — C.P. 3 — Crampton’s Pass Tablet C.P. 3
(September 14, 1862) Upon the approach of the Sixth Corps, Army of the Potomac, from Jefferson, Col. T. T. Munford, Commanding Cavalry Brigade, prepared to dispute its advance through this Pass. Mahone’s Brigade, Lt. Col. Parham, Commanding, was . . . — Map (db m2023) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Burkittsville — First New Jersey Brigade
1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th Infantry and Hexamer’s Battery September 14, 1862 Late in the afternoon the brigade advanced from the fields north and west of Burkittsville, charged up the mountain, carried this point and followed the enemy to the . . . — Map (db m2061) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Burkittsville — Forest of NeedwoodEstate of Governor Thomas Sim Lee — 1745-1819
Member Maryland Convention 1775 Signer Association of Freemen Governor of Maryland 1779-82, 1792-4 Delegate Continental Congress 1783-4 Member state convention which ratified the Constitution 1788. — Map (db m58776) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Burkittsville — GATH: The Man and His Mountain
George Alfred Townsend, known by his pen name of “GATH,” was born in Georgetown, Delaware, in 1841. One of the youngest and most renowned special correspondents of his time, he reported on politics and war in both the . . . — Map (db m2038) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Burkittsville — Gath's Empty Tomb
During the 19th century few people bought burial lots in public cemeteries as we do today. Instead, a small parcel of their own land was usually set aside as a private cemetery. If enough money was available, a mausoleum (tomb) was often built for . . . — Map (db m60905) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Burkittsville — George Alfred TownsendA Man and His Mountain — Antietam Campaign 1862
None of the structures you see here in Crampton’s Gap existed during the battle on September 14, 1862. George Alfred Townsend constructed all the stone buildings and walls, as well as the Correspondents’ Arch, between 1884 and 1896. Townsend, . . . — Map (db m1931) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Burkittsville — C.P. 2 — Maj. Gen. Lafayette McLaws' Command
C. S. A. Maj. Gen. Lafayette McLaws' Command (September 12-13, 1862) McLaws’ Command consisted of Kershaw’s, Barksdale’s, Semmes’ and Cobb’s Brigades of his own Division and R. H. Anderson’s Division of six Brigades-Wilcox’s, Mahone’s, . . . — Map (db m2021) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Burkittsville — Maryland Campaign of 1862 / The Lost Orders
(Left Side) On September 4, 1862, General Robert E. Lee, hoping to shorten the war by winning a decisive victory on Northern soil, crossed the Potomac River into Maryland. Lee planned to draw the Army of the Potomac through South Mountain into . . . — Map (db m2039) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Burkittsville — 6 — MausoleumGathland State Park — Walking Tour Stop 6
Townsend regarded Gapland as a lasting monument to himself and his craft and wanted to rest here for all time. Townsend designed and erected his Mausoleum in 1895. Its four vaults were intended to house his remains and those of his wife and parents. . . . — Map (db m65854) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Burkittsville — Medal of Honor Recipients
In July 1862 Congress authorized the president to present medals to soldiers of the United States Army for gallant and meritorious service. On September 14, 1862, two soldiers so distinguished themselves during the fighting at Crampton’s Gap that . . . — Map (db m2152) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Burkittsville — Mell Rifles & Troup Light Artillery
(Front Side): The Mell Rifles, Co. D, Cobb’s Legion Infantry, was raised in Athens, GA. in July 1861, by Patrick Hues Mell, Baptist minster and Vice Chancellor of the University of Georgia. After Mell resigned due to his wife’s death, . . . — Map (db m2044) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Burkittsville — Padgett’s Field: Confederate Last Stand
On September 14, 1862, this area was an open field belonging to George W. Padgett. A wooden, rail fence lined the road on the east. A low, stone wall bordered the field to the west. As the shattered remnants of Brigadier General Howell Cobb’s force . . . — Map (db m2144) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Burkittsville — C.P. 4 — Sixth Army Corps
U. S. A. Sixth Army Corps. Major Gen. W. B. Franklin, Commanding (September 14, 1862) The Sixth Corps consisted of two Divisions commanded by Major Generals H. W. Slocum and W. F. Smith. On the march of the Army of the Potomac through Maryland, . . . — Map (db m2024) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Burkittsville — The Battle of South Mountain
In September, 1862, after the second Battle of Manassas, Gen. Robert E. Lee led his victorious Confederates on their first invasion of the North. At Frederick, Md. he boldly divided his army. Three columns (No. 1) were to surround and capture the . . . — Map (db m2032) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Burkittsville — The Stage is Set
On the evening of September 13, 1862, Confederate cavalry under Brigadier General Wade Hampton and Colonel Thomas Munford occupied the Crampton’s Gap/Burkittsville vicinity. Early on the 14th, Major General J.E.B. Stuart, en route to Harpers Ferry, . . . — Map (db m2150) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Burkittsville — Troup Light Artillery
Organized in 1858 as the National Artillery, this unit changed its name to the Troup Light Artillery in honor of the former Georgia governor George W. Troup. It became a part of Cobb’s Legion when the war began. During the Maryland Campaign, the . . . — Map (db m2143) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Burkittsville — War CorrespondentsMemorial Arch
Speed - Heed Sept. 14 - 62 - 96 To the Army Correspondents and Artists 1861-65 Whose toils cheered the fireside Educated provinces of rustics into a bright nation of readers and gave incentive to narrate distant wars and . . . — Map (db m13977) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Dickerson — 1862 Antietam CampaignLee Invades Maryland
Fresh from victory at the Second Battle of Manassas, Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia crossed the Potomac River on September 4–6, 1862, to bring the Civil War to Northern soil and to recruit sympathetic Marylanders. Union Gen. . . . — Map (db m4028) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Dickerson — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion & Retreat
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . — Map (db m4033) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Emmitsburg — "To Lift a Nation"
Three firemen raised a flag at ground zero in silent tribute to those brave firefighters who answered the call. This noble flag is raised permanently in honor of those heroes and all who serve this great nation. May God continue to bless America! . . . — Map (db m19023) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Emmitsburg — Amleto Cardinal CicognaniNational Shrine of Our Lady of Lourdes
In Memoriam Amleto Cardinal Cicognani Apostolic delegate to the United States 1933-1958 Cardinal Secretary of State 1958-1973 Under Pope John XXIII - Paul VI While serving as apostolic delegate to the United States Amleto . . . — Map (db m17365) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Emmitsburg — Army of the PotomacJuly 1 1863
First Corps Marched from Marsh Run. Eleventh Corps from Emmitsburg to Gettysburg. Second Corps from Uniontown via Taneytown to near Gettysburg. Third Corps from Bridgeport via Emmitsburg to the Field of Gettysburg. Fifth Corps from Union Mills via . . . — Map (db m19296) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Emmitsburg — Army of the PotomacJuly 4, 1863
First and Second Brigades, First Cavalry Division marched from Westminster and the Reserve Cavalry, First Cavalry Division from Gettysburg en route to Frederick. Second Brigade Second Cavalry Division from Westminster via Emmitsburg to Monterey. . . . — Map (db m19298) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Emmitsburg — Coaches James G. Deegan and James J. Phelan
Universitas Sanctae Mariae Ad Montes Marylandia Fundata Ab Joanne DuBois This boulder honors Coaches James G. Deegan and James J. Phelan for their combined century of dedicated service to Mount St. Mary's University. For over five decades . . . — Map (db m7743) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Emmitsburg — Cornerstone of the Old Church on the Hill
Laid by Father John DuBois in 1807. — Map (db m19028) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Emmitsburg — Corpus Christi Chapel
Built in 1906. Replaces the Old Grotto, 1808 - 1906. — Map (db m19030) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Emmitsburg — Daughters of Charity"O, it was beyond description" — Gettysburg Campaign
Elizabeth Ann Bayley Seton founded the Roman Catholic community of the Sisters of Charity of Saint Joseph's here in 1809 (after 1850, called Daughters of Charity). The sisters played a prominent role during the Civil War as nurses and human service . . . — Map (db m9483) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Emmitsburg — EmmitsburgRoad to Gettysburg
President Abraham Lincoln replaced Army of the Potomac commander Gen. Joseph Hooker with Gen. George G. Meade on June 28, 1863, as the army pursued Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia. Meade placed Gen. John F. Reynolds, I Corps . . . — Map (db m1546) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Emmitsburg — Emmitsburg Longrifles
The longrifle was a distinctly American weapon developed on the frontier for accuracy and distance. Produced mainly in Pennsylvania, Maryland and Virginia, it became known as the “Kentucky” rifle after a popular song commemorated its use . . . — Map (db m1532) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Emmitsburg — Emmitsburg Sisters of Charity
1809 - 1984 Dedicated to Emmitsburg Sisters of Charity The community of Sisters of Charity was founded in this valley on July 31, 1809, by Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton. The Sisters served the citizens of Emmitsburg and the environs both . . . — Map (db m9618) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Emmitsburg — Fallen Firefighters Memorial
Dedicated October 4, 1981. National Emergency Training Center. Emmitsburg, Maryland. "Dedicated to the thousands of Firefighters who have lost their lives in the very act of saving others." Ronald Reagan, President. UNITED STATES OF . . . — Map (db m19021) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Emmitsburg — Gen. John F. Reynolds"Dear Kate" — Gettysburg Campaign
On the last day of June 1863, Emmitsburg became a Union army supply base. Union Gen. John F. Reynolds, commanding the left wing of the Army of the Potomac (I, III, and XI Corps), arrived as I Corps came into Emmitsburg to obtain needed supplies, . . . — Map (db m9489) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Emmitsburg — Interstate and Defense Highways
The first US Army Transcontinental Motor Convoy departed Washington DC for San Francisco on July 7, 1919, to survey roads and test vehicles for military purposes. On the second day, the convoy was forced to detour around a wooden covered bridge on . . . — Map (db m8488) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Emmitsburg — Mother Seton's Rock1809 - 1821
Here on Sunday afternoons Mother Seton "seated on a rock known as Hers," taught Christian Doctrine to the children of The Mountain Parish. "They that instruct many to Justice shall Shine as the Stars for all Eternity." - Daniel XII, 3. — Map (db m19031) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Emmitsburg — Mount Saint Mary's College
1808 - 1983 Dedicated to Mount Saint Mary's College Quote from Helmans History of Emmitsburg: "- The great fire occurred June 15th, 1863 it originated in the livery stable of Guthrie & Beam, consuming over fifty buildings in all; the fire . . . — Map (db m9619) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Emmitsburg — National Shrine of Our Lady of LourdesMount St. Mary’s College, Emmitsburg, Maryland — Built 1875
Proclaimed a Public Oratory, December 8, 1965 by His Eminence, Lawrence Cardinal Shehan, Archbishop of Baltimore.

The faithful who out of devotion visit the Grotto of Our Lady of Lourdes may gain the following special indulgences: A Plenary . . . — Map (db m92525) HM

Maryland (Frederick County), Emmitsburg — Pangborn Memorial CampanileNational Shrine of Our Lady of Lourdes
Ave Maria This monument is dedicated to the glory of God and His Blessed Mother. It is erected on the site of the “Old Church on the Hill,” which was built in 1805 Father John Dubois, founder of Mount Saint Mary’s . . . — Map (db m17360) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Emmitsburg — Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton
Describing the conversion of her sister-in-law, Harriet: Harriet left the log house on the evening of Friday, July 21, 1809, between 10 and 11 o'clock to seek the solitude of the Old Church on the Hill... "Harriet stealing up to the church by the . . . — Map (db m19034) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Emmitsburg — Site of Father Dubois House
This cross marks the site of Father Dubois house in which Mother Seton and her associates lived from Jun 21, to July 31, 1809. "Blessed be God in His Angels and in His Saints." — Map (db m19033) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Emmitsburg — Site of St. Joseph's College
On this site St. Elizabeth Ann Seton, the first U.S. native to be canonized, founded an academy for girls in 1809. A high school was later added and in 1902 St. Joseph's College was chartered as a three year institution for women. In 1914 the . . . — Map (db m9474) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Emmitsburg — St. Elizabeth Ann SetonFounder of the Sisters of Charity
Born Aug. 28, 1774, in New York, she came to Emmitsburg from Baltimore June 24, 1809, occupying stone house on these grounds July 31. The following year, in White House visible from here, she organized nation's first Roman Catholic Parochial School. . . . — Map (db m9473) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Emmitsburg — St. Joseph's Valley Camp"I did not see it multiplied, but saw it there!" — Gettysburg Campaign
About 80,000 Union troops settled here in Saint Joseph's Valley as June 1863 drew to a close, "until the grounds around were actually covered with Soldiers." Emmitsburg was placed under martial law, and the Vincentian priests at Saint Joseph's . . . — Map (db m9485) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Emmitsburg — The John Hughes Cabin
John Hughes, class of 1826, fourth bishop (1838) and first archbishop of New York (1850-1864), born in County Tyrone Ireland (1797), immigrated in 1817. A gardener and mason, Hughes was employed the 10th of November, 1819, by Fr. John DuBois . . . — Map (db m9621) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Emmitsburg — The Spirit of the American Doughboy
1917 1918 Emmitsburg In The Great War This memorial erected and dedicated in honor of those from Emmitsburg District who served in The World War The Supreme Sacrifice Made By Bentzel, Arthur H*         Hahn, Martin . . . — Map (db m44058) HM WM
Maryland (Frederick County), Emmitsburg — The White House
This reconstruction log building, faced with clapboard and painted white, was occupied by Mother Seton and her little community in February 1810. At the close of the year the school numbered thirty boarders and forty day pupils. In 1817 this . . . — Map (db m9617) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Emmitsburg — This Cavalry Group
This calvary group replaces the "old wooden cross" erected by John Dubois of which Mother Seton writes in her journal for the year 1815 --- "Quiet dinner at the Grotto before the old cross, yet standing after winter storms", memorializes forever the . . . — Map (db m19036) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Emmitsburg — White Ash Tree
The tree was a Maryland State Champion White Ash approximately 175 years old when on July 10, 2001 a storm with tornado-like winds took off one of the major limbs and decay was discovered inside the remaining limbs. The Maryland Department of . . . — Map (db m19025) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Emmitsburg — William Elder, Sr.
William Elder, Sr., named this land Mount Saint Mary's & established (ca. 1743) his home "Pleasant Level" and the Elder Cemetery on the plain below. His family deeded (October 24, 1793) this mountain land for a church. In respect for the living . . . — Map (db m17389) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — “South Magnetic”
The compass Meridian Stones of Frederick County. One of two stones set in 1896 by USC&GS to establish a true meridian line. Used by surveyors to check compass variations pursuant to Article 25, Code of MD ──── . . . — Map (db m89631) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — “The Great Baby Waker”
On April 22, 1783, this historic cannon announced the end of the American Revolution here on the western frontier of the new nation Cat at the Mount Aetna forge near Hagerstown, this iron fortification gun entered service at the New Frederick . . . — Map (db m2737) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — 14th New Jersey Infantry Regiment
(Upper Plaque):Erected by the State of New Jersey to commemorate the heroic services of the 14th Regiment New Jersey Volunteer Infantry 1st Brigade, 3rd Division, 6th Corps Army of the Potomac, at the Battle of Monocacy, MD July 9th . . . — Map (db m13301) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — 1862 Antietam CampaignLee Invades Maryland
Fresh from victory at the Second Battle of Manassas, Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia crossed the Potomac River on September 4–6, 1862, to bring the Civil War to Northern soil and to recruit sympathetic Marylanders. Union Gen. . . . — Map (db m2708) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — 1862 Antietam CampaignLee Invades Maryland
Fresh from victory at the Second Battle of Manassas, Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia crossed the Potomac River on September 4–6, 1862, to bring the Civil War to Northern soil and to recruit sympathetic Marylanders. Union Gen. . . . — Map (db m18382) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — 1862 Antietam CampaignLee Invades Maryland
Fresh from victory at the Second Battle of Manassas, Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia crossed the Potomac River on September 4–6, 1862, to bring the Civil War to Northern soil and to recruit sympathetic Marylanders. Union Gen. . . . — Map (db m97907) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — A Bold Plan
In June 1864, with Union Lieutenant General Ulysses S. Grant intent on destroying Confederate General Robert E. Lee's army, Lee developed a bold plan to capture Washington, D.C. He sent Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early with 15,000 troops to invade . . . — Map (db m78623) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — A Crossroads of American HistoryThe Frederick Square Corner
The Square Corner, at the intersection of Patrick and Market Streets, has long been the commercial and financial heart of Frederick. It is here that the National Road meets several important north-south roads that lead to Pennsylvania, Virginia, and . . . — Map (db m2748) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — A Good Night's RestFrederick's Hotel Block
This part of downtown Frederick has long been a place of lodging and hospitality for travelers along the National Road. Kimball's Inn, Talbott's Tavern, the City Hotel and the Francis Scott Key Hotel have occupied this site for over two hundred . . . — Map (db m2822) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Ambush
On the morning of July 9, 1864, John T. Worthington sent his family to safety in the cellar. From an upstairs window he watched Confederate General McCausland lead his cavalry brigade of 1,400 men into an ambush. Concealed behind a fence and waist . . . — Map (db m89982) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — B & O Railroad Station"No malice in my heart" — Antietam Campaign
At this intersection, President Abraham Lincoln spoke from a railroad car platform to Frederick residents assembled in the street on October 4, 1862. He had just returned from viewing the battlefields of South Mountain and Antietam and had called on . . . — Map (db m60166) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Barbara Fritchie House“Shoot if you must this old gray head, but spare your country’s flag.” — Antietam Campaign 1862
As the Confederate army marched through Frederick on September 10, 1862, feisty local Unionists—mostly women—showed their defiance by waving the Stars and Stripes. The poet John Greenleaf Whittier immortalized one of them in “The . . . — Map (db m2693) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Battle BeginsMonocacy National Battlefield
About 8 o'clock a dash was made by the enemy under cover of artillery fire, to drive us from out position, hoping to gain the pike, and proceed on their way to Washington. — Private Daniel B. Freeman, Company G, 10th Vermont Infantry . . . — Map (db m78507) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Battle of Frederick"Best little battle of the war" — Early's 1864 Washington Raid
(preface) Confederate Gen. Jubal A. Early drove Union Gen. David Hunter into West Virginia after the Battle of Lynchburg, Va., clearing the Shenandoah Valley of Federal forces. To draw Union troops from Petersburg, Early launched a raid . . . — Map (db m76651) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Battle of Monocacy
The Battle that saved Washington Here along the Monocacy River on July 9, 1864, was fought the battle between Union forces under General Lew Wallace and Confederate forces under General Jubal A. Early. The battle, although a temporary victory for . . . — Map (db m3218) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Best Family Farm
8:30 a.m. July 9, 1864 The John T. Best family was going about its chores of tending cows, hogs, chickens, and fields of wheat, oats, and corn. The Bests were used to working amid soldiers, for Union and Confederate troops had camped here on the . . . — Map (db m3223) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Birthplace of William Tyler Page
Birthplace William Tyler Page Oct. 19, 1868 Author of The American's Creed Placed by Frederick, Chapter, D.A.R. — Map (db m89037) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Braddock, Washington, and Franklin
On April 23, 1755 At a Tavern located near this spot General Edward Braddock Colonel George Washington and Benjamin Franklin Met to plan the British assault on Ft. Dusquesne During the French & Indian War This plaque erected by the Kiwanis Club of . . . — Map (db m2725) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Brush Creek Crossing
A wagon road crossed Brush Creek at this location connecting the Georgetown Pike with roads to Baltimore. As Federal troops withdrew from the battlefield, they passed Gambrill's Mill and followed this road toward Baltimore, leaving the field to the . . . — Map (db m3272) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Burning of the Bridge
12:00 noon July 9, 1864 Confederates wearing captured blue uniforms had killed or wounded several Union skirmishers who had been sent across the Monocacy River to hold the Georgetown Turnpike and B&O Railroad bridges "at all hazards." The two . . . — Map (db m3270) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Capital For A SummerFoiling Maryland Secession
The building in front of you, Kemp Hall, was the capitol of Maryland during the spring and summer of 1861, as the state came perilously close to leaving the Union. Because secession would have placed the U.S. capital, Washington, D.C. between the . . . — Map (db m67247) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Caught in the Crossfire
Since the war's onset John T. Best had grown accustomed to seeing Union and Confederate soldiers on his farm, but the morning of July 9, 1864, was different. Shots rang out on the farm and a battle ensued. Confederate artillery moved into the . . . — Map (db m82336) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — City HallFormer Frederick County Courthouse — Antietam Campaign 1862
Connections with the Civil War abound around this Courthouse Square, where the first official act of defiance against the British crown - the 1765 Stamp Act Repudiation - occurred almost a century earlier. In 1857, Roger Brooke Taney, Chief Justice . . . — Map (db m2815) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Civilians Under SiegeMonocacy National Battlefield
On the morning of July 9, 1864, C. Keefer Thomas hosted two Union officers at his breakfast table, talking about the impeding battle. Later that morning as the battle drew near, the Thomas family, with several houseguests, neighbors, enslaved . . . — Map (db m89983) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Clustered Spires of Frederick
John Greenleaf Whittier immortalized Barbara Fritchie and the town of Frederick in his poem about the elderly Frederick resident who supposedly displayed the Union flag as Southern soldiers marched by on September 10, 1862. On July 9, 1864, . . . — Map (db m3290) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Commemoration
On July 9, 1907, 43 years after the battle of Monocacy, 180 veterans of the 14th New Jersey Regiment returned to dedicate this monument in honor of their comrades and their sacrifices. Most of the men wore a memorial pin on their lapel, given to . . . — Map (db m82291) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Confederates Invade Maryland
7:00 a.m, July 9, 1864 Confederate troops under Lt. Gen. Jubal A. Early streamed through the gaps of South Mountain and the Catoctins and headed south past Frederick. Bound for Washington, D.C., they were stopped here at the Best family farm by . . . — Map (db m3246) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Desperate Escape
After Union General Wallace ordered the covered bridge burned, the railroad bridge became the only route of escape for Lieutenant Davis and his men, who were seperated from the rest of the Union forces by the river. His troops fought bravely all . . . — Map (db m82115) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Edgewood
The success of miller James H. Gambrill became apparent when he built Edgewood, the grand house on the hill. When it was constructed around 1872, the brick, three-story Second Empire style house was one of the largest single-family residences in . . . — Map (db m90479) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Evangelical Lutheran Church
This tablet is erected to the Glory of God and in grateful recognition of those who organized this congregation and have maintained it for two hundred years 1738   Congregation organized. 1743   Log church built on the Monocacy. . . . — Map (db m14022) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Federal Retreat4:30-5:00 p.m. July 9, 1864
The Northerners held, then lost, then retook the Thomas house grounds as the fighting ebbed and flowed in the stifling heat. Casualties mounted quickly on both sides. Union Maj. Gen. Lew Wallace could see that his numbers were dwindling and that the . . . — Map (db m3274) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Federals Take a Stand
7:00 a.m., July 9, 1864 After skirmishing on July 8 with Confederates west of Frederick, MD, Maj. Gen. Lew Wallace’s 5,800 Union troops—many of them “raw and untried”—took a stand at the Monocacy River. Wallace carefully . . . — Map (db m3247) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Final Attack
Come on, Georgians, follow me and we will show these (Confederate) cavalrymen how to fight. Confederate General Clement Evans (As heard by Private N. Harris, 16th Virginia Cavalry) After the failed cavalry attacks on Thomas Farm, . . . — Map (db m89984) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Final Resting PlaceFrancis Scott Key
In the final months of his life Francis Scott Key enjoyed visits to Terra Rubra farm, his boyhood home not far from Frederick Town. He thought and wrote about the end of life and his hopes of immortality in a life to come.

Key died at his . . . — Map (db m75758) HM WM

Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Final StandMonocacy National Battlefield
The Union troops held the Confederates at bay for most of the day. Around 4:30 p.m. the Union front collapsed and fell back to the Georgetown Pike, where they used the protection of the road bank in their final stand. The Union soldiers fronted . . . — Map (db m78505) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Fleeing for Their Lives
8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. July 9, 1864 Distressed that their main escape route had been burned, the stranded Federal skirmishers fought on as they faced periodic Confederate attacks. Late in the afternoon, they gradually fell back towards the Baltimore . . . — Map (db m3271) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Former Site of Tory Gaol
A log jailhouse (gaol), built to house British prisoners or Tories, stood on this site in June, 1776. The tiny two story gaol was 30 feet long and 20 wide. The six-room facility held prisoners throughout the Revolutionary War. Converted to a stable . . . — Map (db m4960) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Francis Scott KeyThomas Johnson Barbara Fritchie
Francis Scott Key Author of “The Star Spangled Banner”Born in Frederick County, Maryland, 1779. Died in Baltimore 1843 and there buried. Removed to Federick 1866 and interred in family lot. In 1898 the remains of Francis Scott . . . — Map (db m2731) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — FrederickA Town becomes a City
Frederick Town was founded in 1745 when Daniel Dulany the Elder carved out an eastern portion of his 7,000 acre parcel patented as "Tasker's Chance." The town was then laid out in an orderly grid with Patrick Street designated as the east-west . . . — Map (db m2805) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Frederick’s Poet LawyerFrancis Scott Key
Born in what was then northeast Frederick County, Key’s parents first brought him to “Frederick-Town” to be baptized. His parents often rode to the county seat here. Key walked these streets whenever the family came to Frederick. . . . — Map (db m67248) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Gambrill House
James H. Gambrill prospered as a miller after the Civil War, and the family moved up in the world - from a modest dwelling on the lowlands near the mill to this 17-room house on the hill. The three-story frame structure, built about 1872, has . . . — Map (db m90481) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Gambrill Mill
Mill owner James H. Gambrill used his wits to survive the turmoil. A Southern sympathizer, he sold flour to Northern troops as they set up their line of defense on his land. During the battle he took refuge inside the mill with Samuel S. Thomas and . . . — Map (db m3262) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Gen. Bradley T. JohnsonA Visitor in His Own Hometown — Early's 1864 Attack on Washington
(preface) In June 1864, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee sent Gen. Jubal A. Early’s corps from Richmond battlefields to the Shenandoah Valley to counter Union Gen. David Hunter’s army. After driving Hunter into West Virginia, Early invaded . . . — Map (db m75747) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — General Edward Braddock
General Edward Braddock traveled over this road in April 1755 (in a coach and six horses purchased from Gov. Horatio Sharpe of Maryland)after a protracted conference in Frederick with Benjamin Franklin and others concerning the securing of teams, . . . — Map (db m1247) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — General LaFayette
Friend of America and Liberty Arrived at the bridge nearby on his way to Frederick December 29, 1824 —————— Created by a delegation of citizens including the gallant Lawrence Everhart who had come to escort him . . . — Map (db m2326) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — George Washington
On August 5 and 6, 1785, and again June 30 and July 1, 1791, was the guest of Thomas Johnson at the latter's manorial residence which stood on the site of the present farm house, about 150 yards east of this point. Thomas Johnson, a member of the . . . — Map (db m1538) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion & Retreat
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . — Map (db m2792) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Gordon’s Decisive Attack
3:00-4:30 p.m. July 9, 1864 So profuse was the flow of blood from the killed and wounded of both sides of these forces that it reddened the stream [on the Thomas Farm] for more than 100 yards below. Maj. Gen. John B. Gordon The first . . . — Map (db m89244) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Graves, Monuments, and Memorialsof the American Civil War
In Mount Olivet Cemetery are the graves of Union and Confederate soldiers who fought in the battles of South Mountain, Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy. Near the graves is the Confederate Monument, and the Memorial to children who fought and died . . . — Map (db m2733) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Headquarters of Generals Robert E. Lee“Stonewall” Jackson and Longstreet
Headquarters of Generals Robert E. Lee, “Stonewall” Jackson, and Longstreet Sept. 6-9, 1862 Here was written the famous lost order No. 191 and the proclamation to the people of Maryland. — Map (db m1589) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Hessian Barracks - Witness to History
1777 Built at direction of Maryland General Assembly 1778-79 Quartered Hessian and Convention prisoners captured at Bennington and Saratoga 1782 Quartered Hessian and Bayreuth Yager Regiments following Cornwallis' surrender 1799 . . . — Map (db m2739) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — History of the Monocacy River Valley
The earliest inhabitants of the Monocacy River Valley lived here about 12,000 years ago. These Native Americans lived in territorial, semi-nomadic groups dependent upon hunting, fishing, and food gathering. When European settlers first came to . . . — Map (db m3287) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Home of Chief Justice Roger Brooke Taney
Home of Chief Justice Roger Brooke Taney and his wife Anne Key -- Erected by Frederick Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution 1938 — Map (db m2821) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Hospitals in FrederickCaring for the Wounded
In this building, soldiers who died in one of the many area hospitals following the battles of South Mountain, Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy were embalmed and prepared for interment at nearby Mount Olivet Cemetery or for shipment home. James . . . — Map (db m97908) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — In April 1861
. . . — Map (db m2722) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Jacob EngelbrechtA Frederick Diarist on the National Road
In 1826, Jacob Engelbrecht moved to the house across the street near Carroll Creek. He began reporting on the National Road cavalcade that was going by his front door. His priceless diary recorded everything he saw. Travelers he observed included: . . . — Map (db m2706) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — John Hanson
On This Site (1773-1783) Lived John Hanson First President of United States In Congress Assembled (1781-1782) Born Charles County, MD., April 13, 1715 Died Oxon Hill, MD., November 22, 1783 Placed by Historical Society of Frederick . . . — Map (db m89065) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — John Hanson
April 14, 1715 — November 22, 1783 President of the United States in Congress Assembled as called for by the Articles of Confederation first system of government of the new nation prior to the constitution Served November 5, 1781 . . . — Map (db m89101) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — John Hanson
First President of the First United States Government, The United States in Congress Assembled, Which Existed From 1781 until 1788. “As the first elected president of our independent nation, President Hanson began the task of unifying . . . — Map (db m89151) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — John Thomas Schley
In memory of John Thomas Schley Founder of Frederick and Ancestor of many prominent Americans Born Aug. 31, 1712 in Mörzheim, Germany Died Nov. 24, 1790 in Frederick, Md. — Map (db m14025) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Jug BridgeAn engineering marvel for early America
In 1800, travelers expected to ford rivers or use ferries that were slow and often risky in bad weather. The Baltimore and Frederick-Town Turnpike Company, building the first leg of the National Road in 1805, set out to revolutionize American roads. . . . — Map (db m2321) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Jug Bridge Monument
The stone demijohn and memorial plaque, placed by the Sons of the American Revolution, were originally located on a bridge crossing the Monocacy River about 2 miles east of this site. The stone bridge of four arches and two 65-foot spans was . . . — Map (db m2324) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Kemp Hall
1861-1961 In the year 1861 the legislature of Maryland, called into extraordinary session by Governor Thomas Holliday Hicks, held session in this building owned by the Evangelical Reformed Church (now the Evangelical and Reformed - United Church of . . . — Map (db m2720) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Laboring Sons Memorial Ground
Laboring Sons Cemetery A cemetery was established at this site in 1851 by the Beneficial Society of the Laboring Sons of Frederick to provide a burial ground for citizens of color. The Beneficial Society had been formed in 1839 “for the . . . — Map (db m14024) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — L'Hermitage
In the late 1700s, a large slave village was constructed just beyond the building in front of you. By 1800, as many as 90 enslaved laborers were housed there, an unusually large number of slaves for this area. The enslaved people were the property . . . — Map (db m82339) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Major General George Gordon Meade
(Front Face): Took command of the Army of the Potomac Under orders from President Lincoln Seven hundred feet North of this marker June 28, 1863 He pursued the Confederates and at Gettysburg July 1,2,3 Fought the decisive battle of the . . . — Map (db m2800) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Market & Patrick Streets"Scarcely any possibility of crossing the street" — Gettysburg Campaign
Frederick found itself occupied alternatively by Confederate and Union armies during the Civil War. Citizens who frequented this "Square Corner" of Market and Patrick Streets saw Gen. Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia march west from here on . . . — Map (db m2808) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — May 17, 1943
Sir Winston Churchill visited the Barbara Fritchie House while en route with Franklin D. Roosevelt from "Shangri-la" to Washington, D.C. — Map (db m78351) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — McCausland’s Attack
11:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. July 9, 1864 Brig. Gen. John McCausland's cavalry brigade forded the river, dismounted, and advanced up the slope toward the Worthington house. Thinking they would be facing inexperienced militiamen, the Confederates formed a . . . — Map (db m3282) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Meade Takes Command"Come to give me trouble."
Near this spot, on the grounds of Prospect Hall, Union Gen. George Gordon Meade replaced Gen. Joesph "Fighting Joe" Hooker as commander of the Army of the Potomac on Sunday, June 28, 1863. Meade took command reluctantly because he was concerned . . . — Map (db m2775) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Monocacy Battlefield
. . . — Map (db m3294) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Monocacy Battlefield
Monocacy Battlefield has been designated a Registered National Historic Landmark Under the provisions of the Historic Sites Act of August 21, 1935 this site possesses exceptional value in commemorating or illustrating the history of the United . . . — Map (db m41692) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Monocacy National Battlefield
Here on farmlands bordering the Monocacy River, the fate of the nation’s capital was decided July 9, 1864, when Union troops confronted Confederate soldiers marching toward Washington. Though the Confederates won this battle on Northern soil, they . . . — Map (db m41915) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Monocacy National Battlefield
The Battle that Saved Washington In the summer of 1864, Confederate Lieutenant General Jubal Early launched a campaign down the Shenandoah Valley with a corps of approximately 15,000 troops. The campaign was a last attempt to carry the war to . . . — Map (db m41916) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Nick of Time
On July 9, 1864, at 2:00 a.m., the last train of Union reinforcements pulled into Monocacy Junction just hours before the battle. The addition of 3,400 veterans increased Wallace's total to 6,600 men. While Wallace was successful in delaying the . . . — Map (db m76713) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — North Market Street"Now I shall see Cousin J. — Gettysburg Campaign
On June 28, 1863, Gen. John F. Reynolds rode into Federick to visit his cousin Catherine Reynolds Cramer and her sisters near the intersection of North Market and Second Streets. She would have much to write the rest of her family on July 1 about . . . — Map (db m2814) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — One Vast Hospital
“Figuratively speaking, this city is one vast hospital, and yet hundreds of poor fellows continue to arrive who have their wounds attended to, and away they go, uncomplaining.” — Philadephia Inquirer September 25, 1862 — Map (db m97817) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Ramsey House
In this house President Abraham Lincoln October 4, 1862 visited General George L. Hartsuff Wounded In the Battle of Antietam Placed by Frederick Chapter DAR & Cdr. & Mrs. D.M. Page, USN 1975 — Map (db m2818) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Retreat
At about 5:00 p.m. on July 9, 1864, the Confederates stormed the Union line on the Georgetown Pike. Union General Wallace ordered the withdrawal and chaos soon followed. With Confederates in hot pursuit, Union troops fled past Gambrill Mill, then . . . — Map (db m82118) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Richfield“The Boy General of the Golden Lock”
It was here that George Armstrong Custer was first introduced as a general to the troops he would command. The first order signed by Gen. George G. Meade as the newly appointed commander of the Army of the Potomac on June 28, 1863 promoted three . . . — Map (db m1539) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Roger Brooke Taney
Chief Justice Of the United States 1836-1864 Secretary of the Treasury 1833-1834 Attorney General Of the United States 1831-1833 Attorney General Of Maryland 1827-1831 Citizen of Frederick And lawyer practicing in the Frederick County Court . . . — Map (db m2817) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Roger Brooke Taney
Fifth Chief Justice of The Supreme Court of the United States Born in Calvert County, Maryland, March 17,1777 Died in the city of Washington, October 12, 1864 Aged 87 years, 6 months and 25 days He was a profound and able lawyer An . . . — Map (db m58159) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Rose Hill ManorUnion Artillery Reserve
You are on the grounds of Rose Hill Manor, the final home of Maryland's first governor, Thomas Johnson. During its stay near Frederick, the Army of the Potomac's large Artillery Reserve occupied these grounds. Created after the Battle of . . . — Map (db m2803) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Slave to Soldier
On October 1, 1863, nine months after President Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation, Secretary of War Edwin Stanton advised Lincoln that it was a "military necessity in the State of Maryland... for enlisting all persons capable of bearing arms... . . . — Map (db m76714) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — The Battle That Saved Washington
The Battle of Monocacy took place on July 9, 1864, in the valley before you. The battle pitted North against South, and Washington, D.C., was the prize. Richmond and Petersburg were endangered, but the Southern leader, General Robert E. Lee had . . . — Map (db m3292) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — The Congregation in Frederick
circa 1745 - Founded by German Reformed settlers led by schoolmaster John Thomas Schley, the Founder of Frederick City. 1934 - Became part of the The Evangelical and Reformed Church a Merger of the Evangelical Synod and German . . . — Map (db m2816) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — The Dred Scott Decision
At the dedication of the Roger Brooke Taney Bust in Frederick on September 26, 1931, Chief Justice Charles Evans Hughes concluded that “it is unfortunate that the estimate of Chief Justice Taney’s judicial labors should have been so largely . . . — Map (db m89047) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — The Lost OrderShrouded in a Cloak of Mystery — Antietam Campaign 1862
After crossing the Potomac River early in September 1862, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee reorganized the Army of Northern Virginia into three separate wings. On September 9, he promulgated his campaign strategy - to divide his army, send Gen. Thomas . . . — Map (db m18381) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — The Lower Depot Neighborhood / The Frederick Brick Works
(North Facing Side): The Lower Depot Neighborhood The railroad transformed 19th century America, facilitating long-distance travel and the efficient transfer of raw materials to factories and agricultural and manufactured goods to markets. . . . — Map (db m2823) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — The National RoadThe Road that Built the Nation
“. . . so many happy people, restless in the midst of abundance.” —Alexis de Tocqueville, 1840. Americans are an adventurous people. From past to present, they have used feet, horses, wagons, stagecoaches, canals, . . . — Map (db m2753) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — The Ross Home
In this home General Lafayette lodged as a guest of Colonel John McPherson Dec. 29-31, 1824.

In 1840 Francis Scott Key author of the National Anthem was inspired here to write the poem that honors his cousin Mrs. Eleanor . . . — Map (db m88946) HM

Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — These Barracks
1776 - 1814 These Barracks Mark the course of the struggle for American Independence Built in 1777 by the British and Hessian prisoners of the Revolutionary War, here were detained those taken at the Battles of Saratoga, Trenton, and Yorktown, . . . — Map (db m2735) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Thick of the Battle
4:00 - 4:30 p.m. July 9, 1864 The Battle of Monocacy changed from a stalemate to a rout as the final lines of Maj. Gen. John B. Gordon's three Confederate brigades swept down Brooks Hill onto the fields of Thomas farm. Both sides traded blistering . . . — Map (db m89985) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — This Boulder Marks the National Trail — General Braddock Monument
This boulder marks the National Trail over which traveled Gen. Edward Braddock and Lieutenant Colonel George Washington 1755. — Map (db m22275) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — This Boulder Overlooks the Monocacy Battlefield
and is in memory – of – The Southern Solders who fell in the battle fought July 9, 1864 which resulted in a Confederate victory ——— Erected July 9, 1914 by the Fitzhugh Lee Chapter United Daughters of the . . . — Map (db m3215) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Thomas Farm
Col. C. Keefer Thomas, a businessman, should have stayed in Baltimore. He was so sure a war eventually would rage around that city that he moved his family to this 240-acre farm, called Araby. Soon troops were marching through or camping here in the . . . — Map (db m3278) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Thomas Johnson
** Revolutionary Patriot ** Bosom Friend of Washington **** Diligent worker for independence and nominator of Washington for commander in chief of Continental Army ** Member of Council of Safety, Continental Congress and of Maryland Convention . . . — Map (db m2819) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Through a Child's EyesMonocacy National Battlefield
On the morning of July 9, six-year-old Glenn Worthington was ushered into the farmhouse cellar with his family and their slaves. The windows had been boarded with thick oak boards and tubs of drinking water were placed in the cellar. Young Glenn . . . — Map (db m89981) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Tyler’s-Spite House
112 West Church St. Has been placed on the National Register Of Historic Places by the United States Department of the Interior 1814 — Map (db m2724) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — USS Francis Scott Key (SSBN 657)
Front: The first ship of the fleet named for Francis Scott Key, Author of the National Anthem. Born 1 August 1773, Died 11 January 1843. Wrote the verse for our National Anthem "The Star Spangled Banner" during the British Fleet's bombardment of . . . — Map (db m75756) HM WM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — William Tyler PageBoyhood Home
William Tyler Page Though born in marked house One-half block south Lived his boyhood days in this house Placed by Frederick Chapter, N.S.D.A.R. October 18, 1955 — Map (db m89034) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Worthington House
Fields of wheat and corn surrounded the hilltop farmhouse of John T. Worthington. Few trees obstructed his views of the meandering Monocacy River and Thomas farm to the east. In the two years since buying the 300-acre farm, Worthington had seen . . . — Map (db m3283) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Worthington-McKinney Ford
11:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m. July 9, 1864 Confederate troops succeeded in finding their way across the Monocacy River at the foot of this hill. Brig. Gen. John McCausland's 350 cavalrymen came up over the hill and assembled on the front yard of the . . . — Map (db m3285) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Jefferson — Abraham Lakin 2ndBorn Oct. 16, 1713 or 1722. Died Jan., 1796
Veteran of French and Indian War, early settler, head of family of Revolutionary patriots buried in the cemetery of homestead near here. At outset of the Revolution he and his sons Abraham, Basil, Daniel, John and his nephew Samuel were listed with . . . — Map (db m2025) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Jefferson — JeffersonProwling Confederates and Pretty Girls
In June 1863, Federal troops marched through Jefferson as the Army of the Potomac pursued Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia, a menacing force to the west—but where was it headed? Fearing that Lee would push through the gaps in . . . — Map (db m2100) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Jefferson — Journalists Who Gave Their Lives
In Memory of Those Journalists Who Gave Their Lives Reporting on the War on Terrorism Daniel Pearl The Wall Street Journal Afghanistan - February 2002 David Bloom NBC News Iraq - April 2003 Michael . . . — Map (db m86942) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Jefferson — War Correspondents Memorial Arch — Walking Tour Stop 7
This stone Arch, the culmination of Townsend's architectural endeavors, was built in 1896 as a permanent memorial to newspaper correspondents, artists, and photographers of the Civil War. Standing 50 feet tall and 40 feet wide, the Arch's unusual . . . — Map (db m65351) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Knoxville — Frederick County / Washington County
[ South Facing Side: ]Frederick CountyNamed for Frederick 5th and last Lord Baltimore. Erected out of Prince George’s County in 1748. It then included Montgomery County and all of Maryland west to the West Virginia boundary. [ North . . . — Map (db m41770) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Lewistown — LewistownI Corps’ Muddy March
Gettysburg Campaign When the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia Invaded Maryland in June 1863, the Army of the Potomac headed north in pursuit. On Monday, June 29, a “rainy, miserable day,” the 15,000 men, 2,900 horses and mules . . . — Map (db m4120) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Lewistown — Lewistown Trout Hatchery and Bass PondsFrederick County
One mile from this point. Purchased by state 1917. — Map (db m94386) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Libertytown — LibertytownHot, Humid, and Worn Out
Gettysburg Campaign On June 29, 1863, the Army of the Potomac's II Corps, commanded by Gen. Winfield S. Hancock, broke camp south of Frederick near the Monocacy River, marched into Frederick, and turned eastward on the road to Liberty . . . — Map (db m4017) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Middletown — 13 West Main Street"The Lutheran Parsonage"
"Lot No. 1" on Jesserong's plat of Middletown as he laid it out in the year 1767. The Lutheran Parsonage and the two story "Lecture Hall Building" which was located to the front right of the parsonage and the little brick "Pastors Study" located . . . — Map (db m5301) HM

263 markers matched your search criteria. The first 200 markers were listed. Next 63
Paid Advertisement