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Guilford County Markers
North Carolina (Guilford County), Archdale — Mustering out of Confederate Army
General Johnston's men paid off and mustered out near here, May 1-2, 1865, after surrender near Durham. April 26. — Map (db m17845) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Gibsonville — Dr. Charlotte Hawkins BrownJune 11, 1883 - January 11, 1961 — Founder and Builder of the Alice Freeman Palmer Memorial Institute
Leader of women in their quest for finer and more productive living - mentor by her writings, of those seeking to live graciously - by her eloquence, inspired youth to nobler achievements; by her vigor of mind and force of character, championed for a disadvantaged race in its striving for human rights and adult responsibilities. She gave 58 years completely of her unique energies and talents to the building of this institute from its humblest of beginnings in an old blacksmith shop. Her . . . — Map (db m49437) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — 1757 New Garden Land Purchase
This stone, which now falls within the boundaries of Guilford College, marks the northeast corner of 53 acres purchased for “five sterling” from Richard Williams by Henry Ballinger and Thomas Hunt for the New Garden Friends Meeting and Burial Ground in 1757. — Map (db m63029) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — 1st Virginia Cavalry
This site was occupied by the 1st Virginia Cavalry under Lieutenant Colonel William Washington Cont’l Line and it was here Captain Griffin Fauntleroy, 1st Va. Lt. Dragoons, Cont’l Line was mortally wounded on March 15, 1781. Born September 28, 1754. Northumberland Co., Va. — Map (db m34881) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — A Heroine of ‘761781 – 1902
Mrs. Keren Happuch Turner mother of Elizabeth the wife of Joseph Morehead of N.C., and grandmother of Captain James and of John Morehead, a young N.C. soldier under Greene, rode horse-back from her Maryland home and at Guilford Court House nursed to health a badly wounded son. — Map (db m19926) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J 78 — Albion W. Tourgée
1835–1905. Union army officer, author, judge. Member of 1868 Convention. Home was 2 blocks S. — Map (db m2325) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — American ArtilleryGuilford Courthouse National Military Park
As the Americans withdrew from the field they lost all four of their cannons to the British. Two of the six-pounder guns fired the opening shots in the battle from the center of the first line. Greene ordered them pulled back to join his other two six-pounders in the defense of the third line. Artillery was important to both armies as supporting fire for infantry. Mostly ineffective in the heavily wooded terrain that covered much of the battlefield, cannons’ solid shot, grape, and canister . . . — Map (db m63031) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — Backcountry CourthouseGuilford Courthouse National Military Park
To Cornwallis, Guilford Courthouse was not a military or strategic objective. Greene’s army was his target. After receiving intelligence that the British were marching toward the American camp, Greene switched his battle plans from attack to defense. At this point along the main road General Greene began deploying his troops. In 1781 the county seat of Guilford served as the hub of a small farming community of about fifty English, Scots-Irish, and nearby Quakers. At the courthouse these . . . — Map (db m11592) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J 40 — Battle of New Garden
Early on Mar. 15, 1781, the British and American forces skirmished near the New Garden Meeting House prior to the Battle of Guilford Courthouse. — Map (db m63017) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J-55 — Bennett College
Methodist. Begun 1874; reorganized as woman's college, 1926. Named for Lyman Bennett of Troy, N.Y. Campus 2 bl. S. — Map (db m54064) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — Birthplace of the Civil Rights Movement
Four Students at North Carolina A & T State University conducted the first lunch counter sit-in on February 1, 1960 at the Woolworth Store. Franklin McCain Joseph McNeil Ezell Blair, Jr. David Richmond "Sometimes taking a stand for what is undeniably right means taking a seat." Presented to the City of Greensboro by Radio Stations WEAL and WQMG February 1, 1990 Huff Art Studio — Map (db m54076) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — Brig. Gen. Edward Stevens
On this spot Brig. Gen. Edward Stevens was wounded while making a gallant stand with his Virginia Troops — Map (db m34779) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — Brig. Gen. Jethro Sumner
Brig – Gen. Jethro Sumner Born in the year 1733 Died March 18, 1785 ---------------- Colonel of the Third North Carolina Continental Troops April 15, 1776 Charleston, June 28, 1776 Brandywine, Sept. 11, 1777 Germantown, Oct. 4, 1777 Monmouth, June 20, 1778 Stono Ferry, June 20, 1779 Eutaw Springs, Sept. 8, 1781 ---------------- Spotless in character, pure in patriotism, the most eminent soldier among the North Carolina Troops. Side of Monument: To the memory of General Jethro Sumner, . . . — Map (db m19921) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — British Attack
British General Lord Cornwallis placed troops on both sides of New Garden Road below the fields of Joseph Hoskins’ farmstead. Ahead of them the North Carolina militia, drawn up behind a fence line, was supported by two cannons in the middle of the road. The British artillery quickly positioned three cannons and began exchanging fire with the American artillery. The British infantry formed a line of battle across the road, then advanced across Hoskins’ muddy fields. At 150 yards, the Americans . . . — Map (db m34799) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J-33 — Buffalo Church
Presbyterian, organized about 1756. Present building, the third, was erected in 1827. Revolutionary soldiers buried here. — Map (db m30836) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — Capt. George Reynolds
In Memoriam Capt. George Reynolds 1754 – 1813 Officer under General Green in Revolutionary Army [ Rear of Marker: ] Erected by Charter Members of George Reynolds Chapter   D. A. R. Mrs. E. R. Taylor • Mrs. A. M. Ivey • Mrs. K. R. Millner • Mrs. M. R. Snow • Mrs. E. T. Withers • Mrs. H. W. Penn • Mrs. M. T. Davidson • Miss A. R. Millner • Mrs. K. M. King • Miss A. H. Taylor • Mrs. C. M. Carter • Miss M. E. Millner Donated by J. F. and T. E. Reynolds — Map (db m34780) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — Captain James Morehead1778-81.     1800
To Captain James Morehead of the 10th Regiment, N.C. Continental Line. Battle of Stong June 20, 1778 • • • • • • Elizabethton     July 1781 Born 1750     Died 1815 — Map (db m19947) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — Christian Isley House
Originally located in eastern Guilford County this one-and-a-half story structure was the home of Christian and Mary Isley. Like other German families, the Isleys migrated to North Carolina from Pennsylvania. In 1788 they purchased approximately 300 acres of land along Rock Creek. When Christian Isley died 1845 the property was divided between his wife and their thirteen children. In 1972, the museum purchased the house and moved it from its original location at Bethel Church Road. The . . . — Map (db m54098) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — Col. Arthur Forbis
In Honor of Col. Arthur Forbis of the N.C. Troops who fell at his post in the discharge of duty on this memorable field of battle. March 15, 1791. Presented by McGalliard & Huske July, 4 1887. — Map (db m11598) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J-96 — Cone Brothers
Moses and Ceasar Cone pioneered marketing of textiles; manufactured denim & flannel. Their first mill, Proximity, 1895, was 1/4 mile N.E. — Map (db m31027) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — Confederate Arms Factory
The Tarpley breech-loading carbine was manufactured by Tarpley, Garrett & Co. at the site of the old Pioneer Foundry, located 300 yards east. Jere A. Tarpley received a patent from the Confederate Government for the carbine on February 14, 1863. In partnership with J & F Garrett, he produced carbines for the state of North Carolina and the Confederate States of America. It is believed over 400 carbines were produced during 1863 and 1864. — Map (db m34096) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J-22 — Confederate Cabinet
Members of the cabinet, fleeing south, occupied a railroad car near this spot, Apr. 11-15, 1865. — Map (db m31033) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J 30 — Confederate Hospital
Confederate hospital set up in the First Presbyterian Church to receive wounded from battle of Bentonville, 1865, was here. — Map (db m2284) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — Costly VictoryGuilford Courthouse National Military Park
Another such victory would ruin the British army. Charles James Fox, addressing the House of Commons after news of the Battle of Guilford Courthouse reached London. Fighting along the third line swayed back and forth. From Continental positions here, the Third Line Trail crosses the contested terrain of the stream valley below to the British position on the other side. Here on the high ground overlooking the stream valley stood the American third line, a mix of seasoned . . . — Map (db m63034) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J-2 — David Caldwell1725-1824
Educator, minister, & orator for Patriot cause. His "Log College," a classical academy, stood 2½ miles northwest. — Map (db m74938) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J-111 — David Schenck1835-1902
Founder, Guilford Battle Ground Company, 1887. Led effort to preserve battlefield. His grave is 200 yds. northwest. — Map (db m30992) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — David Schenck
The projector of this battle field’s reclamation and organizer and first president of the Guilford Battle Ground Company 1835             1902 — Map (db m34992) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — Death of StewartGuilford Courthouse National Military Park
The small monument in the field commemorates the death of Lt. Col. James Stewart (Stuart) of the Second Battalion of Guards. During hand-to-hand fighting, Captain John Smith of the 1st Maryland Regiment cut down Stewart with a heavy saber. Accounts place Stewart’s death near the American third line. Guildford Battle Ground Company placed the monument on this site because they were told that Stewart’s sword was found here inside a hollow log in 1866. In reality, the monument’s location is more symbolic than historically accurate. — Map (db m11579) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — Delaware ContinentalsGuilford Courthouse NMP — Nat’l Park Service
In 1888, David Schenck, searching for battlefield artifacts, found the upturned bones of three unidentified soldiers on a farm north of the park. From buttons found in the grave, supposedly marked “USA,” Schenck concluded that the deceased were American Continentals killed in action. The location of the soldiers’ remains suggests that they were part of Kirkwood’s Delaware company, on the right flank of the first line. In contrast to the first line’s militia, the Delaware troops were . . . — Map (db m34986) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — Delaware Monument
Thursday March 15, 1781 Three Continental Soldiers Rest Here In fame’s eternal camping ground — Map (db m34990) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J 6 — Dolly Madison1768 - 1849
Hostess and social leader. Wife of President Madison. Birthplace stood 1½ mi. northeast. — Map (db m34099) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
[ Upper Marker ] Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. by Wilbur Lee Mapp 1994 [ Main Marker ] Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., planned to speak at Trinity AME Zion Church in Greensboro (a few blocks from here) on April 4, 1968. He canceled his visit to Greensboro to remain in Memphis where he was assassinated on that day. [ Marker on Back ] (not shown) Hatred Confuses Life, Love Harmonizes It. Hatred Darkens Life, And Love Illumines It. --- Dr, Martin Luther King, Jr. — Map (db m54074) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — Dr. Ronald E. McNair
Dedicated in Memory of Dr. Ronald E. McNair 1950 - 1986 • Astronaut • Scientist • Humanitarian "A genuine American Hero who carried the name of A & T State University magnificently to the far corners of the universe." Donated by Ralph Clay & Janie Pace Price ________ Sculptor Janos Farkas — Map (db m54072) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J-34 — Edgeworth Female Seminary
Established by John M. Morehead, operated, 1840-1862, 1868-1871. Building, burned in 1872, stood at this site. — Map (db m30958) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J-92 — Edward R. Murrow1908-1965
Radio correspondent in London during World War Two. Television interviewer & commentator. Born one mile east. — Map (db m30834) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — Edward R. Murrow1908 - 1965
Pioneer in Broadcast Journalism and Guilford County Native Sculpture by Ogden Deal Commissioned by Greensboro Chamber of Commerce and Cumberland Development Corporation 1970 — Map (db m54071) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — Expanding BattleGuilford Courthouse National Military Park
This monument honors Maj. Joseph Winston and the Surry County rifleman who fought stubbornly beside William Campbell and “Light-Horse Harry” Lee. During the fierce struggle with British regiments, Lee’s Legion veered southeast of the American second line, with a large contingent of enemy troops in pursuit. You are looking in the direction of that separate engagement, but the fighting actually occurred a half-mile to the south, well beyond the present-day park boundary. The Battle . . . — Map (db m11578) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — Fragmented AttackGuilford Courthouse National Military Park
Among these trees you may find it difficult to stay oriented to the battlefield. The combatants faced the same problem. Stationed here on the left flank of the American First Line, Lt. Col. Henry Lee and his legion of cavalry and infantry had orders to withdraw and support the second line after the first line gave way. Disoriented by the thick woods and chase of battle, Lee’s forces veered southeast and missed the left flank of the second line. This confusion had serious consequences for both . . . — Map (db m11576) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — Francis McNairy House
Originally located in northwest Guilford County, this two-story log house was the home of Francis and Mary Boyd McNairy. Like other Scots-Irish families, the McNairys migrated to North Carolina from Pennsylvania. In 1762, they purchased 640 acres of land, and probably lived in a smaller house until this structure was built. Between 1762 and 1786 Mary gave birth to eleven children. In 1967 the museum purchased this house and moved it approximately eight miles from its original site on Old . . . — Map (db m54097) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — General Nathanael Greene1742 - 1786
[ Right of Monument: ] “ . . . in the very name Greene are remembered all the virtues and talents which can illustrate the patriot, the statesman, and the military leader.” Marquis de Lafayette [ Left of Monument: ] “I never saw such fighting since God made me. The Americans fought like demons.”General Charles, Earl Cornwallis [ Back of Monument: ]A Gift from The Joseph M. Bryan Foundation commemorating Greensboro’s Bicentennial 2008 James Barnhill,   . . . — Map (db m34179) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J-80 — George Preddy1919-1944
World War II fighter pilot. N.C.'s leading ace. Killed in action. Home 1 block east. — Map (db m54067) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — Gillies“Light Horse Harry Lee’s bugler-boy”
“Dulce et Decorum est pro patria morti” Erected by the Literary Societies and alumni of Oak Ridge Institute May 6th, 1898 to the memory of the gallant Gillies who fell under the swords of Tarleton’s dragoons near Oak Ridge, N.C. Feb. 12th, 1781. A noble sacrifice to his own generosity and for his country’s freedom. — Map (db m19949) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J-11 — Greensboro College
First college chartered for women in N.C., 1838. Founded by Methodist Church. Coeducational since 1954. — Map (db m30893) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J-109 — Greensboro Law School
Est. by Robert P. Dick & John H. Dillard in 1878. About 300 graduates licensed. School, which was here, closed 1893. — Map (db m30918) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J-73 — Greensboro O.R.D.
World War II training camp and overseas replacement depot, 1943-1946. Over 330,000 servicemen were processed here. This is center of 652 acre site. — Map (db m31088) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J 35 — Guilford College
A coeducational college operated by the Society of Friends. Chartered as New Garden Boarding School in 1834. Opened in 1837. — Map (db m63023) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J 89 — Guilford County Health Department
Established in 1911, it was the first county health department in N.C. and second in U.S. Now two blocks north. — Map (db m31000) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J-3 — Guilford Courthouse
Important battle of the Revolution between armies of Greene and Cornwallis. U.S. military park. — Map (db m30803) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — Guilford Courthouse National Military Park
On March 15, 1781, the crackling of musket fire, the clamor of headlong cavalry charges, and the cries of the wounded disturbed the serenity of these woods and fields. Coming late in the war, the Battle of Guilford Courthouse was a climatic episode in the struggle for American independence. To follow the progress of the fighting, take the 2¼-mile auto/bicycle tour road and see where thickets and stream valleys broke soldiers’ orderly ranks into an unpredictable struggle. Foot trails lead . . . — Map (db m35023) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — Hon. Lieut. Colonel Stuart
Of the Second Bat- alion of the Queens Guards, was killed at this spot by Captain John Smith of the First Mary- land Regiment. [ Left Side of Monument: ] Col. Stuart’s sword was unburied here in 1866. [ Right Side of Monument: ] Erected by the G.B.G. Co. in honor of a brave foe. 1895 — Map (db m34893) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — Hoskins Farmstead
Joseph Hoskins bought his 150-acre farmstead for £200 “Current money of the State of North Carolina” in May 1778. Not much is known about the property and how it was utilized after Hoskins purchased it, but his will indicates some of the activities that took place on the farm. When Hoskins died in 1799, he left three horses, two cows, five head of sheep, 250 acres, and a variety of personal and household items to his wife Hannah and to his four sons and four daughters. To . . . — Map (db m34831) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J-74 — Immanuel College
Lutheran. Founded 1903, and moved here in 1905; prepared black students for work in theology & education. Closed 1961. — Map (db m31086) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J-21 — Jefferson Davis
The President of the Confederacy held two meetings of his cabinet, April 12-13, 1865, at the home of J. T. Wood, which was a few yards N. — Map (db m31078) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J-4 — John Motley Morehead1796-1866
Governor, 1841-45. An advocate for railroads & industrial development. Lived at Blandwood. — Map (db m31005) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J-27 — Joseph G. Cannon
Member of Congress for 46 years from Illinois, Speaker of the House, 1903-11. His birthplace stood 1 1/2 miles southwest. — Map (db m30855) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — Joseph Gurney Cannon
Memorial to Joseph Gurney Cannon For forty-six years congressman from Illinois Speaker, National House of Representatives, 1903-1911 who was born one and a half miles north of this place on May 7, 1836 — Map (db m63027) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — Joseph M. Morehead
July 9th, 1840.       January 1, 1911. Joseph M. Morehead Vice-President, acting President, and second President of the Guilford Battle Ground Company — Map (db m35003) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — Legend vs. RealityGuilford Courthouse National Military Park
According to the Guilford Battle Ground Company, the British Guards emerged from the woods, crossed this open field, and clashed on the right with the American third line. In the 1880s this version of the battle seemed to agree with the historical research of Company founder David Schenck. Convinced that the third line action occurred here within the original boundaries of the park, he placed the American Cavalry obelisk on this hill. Benefiting from historical information that has come to . . . — Map (db m11595) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J 46 — Levi Coffin1789 - 1877
Anti-slavery leader, reputed president of “Underground Railroad,” was born about 4 miles north. Moved to Indiana in 1826. — Map (db m63022) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — Liberty Oak Tree
Seedling from Liberty Oak Tree Revolutionary War Planted March 1987 by Guilford Battle Chapter NSDAR — Map (db m15738) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J-77 — Lindley Field
First air mail flight through N.C. landed here May 1, 1928. Charles Lindbergh, on Oct. 14, 1927, landed nearby to open field. — Map (db m30835) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J-81 — Lindsay Street School
The first permanent public graded school in N.C. opened in 1875 in a building which stood on this site. — Map (db m54060) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — Local HeroGuilford Courthouse National Military Park
This monument honors Capt. Arthur Forbis of the Guilford County militia. At approximately this site along the American first line, Forbis picked off one of the British officers who was leading the redcoat advance. Forbis was wounded during the struggle at the fenceline and was captured by the British. He was carried to his home and died a few days later. In the battle’s aftermath many reports mentioned the panic of the North Carolina militia. Forbis’s composure, described in eyewitness . . . — Map (db m11597) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J-112 — Lunsford Richardson1854-1919
A pharmacist and entrepreneur, he created Vicks VapoRub in 1894 while operating a drugstore 150 yards north. — Map (db m30938) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — Maryland Monument
Maryland’s tribute to her heroic dead. ----------- Erected by members of the Maryland Historical Society in memory of the soldiers of the Maryland Line. 1781-1892 ---------- Non Omnis Moriar — Map (db m34991) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J 84 — Masonic Home
Established in 1912 by Grand Lodge of Masons and Order of Eastern Star for their aged. — Map (db m63053) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — Men of Greensboro and Guilford County
To the memory of the men of Greensboro and Guilford County, who fought for North Carolina and the Confederacy in the War for Southern Independence. 1861     -     1865 These while in the prime of life, fought, bled and died; walking in the steps of Father Abraham (Gen. 14:13-14) in behalf of a lost cause. While some of these in our church- yards sleep, others fill an unknown grave; whether unknown or known to fame their cause and country still the same. They died and wore the gray. (by John . . . — Map (db m34178) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — Monument RowGuilford Courthouse NMP — National Park Service
The old postcard (below) depicts the Guilford Battle Ground Company’s treatment of the battlefield landscape. In 1887 the company began constructing the row of monuments and arched entrance gates. Installing a total of thirty-two monuments on 125 acres of battlefield land, the Company was more intent or ornamenting the field than recreating the authentic 1781 scene. Other monuments can be found at tour road stops and along park trails and historic Garden Road. The many monuments reflect . . . — Map (db m35008) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J 104 — Mount Hecla Mill
First steam-powered cotton mill in N.C. Operated ca. 1934-80 in large brick building that stood 2 blocks N. — Map (db m2288) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — Mrs. Martha McFarlane McGee-Bell1735 - 1820
Loyal Whig – Enthusiastic Patriot Revolutionary Heroine We are indebted to E. W. Caruthers for the eventfull story of her life. — Map (db m34783) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J-29 — N.C. A. & T. University
Chartered in 1891 as a land grant college for blacks. Since 1972 a campus of The University of North Carolina. — Map (db m54070) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — Nathanael Greene
[Front of monument pedestal]: Appointed Major General in command of the Southern Army October 14, 1780 Born in Rhode Island August 7, 1742 Died in Georgia June 19 1786 [Left Side of monument pedestal]: Guilford Court House · Hobkirks Hill · Ninety – Six · Eutaw Springs [Right Side of monument pedestal]: Harlem Heights · Trenton · Princeton · Brandywine · Germantown · Monmouth [Lower left of monument base]: It is with a pleasure which . . . — Map (db m6975) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — Nathaniel Macon
Nathaniel Macon willed that his memorial should consist only of rude stones. ---------- Here they are. — Map (db m19929) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J-75 — New Garden Friends Meeting
Meeting for worship was begun in 1751; became a Monthly Meeting, 1754. Present bldg. is here. — Map (db m74937) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J 102 — North Carolina Railroad
Opened interior of N.C. The ground-breaking took place nearby, July 11, 1851. First president, John Motley Morehead. — Map (db m34097) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — O Henry's Family
William Sydney Porter, 1862-1910, better known by his pen name O Henry, gained fame as a gifted short story writer. O Henry's parents, Dr. Algernon Sidney Porter and Mary Jane Virginia Swaim Porter, his grandparents, Sidney and Ruth Worth Porter, and three uncles, Oscar, Henry, and Charles have gravestones in the cemetery. O Henry's father, affectionately called Dr. Al, was a doctor, pharmacist, and an inventor. O Henry's mother, Mary, a talented writer, met an early death from tuberculosis. . . . — Map (db m54078) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J 1 — O. Henry
William Sydney Porter, 1862-1910, short story witer, lived in a house which stood near here. — Map (db m2320) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — Original Methodist Church1831
Here in 1830-31, 64 Methodists led by Peter Doub built the first church in Greensboro. Moving to a second church on West Market Street in 1851, the congregation relocated a third and final time to the third block in 1893. West Market Street’s Victorian sanctuary, completed in 1898, was listed on the National Register in 1985. — Map (db m35093) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — Park FoundersGuilford Courthouse NMP — National Park Service
Nearby monuments commemorate park founders David Schenck and Joseph M. Morehead. Appalled at the neglect of the battlefield in the 1880s, Schenck directed the purchase of historic land and incorporated the Guilford Battle Ground Company to preserve the site and construct monuments. Schenck’s and Morehead’s efforts helped establish the battleground as a national park. Both men served as president of the Company. Their intent was not to restore the rugged, wooded appearance of 1781 but to create . . . — Map (db m35002) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — Peter Francisco / Marquis of Bretigny and Col. Wm. Washington
To Peter FranciscoA giant in stature, might and courage – who slew in this engagement eleven of the enemy with his own broad sword rendering himself thereby perhaps the most famous private soldier of the Revolutionary War. [ Reverse Side: ] 1781             1903 To the Marquis of Bretigny and Col. Wm. Washingtonwho with their North Carolina and Virginia Cavalry charged and ran through and over the 2nd Queens Guards in the valley below. — Map (db m34889) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J-85 — Piedmont Railroad
Railroad line between Greensboro and Danville. Constructed, 1862-1864, for the Confederacy. Its terminus was nearby. — Map (db m31071) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J 56 — Randall Jarrell1914 - 1965
Poet & literary critic of national acclaim. Taught at UNC – Greensboro from 1947 to 1965. His grave is 120 yards southwest. — Map (db m63018) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — Regulars’ Monument
Regulars Greene’s 3rd Line 1890 — Map (db m34896) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — Richardson Civic Center
On this site, members of the First Presbyterian Church of Greensboro built their first house of worship in 1832, and on the adjacent land citizens of Greensboro erected the first graded public school in North Carolina in 1875. These grounds and the present buildings were given to the City of Greensboro in 1937 by Mrs. Mary Lynn Richardson and her daughters, Mrs[.] Laurinda R. Carlson, Mrs. Mary Norris R. Preyer and Mrs. Janet Lynn R. Prickett to be known as the Richardson Civic Center. . . . — Map (db m54095) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — Second Line TrailGuilford Courthouse NMP — National Park Service
This trail follows the second American line for a half-mile to Stop 8 on the Tour Road. All along the line, Virginia militia opened their ranks for the retreating North Carolinians and then waited tensely for the British attack. The first section of trail travels through the dense woods that broke up and slowed the British advance. After passing the Nathanael Greene statue and other monuments, the path ends at the American right flank, where Virginia militia faced 800 British infantry. — Map (db m35012) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — Signers Monument
In Memoriam William Hooper and John Penn delegates from North Carolina 1776 to the Continental Congress and signers of the Declaration of Independence. Their remains were reinterred here 1894. Hewes’ grave is lost. He was the third signer. -------------------- “Lee, Henry and Hooper were the orators of the Congress” John Adams’ diary Vol.2.P.396 1774 — Map (db m34883) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — Signers of the DeclarationGuilford Courthouse National Military Park
This monument honors the three North Carolina delegates to the Continental Congress who signed the Declaration of Independence of July 4, 1776. Although Hooper and Penn were reburied here in 1894, they had no direct ties to the battle. The relation is more symbolic; the Guilford Battle Ground Company founders wanted Guilford Courthouse to be North Carolina’s official Revolutionary War cemetery. Between the Declaration and Guilford Courthouse, between these signers and this battlefield, the . . . — Map (db m11891) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J-79 — Sit-Ins
Launched the national drive for integrated lunch counters, Feb. 1, 1960, in Woolworth store 2 blocks south. — Map (db m30921) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — Sustained FirefightGuilford Courthouse National Military Park
After swiftly rolling over the American first line, the British met unexpected resistance here. Greene had posted the second line in the woods astride New Garden Road, and the Patriots held a strong position along the high ground just ahead. Firing from behind thick trunks of the ancient forest, Virginia militia exchanged heavy fire with advancing British infantry. The trees and undergrowth made it impossible to maintain the disciplined formations of classic 18th-century warfare. At this point . . . — Map (db m11577) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J-64 — T. Gilbert Pearson1873-1943
Ornithologist; teacher; internationally honored conservationist. Founded Audubon Society in N.C. Grave is 1/10 mi. N.E. — Map (db m30996) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — Tannenbaum Historic ParkParks and Recreation Department — City of Greensboro
In 1778 Joseph and Hannah Hoskins moved to Guilford County from Chester County, Pennsylvania, and purchased 150 acres of land here from James Ross. During the Battle of Guilford Courthouse on March 15, 1781, the British army formed its first battle lines across New Garden Road and the Hoskins’ fields. Although no original buildings from the battle stand today at Tannenbaum Historic Park, a British army surveyor’s map of the battle depicts two buildings on Joseph Hoskins’ farm. Describing the . . . — Map (db m34841) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — Tannenbaum ParkHoskins – Wyrick House — March 19, 1988
This park is dedicated by the Guilford Battleground Company to the brave men and women who fought and served here for our freedom in the Battle of Guilford Courthouse on March 15, 1781 and to all those who came together to preserve this site for posterity. Guilford Battleground Company J. F. Kirkpatrick, Jr. President and Founder Thomas M. Phillips, Vice President         Robert L. Dickson, Treasurer Don R. Vought, Secretary         John C. Harmon, Building Chairman Directors and Advisory . . . — Map (db m34849) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — The Army of Tennessee
They are all gone now with their tattered flags and their faded uniforms. Shiloh, Perryville, Murfreesboro, Chickamauga, Lookout Mountain, Missionary Ridge, Resaca, Kennesaw Mountain, Peachtree Creek, Atlanta, Ezra Church, Jonesboro, Franklin, Nashville, Averasboro, Bentonville and finally to Greensborough. [ Right of Monument: ]On April 26, 1865, General Joseph E. Johnston surrendered the Army of Tennessee at Durham Station, North Carolina. The Army centered in and around Guilford County, . . . — Map (db m54050) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — The Battle BeginsGuilford Courthouse National Military Park
You are standing 200 yards behind the first American line, which stood looking across what was then an open field. A quarter-mile away the British arrived and formed well-ordered ranks on either side of New Garden Road. To the untrained North Carolina militia – citizen-soldiers – the approaching redcoats appeared confident and lethally professional. The battle began with a terrifying exchange of canon fire, the roll of drums, and a clear view of British bayonets. As the redcoats . . . — Map (db m11575) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — The British PerspectiveGuilford Courthouse National Military Park
As a British soldier, you are far more disciplined and experienced in battle than the rag-tag militia. Here at Guilford Courthouse your troops are outnumbered by more than two to one, but hunger and exhaustion seem greater enemies. This is foreign soil and hundreds of miles away from resupply and reinforcement. A battalion of British Guards sweeps across this ground from right to left to assault the American third line. By this stage in the fighting, the Guards have momentum but their ranks . . . — Map (db m11582) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — The Monument and the General
Nathanael Greene’s statue, the largest in the park, looks like the monument of a victor. But by the end of the day the British had forced him from the field. The fighting did not go according to plan for either side. After an orderly retreat, Greene expressed disappointment in the results of the battle. As reports trickled in, however, it became clear that the British army had suffered severe casualties. Cornwallis and his weakened army retired to the North Carolina coast. The battle for . . . — Map (db m6972) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — Third Line TrailGuilford Courthouse NMP — National Park Service
This trail passes through the actual deployment of the American third line, contradicting the location of the Regulars’ Monument near Stop 7. Recent research and study may reveal more accurately where the battle action fit the terrain. Before rejoining the historic road trace, the trail curves along high ground. Greene chose this position wisely; the British had to climb out of the creek valley before engaging the patriots’ most seasoned troops – the Maryland and Delaware Continentals. . . . — Map (db m35013) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — Underground Railroad
An informal secret network of blacks and whites provided food, clothing, shelter, and guidance for fugitive slaves. “Passengers,” often guided by “conductors,” traveled along routes that included “stations” or safe places. A station located in the woods near New Garden Meetinghouse connected Greensboro and Richmond, Indiana. Around 1819, assisted by Quaker Vestral Coffin and a slave named Sol, John Dimery was the first known passenger from Guilford . . . — Map (db m63019) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J-10 — University of N.C. at Greensboro
Est. in 1891 as a normal school; became Woman's College of the University of North Carolina, 1932. Coeducational since 1963. — Map (db m30891) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — Washington & Greene
NO North Washington 1776 NO South Greene 1903 — Map (db m34885) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — Washington’s Southern States Tour
In patriotic commemoration of the visit of George Washington on his tour of the Southern states 1791 Marked by the North Carolina Daughters of the American Revolution 1925 — Map (db m19952) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — Weitzel's Mill
Site of a skirmish between American forces under Col. O. H. Williams and British troops under Col. James Webster, Mar. 6, 1781, is 6 mi. E. — Map (db m30796) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — J-108 — William McBryar1861-1941
Buffalo Soldier & officer. In 1890 awarded Medal of Honor. His long career exemplified struggles of black soldiers of the era. House stood here. — Map (db m31080) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Greensboro — Winston Monument
In memory of the North Carolina Troops under Major Joseph Winston who were fighting the Hessians and Tarleton’s Cavalry near this spot after the Continental Line had retreated from the field of battle March the 15th, 1781. [ Right Side of Monument: ] Major Joseph Winston Captain Jesse Franklin Richard Talliaferro ---------- Palmam Qui Meruit Ferat [ Left of Monument: ] Erected by Governor Thomas M. Holt 1893 — Map (db m35265) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), High Point — Camp Fisher
Located ¾ mile east, Camp Fisher was a camp of instruction for North Carolina troops in 1861 – 1862. Camp Fisher was named for Col. Charles Fisher of Salisbury, after his death at the battle of First Manassas. — Map (db m34039) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), High Point — Confederate Arms Factory
The Gillam & Miller Gun Factory was located here. Owned by Dr. L. M. Gillam and James Miller, the firm manufactured rifles and gun stocks for the state of North Carolina in 1863. The firm also had a contract to sell rifles to the Confederate government in 1862. — Map (db m34033) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), High Point — Guilford Technical Community CollegeChartered As The Guilford Industrial Education Center In 1958
Site of classes started in 1955 by High Point Furniture and Hosiery Manufacturers and the High Point Public Schools that later became GTCC, one of the first community colleges in North Carolina. — Map (db m67726) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), High Point — J 58 — Haley House
Built 1786 by John Haley, blacksmith & sheriff, on the Petersburg-Salisbury Road. Later a tavern; now preserved as a museum. — Map (db m34741) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), High Point — High Point
Approximately 424 feet west southwest lies the geographic “high point” between Goldsboro and Charlotte. Identified by the survey crew for the North Carolina Railroad about 1849, the elevation became the city namesake upon the granting of a city charter on May 26, 1859 Dedicated on the 125th Anniversary of the city May 26, 1984 — Map (db m34938) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), High Point — High Point University
Founded by Methodist Church in 1924 with aid from City of High Point. University since 1991. — Map (db m57694) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), High Point — High Point Veterans Memorial
This memorial is dedicated to the memory and honor of those who have served bravely in our Armed Forces in both times of war and in times of peace. May 30, 2005 World War I • World War II • Korean War • Vietnam War • Persian Gulf War • Operation Enduring Freedom, Afghanistan • Operation Iraqi Freedom, Iraq — Map (db m35811) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), High Point — Little Red Schoolhouse
The Little Red Schoolhouse was built 1930 adjacent to the Ray Street Elementary School (corner of Montlieu and N Hamilton Streets) to accommodate a growing student body. It was designed by local architect Louis Voorhees as a tribute to the old one-room schoolhouse. The building housed a classroom for first graders, with a restroom and a small “library” in the bay window area. Ray Street School was destroyed in a major fire in 1961. The “Little Red Schoolhouse” escaped . . . — Map (db m35122) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), High Point — Maxwell Reid ThurmanFebruary 18, 1931 - December 1, 1995 — Be All That You Can Be
Born in High Point. Max Thurman made his home on Historic Johnson Street before entering NC State University in 1949. Graduated with Honors 1953 and entered US Army from ROTC. Rose to rank of General and distinguished himsel as the Army's Second in Command. Commander of the Army's Training/Doctrine Command, and Commander of all US Military Forces in Operation Just Cause Panama 1989. — Map (db m63685) HM WM
North Carolina (Guilford County), High Point — J 100 — Model Farm
Established by Quakers 1867 to stem westward migration by promoting improved agricultural practices. Tract, sold in 1891, was ½ mi. E. — Map (db m34042) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), High Point — Oldest Building in High Point
Colonial home of Mary and Philip Hoggatt A Quaker Potter Typical example of a Pre-Revolution home Built in Guilford County ca. 1754 In continuous use until the 1960’s. 1996 State Regents Project Mary Ann Groome Helper, State Regent — Map (db m34928) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), High Point — Oldest Colonial Trail
Ancient Indian Warrior / Trading Path. A branch passed through Guilford Co. here, ran from the Great Lakes to Georgia. Used by Colonists in Indian Treaty br 1744 but traveled after 1745 at their own risk. Most heavily traveled Early American Road. English, Scotch – Irish, and German Settlers followed the Quakers down this path ca 1750, as the First White Settlers in Guilford Co. Roanoke to Salem to Salisbury to Charlotte. Project of 1997-1999 State President Mary Ann Groome Helper — Map (db m34925) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), High Point — J 24 — Plank Road
A section of the Fayette- ville – Salem plank road, a toll road 129 miles long, built 1849 – 1854, followed this route. — Map (db m34036) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), High Point — Revolutionary War Patriots
This marker commemorates the men and women who participated in The American Revolution. These patriots, believing in the noble cause of liberty, gallantly fought for their home and country. 1775 – 1783. — Map (db m34746) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), High Point — J 95 — Springfield Friends Meeting
Established in 1773 and organized as a Monthly Meeting, 1790. Building erected 1927 on original site is ½ mile east. — Map (db m58267) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), High Point — The Blacksmith Shop
This restored log structure is a working blacksmith shop, equipped with tools and materials similar to those John Haley used in his trade. The shop was found in Davidson County and was relocated to this site in 1970 with funds from the Millis family. It is believed that this structure was built in the mid-1700’s. — Map (db m34931) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), High Point — The Haley House
In 1786, John & Phebe Haley built this home on the Petersburg (Va) to Salisbury (NC) Road, a major trade route. At that time, the Haleys owned 368 acres of land around this site. John Haley was a blacksmith by trade, but also served as sheriff, tax collector, and road commissioner. The home is now furnished with late 18th century furniture, ceramics, and household goods. This story-&-a-half house was built on the Quaker Plan, with 3 rooms and 3 interior chimneys – an uncommon plan in the . . . — Map (db m34933) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), High Point — The Hoggat House
Philip & Mary Hoggat built this house in 1754, 4 miles southwest of here. The Hoggats were among the first Quakers to move to this area. Donated by Mrs. Betty Jo Kellam, the cabin was relocated to this site in 1973 & restored with funds from the Amos family. The cabin now contains a floor loom and other textile production artifacts of the early 19th century. Craft demonstrations are also conducted here. — Map (db m34929) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), High Point — The Plank Road
The Fayetteville and Western Plank Road was constructed in the late 1850’s, stretching 129 miles long and covering what is now High Point’s Main Street. In 1852, when the North Carolina Railroad Company surveyed the proposed rail route from Goldsboro to Charlotte, the highest point was marked near the Plank Road, laying the foundation of what would become High Point. The town sprang from the crossing of the Plank Road and the railroad. To commemorate the Plank Road’s significance in High . . . — Map (db m34936) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), High Point — The Plank Road Foreman
This statue of a Plank Road Foreman is dedicated to the establishment of the City of High Point and in honor of the men and women who worked in local industries and businesses that made it famous. In the 1840’s and 1850’s construction was commenced on the 130 mile plank road from Fayetteville to Salem. This intersection of the Fayetteville and Western Plank Road with the North Carolina Railroad resulted in a settlement that grew to become known as High Point. [ Left Side Marker: ] David A. . . . — Map (db m35279) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Jamestown — J-19 — Beard's Hat Shop
William Beard made & sold hats at his well-known shop, established before 1795 and later operated by his son David. Site 1 1/3 mi. N. — Map (db m57684) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Jamestown — Confederate Arms Factory
The Mendenhall, Jones, and Gardner gun factory was located 200 yards west. Owned by Cyrus P. Mendenhall, Ezekial Jones, and Grafton Gardner, the firm produced approximately 2,000 rifles for the state of North Carolina at this location from 1862-1864. Prior to the M. J. & G., the site had been the flour mill of Isaac and Henry Potter. The site is now the Oakdale Cotton Mill. Erected May 10, 1988, by the Col. John Sloan Camp, 1290 Sons of Confederate Veterans — Map (db m57697) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Jamestown — Confederate Arms Factory
The H.C. Lamb & Co. gun factory was located 1 mile Northwest. Owned by Henry Clarkson Lamb, Anderson Lamb, Jehu Lamb, and F.J. Carpenter, the firm manufactured approximately 700 rifles for the state of North Carolina. The firm also sold gun parts to the state arsenals in Raleigh and Florence. Erected May 10, 1988, by the Col. John Sloan Camp, 1290 Sons of Confederate Veterans — Map (db m57698) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Jamestown — J-49 — Deep River Friends Meeting
Was begun in 1753 and organized as a Monthly Meeting, 1778. Present building erected 1875. — Map (db m57659) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Jamestown — Home of Richard Mendenhallc. 1811
Built in the center of Old Jamestown, near the intersection of Federal and Union Streets, Richard Mendenhall’s house served as a gathering place for residents and a stopover for travelers. This home exemplifies the community of Quaker tradepeople and farmers who actively opposed slavery, promoted education for all, and labored to create a life of peace and simplicity during troubled times. Family members lived here until 1900. — Map (db m34702) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Jamestown — Jamestown Friends Meeting House and Cemetery
This Quaker place of worship, built by the Mendenhall family around 1819, was used when bad weather made the one-mile trip to Deep River Fiends Meeting House impossible. It is located on its original site, across from Mendenhall Plantation. The single room interior is plain with plastered walls. Adjacent to the structure is a cemetery with early graves, many unmarked. The Society of Friends, also known as Quakers, made up a large portion of the early European settlers to this area. They began . . . — Map (db m34704) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Jamestown — Lord Cornwallis
With 2400 British soldiers forded Deep River at this point and camped on its left bank, one mile up stream, prior to the Battle of Guilford Court House, March 15th, 1781. This battle wass a determining factor in the establishment of American independence. Erected by the Alexander Martin Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution High Point, N.C 1934 — Map (db m57699) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Jamestown — Richard Mendenhall Store1824
Richard Mendenhall built the store as an adjunct to his tanning business. His wares included general goods and food items. During the 20th century the building served as a private residence and also housed a variety of stores and offices. The interior originally comprised two rooms on each floor. The brickwork is laid in Flemish bond and includes a corbelled cornice, created by setting the bricks as an angle. Features of special interest include the pairing of an inside and outside chimney, a . . . — Map (db m34703) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Jamestown — The Florence Armory
The North Carolina Armory at Florence, was located 1/4 east. Commanded by Captain Z.S. Coffin, the armory converted hunting rifles into military arms, repaired broken guns, and assembled new guns between 1862 and 1865. On April 11, 1865, a detachment of the 15th Pennsylvania Cavalry Regiment, under the command of Captain Adam Kramer and Lieutenant Ed Smith, destroyed the armory, which at that time contained 800 completed guns and 2500 partially completed. Erected January 19, 1989 by the . . . — Map (db m57696) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Oak Ridge — Charles Benbow HouseCirca 1823
Charles Benbow was born on December 6, 1787 to Thomas and Hannah Benbow. Charles married Mary Sanders on December 11, 1811, and they had seven children. This Quaker style house was conservative in plan, though Charles' application to detail was the least inhibited of any builder in Guilford County. Its ambitious, decorative design is individualistic and inorthodox, combining Georgian, Federal and Greek Revival elements. The house was completed between 1823 and 1824. Charles Benbow, a . . . — Map (db m54329) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Oak Ridge — Jesse Benbow House1858
Jesse Benbow was born in 1815 to Charles and Mary (Saunders) Benbow. In 1838 Jesse married Ann Clark and they had seven children. Jesse designed the house using oak trees from the property for the joists and foundation, and clay from the Haw River to make the bricks. In 1852, along with the help of other residents, Jesse opened the doors of Oak Ridge Institute, which is now Oak Ridge Military Academy. Jesse loved this land and was a farmer, raising cattle and hogs. Jesse died in 1900 . . . — Map (db m54331) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Oak Ridge — J-36 — Oak Ridge Institute
First building erected 1851-52. Opened during academic year 1852-53. Since 1929 Oak Ridge Military Institute. — Map (db m54125) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Oak Ridge — Oak Ridge Public SchoolOpened 1925
The Oak Ridge Public School had a capacity for 123 students and served grades 1-8. The structure contained six classrooms and had two indoor flush toilets, but no cafeteria or gymnasium. The center of the original building included a stage and auditorium which seated 300. In 1937, an office/library was created and in 1959, a community public library was located within the school. The cost of the structure in 1925 was $30,552. In 2006, the old building was incorporated during a $13 million . . . — Map (db m54344) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Oak Ridge — Oakhurst1897
Oakhurst was built for Martin Hicks Holt, Co-Principal of Oak Ridge Institute, and his wife Mary. The finest Queen Anne style house surviving in all of Guilford County, it was designed by the prominent and prolific southern architect Frank P. Milburn whose distinguished building appear in most major North Carolina cities. He also designed the South Carolina State Capital building. Thomas Eary Whitaker, a lawyer, North Carolina legislator, and professor at the school, became President of . . . — Map (db m54327) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Sedalia — Athletic Field
Palmer students always enjoyed baseball. Team photographs appeared in school bulletins as early as 1916. The field’s original orientation placed home plate and a wooden backstop at the corner of Palmer Farm Road and the highway. In 1997, Whitsett resident Boyd Toben donated funds to restore the baseball diamond for community youth teams. The restoration relocated home plate and added fencing and bleachers to accommodate today’s baseball and softball teams. It was named for Charles W. . . . — Map (db m41753) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Sedalia — Bell Tower
The bell tower signaled the beginning and the end of most activities at the Palmer Memorial Institute.These included classes, farming, meals, lights-out, and community as well as campus emergencies. — Map (db m43116) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Sedalia — 5 — Canary Cottage
Canary Cottage (c.1927-1928) was the personal residence of Dr. Charlotte Hawkins Brown, where she hosted numerous social functions for faculty, students, and her many friends. Dr. Brown did keep canaries at her home. It is because of the birds, the cottage's exterior paint color, or both that the house acquired its name. It was a modern urban style home with two full bathrooms, central heating from radiators, a refrigerator, electric lights, telephones, and a radio in the library. The . . . — Map (db m43115) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Sedalia — Carrie M. Stone Cottage 1948
The Carrie M. Stone Cottage was made possible primarily through the efforts of Brown's longtime friend, Daisy S. Bright. Stone Cottage, named for the wife of Palmer's largest benefactor, Galen L. Stone of Boston, also was called the teachers' cottage. Built in 1948, the structure is similar to the Massachusetts Congregational Women's Cottage. The cottage provided housing for unmarried female teachers. — Map (db m41575) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Sedalia — Charles W. Eliot Hall1934
Eliot Hall, named in honor of noted educator Charles W. Eliot (1834-1926), was the school's main dormitory for boys. The structure was built in 1934 and is similar in style to Galen Stone Hall for girls on the opposite end of the Palmer campus. Eliot, president of Harvard University from 1869 to 1909, was one of the most influential American educators of his day. He supported universal education and social mobility regardless of race. Although never a large financial contributor to . . . — Map (db m41751) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Sedalia — Charlotte Hawkins Brown Museum
The Charlotte Hawkins Brown Museum opened in 1987 to preserve and interpret the history and legacy of Dr. Charlotte Hawkins Brown, Palmer Memorial Institute, and African American education in North Carolina. It is located on the former campus of the nationally-renowned Palmer Memorial institute, which closed in 1971. Walking Tour 1. Origins of Palmer Memorial Institute 2. Carrie Stone Teachers Cottage 3. Charles W. Eliot Hall 4. Brightside & Gregg Cottages, and Brice-Maye Cottage . . . — Map (db m41572) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Sedalia — 7 — Dr. Charlotte Hawkins Brown, 1883 - 1961
A remarkable example of achievement in the face of segregation and discrimination, Charlotte Hawkins Brown was buried on the grounds of the school she led for fifty years. Charlotte Hawkins Brown was born in Vance County, North Carolina, the granddaughter of a slave. She grew up in Cambridge, Massachusetts. While in college there, training to be a teacher, she accepted a position with the American Missionary Association to teach school at Bethany Church here in Sedalia. Over her career, . . . — Map (db m43305) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Sedalia — Galen L. Stone Hall 1927
Built in 1927 and dedicated in honor of Galen Stone, by far Palmer's largest contributor, this building was the school's dormitory for girls. In 1950 Stone Hall suffered a disastrous fire. By the following fall, however, after a whirlwind campaign by Brown, it had been completely renovated. Stone Hall is perhaps the building most remembered by Palmer students. In addition to dormitory rooms it also contained a beauty salon; offices; guest room; matron room with bath; and lounge, television, . . . — Map (db m46154) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Sedalia — In Memory of Dr. Charlotte Hawkins Brown
In Memory of Dr. Charlotte Hawkins Brown Founder Educator Humanitarian July 1976 — Map (db m43306) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Sedalia — Kimball Hall
Kimball was the school's dining hall. Built in 1927, it honored the Kimball family of Massachusetts. In 1907, Helen F. Kimball purchased a 200-acre farm for the school's use. Palmer students learned and practiced proper dining etiquette during their meals. Any departure from acceptable table manners resulted in immediate disciplinary action and possible removal from the dining hall. The basement of Kimball originally housed the industrial and mechanical arts classes. — Map (db m43114) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Sedalia — McLean House
One half mile south of this marker stands the house built by John McLean and his wife Jane Marshall McLean before 1767. Col. Wm. Washington spent some time in this house in the spring of 1781. It has been the home of every successive generation of the McLean family, members of which have served in six wars. — Map (db m39617) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Sedalia — Meditation Altar
Palmer grounds keeper James Rudd Sr. constructed the altar with stones brought from across the country and the Caribbean. Each morning Brown prayed before beginning her long day at the school. The altar was a favorite place for students and faculty to enjoy the scenic beauty of the campus while relaxing and studying but also was used as a time-out area for students who did not follow Brown's strict rules. — Map (db m43127) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Sedalia — J 87 — Palmer Memorial Institute
Preparatory school for blacks founded 1902 by Charlotte Hawkins Brown. Named for Alice Freeman Palmer. Closed in 1971. Now state historic site. — Map (db m39614) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Sedalia — The Origins of Palmer Memorial Institute
In 1846, Christian abolitionists established the American Missionary Association (AMA). After the Civil War, the AMA provided schools for African Americans in the South and founded Bethany Institute here in 1870. Few educational opportunities existed for anyone, especially the poor or those living in rural areas. African Americans, mostly rural and poor, had little hope of receiving even a basic education except through these types of schools. Many students walked miles to Bethany Institute . . . — Map (db m41744) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Whitsett — J 62 — Cedar Hill Foundry and Machine Shop
Operated by Clapp, Gates and Company. Made rifles and military supplies for N.C. and the Confederacy 1861-64. Site ¼ mi. E. — Map (db m69984) HM
North Carolina (Guilford County), Whitsett — J 107 — Wadsworth Church
Congregational. Founded 1870 by former slave Rev. Madison Lindsay. Restored 1885 building is 80 yards southwest. — Map (db m77292) HM
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