HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
            “Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
  Home  — My Markers  — Add A Marker  — Marker Series  — Links & Books  — Forum  — About Us
Click First to browse through the results shown on this page.   First >> 
Show DirectionsOmit Marker TextClick to map all markers shown on this page.
Greenville County Markers
294 markers matched your search criteria. The first 250 markers are listed. Next 44
South Carolina (Greenville County), Cleveland — Point of View
The View from the Mountain Bridge Wilderness Area Located in northwestern South Carolina. The Blue Ridge Escarpment ends with an abrupt drop of some 2,000 feet to the foothills below, where the state's Piedmont region begins. The escarpment affords spectacular waterfalls and provides a protected environment for rare and endangered plant and animal species. Campbell Mountain 2589 feet Paris Mountain State Park This isolated mountain stands at 2020 feet above sea . . . — Map (db m12533) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Cleveland — Raven Cliff Falls
This beautiful falls has been preserved and protected by the Mills and Moore Families for several generations and was acquired in 1981 from James P. Moore and Otis P. Moore for the benefit of the citizens of South Carolina. — Map (db m20354) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Cleveland — Tommy Wyche
The State of South Carolina expresses its deep appreciation to Tommy Wyche whose vision and commitment are responsible for the Mountain Bridge Recreation and Wilderness Area — Map (db m12470) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Cleveland — Welcome to Caesars Head State Park
About Caesars Head State Park Caesars Head State Park is part of an 11,000 acre area known as the Mountain Bridge Wilderness Area. Located in the Blue Ridge Mountains, Caesars Head contains a diversity of plant and animal communities adapted for life along the escarpment. The Mountain Bridge Wilderness Area provides more than 55 miles of hiking trails, ranging from easy to very strenuous as well as trailside campsites. Picnicking may also be enjoyed in the cool mountain forest. . . . — Map (db m20699) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Conestee — Beaver at Lake Conestee
Beaver (Castor canadensis) inhabited the Conestee area long before the arrival of Europeans in the 18th century. Their numerous dams throughout the Park have inundated much of the former lake bed, creating wetlands which provide habitat for wildlife and filtration to purify the waters of the streams and creeks flowing into the Park. Animals dependent on these wetlands include muskrats, river otters, turtles, frogs, water snakes, fish, dukes, geese, herons, and other birds. A . . . — Map (db m15935) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Conestee — Lake Conestee in Transition
At its largest, Lake Conestee's water surface covered about 130 acres - the area inside the colored boundaries shown on the four aerial photos. This original lake was created when the current dam at the mill was constructed about 1892. As the City of Greenville grew upstream, sediment from development and industrial discharge gradually began to fill the lake. During World War II, the construction of Donaldson Air Force Base, to the west on Marrow Bone Creek, increased the rate at which the . . . — Map (db m15932) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Conestee — McBee Chapel
Was built in 1841 at the request of Alexander McBee son of Vardry McBee founder of Conestee, S.C. This building was designed and laidout by John Adams, Vardry McBee's millwright. Mr. Adams designed the church in an octagonal shape so as to accommodate more seating space. The church seats 150 people. There are only two other octagonal brick churches of this type in the United States. — Map (db m9395) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Conestee — Reedy River Factory
1820 The South preferred to send its raw cotton to New England for spinning and weaving when Vardry McBee and his Mill Right John Adams built this Dam at Conestee to power a paper wood and cotton mill. The mill supplied the news print for the papers of Greenville, Spartanburg, and Charlotte. When J.W. Grady and David O. Hawthorne took over the mill in 1862 they worked around the clock to make uniforms for the Confederate Army. The Reedy River Plant was replaced by the Conestee . . . — Map (db m12166) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Fork Shoals — Erected by Sullivan - Dunklin Chapter D.A.R.
[Front]: Approximately 2 miles s.e. is the corner of the Old Indian Boundary Line. Nearby is also the original site 1785 of the following: Lebanon Church, the Rev. Mark Moore's School, the Grove Settlement. The church organizers 1785 were: the Rev. Mark Moore & families of Arnolds, Bowmans, Dunklins, Camps, Gores, Ragsdales, Sullivan, Ridgeways. Property donor - Mary Charlton Sullivan. Builders of the 2nd structure 1832: Rev. Barnett Babb, Benj. Camp, Wm. Mears, . . . — Map (db m16323) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Fork Shoals — 23-16 — Lebanon Church
This United Methodist Church was originally located about 1Ό miles east and named the Grove. It was visited by Bishop Francis Asbury in 1790 and 1800. Relocated about ½ mile SW of here after the land was obtained 1832. Present house of worship was erected in 1850's and named changed to Lebanon. Sunday School annex completed 1951 and steeple and portico in 1955. — Map (db m9018) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Fork Shoals — 23-17 — Sullivan (Grove) Cemetery
The cemetery located about ½ mile north, marks the site of Grove Church, established prior to 1790, one of the first Methodist churches in Greenville County. The present church, renamed Lebanon, is located about 1Ό miles W. of here. A number of Revolutionary War soldiers and church founders are buried in this cemetery, now maintained by the church and the Sullivan family. — Map (db m9021) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Fountain Inn — Cannon Memorial Park Veterans Monument
[Top Plaque]: In Honor of our fallen hero Courtesy of Cannon Memorial Park [Lower Plaque]: Although you are gone your strength to fight for our lives, property and our freedom at home will always be known. May you sit at the throne of God with the angels above, until we meet again my friend you will always be loved. — Map (db m40286) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Fountain Inn — Charles G. Garrett Interchange
Named in 1985 by action of the General Assembly and Highway Commission in recognition of his many years of devoted service to the people of Greenville County and of the state Former Mayor, Fountain Inn Member House of Representatives 1949-1968 Member South Carolina Senate 1968-1980 — Map (db m40142) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Fountain Inn — 23-30 — Cherokee Boundary (1767)
[Front]: In 1766-67 S.C. & N.C. negotiated with the Cherokee to establish a boundary between Indian land to the west and new settlement to the east. This north-south line ran past this point to N.C. and on to Va. In S.C. it ran north from near present-day Honea Path, crossed the Reedy River near present-day Princeton, and ended at the S.C.-N.C. line. [Reverse]: The Cherokee ceded all land east of the 1767 line to the colonies of S.C. and N.C. In 1786, when S.C. created . . . — Map (db m49086) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Fountain Inn — Clayton "Peg Leg" Bates — 10/11/07 - 12/6/98
[Southwest]: Don't look at me in sympathy, I'm glad I'm this way for I feel good and I'm knocking on wood, as long as I can say you just watch me peg it. You can tell by the way I leg it that I'm Peg Leg Bates, the one legged dancing man. I mix like fantastic, but with hot gymnastics I'm Peg Leg Bates, the one legged dancing man. "Life means, do the best that you can with what you have, with all your mind and heart. One can do anything in this world if one wants to do it badly . . . — Map (db m9022) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Fountain Inn — Eve
In Mermory of Eve The First Woman — Map (db m19297) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Fountain Inn — 23-19 — Fairview Church / Fairview Cemetery
(Front): Settlers from the Nazareth area of Spartanburg County founded this Presbyterian church in 1786 on land ceded by the Cherokee Indians in the treaty of DeWitt's Corner, 1777. It is said that three buildings, two of logs and one of brick, preceded this 1858 building. The Sunday school annex was built in 1949 and the office-historical building in 1986. (Reverse): The oldest marked graves in this cemetery are those of Margaret Alexander, d. 1791, and Elizabeth . . . — Map (db m8946) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Fountain Inn — Fountain Inn High School
The National Register of Historic Places Fountain Inn High School — Map (db m31724) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Fountain Inn — 23-45 — Fountain Inn Rosenwald School
[Front]: The Fountain Inn Rosenwald School, also known as the Fountain Inn Colored School, was a complex of several buildings built here from 1928 to 1942. The first school, a frame seven-room elementary school for grades 1-7, was a Rosenwald school, one of 500 rural schools in S.C. funded in part by the Julius Rosenwald Fund from 1917 to 1932. It was built in 1928-29 at a cost of $7,200. [Reverse]: The Fountain Inn Colored High School, a frame three-room high school . . . — Map (db m50524) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Fountain Inn — Fountain Inn Veterans Monument
Dedicated to the memory of our fallen comrades — Map (db m19269) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Fountain Inn — Mrs. Emmie Fulmer
In Honor or Mrs. Emmie Fulmer Age 102 - 1981 Nation's Oldest Active Garden Club Member — Map (db m19293) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Fountain Inn — 23-6 — Old Fountain Inn
According to tradition an ante-bellum inn with a gushing fountain in the front yard stood near here on the old stage road between Greenville and Columbia
Map (db m8447) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Fountain Inn — Snow Campaign Chapter Marker
National Society Daughters of the American Revolution To commemorate the Snow Campaign Chapter, NSDAR organized September 23, 1972 in Fountain Inn, South Carolina with twenty charter members — Map (db m19272) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Fountain Inn — 23-29 — Stone's Mill / Jones' Mill
Stone's Mill: The first grist mill on Big Durbin Creek was built about 1813 for John Bruce (d. 1818), a veteran of the American Revolution, who also ran a sawmill and woolen mill here. The present mill, built by slave labor before 1860, is made of heart pine, with a granite foundation. It was built for Jesse K. Stone (1825-1899), and the mill was known as Stone's Mill until his death. Jones' Mill: The mill complex was sold to R.B. Holland in 1899, then to the Jones family soon . . . — Map (db m43522) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Fountain Inn — 23-21 — Tullyton
This house was built by T.C. Booling c. 1840 near the old indian boundary. C.B. Stewart minister of nearby Fairview Presbyterian Church lived here 1859-1890. — Map (db m8947) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — "Mom, Can I Have a Nickle?"
Soft drinks, candy and snacks were once sold here. The building's original 1935 plans (see exhibit inside) included a concession area at the main desk. However, after the annex (where restrooms are now) was added in 1945, the park manager's family and, later, the South Carolina Commission of the Blind ran a concessions stand there. Lifeguards had a first aid station here and "there was a jukebox at the main door to the bathhouse on the porch." With hits like Shake, Rattle and . . . — Map (db m20203) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — "Old College"
Built in 1851 with two class rooms for use while the main building was being completed. Dr. James C. Furman used the south end, Dr. Charles H. Judson, the north end. Entrusted by action of the Trustees on June 10, 1910 to the Quaterion Club for preservation. Moved to the new campus in 1958. — Map (db m21170) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — "Shoeless Joe" Jackson
• Favorite baseball bat: "Black Betsy" • 1911 - highest rookie batting average - .408 • All time batting average - .356 • Played for: Philadelphia (1908-1908), Cleveland (1910-1915), Chicago White Sox (1915-1920) — Map (db m29908) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — 23-43 — "Shoeless Joe" Jackson House
[Front]: This house, built in 1940, was originally 3 mi. SW at 119 E. Wilburn Ave. It was the last home of Joseph Jefferson Wofford "Shoeless Joe" Jackson (1888-1951), one of the greatest natural hitters in the history of baseball. Jackson, born in Pickens Co., moved to Greenville as a boy. He worked at the Brandon Mill, joined the mill baseball team as a teenager, and was a star long before he made the major leagues in 1908. [Reverse]: In 1911, his first full season, . . . — Map (db m44047) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — "Shoeless" Joe Jackson — Carolina Legends
Shoeless Joe Jackson began his playing career with the Greenville Spinners. After moving up to the majors, he became one of the greatest hitters of all-time. After playing 13 seasons in the majors, he compiled a .356 average, the third highest in Major League Baseball history. — Map (db m19155) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — 23-9 — "The Poplars" / Elias Earle
"The Poplars" This was approximately the center of the many acred estate and "seat of hospitality" of Elias Earle, pioneer Greenville settler who began acquiring property here as early as 1787. His home, "The Poplars," stood at the N.E. corner of Rutherford and Buist Streets. Elias Earle June 19, 1762-May 19, 1823 Builder of the "Great Wagon Road" across the western mountains from South Carolina to Tennessee in 1797, Elias Earle served as State Legislator 1794-1798, state Senator . . . — Map (db m9084) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — "The Shack"
The Shack, built in 1937, served as a snack bar and rustic gathering place on the campus of the university's coordinated women's college until it was moved to Furman's new campus in 1961. Now a student residence, it is the only remaining structure from the former Greenville Woman's College. — Map (db m20751) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — 6 inch Field Howitzer Model of 1908
This type of gun was used by the United States for training purposes in World War I (1917-1918). Our French allies had requested that all pre-1917 American guns by relegated to training purposes only. Our allies supplied all of our artillery needs overseas. This allowed us to get more men on ships being sent across the Atlantic Ocean to aid our British and French allies. The howitzer was designed to shell enemy trenches from great distances. The 6 inch Field Howitzer was one of the largest . . . — Map (db m14547) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — 75 mm Field Gun / 3 inch M1903
This gun is based on the British 15lb. Erhardt gun and was manufactured prior to World War I (1914-1918). Since the gun trail is one piece it could not be elevated easily. It could fire between 20 and 30 rounds of 75mm shells per minute. The 75mm fired mainly explosive and shrapnel shells. Each 75mm shrapnel shell had a time fuse that could be set to explode while still in the air. The shrapnel shell time fuse could be set to fly for 21 seconds. In the event that the time fuse did not work . . . — Map (db m14548) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — 90 mm M-2 Anti-Aircraft Gun
This type of gun was adopted in 1942 and was used mainly against enemy planes. It was used in both the European and Pacific Theaters of Operation during World War II (1941-1945). The 90 mm M-2 AA gun could fire at airplanes up to an altitude of 33,000 feet. Shells were set to explode when they reached a certain altitude. The men who fired this type of gun were known as ack-ack crews. It could be used as a field gun for bombardment and as an anti-tank gun as well. These guns usually operated . . . — Map (db m14544) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — 23-4 — About 1765
Near Reedy River Falls, stood the home, trading station, and grist mill of Col. Richard Pearis, first white settler of this section. He was a noted Indian trader and prominent Tory of the Revolution. — Map (db m10428) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — African Elephant — Loxodonta africana
In Greenville! Joy eats 2 bales of hay, 25 pounds of grain, 20 pounds of fruits and vegetables, with vitamin supplements added, and browse. Total food consumption is up to 200 pounds each day. Joy, a female, weighs over 8,000 pounds and is just under 8 feet tall. Females are smaller than males, but not dainty. It's impolite to ask a lady her age, however, Joy was born in 1970 and has been a popular resident of the Greenville Zoo since 1977. Because "elephant years" are about . . . — Map (db m19443) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Al Rosen
Al Rosen is a native of Spartanburg, South Carolina and launched his career in 1950 by hitting a record 37 home runs in his rookie season. In 1953, he was unanimously voted the American League MVP after slugging 43 home runs and collecting 145 RBIs. Rosen is also one of only 6 players to ever hit 2 home runs in a single All-Star game. Power Fact Lee Steam Station, named for Duke Energy's co-founder William States Lee, started generating electricity in 1951. It is the company's . . . — Map (db m44084) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Alester G. Furman, Jr. Administration Building — Erected 1957
Named in Honor of Alester Garden Furman, Jr. Humanitarian, Master Planner, Friend of Youth, Champion of Education, Guiding Light in Building the New South. This administration building is named to honor Mr. Furman in grateful recognition of his enduring support of Furman University. — Map (db m18863) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Alester Garden Furman, Jr. — 1895-1980
Fourth generation descendant of Richard Furman, who was the spiritual founder of Furman University. He served many terms on the Board of Trustees of the University. As chairman he was instrumental in moving Furman University to the present location and in determining the quality and design of the campus and buildings. — Map (db m18903) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Allen Temple AME Church Bell
This bell was transferred from the old to the rebuilt church in 1929. Present Mounting: Sept. 1983 Donors: W.W. Henderson, Sr., Wilton Wells, Sr., Wilfred Walker, Sr. Pastor: W.J. Jefferson, Jr. Elder: C. Jackson Bishop: F.M. Reid, Jr. — Map (db m15959) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Alliance Cotton Warehouse — West End Commercial Historic District
The National Register of Historic Places: Alliance Cotton Warehouse West End Commercial Historic District — Map (db m28239) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Andrew Pickens — "The Wizard Owl" — 1739 - 1817
As a tribute to his skills exploiting enemy weaknesses, Pickens became known as the "Wizard Owl" or "Skyagunsta" - a bird known for seeing clearly, acting wisely and striking quickly. Pickens was a tall, religious Presbyterian from Pennsylvania and one of General Greene's most trusted detachment field commanders. His home and church were burned by the British during the Revolution as the Royal government sought to install state sponsored religion and hang all "rebels." Pickens was . . . — Map (db m11253) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Barracks in the Woods
Look around and you'll notice lumps in the terrain. These overgrown foundations are all that's left of wooden barracks that once housed the men who built this park. The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) began work here in 1935, transporting men from Cleveland until onsite housing was constructed in 1937. The camps, called "S90," completed Paris Mountain State Park and moved on to other projects, abandoning this site in 1940. Soon thereafter, American entered World War II and many . . . — Map (db m20301) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Beatrice Dennis Plyler Fountain
This fountain is dedicated to Beatrice Dennis Plyler First Lady of Furman University 1939 to 1964 — Map (db m18897) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Beattie E. Huff Highway
That part of U.S. 25 between Saluda Dam Road and U.S. 276 Named in 1986 by action of the General Assembly and highway commission in recognition of his 24 years of dedicated service to Greenville County and South Carolina as a member of the House of Representatives 1961-1984 — Map (db m17792) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Boyhood Home of Hugh Smith Thompson — 1836 - 1904
Here was the Boyhood Home of Hugh Smith Thompson 1836 - 1904 State Superintendent of Education South Carolina 1877 - 1882 Governor of South Carolina 1882 - 1886 Assistant Secretary of The Treasury, United States 1886 - 1889 United States Civil Service Commissioner 1889 - 1892 Comptroller, New York Life Insurance Company 1892 – 1904 — Map (db m16005) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Brockman Park
Upper Plaque: Dedicated to the memory of Dr. William Thomas Brockman A distinguished Surgeon -- Humanitarian -- Churchman Citizen and Commissioner of the City of Greenville, South Carolina 1881 ---- 1968 Lower Plaque: Brockman Park In honor of Dr. Thomas Brockman for his many contributions as alderman for the city of Greenville, S.C. — Map (db m17503) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — 23-38 — Brutontown
[Front]: Brutontown, an historic African-American community, grew up around the intersection of Paris Mountain Rd. and Rutherford Rd. Benjamin Bruton, a mulatto freedman, bought 1.75 acres here in 1874. He built a house and blacksmith shop, labeled "Bruton's Shop" on Kyser's 1882 map of Greenville County. Other blacks, a few of them tradesmen like Bruton but most tenant farmers, soon moved to this area. By 1880 sixty African-American families lived here. [Reverse]: The . . . — Map (db m22120) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Buck Mickel
In Remembrance Buck Mickel An extraordinary Leader Whose Vision, Generosity and Perseverance Inspired the Transformation of Greenville into a Vibrant and Beautiful Community — Map (db m16428) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Bull's Eye!
An archery range was one of the planned recreational features when the Civilian Conservation Corps designed the park in 1936. Eventually laid out between here and the Sulphur Springs parking lot, the course began with a posted diagram and instructions. Targets - made of tightly woven excelsior bales - were arrayed along a path. Each station had a choice of markers from which to shoot; shooting from the marker further away from the target earned more points than shooting from a closer-in . . . — Map (db m20243) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Camperdown Mill — Reedy River Historic Park
Greenville's first post-bellum textile mill was founded by Massachusetts mill owners George Hall, George Putnam, and O.H. Sampson, who came south to start a textile business after a disasterous fire in Boston. In cooperation with Vardry McBee's heirs, Alexander and Vardry A. McBee, Hall and Simpson opened the water-powered Camperdown Mill (named for the Camperdown elms on the property) in 1876. The mill produced yarn and gingham fabric until 1956, when the Citizens and Southern National Bank . . . — Map (db m8066) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Capers Bouton Memoral Fountain
Dedicated to the memory of Capers Bouton (October 2, 1950 - October 22, 1988), accomplished attorney and athlete, dedicated to his community and family, who died while pursuing his favorite recreation - running. — Map (db m16059) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Carolina Supply Company
The National Register of Historic Places: Carolina Supply Company — Map (db m30255) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Chamber of Commerce Building
The National Register of Historic Places: Chamber of Commerce Building — Map (db m28360) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Charles H. Townes Center for Science
This four-building science center is named for Greenville native and Furman Trustee Charles Hard Townes, Furman Class of 1935, son of Furman alumni Henry K, '97 and Ellen Hard '02 Townes. Lifelong innovator and teacher, he was presented the Noble Prize in 1964 for his work on the maser and the laser, and in 2005 he received the Templeton Prize for Progress in Religion for his contributions to the study of faith and reason. — Map (db m18576) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Cherrydale
James Clement Furman, the University's first president, purchased Cherrydale from George W. Green in 1857. Probably built in the 1840s, the farmhouse was Furman's summer home until 1881 and his residence until his death in 1891. In 1939 Eugene E. Stone III purchased the house from Furman's descendants. AIG Baker acquired it in 1999 and donated it to the University. In March 1999 Cherrydale was moved to campus from its original site on Poinsett Highway. Furman University is grateful to the . . . — Map (db m18279) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Chicora College — Reedy River Falls — Historic Park
The Presbyterian Synod of South Carolina established Chicora College for Young Ladies in 1893 as "McBee's Terrace," opposite the Greenville Coach Factory on the south bank of the Reedy. Its sixteen acre campus, with grounds landscaped down to the river's edge, eventually included a 1200 seat auditorium, a dormitory, administration building, and a president's home. Liberal arts subjects, business courses (including typewriting and bookkeeping), photography, and music were taught to more than . . . — Map (db m41444) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Chino Smith
Chino Smith, a Greenwood, South Carolina native, was known as one of the best hitters in the Negro Leagues. He was the first Negro League player to hit a home run in Yankee Stadium, and during his tragically short career, he maintained a batting average of no less than .428. Satchel Paige referred to Smith as one of the most dangerous batters he ever faced. Power Fact In 2010, almost 40 percent of the electricity Duke Energy generated was from carbon-free sources, including nuclear, hydro, solar and wind. — Map (db m44089) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — 23-10 — Christ Church (Episcopal)
Started in 1820 as St. James' Mission, the first church built here in 1825 on land given by Vardry McBee, was consecrated in 1828 by Bishop Nathaniel Bowen as Christ Church. The present church was built 1852-54 with Rev. John D. McCollough as architect using plans drawn by Joel R. Poinsett, and consecrated in 1854 by Bishop Thomas Davis. — Map (db m8506) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Church Street
C.F. McCollough Mayor City of Greenville 1937-1947 J. Kenneth Cass Mayor City of Greenville 1947-1961 C.R. McMillian Chief Commissioner S.C. Highway Department 1947-1961 S.N. Pearman Chief Commissioner S.C. Highway Department 1961- Plans for this multimillion dollar project began in 1944, upon request to the South Carolina Highway Department, by the Mayor and City Council of 1944, for recommendations to relieve Main Street traffic congestion. The . . . — Map (db m19239) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Cigar Factory — On Court Street Behind the Historic Chamber of Commerce Building
By 1906 the factory employed 400 girls at the wage of $60.00 per month. By November 1907 the factory was turning out 1 million cigars a month. The land was purchased for $2,000.00 and built at the site of Richard Pearis home. — Map (db m28198) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — City of Greenville 9-11 Plaque
Somerset, Pa., New York, N.Y., Washington D.C. 09.11.2001 A Day Not To Be Forgotten — Map (db m17294) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Clay Buchholz
Clay Buchholz was a member of the Greenville Drive's inaugural season in 2006. In 2007, he made his Major League debut with the Boston Red Sox, the first Drive player to make it all the way to the big leagues. On September 1st, 2007, he became the first Boston rookie to throw a no-hitter. In 2010, Buchholz finished the season with a 17-7 record and 2.33 earned run average (ERA), earning him a spot on the American League All Star Team. Power Fact In 2010, Oconee Nuclear Station . . . — Map (db m44052) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Clayton "Peg Leg" Bates — Carolina Legends
The great tap dancer Clayton "Peg Leg" Bates began his career in Fountain Inn, South Carolina. After a cotton gin accident took his leg, many felt his life was over. Through perseverance and determination, Peg Leg Bates is known as one of the greatest entertainers of all time. — Map (db m19219) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Cleveland Park
In memory of W.C. Cleveland who, on February 13, 1925 unselfishly gave this park to the citizens of Greenville, South Carolina ---------- Mayor Max M. Heller Councilmen Joe E. Jordan, Wayne Wuestenberg James H. Simkins, Joseph R. Bryson Vardry D. Ramseur, III, James M. Shoemaker, Jr. — Map (db m16027) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Come On In, the Water's Fine!
"All summer, everyone came up here and lay in the sun and carried on," recalls Mary Ann Epps McCullough, who, along with other lifeguards in the 1940s, "would swim to the dam and back every day." July 4 brought Aquatic Day festivities with races and a diving clown. Spectators cheered as lifeguards stood on boats, using bamboo poles to knock each other into the water. One year, 4th of July attendance totaled 1,400 people. All of this occurred in what was originally simply "Reservoir . . . — Map (db m20201) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Confederate Armory — 1861-1864
Erected on land donated to the state by Vardry McBee for the manufacture of arms for the South Carolina troops in the Confederate service. George W. Morse, superintendent of the works, invented and manufactured a breech-loading carbine pronounced by General Wade Hampton the best that he had seen. — Map (db m73773) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Cradle of Greenville
Near this sign, before the adoption of the Declaration of Independence, Richard Pearis, best known of all Pre-Revolutionary settlers in the surrounding Cherokee Indian nation, established his home with a grist mill and trading post. Around this location grew up the community of Greenville Court House, laid out in 1797, the county seat for Greenville District. In marking this site...the "Cradle of Greenville"...and building thereon its permanent home, the Citizens and Southern National . . . — Map (db m8208) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Crenshaw's Battery — Charles L. Crenshaw, Jr 1921-2002
This authentic 12-pound brass Napoleon, a favorite of the Confederate artillery, was constructed by Charles Crenshaw Jr. Gharlie co-founded the "Southern Guns of Thunder" and for years built and fired cannons to lend a thunderous salute at memorial services, victory celebrations and orchestral presentations of the 1812 Overture. MODEL: 1857, 12-pound Napoleon BORE SIZE: 4.62inches BARREL WEIGHT: 1,220 pounds CARRIANGE: #2 gun carriage WHEEL SIZE: 57 inch diameter, 250 pounds per . . . — Map (db m56844) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Deputy Marcus L. Whitfield — Jan 6, 1979 - Aug 13, 1999
An officer's sworn to protect and serve, Answering each call with unwavering nerve, Never knowing when life will throw out a curve. A policeman's life was what I chose, To follow a noble, honorable code, And it cost me my life on this very road. As you stand upon this ground, be aware, Take a frief moment and say a small prayer, For my fellow officers still out there. My family and friends have one last request, That as a citizen you do your best. Thank you for . . . — Map (db m15971) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — DeSantis Pavilion
Presented by Magdalina B. and Blaine J. DeSantis '75 In Honor of Joseph E. DeSantis 1922-2001 A True Gentleman in the Classic Sense of the Word Born in Ascoli Piceno, Italy Emigrated to United States in 1929 Rose from Humble Beginnings to Become A Prominent Attorney and Business Leader in Pennsylvania Established Bernice J. DeSantis Scholarship at Furman Friend of Furman University — Map (db m18275) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — 23-26 — Donaldson Air Force Base / Captain John O. Donaldson
Donaldson Air Force Base Greenville Army Air Base opened on this site in 1942 and trained B-25 bomber crews during World War II. Emphasizing air transport after 1945 and renamed Donaldson Air Force Base in 1951. It was the home to C-124 transports and called "The Airlift Capital of the World" for its role in the Berlin airlift, Korean War, and Cold War. Closed in 1962, it has been an industrial park since 1963. Captain John O. Donaldson John Owen Donaldson (1897-1930) for whom the . . . — Map (db m9332) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — 23-26 — Donaldson Air Force Base / Captain John O. Donaldson
Donaldson Air Force Base Greenville Army Air Base opened on this site in 1942 and trained B-25 bomber crews during World War II. Emphasizing air transport after 1945 and renamed Donaldson Air Force Base in 1951. It was the home to C-124 transports and called "The Airlift Capital of the World" for its role in the Berlin airlift, Korean War, and Cold War. Closed in 1962, it has been an industrial park since 1963. Captain John O. Donaldson John Owen Donaldson (1897-1930) for whom the . . . — Map (db m12118) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Downtown Baptist Church
Chartered September 23, 1974 Placed on the National Register of Historic Places August 1977 Sanctuary designed by Samuel Sloan of Philadelphia Erected in 1857 and Dedicated February 21, 1858 — Map (db m37591) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Dr. Charles Hard Townes
Born in Greenville, S.C. 1915. Graduate of Furman University 1935. Nobel Prize Laureate in Physics 1964. Templeton Price Winner 2005. Designated one of the world's most influential 1,000 men of the past 1,000 years. Depicted at the moment of his “revelation” of the equation for the laser and master principle...an equation that forever change the world. Map (db m8112) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Dr. Harold B. Sightler — Psalm 78:19: Can God Furnish a Table in the Wilderness? — God Can!
Interchange Named in Honor of Dr. Harold B. Sightler 1914-1995 Founder of: Tabernacle Baptist Church 1952-1995 Christian Schools Children's Home Baptist College Tabernacle Baptist Missions International WTBI AM & FM ----------•---------- Champion of Old Time Religion — Map (db m24126) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Dr. John Todd Anderson
Furman Student Medical Missionary to China Born 1887 Died 1918 — Map (db m21172) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — 23-52 — Dunean Mill
Dunean Mill, chartered in 1911 and opened in 1912, was one of several textile mills owned by Capt. Ellison Adger Smyth (1847-1942), a national leader in the industry for more than 60 years. Dunean was named for the Irish village where Smyth's Adger ancestors lived. The mill, called "the Million Dollar Mill" while it was being built by J. E. Sirrine & Company, was an all electric mill with 50,000 spindles and 1,200 looms when it opened, making fine cotton goods. The light gray brick and black . . . — Map (db m55675) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Eighty Unnamed Soldiers
In Grateful Memory of Eighty Unnamed Soldiers of The Southern Confederacy Whose Remains Lie Buried In This Block — Map (db m13480) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Elizabeth Lyles Blackwell Fountain
This fountain is dedicated to Elizabeth Lyles Blackwell First Lady of Furman University 1965 to 1976 — Map (db m18935) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Eugene E. Stone III Soccer Stadium
Named in honor of Eugene E. Stone III, distinguished chairman of Stone Manufacturing Company, prominent leader in the Greenville community and generous friend of Furman University and its soccer program. — Map (db m18408) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Falls Cottage
Falls Cottage was originally used as a home by the Camperdown Mills Supervisor. It has been many things including a home, gas station, and restaurant. The West End became a settlement in the 1830s. — Map (db m29900) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Falls Place — Reedy River Historic Park
Greenville was a major textile center by the beginning of the twentieth century, and local cotton growers and brokers needed storage places for the harvested cotton. West End banker H.L. Gassaway and Dr. Davis Furman purchased land immediately south of the bridge at Main Street in 1910. In 1913 they erected a fireproof cotton warehouse that was attached to a new heavily-reinforced concrete bridge at the same time. The building housed a soft drink company for many years, and was used as a . . . — Map (db m8209) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — 23-24 — Fountain Fox Beattie House / Greenville Women's Club
Fountain Fox Beattie House This house, built in 1834, first stood a few blocks south on East North St. It was built by Fountain Fox Beattie (1807-1863), a textile merchant, for his new bride Emily Edgeworth Hamlin. Their son Hamlin Beattie (1835-1914), who founded the National Bank of Greenville in 1872, added wings and elaborate Italianate ornamentation. The house was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1974. Greenville Women's Club The home remained in the . . . — Map (db m11036) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Francis Marion — "The Swamp Fox" — 1732-1795
Battle hardened in the Cherokee War of 1760-61 and the battle of Sullivan's Island in 1776, Marion was 48 years old when the British invaded & conquered SC in 1780. His volunteer militia detachment operated primarily in the lowcountry attacking Tory Units, disrupting British supply lines and providing intelligence reports to his Commanding Officer - General Greene. Marion & his men, which included African Americans, would often escape pursuing British forces by retreating into the swamps, . . . — Map (db m10806) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Frank Howard — Carolina Legends
This legendary Clemson coach was on the sidelines for 30 years as a head coach. He won over 150 games, six ACC Championships and was also Athletic Director during his time as head coach. After his retirement, Clemson named the playing surface at Memorial Stadium "Frank Howard Field." — Map (db m19220) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Frank Selvy — Carolina Legends
This All-American Furman graduate averaged 32.5 points a game during his college basketball career. He achieved lasting fame when he scored a NCAA Division One record 100 points in a 149-95 win over Newberry on February 13, 1954. — Map (db m19168) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Fred W. Symmes Hall of Science
This Hall of Science is Dedicated to the Memory of Fred W. Symmes 1879-1957 Textile Manufacturer, Public Servant, Seeker after Knowledge, who throughout a long life labored unceasingly for the cause of Education Constructed through the generosity of the Fred W. Symmes Foundation 1988 Trustees: William H. Orders, Wilson C. Wearn, Katherine McKinnon Wilkinson — Map (db m10981) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Fulton H. Anthony Memorial Bridge
Named in honor of Patrolman Anthony who was killed near nere March 10, 1973 while performing his duty as a highway patrolman and in recognition of his life of service as a conscientious loyal and dedicated law enforcement officer. Erected in 1981 in the 50th Anniversary Year of the S.C. Highway Patrol. — Map (db m38780) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Furman Class of '05 September 11 Memorial
Provided by Members of the Class of 2005 In memory of September 11, 2001 our first day of class [Left]: In the early hours the news broke, the truth uncertain, the implications unfathomable We continued on, not knowing the world was changed forever Afternoon, our adrenaline slowed to the freezing point With heavy souls, realizing our world had changed forever As the days slipped by and the heroes emerged, we grew to realize the triumph born on the day that . . . — Map (db m18990) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Furman Men Who Gave Their Lives in the World War
Lt. John H. David Jr. The First South Carolina Officer Killed in Action. Lt. Charles S. Gardner Sgt. Charles E. Timmons Jr. Corp. Talmadge W. Gerrald Pvt. Thomas J. Lyon Jr. Pvt. Otis B. Brodie — Map (db m53063) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — 23-14 — Furman University
Established in 1825 by the S.C. Baptist Convention, the Furman Academy and Theological Institution opened in Edgefield, 1826, moved to Sumter District, 1829-34, and to Fairfield 1837-1850. Chartered in 1830 as Furman University, it opened in Greenville, 1851, and for over a century, 1852-1958, occupied this site purchased from Vardry McBee. In the summer of 1958, Furman moved to a new campus six miles north of town. — Map (db m11383) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Furman University
This plaque commemorates the 50th anniversary of Furman University's relocation from this site to the current campus north of Greenville on Poinsett Highway. From 1851 to 1958, Furman University was located atop this bluff above the Reedy River Falls, and the Greenville Woman's College was located a mile away on College Street at the current site of Heritage Green. The all-male university and the woman's college was separate institutions until they were coordinated during the Great . . . — Map (db m14540) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Furman University
Established in 1826 in Edgefield as an academy and theological institution, Furman University was charted in 1850 and in 1851 established a campus on the bluff above this spot, where it remained for the next century. Named for Baptist minister Richard Furman, a Revolutionary War patriot, the university's first president was his son, James Clement Furman. Its first two-room frame building, "Old College" was replaced in 1854 by the Richard Furman Classroom Building, known fondly as "Old Main." . . . — Map (db m14549) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Furman University — Reedy River Falls Historic Park
Established in 1826 in Edgefield as an academy and theological institution, Furman University was charted in 1850 and in 1851 established a campus on the bluff above this spot, where it remained for the next century. Named for Baptist minister Richard Furman, a Revolutionary War patriot, the university's first president was his son, James Clement Furman. Its first two-room frame building, "Old College" was replaced in 1854 by the Richard Furman Classroom Building, known fondly as "Old Main." . . . — Map (db m32950) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Furman University World War II Memorial
In Memory of Those Who Paid the Supreme Sacrifice in World War II — Map (db m18297) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Gassaway Mansion — "Isaqueena"
Built in 1919 by Walter & Minnie Quinn Gassaway National Historic Register Map (db m15841) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Geer Hall
Bennette Eugene Geer, Litt.D, LL.D. 1873- Teacher, 1898-1911 Dean, 1907-1911 Treasurer, 1911-1927 Trustee, 1914-1933 President, 1933-1938 And John Mattison Geer 1858-1919 Benefactor, Trustee, 1905-1919 — Map (db m18512) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — General Robert E. Lee
A tribute to the memory of General Robert E Lee "His monument is the Adoration of the South, his shrine is in every Southern Heart." Thomas Nelson Page. Erected 1935 By the Greenville Chapter and Fort Sumter Chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy of Greenville South Carolina to mark the route of the Dixie Highway Love makes memory eternal — Map (db m10778) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — 23-5 — General Store — Alexander McBeth & Co.
One of the first stores in this section of the state stood near this spot. Its day book shows that it was in operation in 1794, three years before the founding of the town of Greenville. — Map (db m9131) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Getting Water from Here to There
To secure a safe and reliable water source, Greenville needed a reservoir. City leaders hired American Pipe Company, which, under the name Paris Mountain Water Company, bought Mountain Creek's forested watershed and built this dam around 1890. From this altitude, gravity carried the water into town with no need for a pump. However, a valve was needed to control the flow out of the lake. This stone structure was built to house the necessary mechanism. The valve inside, similar to . . . — Map (db m20311) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Gilder
Austin Plantation: Settled before the rev. war by Nathaniel Austin (c. 1720 - c. 1800) and his wife, Agnes Dickinson. Ten sons: Nathaniel, Jr., Walter, Thomas, John, Francis, Dickinson, William, Thompson, Samuel & Robert. One daughter: Mary. Nathaniel Austin, Capt., S.C. Militia, & sons served in the Rev. War. The first house was a mile south near Gilder Creek & family cemetery. Second house 1786 was 100 yds. east of this marker. Present house built 1830 by William & Jane Collins Austin. . . . — Map (db m15996) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Graceland East Memorial Park Veterans Monument
A Nation that honors its veterans is a nation dedicated to the preservation of freedom won by the sacrifice of life itself. These emblems are appropriately dedicated to the valiant dead of the armed forces who ventured far, fought bravely, and gave their lives to preserve freedom and liberty in our land. Together they lie here in mute testimony to the manner in which they lived, worked and fought to achieve the victories in order that America may life. In Memory of All World War I . . . — Map (db m30823) WM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Greenville Arboretum — Reedy River Falls Historic Park
The Greenville Garden Club won the $500 second place price in Better Homes and Gardens' "Most Beautiful America" contest in 1932 for their landscaping of Rock Quarry Park. Members used the money to develop South Carolina's first arboretum on five acres of Furman University land immediately above this plaque. The plan, developed by Mrs. H.T. Crigler of the Garden Club, J.A. McPherson of the Parks and Trees Commission, and Furman botanist Sumner Ives, included flower beds, terraces, . . . — Map (db m17562) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Greenville County Confederate Monument
[South Side]: All lost, but by the graves Where martyred heroes rest He wins the most who honor saves Success is not the test The world shall yet decide In truth's clear far off light That the soldiers Who wore the gray and died With Lee, where right. [East Side]: Come from the four winds, O breath, And breathe upon these slain That they may live. Resting at last, in that glorious Land, where the white flag Of peace is never furled. . . . — Map (db m41803) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — 23-42 — Greenville County Courthouse - The Willie Earle Lynching Trial
[Front] This Beaux Arts building, built in 1916-18, was the fourth Greenville County Courthouse, from 1918 to 1950. It was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1994. The largest lynching trial in U.S. history was held here May 12-21, 1947. Willie Earle, a young black man accused of assaulting white cabdriver Thomas W. Brown, had been lynched by a white mob on Bramlett Road in Greenville. [Reverse] The trial of 31 whites, 28 of them cabdrivers, was rare at . . . — Map (db m40504) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Greenville County Veterans Memorial / Greenville County Medal of Honor
[Veterans Memorial]: Veterans Memorial WWI 1917-1918 WWII 1941-1946 Korea 1950-1955 Military Branch Seals: United States Army, United States Marine Corps, United States Navy, United States Air Force, United States Coast Guard, United states Merchant Marine Vietnam 1961-1975 Persian Gulf 1990 Undeclared Wars POW...Remembering Those Who Served...MIA [Medal of Honor]: The Medal of Honor is awarded by the President to the name of . . . — Map (db m19842) WM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Greenville County Vietnam Veterans Memorial
Southeast Wall Panel 1: The Purple Heart Awarded to Combat-Veterans "For Your Tomorrow, They Gave Their Today. Panel 2: The young warrior does no speak. Nevertheless, he is heard in the still houses: who has not heard him. He has a silence that speaks for him at night and when the clock counts. I am young. I have died. Remember me. I have done what I could but until it is finished it is not done. I have given my life, but until it is finished . . . — Map (db m16124) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Greenville Gas and Electric Light Company
The National Register of Historic Places: Greenville Gas and Electric Light Company — Map (db m30288) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Greenville Memorial Auditorium
This building was erected by the citizens of the Greenville community as a tribute to that glorious heritage which inspired the development and formation of the American government and the freedoms to which it aspires and is dedicated to the men and women of this community who in time of war gave freely of service and even life itself in order that this government and those freedoms might by perpetuated. 1958 Board of Trustees Ed. B. Smith, Chairman L.M. Glenn, Secretary; E. . . . — Map (db m19197) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — 23-15 — Greenville Woman's College
Established in 1854 by the S.C. Baptist Convention, this institution opened as Greenville Baptist Female College in February 1856, on this site originally donated by Vardry McBee to the Greenville Academies. Its name was changed to Greenville Woman's College in 1914. It was coordinated with Furman University in 1933, merged with Furman in 1938, and moved in 1961 to the consolidated campus six miles north of town. — Map (db m9082) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Greenville's General
Have you heard the story of General Greene, A Rhode Island private who followed his dream. In 1780 as Washington's man He came to our state to free our great land. Armies of British were sent by the King, But they were no match for the genius of Greene. Backed by the bravest of ill-equipped men The Patriots fought to the glorious end. There were Pickens and Sumter and Marion too, Wild men at heart but to Greene they were true. These Ghosts of the Woodlands who took up . . . — Map (db m21828) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Guilford Courthouse Flag
This flag, often referred to as the Guilford Courthouse Flag, is an example of the diversity of American flags during the Revolutionary War period. It has the unique design elements of an elongated canton with white background and 13 blue, eight-sided stars and matching blue stripes. The eight-sided stars represent the combined forces from eight states that compromised Major General Nathanael Greene's Southern Army. This flag was present at the Battle of Guilford Courthouse, North Carolina . . . — Map (db m10863) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Harper Plaza
Dedicated to Caldwell Harper Entrepreneur Civil Leader Philanthropist Whose lasting influence and generosity in this community are symbolized here in ensuring granite and flowing water. He donated the site of the plaza to the Greenville Foundation in 1969. Through further donations in 1996, he made possible the beautification of the plaza. These gifts are representative of the thoughtful spirit by which Caldwell Harper has helped shape the destiny of Greenville. — Map (db m16219) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Harriet Smith Wyche — Park Committee Chairman for the Carolina Foothills Garden Club — Reedy River Falls Historic Park
In recognition of her vision and sustained commitment to the conservation and renewal of the Reedy River Falls Historic Park. Her enthusiastic guidance over two decades has been a continuing inspiration to the community. Under her direction the Park Committee has acquired property, undertaken a successful capital fund drive and implemented a park rehabilitation plan. "Her devotion to the beautification of our city, her commitment of resources, her leadership in mobilizing support . . . — Map (db m13695) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Herbert C. Granger Interchange
Named by action of the General Assembly and Highway Commission in recognition of his distinguished public service during 24 years as a member of South Carolina House of Representatives and in particular his role in the development and construction of roads and highways in Greenville County Chairman: Grats Committee 1976 - 84 Delegation's Highway Committee 1969 - 80 Legislative Delegation 1980 - 84 — Map (db m19489) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Here Lieth the Body of Sarah M. Crittenden
Wife of Doct. John Crittenden Who died 14th July 1835, Aged 37. She occupies the first grave opened in this consecrated ground. Leaving an affectionate husband with six weeping children. Her infant Sarah M. died on the 17th and lies entombed in the 2nd grave Aged 8 months and 17 days. ---------- This grave lies beneath this arm of the Church. Map (db m19388) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Herman N. Hipp Hall
Named to honor the memory of Herman N. Hipp, Class of 1935 President of Liberty Life Insurance Corporation Trustee of the Greenville Hospital System and the Greater Greenville Chamber of Commerce Member of the Furman University Advisory Commerce Philanthropist, Loving Husband and Father. This building is named in tribute to his extraordinary accomplishments in the insurance industry and his deep and abiding love for Furman University and her students. — Map (db m18543) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Herman W. Lay Physical Activities Center — Erected 1973
This Building is Named in Honor of Herman Warden Lay Entrepreneural genius of the business world, leader in civic and cultural affairs, friend and benefactor of higher education, loyal alumnus of Furman University. — Map (db m18364) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Historic Plants Garden — The Children's Garden — History Garden
Agricultural plants that were grown and sold by farmers are important to Greenville's history. For many years, most families in Greenville made their living by farming. Corn, Wheat and Oats In the early 1800s, corn, wheat, and oats were the most commonly grown crops in Greenville. These were turned into flour in a mill, then used to make foods and animal feed. After the Civil War, soil was poor, many men were lost, and families had little money or livestock. The 1866 harvest . . . — Map (db m31232) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Historic River Cane — The Children's Garden — History Garden
River cane (Arundinaria gigantean) is the only native American bamboo, and it is the "reed" that gave the Reedy River its name. Found in flood plains throughout the southeastern United States, it is a member of the Grass family (Poaceae), and grows to over 25 feet in height. A smaller subspecies called switch or mountain cane (Arundinaria gigantea tecta grows to about 4 feet high. Like all grasses, river cane blooms and produces seeds, but only does so infrequently . . . — Map (db m31259) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — History of Falls Park
The Carolina Foothills Garden Club, beginning in 1967, spearheaded efforts to reclaim the long neglected site of Greenville's birthplace and to preserve its natural beauty along the banks of the Reedy River. The City of Greenville endorsed the project and resolved to establish and maintain the park. Furman University, whose campus was once located nearby, donated the original six areas, followed by other land grants from adjoining property owners. Over the next two decades the Garden . . . — Map (db m27949) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — History of the Reedy River — The Children's Garden — History Garden
The Reedy is Greenville's river. Its flowing waters have nourished the city and its people for centuries, and its falls are the reason why Greenville is located where it is. But Greenville's people have not always been kind to the river, and now it is time to give something back. The Reedy flows 75 miles from its headwaters in Travelers Rest through Greenville to Lake Greenwood. Pioneer Richard Pearis built an Indian trading post at the Reedy River Falls over 200 years ago. The city of . . . — Map (db m31263) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Huguenot Mill Office
Circa 1880 Later Nukasee Manufacturing Restoration 1979-1890 Greenville County Historic Preservation Commission Vance B. Drawdy Chairman Romayne A. Barnes / John W. Grady, III Laura Smith Ebaugh / Georgianna Graham Mrs. Fred W. Ellis / Mrs. Lawson W. Stoneburner Henry Bacon McKoy Dalton/Morgan, AIA / Adair Construction Co., Inc. — Map (db m17570) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Hunting Grounds to Mill Town
The Cherokees Greenville County was Cherokee Territory before the Revolution. European settlers were forbidden to live here until 1777, when Native Americans were forced to cede this land to the new state. Most of modern day Greenville was hunting land used by the Cherokees, whose main villages were located in modern day Oconee County. A part of the Iroquoian nation, the Cherokees may have set up temporary summer camps along the banks of the reedy River. In the nineteenth and early . . . — Map (db m14535) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — In 1825
In 1825 Erected on This Site The First Church in Greenville Christ Church — Map (db m15208) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — In Honor Of
In honor of those who served in Grenada, Lebanon, Panama and the Persian Gulf. — Map (db m16112) WM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — In Memory of 81st Wildcat Division / Camp Sevier
[Main marker]: In Memory of 81st Wildcat Division which trained at Camp Sevier, Apr to July 1918 Maj. Gen. Chas. J. Bailey, commanding. [Plaque at foot of marker]: Camp Sevier Camp Sevier, a WWI National Guard training center, was located on 1900 acres off Lee Road, three and 1/2 miles east of downtown Greenville. The Thirtieth Division, 30,000 strong, was formed and trained here in 1917-1918. It was composed of the National Guard from the states of . . . — Map (db m8151) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Irvin H. Philpot Highway
Named in honor of Irvin H. Philpot for his dedicated public service to South Carolina. Member, State Legislature 1952 -- 58 Member, State Highway Commission 1959 -- 63 1967 -- 71 Chairman, State Highway Commission 1962 -- 63 — Map (db m11198) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — James Buchanan Duke Library
Erected 1956 Renovated 2004 In Memory of James Buchanan Duke 1856-1925 Philanthropist, Master Builder, Creator of the Duke Endowment, and Benefactor of Humankind This library is named in honor of Mr. Duke in grateful recognition of his generous support of Furman University. "Education, When Conducted Along Sane and Practical, as Opposed to Dogmatic and Theoretical, Lines, is, Next to Religion, the Greatest Civilizing Influence." — Map (db m18940) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — James C. Furman Classroom Building — Erected 1955
In Memory of James Clement Furman, D.D. 1809-1891 President 1859-1879 Professor 1844-1881 ----- At a crisis in 1868 Furman was admonished to abandon the institution. His reply was: "I will nail my colors to the mast of the old ship, and if she goes down I will go with her." — Map (db m18986) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Jane Fishburne Hipp Plaza
Named in honor of a beloved member of the extended Furman University Family, generous benefactor, and wife of Herman N. Hipp, Class of 1935. — Map (db m18539) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Jim Rice
Jim Rice is a native of Anderson, South Carolina and was one of the most feared hitters during his 16-year career with the Boston Red Sox. He still holds career records with the Red Sox for home runs (382), hits (2,452), RBIs (1,451) and total bases (4,129) by a right-handed hitter. Jim Rice was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2009. Power Facts Launched in 1978, Duke Energy's Matching Gifts program provides matching funds to charitable organizations employees and retirees personally support. — Map (db m44080) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Joe Anders
Jo Anders was one of the greatest players in Upstate Textile League history. Anders turned down a dream contract with the New York Yankees in 1942 to join the U.S. Army and serve in World war II. After the war, he was offered a chance to play in the minor leagues for the Brooklyn Dodgers, but instead returned home to play in the Textile Leagues. Power Facts Plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) reduce greenhouse gasses by 25 to 30 percent over conventional vehicles. — Map (db m44087) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Joel Roberts Poinsett — 1759 - 1851
Statesman • Diplomat • Naturalist Founder, National Institution for the Promotion of Science, forerunner of the Smithsonian Institution • First United States Minister to Mexico • • United States Secretary of War • While serving as Minister to Mexico in 1825, Poinsett introduced to America a species of the Euphorbia plant later named Poinsettia pulcherrima in his honor. Map (db m8087) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — 23-11 — Joel Roberts Poinsett — 1779-1851
[Front]: Born in Charleston, S.C., educated in this country and Great Britain, he travelled widely in Europe and Asia before returning to a distinguished career. He served South Carolina in the state legislature, 1816-1820; 1830-1832; and as Chairman of the Board of Public Works 1818-1820. He represented S.C. in Congress 1821-1825, was first American Minister to Mexico 1825-1829, and Secretary of War 1837-1841. [Reverse]: Planter. Writer. Botanist. Diplomat. Statesman. . . . — Map (db m9187) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — John E. Jones '47
This site honors the memory of John E. Jones '47 President Furman University 1976-1994 — Map (db m18902) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — John E. Jones Hall
Dedicated in honor or the ninth president of Furman University who led Furman through a period of great achievement, change and renewal from 1976 to 1994. — Map (db m18849) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — John Smoltz
John Smoltz had a stellar career that spanned 21 seasons. In 2009, he played two games for the Greenville Drive, including a game on May 31st, 2009, where more than 7,100 people packed Flour Field - before moving back to the top of the Red Sox organization. Prior to joining the Red Sox, Smoltz helped the Atlanta Braves win 14 consecutive divisional titles and the 1995 World Series. Power Fact It only costs $3.59 to power the average-sized customer's home for 24 hours. — Map (db m44271) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — John Wesley Methodist Episcopal Church
The National Register of Historic Places: John Wesley Methodist Episcopal Church — Map (db m28287) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Joseph Jefferson Jackson — Shoeless Joe Jackson — 1888 - 1951
Philadelphia Athletics 1908-1909 Cleveland Naps 1910-1915 Chicago White Socks 1915-1920 Position: Left Field Threw: Right Batted: Left 1919 World Series Batting Average .375 Lifetime Batting Average .356 Third Highest in Baseball History ------------------------ 1911 - Batted .408, Highest Batting Average Ever by a Rookie 1912 - Led American League in Triples 1913 - Led American League in Hits. Slugging Percentage .551 1917 - Led Chicago White Sox to World Series . . . — Map (db m10844) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Judson Hall
In Memoriam Charles Hallette Judson, LL.D 1820-1901 Professor and Professor Emeritus, 1851-1907 Treasurer, 1855-1894 Executive Committee of Trustees, 1857-1897 Acting President, 1902-1903 President, Greenville Female College, 1864-1878 and Mary Camilla Judson 1828-1920 Teacher and Teacher Emeritus of Greenville Female College 1866-1868, 1875-1920 Lady Principle of Greenville Female College 1879-1905 — Map (db m18813) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Kershaw Brigade
Erected by the City of Greenville, South Carolina in commemoration of the "Project Southland" Monument erected on the Gettysburg Battlefield honoring The Kershaw Brigade of South Carolina. ————— A Greenville Pharmancist, Albert M. Goldstine director of Project Southland in cooperation with the Gettysburg Battlefield Preservation Association, was given the honor and privilege to supervise the erection and unveiling of the "P.S." Monument by the U.S. . . . — Map (db m10779) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Kilgore-Lewis House
Registered by the City of Greenville South Carolina In Recognition of Historical Significance — Map (db m29047) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Lawrence Peter Hollis — "Pete"
1883 - 1978 It can be done [North Face]: Superintent of Parker District Schools. Founded the first Adult Education Center in Greenville Coounty. Introduced Vocational Education (Forerunner of Technical Education Colleges in South Carolina). President of South Carolina Education Association. Leader in peaceful integration. Founded the Singing Christmas Tree. [South Face]: Organized Greenville's first basketball team. Started the first Boy Scout Troop in . . . — Map (db m10182) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Liberty Bridge
Honoring Liberty Corporation founder W. Frank Hipp and his children -- Francis M. Hipp, Herman N. Hipp, B. Calhoun Hipp and Dorothy Hipp Gunter -- for their commitment and countributions to the Greenville community. — Map (db m17480) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Liberty Bridge
Honoring Liberty Corporation founder W. Frank Hipp and his children Francis M. Hipp, Herman N. Hipp, B. Calhoun Hipp and Dorothy Hipp Gunter for their commitment and countributions to the Greenville community. — Map (db m17495) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Linky Stone Park — The Children's Garden — History Garden
Linky Stone Park is home to the Children's Garden today, but it was a very different place in the early 1900s while Greenville was evolving from a farming town to a textile (cloth) producing city. Stone Manufacturing was founded here and its dresses, slips and sleepwear were designed and made in a building that once stood where the park is today. The Stone family later generously granted the land to the City for the enjoyment of all as a park. The plants here are all used in making and . . . — Map (db m31477) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Lou Brissie
Lou Brissie was born in Anderson, South Carolina. After getting his career off to a promising start, he suffered a devastating injury in Italy during World War II. Brissie convinced doctors not to amputate his leg, and three years later, he was [would] be back on the diamond beginning his Major League career. Power Fact Duke Energy's regulated utility operations serve approximately 4 million U.S. customers in the Carolinas and the Midwest, representing a population of approximately 12 million people. — Map (db m44083) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Major Rudolf Anderson Jr.
Dedicated to Major Rudolf Anderson Jr. U.S.A.F. Sept. 15, 1927 - Oct. 27, 1962 By the Citizens of Greenville State of South Carolina The United States of America In a period of great international stress he performed this duty of great responsibility with honor. He was awarded the Distinguished Service Medal, and gave his life that America could proceed on a course toward peace without the threat of tyrants. "Greater love hath no man than this, that a man lay down his life . . . — Map (db m11059) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Marshall E. and Vera Lea Rinker Hall
In honor of Marshall E. and Vera Lea Rinker Entrepreneurs, philanthropists and community leaders Throughout 60 years of marriage, "Doc" and "Petey" Rinker believed that their true wealth was in the investments they made in the lives of others. They shared the love, wealth and wisdom the Lord had given them. — Map (db m18585) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Max Heller Legacy Plaza
New Beginnings [Top Panel]: It was 1919 and Greenville, South Carolina had emerged from World War I with a surge of patriotism and community spirit. Main Street was a center of activity and a building boom brought the Woodside Building, the Chamber of Commerce Building and the Poinsett Hotel to the downtown. The textile mills that circled the city were operating at full speed. It was an exciting time. [Middle Panel]: In Vienna, Austria, on May 28, 1919, Max Heller . . . — Map (db m26979) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — McAlister Auditorium
Erected 1960 to the Glory of God through the advancement of Christian culture In Memory of William H. McAlister and his daughter Amelie This building was made possible by a grant made by Logan Fulrath and Guaranty Trust Company of New York as executors of the last will and testament of Amelie McAlister Upshur. — Map (db m18810) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — McBee's Mills — Reedy River Falls Historic Park
Vardry McBee purchased more than 11,000 acres around the Reedy River from Lemuel Alston in 1815. Although McBee lived in Lincolnton, North Carolina, he wished to develop his Greenville property, and in 1819 he build a "superior" brick corn mill on the south bank of the Reedy River. In 1829 he added a stone grist mill. The mills attracted farmers from miles around who brought their wheat and corn to be ground by miller Elias Alexander, McBee's brother-in-law, who lived in a cottage above the . . . — Map (db m28093) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — McKay Memorial Chapel
In honor of Jennie McKay Died September 25, 1932 and Lilley McKay Died September 26, 1941 Faithful members whose generosity inspired this chapel — Map (db m17610) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — McPherson Park
Donated by Caroline Choice June 18, 1884 Named for John A. McPherson 1910 First Chairman of Park and Tree Commission City of Greenville — Map (db m10501) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Melvin and Dollie Younts Conference Center
In named in Tribute to Melvin K. Younts Class of 1950 Attorney, Clvic and Corporate Leader Successful Investor, Developer and Lifetime Member of the Furman University Advisory Council and Dollie Isgett Younts Graduate of Columbia College Class of 1951 Teacher, Mother of Four Sons and One Daughter Homemaker, and Civic Volunteer — Map (db m18267) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Milford Mall
Is named in grateful recognition of the benefactions of Eugene W. and Louise H. Milford of Greenwood, South Carolina. — Map (db m19035) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Mill Village — Reede River Falls Historic Park
On the hills surrounding this site, a twenty-seven acre mill village, complete with churches, mill store and recreation grounds once served the Camperdown and Vardry Mills. Houses were built on both sides of the river. The foundations and road bed of the Vardry Mill village are still visible on the hill side behind you, between this site and the Governor's School for the Arts. Whole families, often including children as young as nine or ten years old, worked at the mill. They rented houses . . . — Map (db m14557) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Mills & McBayer Cotton Warehouse — West End Commercial Historic District
The National Register of Historic Places: Mills & McBayer Cotton Warehouse West End Commercial Historic District — Map (db m28284) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Minor Herndon Mickel Square
In Recognition of the Extraordinary Leadership of Minor Herndon Mickel As Chair of the Board of Trustees from 1990-1992. Her courage and grace enabled Furman University to forge its own destiny. — Map (db m18930) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Mrs. James Williams
In 1812 Mrs. James Williams Born Elizabeth Blackburn Widow of a Revolutionary Officer of Ga. and Mother-in-Law of Chan. Waddy Thompson was Buried Here. Her's was the First Grave in this Cemetery Once the Chancellor's Garden. — Map (db m15799) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — New Life for Old Bathhouse
In 1935, this land was undeveloped acreage surrounding Greenville's outdated reservoirs. By 1937, it had been converted into a state park. Because boating and swimming in Lake Placid were the main attractions, a bathhouse was built overlooking the water. Starting in 1999, Paris Mountain State Park Friends began raising over $100,000 to renovate the old bathhouse into a modern Park Center. Local businesses, notably BMW, also made generous contributions. Ready to welcome you with . . . — Map (db m20175) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Nolan Ryan
Nolan Ryan was a member of the 1966 Greenville Mets and went on to establish himself as one of the greatest pitchers in baseball history. During his career, he threw 7 no-hitters and 5,714 strikeouts. He played for the New York Mets, California Angels, Houston Astros, and the Texas Rangers, accumulating 53 Major League records and being named an All-Star 8 times. Nolan Ryan was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1999. Power Fact Affordable and clean nuclear energy has been . . . — Map (db m44270) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Old Glory
"Old Glory" or "The Stars and Stripes" as our present day American flag is referred to, is the most recognizable symbol of freedom, unity and hope on earth. Our flag and its meaning are described in the lyrics of our national anthem, "The Star Spangled Banner" by Francis Scott Key. After Hawaii was admitted as the 50th state on August 21, 1959, a new 50-star flag was needed. An Executive Order of President Eisenhower on that date provided for the arrangement of the stars in nine staggered . . . — Map (db m10861) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — 23-12 — Old Greenville Graveyard
[Front]: About 150 feet east of this point are buried some of Greenville's earliest settlers, including Elias Earle (1762-1823), State Representative and Senator and United States Congressman; George Washington Earle (1777-1821), wealthy planter and early Greenville Clerk of Court, and their immediate families. [Reverse]: Among the Earls descendants buried about 150 feet east of this point is George Earle Yancey, infant son of William Lowndes Yancey, known as the . . . — Map (db m71592) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Old Mill Ruins
Vardry Mill In 1874 Vardry McBee's heirs leased and renovated an old grain mill on this property to Massachusetts natives O.H. Sampson and George Hall. First called Sampson, Hall & Co. by its founders, the textile mill consisted of two, three-story buildings, each forty by twenty-eight feet. Its stone foundations are clearly visible below this terrace. The mill initially employed between fifty and seventy-five workers. Its 4,000 spindles spun cotton yarn for knitting and crocheting. It . . . — Map (db m14551) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Open to the Sky
Political speeches, group baptisms, concerts and more have drawn spectators to this amphitheatre since the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) built it of local stone in the 1930s. It is one of South Carolina's only remaining amphitheaters with classic CCC features. Like the ancient Greeks, the CCC capitalized on the contours of the land to create an open-air theater featuring natural acoustics and a good view of the stage from any seat. Unlike the Greeks, the CCC left trees standing within the site. — Map (db m20274) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Parker High School Auditorium — Greenville County Historic Site
Built in 1938 by the Works Progress Administration, it was a part of the largest WPA school project in the state of South Carolina. The auditorium was built at a cost of $50,000 and named for Thomas F. Parker, local mill executive. The dedication ceremony was held on March 26, 1940. — Map (db m30316) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Pelham Mill — The Buena Vista Factory, Hutchings Factory, Lester Factory
• First Textile Mill in Greenville County. • Site used for textile manufacturing from 1820-1935. • The mortared stone dam spanning the Enoree River was built with six sluice gates in the 1880's. Rocky Field Creek runs from the North to the South through the mill site. • The first mill was built in 1820 by Rev. Tomas Hutchings from Rhode Island. • He bought the land from Charles Dean, who on November 30, 1798 was given a land grant by the state of South Carolina for 167 acres on the North . . . — Map (db m51061) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Poinsett's Spring
This park was given to the county of Greenville in 1788 by Lemuel J. Alston The Poinsett-Spring-Stones given in 1956 by the heirs of C.C. Hindman to the Poinsett Hotel, J. Mason Alexander, Mng. Dir. — Map (db m17296) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Poteat Hall
In Memorial Edwin McNeil Poteat, D.D., L.L.D 1861-1937 President 1903-1918 Teacher 1934-1937 — Map (db m18507) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Prospect Hill Park
[East Face - Top Inscription]: Prospect Hill Park [East Face - Bottom Inscription]: Established by Greenville County Historic Preservation Commission [North Face - Top Inscription]: Site of Alston/McBee House Ca. 1799 Razed 1920 [North Face - Bottom Inscription]: "Pleasantburg" Founder Lemuel Alston built "Prospect Hill" Mansion. Sold 1815 to Vardry McBee, merchant, developer of Greenville, public benefactor, . . . — Map (db m11584) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Reedy River Falls — Reedy River Historic Park
The falls of the Reedy River were a power source for industry, but they were also the town's chief price in the early nineteenth century. The subject of a Cherokee myth (a brave was said to have thrown himself over the falls because of unrequited love) and of at least five published poems and several noted paintings, the falls became the favorite trysting place for young lovers as well as a resort for visitors and families. Dams above and below the falls created pools where children swam in . . . — Map (db m8212) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Reedy River Falls — The Cradle of Greenville
Source of Power, Growth, Inspiration, Love & Good Clean Fun The Reedy River, named for the reeds which once grew close around its banks, flows from travelers Rest southward for almost sixty miles. In the middle of Greenville, it tumbles into steep, narrow falls, and then meanders toward Conestee before joining the Saluda River at Lake Greenwood. Greenville's Main Street is located at its shallow ford. Its shoals and falls have been a source of power and growth, fun, inspiration and . . . — Map (db m13733) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Reedy River Falls Historic Park
Richard Pearis settled near this site in 1776, and built a trading post and grist mill by the falls. This early settlement eventually became the City of Greenville. — Map (db m29939) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Restoration and Development — Reedy River Falls Historic Park
The Carolina Foothills Garden Club, beginning in 1967, spearheaded efforts to reclaim the long-neglected site of Greenville's birthplace and to preserve its natural beauty along the banks of the reedy River. The City of Greenville endorsed the project and resolved to establish and maintain a park. Furman University, whose campus was once located nearby, donated the original six acres, followed by other land grants from adjoining property owners. Over the next two decades the Garden Club, in . . . — Map (db m17380) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Rev. James R. Rosemond
[West side of marker]: Feb. 1, 1819 - Aug.5, 1902 This monument is erected to the glory of God in memory of the Rev. James R. Rosemond, founder and organizer, who gave his life advancing the cause of Methodism throughout the Piedmont area. Churches built under the Pastorate of Father Rosemond From 1866 to 1869 Greenville County Mt. Zion Mt. Moriah St. Marks Laurel Creek Golden Grove St. Paul John Wesley St. Matthews Mt. . . . — Map (db m10974) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Richard Pearis — Reede River Falls Historic Park
Richard Pearis, Greenville's first white settler, was an Irish adventurer who had settled in Virginia with his wife and family by the middle of the eighteenth century. He developed good trade relationships with the Cherokee Indians, had a son by an Indian woman, and in 1770 acquired title to 100,000 acres of Indian land in what is now Greenville County. He set up his "Great Plains" Plantation with a trading post and grist mill on the banks of the Reedy River. Pearis was wooed by both . . . — Map (db m8035) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Richard W. Riley Hall
Named in honor of Richard W. Wiley, Class of 1954 U.S. Secretary of Education, Governor of South Carolina Legislator and Attorney In recognition of his distinguished service in high public office and his lasting contributions to the cause of education in the state and the nation. — Map (db m18566) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — River Lodge
In Memory of James Alden Simpson Devoted friend and supporter of Reedy River Falls Historic Park Given by Allen Johnson Simpson James Alden Simpson, Jr. Daniel Lanier Simpson and Families — Map (db m14555) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Roger Craft Peace Plaza
Roger C. Peace (May 19, 1899 - August 20, 1968) Reporter, Editor, Business Manager, Publisher _ _ _ The Complete Newspaperman, Who guided The Greenville News and The Greenville Piedmont to eminence among newspapers. Who inspired successful ventures in radio and television, And whose labors for his community, state and nation were unstinting Patriot, public servant and entrepreneur, Cherished by his friends who were warmed by his affection and . . . — Map (db m17270) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — 23-37 — Sans Souci
(Front): This early twentieth century suburb takes its name from Sans Souci, the nearby house and estate of Gov. Benjamin F. Perry (1805-1886). Perry, a prominent Unionist before the Civil War, was appointed provisional governor of S.C. by President Andrew Johnson in June 1865 and served until December 1865. In 1876-77 he built an ornate Second Empire house N of this location. (Reverse): After B. F. Perry's death in 1886, the house was briefly a girl's school. His heirs . . . — Map (db m15920) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — 23-7 — SC Ordinance of Secession
Dedicated in reverence and admiration for their courage and integrity to the five signers of the Ordinance of Secession from Greenville County, December 20, 1860: William Hans Campbell 1823-1901 Perry Emory Duncan 1800-1867 William King Easley 1825-1871 James Clement Furman 1809-1891 James Perry Harrison 1813-1871. — Map (db m41965) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Second Baptist Church World War II Memorial
In Honor and Memory Of the Members of the Second Baptist Church who served in World War II Herman A Arrowood - Fred A Johnson Willard W. Batson - J.Clyde Jones R.Douglas Bishop - Glover Y.Jones Hubert E.Bishop - Ray F.Jones Charles R.Brown. Jr. - Roy F.Jones Lee W.Bryant - Clyde Knight Alvin DBurnett - W.Raymond Landreth James E.Burrell - Ben L.Landreth William E. Canada - Robert A.Lee Joe A.Carter - William D.LeGrand Carroll B.Carver - Wallace D.Lipscombe Elmer . . . — Map (db m51277) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — 23-20 — Site of First Baptist Church / Baptist Seminary
Site of First Baptist Church In 1825, Wm. Bullein Johnson opened a subscription for a Baptist meetinghouse, which was soon built here. The 120 foot-square lot, which extended well into present McBee Ave., was given by Vardry McBee. After its organization in 1832, First Baptist Church occupied the building here until it moved to West McBee Ave. The church moved to its present location on Cleveland Street in 1974. Erected by First Baptist Church, Greenville Baptist . . . — Map (db m9086) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Soldier's Rest
1862 - 1865 Soldier's Rest Here is the dwelling where our sick and wounded soldiers found shelter, food, clothing and sympathy. The soldiers rest was established and supported by the ladies confederate and association — Map (db m11118) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — South Carolina's First National Bank
This historic site, home of South Carolina's first nationally charted bank in 1873, has served as the cornerstone of the spirit of community banking in Greenville ever since. Carolina First Bank is honored to uphold the banking heritage that puts South Carolina first. — Map (db m15833) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — South Carolina's First National Bank
This historic site, home of South Carolina's first nationally charted bank in 1873, has served as the cornerstone of the spirit of community banking in Greenville ever since. Carolina First Bank is honored to uphold the banking heritage that puts South Carolina first. — Map (db m17337) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Spirit of Freedom
Dedicated to Freedom's Defenders Our Soldiers, Sailors and Airmen Whose Service and Sacrifice "Secure the blessings of liberty" for out community and country. — Map (db m17272) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — St Mary's Catholic Church
With the founding of the Greenville Missions in 1852 this parish, dedicated to Our Lady of the Sacred Heart of Jesus, became the Mother Church of Catholicism in the twelve counties of Upstate South Carolina which comprise the Piedmont Deanery of the Diocese of Charleston. — Map (db m30221) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — 23-33 — Sterling High School
[Front]: Sterling High School stood Ύ mi. southeast of here and served generations of African Americans in Greenville. Founded in 1896 by Rev. D.M. Minus and called Greenville Academy, it was first located in west Greenville. It moved into a new two-story brick school nearby in 1902 and was then renamed Sterling Industrial College after Mrs. E.R. Sterling, who had financed Rev. Minus's education at Claflin University. [Reverse]: The school closed briefly but reopened in . . . — Map (db m10847) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Sterling High School
Established 1929 Destroyed by fire 1967 Past Principals J.C. Martin • R.L. Hickson • Joseph E. Beck • Harold O. Mims, Sr. • Luke H. Chatman Sponsored and erected by Class of 1955 — Map (db m10883) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Sterling High School Memorial
Civil Rights The students of Sterling High School were the driving force that promoted the change of institutional segregation in Greenville County. During the 1950s and 1960s, Sterling students held demonstrations, marches and rallies that finally integrated the Greenville County Library and public accommodations, changed the seating arrangement on city buses and eliminated the segregated lunch counters at the former Woolworth's Department Store at this . . . — Map (db m16217) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Stradley and Barr Dry Goods Store
The National Register of Historic Places: Stradley and Barr Dry Goods Store — Map (db m28485) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Sulphur Spring
Water with heavy mineral content has long been valued as a health tonic. Sulfur water, despite its rotten-egg smell, was among the most popular "remedies." A sulphurous spring - now plugged with concrete - once flowed here and, in 1900, local entrepreneurs began the "Paris Mountain Sulphur Spring Company." What little we know of this operation comes from an elderly man interviewed around 1970 by Park Ranger Mike Davis. Its worth noting that the man's family chose to get their water . . . — Map (db m20247) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Tate Plaza
In honor of George Tate and Jack Tate Under black out conditions in France during World War II, two army captains, George and Jack Tate, agreed to open a furniture store in Greenville if they survived. Tate Furniture opened in 1946 on Main Street at the Reedy River Bridge. — Map (db m17499) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — 23-31 — Textile Hall
[Marker Front]: Textile Hall, built in 1917 to host the annual Southern Textile Exposition, stood on this site until 1992. The first exposition of the Southern Textile Association had been held in Greenville in 1915. Textile Hall, designed by J. E. Sirrine & Co. at a cost of $130,000, was a five-story Renaissance Revival building: its facade featured a limestone tablet bearing the initials "STE" for "Southern Textile Exposition" and the words "Textile Hall" . . . — Map (db m10527) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — The "Pearis" of "Paris" Mountain
An adventurous hero or an opportunistic traitor, Richard Pearis led a life touched by many of colonial America's defining themes. Leaving Virginia, he settled by the Reedy River in 1768 and is credited with being the first to harness local waterpower at a gristmill. Through his Cherokee "side wife," Pearis built alliances with Native Americans that helped him amass some 150,000 acres, including all of what is now Greenville. During the revolution, Pearis's support of the Crown prompted . . . — Map (db m20205) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — The "Swamp Rabbit" Railroad
For 100 years the "Swamp Rabbit" railroad crossed the Reedy River at this site. The train trestle was demolished in 1990, leaving the old concrete piers which now form an integral part of this dam. Primarily a carrier of freight, the railroad was first known as the Carolina, Knoxville and Western and later became the Greenville and Northern. It was nicknamed "Swamp Rabbit" by local Greenvillians who often rode it on picnic excursions to northern Greenville County. — Map (db m29196) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — The Betsy Ross Flag
This flag, commonly referred to as "The Betsy Ross Flag," was adopted June 14, 1777 (Flag Day). The Continental Congress on this day resolved "That the flag of the United States be thirteen stripes alternating red and white; that the Union be thirteen stars, white on a blue field, representing a new constellation." The designer of this flag is not known, although John Paul Jones has been suggested as a possibility. Congress did not specify an arrangement or number of points for the stars in . . . — Map (db m10853) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — The Buncombe Road
This road, long in use, was completed in 1820 during the administration of Joel R. Poinsett, president of the Board of Public Works. Paved July 1926. — Map (db m32590) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — The Charles Erza Daniel Memorial Chapel
Dedicated in 1996 to the Glory of God and in Loving Tribute to Charles E. Daniel, 1895-1964 This chapel was provided by his wife, Homozel Mickel Daniel, 1903-1992 Her benefactions tough the lives of all who teach, learn, and worship at this university. — Map (db m18900) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — The Cherokees — Reedy River Historic Park
Greenville County was Indian Territory before the Revolution. European settlers were forbidden to live here until 1777, when Cherokee Indians were forced to cede this land to the new state. Most of modern day Greenville was hunting land used by the Cherokees, whose main villages were located in modern day Oconee County. A part of the Iroquoian nation, the Cherokee may have set up temporary summer camps along the banks of the Reedy River. In the nineteenth and early twentieth century, Indian . . . — Map (db m8210) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — The Dam for Reservoir 2
When this dam was built in 1898, the water it collects was known simply as Reservoir 2. The first reservoir, today called Mountain Lake, had been constructed eight years earlier, but the growing city demanded additional reliable and pure water, so this second reservoir was needed. Look at the hills above the water. Notice how any precipitation that lands within this bowl-shaped area must drain down into the lake. Therefore, by protecting that land or "watershed" from agricultural, . . . — Map (db m20262) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — The Earle Infirmary
Commemorating the life and service to Furman University and Greenville County of Joseph Baylis Earle, M.D. 1862-1943 A.M., Furman University, Class of 1882 M.D., University of Virginia, Class of 1886 Furman Trustee, 1898-1837 Physician to Furman He lived and labored for others. — Map (db m18846) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — The Geologic History of Greenville — The Children's Garden — Geology Garden
The mountains of the Upstate have a very long and complex history. In fact, it took at least 200 million years for them to form! The mountains rose up as huge slowly "drifting" blocks of the earth's rocky crust -- called "plates" -- collided with each other over millions of years and folded and thrust the rocks to form ridges. Based on evidence gathered from Upstate rocks, geologists believe that the mountain building occurred in three main events. The first is called the Taconic . . . — Map (db m31213) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — 23-41 — The Lynching Of Willie Earle
[Front] The Willie Earle lynching was the last recorded in S.C. and the one of the last in the South. On the night of February 15, 1947, white cabdriver Thomas W. Brown was found mortally wounded beside his cab in Pickens County. Earle, a young black man, was thought to be Brown’s last passenger. He was arrested near Liberty on February 16, accused of assault and robbery, and held in the Pickens County Jail. [Reverse] Early on February 17, 1947, a white mob forced the . . . — Map (db m40503) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — The Moultrie Flag
This flag, commonly referred to as "The Moultrie Flag," was carried by Colonel William Moultrie's South Carolina Militia on Sullivan's Island in Charleston Harbor on June 28, 1776. The British were defeated that day which saved the South from British occupation for another two years. This flag was also present at the liberation of Charleston on December 14, 1782 by Greene's Southern Continental & Militia Army -- marking the end of the Revolutionary War and final victory in South Carolina. . . . — Map (db m10864) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — 23-1 — The Old Record Building
70 feet south of this point was erected, 1820, the old "Record Building," designed by Robert Mills (1871-1855), famous Charleston architect, designer of the Washington Monument. This building of classic design was county courthouse until 1855; then Record Building until removed 1924. John C. Calhoun spoke from its portico on current issues. — Map (db m7942) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — The Original Water Filter
A watershed is the land that drains into a body of water. The land in front of you is a forested watershed. That's important because rain falling on a dirt road will end up as a mud puddle, but rain falling on a forested slope will end up as clear streams. This land is also a protected watershed. That's important because rain falling on developed land can pick up chemicals, animal waste and other trash, but rain falling on underdeveloped land stays free of . . . — Map (db m20244) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — The Reedy River — Reedy River Falls Historic Park
The Reedy River, named for the "reeds" which once grew close around its banks, flows from Traveler's Rest southward for almost sixty miles. In the middle of Greenville, it tumbles into steep, narrow falls, and then meanders toward Conestee before joining the Saluda River at Lake Greenwood. Its shoals and falls were a source of power for early settlers. Greenville's Main street is located at its shallow ford. Early water-powered industries clustered along the Reedy River: an ironworks, the . . . — Map (db m28064) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — The South Carolina Flag
Our South Carolina state flag represents one of the oldest flag designs still in use. Its design elements go back to 1765 when three white crescents were used on a blue flag by protesters against the Stamp Act. Ten years later, a flag with a single crescent, or new moon, was hoisted in the Revolutionary War. Colonel William Moultrie designed a flag for the South Carolina soldiers using the blue color of their uniforms as the field and a silver crescent, which the soldiers wore on the front of . . . — Map (db m10856) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — The Touchstone House — "Falls Cottage" — Reedy River Falls Historic Park
The small two-story stucco-covered brick house overlooking the Reedy River falls was built by W.E. Touchstone between 1894 and 1896. It was located in the "West End," a rapidly developing residential and commercial area across the river from Greenville's earliest development. Used as a rental property for about twenty years, by 1918 when the West End was fast becoming the city's first "motor mile," the house became Curry's Gasoline Station. Later it was People's Service Station. In 1972, the . . . — Map (db m27007) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — The Touchstone House "Falls Cottage"
Multi Use House The two-story stucco-covered brick house overlooking the Reedy River falls was built by W.E. Touchstone between 1894 and 1896. It was located in the "West End," a rapidly developing residential and commercial area across the river from Greenville's earliest development. Used as a rental property for about twenty years, by 1918 when the West End was fast becoming the city's first "motor mile," the house became Curry's Gasoline Station. Later it was People's Service . . . — Map (db m27004) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Thomas C. Gower Bridge
City of Greenville Renovation of this historic bridge was completed in 2001. The first of many projects planned for the new millenium with the goal of enhancing the public's enjoyment of the historic Reedy River Falls area. Knox H. White, Mayor Lillian B. Flemming, Mayor Pro Tem, District 2 Fred Carpenter, Vice Mayor Pro Tem, At-Large Debra M. Sofield, District 1 Chandra E. Dillard, District 3 Garry W. Coulter, District 4 Michelle R. Shain, At-Large Rededicated . . . — Map (db m10721) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Thomas Sumter — "The Gamecock" — 1734-1832
The most controversial of Greene's Militia commanders, Sumter was known for his trademark gamecock feather in his hat, his tenacity and his penchant for bloody frontal assaults - characteristics that earned him the moniker "The Gamecock." Poorly educated but handsome, he was 46 when the British conquered South Carolina and destroyed his home. He raised Militia units to operate in the Midlands by promising plunder of Tory and British property (Sumter's Law) - a practice Greene stopped. . . . — Map (db m10807) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Tommy Lasorda
Tommy Lasorda was a pitcher for the Greenville Spinners in 1949. Best known for his managerial career, Lasorda's baseball roots are here in Greenville. His 21-year career includes 1,599 wins and 2 World Series championships. In 1997 he was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame. Power Facts Duke Energy distributed more than 10 million compact fluorescent light bulbs (CFLs) to its residential electric customers in 2010. By replacing their incandescents with those CFLs, our . . . — Map (db m44082) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Trains
At first the railroads were individually owned. After the Civil War the Southern Railway company turned them into one large system. This made Greenville easily accessible from Atlanta to New York. Vardry McBee lured early railroad lines to Greenville. The Greenville & Columbia passenger depot was located in a former residence at the corner of Augusta and Beattie (now Field) Streets. Its first passenger pulled into the terminus on Decemeber 8, 1853. — Map (db m29370) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Vardry Dixon Ramseur, III — October 19, 1941 - February 13, 2007 — "A Gentleman with a Servant's Heart"
City Councilman 1971 - 1977 Water Commissioner 1981 - 2007 First Presbyterian Church Elder Lt. Colonel US Air Force Reserves, Retired Executive Director of Donaldson Development Center 1995 - 2007 — Map (db m16229) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Vardry McBee — (1775–1864) — “Father of Greenville”
“A man should be prudent and careful, without seeming to be so, in character, information, propriety, friends, and money, and in everything, never neglecting his friends.” Vardry McBee, 1852. Entrepreneur, Philanthropist, Industrialist. In 1815, Vadry McBee purchased extensive properties in Greenville from Lemuel Alston. McBee accelerated industrial growth by establishing an iron works, a saddlery, tan yard, brick yard and a stone quarry, in addition to building . . . — Map (db m11263) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Vardry Mill — Reedy River Historic Park
In 1874 Vardy McBee's heirs leased and renovated an old grain mill on this property to Massachusetts natives O.H. Sampson and George Hall. First called Sampson, Hall & Co., by its founders, the textile mill consisted of two, three-story buildings each forty by twenty-eight-feet. Its stone foundations are clearly visible. The mill initially employed between fifty and sevety-five workers. Its 4,000 spindles spun cotton yarn for knitting and crocheting. It became Camperdown Number One when . . . — Map (db m10129) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Welcome to Paris Mountain State Park
About Paris Mountain State Park What is now Paris Mountain State Park traces its beginnings to an innovative plan by the City of Greenville to protect this fragile mountain watershed while supplying the city with water. Four lakes were built between 1890 and 1905 to meet that goal. Then in 1935, the watershed was turned over to the State of South Carolina. The men of the Civilian Conservation Corps soon built more than 50 structures on the site, many of which remain in use to this . . . — Map (db m20147) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — What's So Special About this Bridge?
Leading America out of the Great Depression, President Franklin Roosevelt implemented programs to give citizens jobs that improved our nation's infrastructure: adding schools, roads, parks and, yes, bridges! One such building program was the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC). In creating Paris Mountain State Park and scores of other parks across America, CCC men used easy-to-get, cost-effective materials plus design principles that produced a look now called "parkitecture." Notice how . . . — Map (db m20145) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — 23-8 — Whitehall
Built by Henry Middleton on land bought from Elias Earle in 1813, Whitehall served as his summer home until 1820 when it was sold to George W. Earle, whose descendants have occupied it ever since. Henry Middleton was son of Arthur Middleton, signer of the Declaration of Independence. He served as Governor of South Carolina from 1810 to 1812. — Map (db m9085) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Wilson Cooke — 1819-1897
A native of NC who was brought to Greenville by Vardry McBee as a slave. He worked after hours and bought his way out of slavery. Once a free man he soon owned a general store and tannery. He served in the State House from 1868-1870. He died at his home on Coffee St. at the age of 78. — Map (db m30340) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Woodlawn Memorial Park Veterans Memorial
In honor of those who served in the Armed Forces of the United States of America In Memory of All American Veterans This memorial honors all American veterans who, although separate by generations, shared a common, undeniable goal -- to valiantly protect our country's freedoms. The memories of these American veterans will continue to live on whenever and wherever democracy exists. The American veterans -- forever a symbol of heroism, sacrifice, loyalty and freedom. — Map (db m40119) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — 23-27 — Working Benevolent Society Hospital
[Marker Front]: The Working Benevolent Society Hospital, first known as St. Luke Colored Hospital, was a two-story frame building standing here at the corner of Green Avenue and Jenkins Street. Founded in 1920, it served blacks in Greenville for twenty-eight years. The Working Benevolent Grand Lodge of S.C., at Broad and Fall Streets in Greenville, operated the hospital from 1928 until it closed in 1948. [Marker Reverse]: The hospital, described at its opening as . . . — Map (db m10878) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greenville — Wyche Pavilion
In Honor of Harriet and Tommy Wyche Given by Their Friends In Appreciation of Their Dedication and Leadership in the Restoration of Downtown Greenville — Map (db m16466) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greer — 101 Trade Street
The National Register of Historic Places 101 Trade Street Greer Downtown Historic District South Carolina Department of Archives And History — Map (db m50206) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greer — 23-30 — Cherokee Boundary (1767)
[Front]: In 1766-67 S.C. & N.C. negotiated with the Cherokee to establish a boundary between Indian land to the west and new settlement to the east. This north-south line ran past this point to N.C. and on to Va. In S.C. it ran north from near present-day Honea Path, crossed the Reedy River near present-day Princeton, and ended at the S.C.-N.C. line. [Reverse]: The Cherokee ceded all land east of the 1767 line to the colonies of S.C. and N.C. In 1786, when S.C. created . . . — Map (db m8446) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greer — 23-21 — Cotton Mills
By 1820 one of the first cotton mills in Greenville County was located at these river shoals. Pelham Manufacturing Co. purchased a mill here sixty years later. — Map (db m19061) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greer — 23-33 — Early White Settlement / The Massacre of Jacob Hite
[Marker Front]: Early White Settlement By 1768 Indian traders and land speculators Richard Pearis (d. 1794) and Jacob Hite of Virginia acquired large tracts from the Cherokees in present-day Greenville County. Though royal authorities disputed the validity of these titles, Pearis and Hite moved their families to this area between 1768 and 1775. [Marker Reverse]: The Massacre of Jacob Hite Jacob Hite settled nearby with his wife Frances Madison Hite and their . . . — Map (db m24254) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greer — Gilreath's Mill
State of South Carolina Department of Archives and History Gilreath's Mill has been entered on The National Register of Historic Places by the United States Department of the Interior under provisions of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 — Map (db m11602) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greer — 23-4 — Indian Boundary Line
This marks the eastern boundary (the present Greenville-Spartanburg county line) between the Cherokee Nation and the province of South Carolina from the end of the Cherokee War (1759-61) until 1777. In that year, the Treaty of DeWitt's Corner extended the western boundary of South Carolina to the Savannah River. — Map (db m11264) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greer — Indian Boundary Line
This marks the eastern boundary (the present Greenville-Spartanburg county line) between the Cherokee Nation and the province of South Carolina from the end of the Cherokee War (1759-61) until 1777. In that year, the Treaty of DeWitt's Corner extended the western boundary of South Carolina to the Savannah River. — Map (db m63636) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greer — Manufacturing Site
On this site in 1820 John Weaver established a yarn mill. It changed owners several times until about 1900 when Spartan Commodor Berry tore down and built on the same foundation. Berry operated a cotton gin, grist mill and saw mill. In 1912 he and two sons, Broadus Carlyle and Claude Otis Berry added a flour mill. Two large water wheels provided power to Berry's Mill, powered by dams dating back to 1764. — Map (db m7939) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greer — Mike Garfield
In Memory of Mike Garfield Friend of Children • Community Servant Lover of Greer • Dream Builder Visionary for Kids Planet and Kids Planet Too Through the laughter of those at play, Mike's legacy endures. His character and his dreams will continue on! 1939 - 2001 — Map (db m12284) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greer — O'Neal Village — Est. 2007
Named for John Belton O'Neall (1793-1863) Chief Justice of the State of South Carolina — Map (db m9831) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greer — Spring-Wood Park
This park was planned and developed by The Greer City Council with reconstruction finance corporation funds. — Map (db m11278) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greer — Stone Mortar — (Circa 1500-1800 AD)
Discovered about 1930 by Henry Clark near Frohawk Creek on property belonging to J.T. Moon. Most likely used to crack and grind corn and acorns into meal by a band of Lower Cherokee, this mortar is highly unusual because of its massive dimensions, a fact which suggests the possibility that a permanent village was once located nearby. — Map (db m30810) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greer — 23 54 — Suber's Mill
Four generations of the Suber family have owned and operated a waterpowered grist mill on Princess Creek, a branch of the Enoree River, since shortly after the Civil War. James A. Suber (1826-1923) ran a sawmill and whiskey still a short distance upstream before serving in the Confederate army, and added a grist mill at that site soon after he returned to Greenville County.(Continued on other side) (Back): (Continued from other side ) Suber's Mill is one of the only water-powered . . . — Map (db m56839) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greer — Tribute to Greer Firefighters — "The Fire Boys Team"
Presented to: The Greer Fire Department In recognition of the dedicated service provided by the Greer Firefighters and in tribute to firefighters everywhere "The Hero is commonly the simplest and abscurest of Men" Henry David Thoreau — Map (db m11181) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Greer — Worth Barnett Overpass
Named in 1986 by action of the General Assembly and Highway Comission in Recognition of his distinguished public service as Mayor of Greer 1967-1979 and as a member Greer City Council 1955-59       1961-66 — Map (db m10750) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Landrum — 23-25 — Campbell’s Covered Bridge
This bridge, built in 1909, is the last extant covered bridge in S.C. Built by Charles Irwin Willis (1878–1966), it was named for Alexander Lafayette Campbell (1836–1920), who owned and operated a grist mill here for many years. Measuring 35 feet long and 12 feet wide, it is an excellent example of a four-span Howe truss, featuring diagonal timbers and vertical iron rods. — Map (db m8507) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Landrum — Campbell's Covered Bridge
In the earliest of times the rock shoal upstream of the bridge was used as a ford until a flat bridge was built across Beaverdam Creek. In Monday, August 24, 1908 starting at 7:00 p.m., twenty inches of rain fell during the next twenty-four hours. This freshet washed out the bridge and local residents again used the ford to cross. Charles Irwin Willis (1878-1966) built the current 35 feet long by 12 feet wide bridge on land owned by Alexander Lafayette Campbell (1836-1920). Willis let . . . — Map (db m27555) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Landrum — Campbell's Covered Bridge — A Tribute to Stella (1921-2004)
Many generations of area residents have treasured Campbell's Covered Bridge as a local icon and place to enjoy Beaverdam Creek on a hot day, meet neighbors while your corn is ground, or as a quiet place to court your sweetheart. There are many stories of family picnics, engagement proposals and photographs of friends at Campbell's Covered Bridge. It was a place to weather a sudden storm or pull the motor out a pickup truck. Stella M. Atkins felt strongly that the cherished bridge . . . — Map (db m37498) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Mauldin — Laurel Creek Church
Built 1869 Laurel Creek Church Rebuilt 1938 Trustees G.C. Franklin Jas A. Tolbert J.N. Brown R.C. Means Rev. N.E. Franklin-PC Rev. D.S. Curry D.S. Laurel Creek U. M. Church New Addition 2005 Trustees John B. Hallums, CH Person Thomas Burts Banner Copeland Thomas Hallums John W. Prince Adrick Talley Elaine Means Willie Dillard Terry Conner James Walker Jr. CH Finance Fred Carter CH Council Mary Virginia Taylor, Bishop . . . — Map (db m10889) HM
South Carolina (Greenville County), Mauldin — 23-46 — Mauldin
Front This area was settled soon after the Revolution, and a community grew up here on the road from Greenville to Laurens. It was later known as Butler’s Crossroads for Willis W. Butler, who acquired a tract including the intersection of the Laurens and Reedy River roads in 1853. This community became a town after the Greenville & Laurens Railroad completed its line here in 1885 and built a frame passenger and freight depot 1/4 mi. N on Jenkins Street in 1886. Reverse . . . — Map (db m60344) HM
250 markers matched your search criteria.
Click to map all markers shown on this page.
Click First to browse through the results shown on this page.   First >> 


•••
More Search Options
 
Markers
Near You

 
Categories

 
States & Provinces

 
Counties
Click to List


 
Countries

Page composed
in 488 ms.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
To search within this page, hold down the Ctrl key and press F.
On an Apple computer,
hold down the Apple key and press F.