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Johnston County Markers
North Carolina (Johnston County), Bentonville — Battle of Bentonville“In suffering condition” — Carolinas Campaign
(Preface):The Carolinas Campaign began on February 1, 1865, when Union Gen. William T. Sherman led his army north from Savannah, Georgia, after the “March to the Sea.” Sherman's objective was to join Gen. Ulysses S. Grant in Virginia to crush Gen. Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia. Scattered Confederate forces consolidated in North Carolina, the Confederacy's logistical lifeline, where Sherman defeated Gen. Joseph E. Johnston's last-ditch attack at Bentonville. After . . . — Map (db m3738) HM
North Carolina (Johnston County), Bentonville — H 1 — Battle of Bentonville
Johnston's Confederates checked Sherman's Union army, March 19-21, 1865. Historic site 2½ Mi. E. — Map (db m5855) HM
North Carolina (Johnston County), Bentonville — Bentonville
This memorial marks the battlefield of Bentonville where, on March 19-21, 1865, General Joseph E. Johnston, with about 15,000 Confederate troops, principally from North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia Tennessee, Alabama, and Mississippi, checked the advance of Major-General W.T. Sherman’s army of United States troops until confronted with overwhelming numbers. Conspicuous in this battle were three regiments and one battalion of North Carolina Junior Reserves in Major-General Robert F. Hoke’s . . . — Map (db m5843) HM
North Carolina (Johnston County), Bentonville — Confederate High Tide
You are standing at the Morris farm, where part of the Union XX Corps arrived late in the afternoon on March 19,1865, to stop the main Confederate assault, which had crushed Carlin’s division of the XIV Corps at the Cole plantation. In the morning the Morris farmhouse was the XIV Corps field hospital, but it was abandoned and its wounded moved to the John Harper farm a half-mile west when Carlin’s men came streaming back and Confederate bullets began hitting the structure. “The . . . — Map (db m5847) HM
North Carolina (Johnston County), Bentonville — Confederate Line Crossing the Goldsboro Road
Directly in front and to your left, Confederate Maj. Gen. Robert F. Hoke’s division, on loan from the Army of Northern Virginia, blocked the old Goldsboro Road (now Harper House Road) to deflect the oncoming Union advance. The division was a mixed bag of veterans of Gettysburg and Cold Harbor, “Red Infantry” (artillery units from Fort Fisher and other coastal forts who served as infantry during the battle), and teenage boys formed into three regiments as a last-ditch Southern . . . — Map (db m5882) HM
North Carolina (Johnston County), Bentonville — Confederate North Carolina Junior Reserve Line
In front of you is where the North Carolina Junior Reserves stood as the Army of Tennessee made its last grand charge against Carlin’s division at the Cole plantation on March 19, 1865. Three regiments and one battalion of Junior Reserves were assigned to Hoke’s Division – the 70th, 71st, and 72nd North Carolina regiments (1st, 2nd, and 3rd Junior Reserves); and Millard’s (20th) Battalion. The Junior Reserves, assigned to Hoke’s Division, numbered nearly 1,000 muskets in the field. . . . — Map (db m5845) HM
North Carolina (Johnston County), Bentonville — Fighting at the Cole Plantation: The “Battle of Acorn Run”
You are looking north of the Goldsboro Road at the site of the former Willis Cole plantation. Lt. Gen. Wade Hampton chose this ground (a mixture of dense vegetation and open fields) as an ideal location for Confederate forces to block the advance of the Union army (Sherman’s Left Wing). Deploying north of the Goldsboro Road on March 19, 1865, Union Brig. Gen. William P. Carlin’s division (of the Union XIV Corps) sought shelter in a Y-shaped ravine from the incoming barrage by the Confederate . . . — Map (db m5880) HM
North Carolina (Johnston County), Bentonville — Fighting South of the Goldsboro Road: The “Bull Pen”
You are looking south of the Goldsboro Road at the area where Union Brig. Gen. James D. Morgan’s division began a defensive position facing Gen. Robert F. Hoke’s division after being deflected by the main Confederate line. These battle-hardened Union veterans had difficulty fortifying their position in the swampy, dense mass of trees and briars. Because of this harsh terrain, Morgan’s division was without artillery support. One participant in the fighting referred to this hotly contested area . . . — Map (db m5881) HM
North Carolina (Johnston County), Bentonville — Hardee’s Counterattack
To your front and left, Confederate forces counterattacked Union forces under Maj. Gen. Joseph Mower on three sides. Leading a counterattack to protect the vital Mill Creek bridge – the only avenue of retreat for Johnston’s army – Gen. William Hardee along with Confederate cavalry commanders Wheeler, Hampton, and Allen bought precious time. With the support of Cumming’s infantry, they stopped and threw back two veteran brigades of Sherman’s boldest division. When Hardee made his way . . . — Map (db m5873) HM
North Carolina (Johnston County), Bentonville — HHH-24 — Johnston’s Headquarters
Established here on the night of March 18, 1865 and remained during the battle. Mower’s Division came within 200 yards of this point in the Union assault of March 21. — Map (db m14427) HM
North Carolina (Johnston County), Bentonville — Merging of the ArmiesSherman’s Right Wing Arrives — Carolinas Campaign
(Preface):The Carolinas Campaign began on February 1, 1865, when Union Gen. William T. Sherman led his army north from Savannah, Georgia, after the “March to the Sea.” Sherman's objective was to join Gen. Ulysses S. Grant in Virginia to crush Gen. Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia. Scattered Confederate forces consolidated in North Carolina, the Confederacy's logistical lifeline, where Sherman defeated Gen. Joseph E. Johnston's last-ditch attack at Bentonville. After . . . — Map (db m5844) HM
North Carolina (Johnston County), Bentonville — Mower’s Charge Reaches Johnston’s Headquarters
In the field in front of you skirmishers from the 64th Illinois, armed with Henry repeating rifles, overran Gen. Joseph E. Johnston’s headquarters, forcing the general and his staff to flee on foot toward Bentonville (to your left). Maj. Gen. Joseph Mower had set out to do a “little reconnaissance” of the Confederate left flank on the morning of March 21, 1865. Due to driving rain and difficult terrain (deep swamps, briars, and dense undergrowth), it took Fuller’s and Tillson’s . . . — Map (db m5865) HM
North Carolina (Johnston County), Bentonville — North Carolina Monument
In memory of the North Carolina soldiers who fought and died so courageously and the civilians who suffered so grievously during the Battle of Bentonville. March 19-21, 1865. [ Back of Monument: ]Sleep, soldier, sleep, in thy rough earthen tomb. While above thee the winter winds rave. In summer the birds will thy requiem sing, and willows weep over thy grave. No coffin enclosed his mangled remains, no shroud, save his uniform old; but his name is entwined in the laurels of fame, and on . . . — Map (db m6067) HM
North Carolina (Johnston County), Bentonville — HHH-1 — Sherman
Gen. Wm. T. Sherman camped in this area with his Left Wing on the night of March 18, 1865. The following morning, the Left Wing continued east along this road, meeting Gen. Joseph E. Johnston’s Confederates in the Battle of Bentonville, 2 miles east. Meanwhile, Sherman joined his Right Wing, marching toward Goldsboro on another road, and thus missed the first day of the battle. — Map (db m14430) HM
North Carolina (Johnston County), Bentonville — Texas
(Front Inscription):Texasremembers the valor and devotion of her sons who served at Bentonville March 19-21, 1865 The eighth Texas cavalry was engaged with the left wing of Sherman’s Union army on the eve of the Battle of Bentonville. During the battle on March 21, the eighth Texas again performed valuable service in the Confederate attack on Union General Mower’s Division of the Seventeenth Army Corps. Lieutenant-General William J. Hardee commanding a corps in the battle, ordered . . . — Map (db m6066) HM
North Carolina (Johnston County), Bentonville — Union Artillery at the Morris Farm
A point approximately 400 yards in front of you marks the center of a line of Union cannons positioned on the Morris Farm on March 19, 1865. These massed guns played a significant role in blunting the final Confederate attacks on the first day of fighting at Bentonville. Four batteries (of four guns each) were arrayed on both sides of a ravine, north of the Goldsboro Road. These sixteen guns held commanding angles of fire across the open fields to your right and behind you. An additional . . . — Map (db m5851) HM
North Carolina (Johnston County), Bentonville — Village of Bentonville
You are looking at the village of Bentonville. This small hamlet bore the name of the largest battle ever fought in North Carolina. Named after local resident John Benton, the hamlet had a post office as early as 1849. In the 1860s Bentonville was a marketplace for naval stores and had a small carriage shop. During the battle, several homes in the village served as Confederate hospitals, which treated men from both sides. At one point during Mower’s charge, wounded Confederates fled as Union . . . — Map (db m5877) HM
North Carolina (Johnston County), Bentonville — Village of BentonvilleWounded and Abandoned — Carolinas Campaign
(Preface):The Carolinas Campaign began on February 1, 1865, when Union Gen. William T. Sherman led his army north from Savannah, Georgia, after the “March to the Sea.” Sherman's objective was to join Gen. Ulysses S. Grant in Virginia to crush Gen. Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia. Scattered Confederate forces consolidated in North Carolina, the Confederacy's logistical lifeline, where Sherman defeated Gen. Joseph E. Johnston's last-ditch attack at Bentonville. After . . . — Map (db m14677) HM
North Carolina (Johnston County), Clayton — Flag of TruceNegotiating for Raleigh — Carolinas Campaign
(preface) The Carolina Campaign began on February 1, 1865, when Union Gen. William T. Sherman led his army north from Savannah, Georgia, after the March to the Sea. Sherman’s objective was to join Gen. Ulysses S. Grant in Virginia to crush Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of the Northern Virginia. Scattered Confederate forces consolidated in North Carolina, the Confederacy’s logistical lifeline, where Sherman defeated Gen. Joseph E. Johnston’s last-ditch attack at Bentonville. After . . . — Map (db m77839) HM
North Carolina (Johnston County), Clayton — H 49 — William E. Dodd1869-1940
Ambassador to Germany 1933-37, professor and writer of U.S. history. He was born 2 mi. N.E. — Map (db m77838) HM
North Carolina (Johnston County), Four Oaks — HHH-21 — Bentonville
In 1865, a local market center for naval stores (tar, pitch & turpentine). Bentonville gives name to the battle fought nearby, March 19-21, 1865. Confederates concen- trated here the day before the battle. As they retreated on March 22, they burned all stocks of naval stores. Union forces occupied the village, March 22-24. — Map (db m34667) HM
North Carolina (Johnston County), Four Oaks — Bentonville Battlefield
has been designated a National Historic Landmark This site possesses national significance in commemorating the history of the United States of America 1996 National Park Service United States Department of the Interior — Map (db m34331) HM
North Carolina (Johnston County), Four Oaks — Bentonville Battlefield Driving Tour
In the forests and fields around the North Carolina village of Bentonville, the armies of Confederate Gen. Joseph E. Johnston and Union Gen. William T. Sherman fought their last major engagement of the Civil War on March 19-21, 1865. Sherman was marching toward Goldsboro to meet Union armies coming inland from New Bern and Wilmington to re-supply his force. Johnston tried to stop Sherman by striking one last blow against his foe. Before Bentonville, their two armies had fought at Shiloh, . . . — Map (db m34356) HM
North Carolina (Johnston County), Four Oaks — HHH-10 — Confederate Attacks
Across the fields be- hind this marker the Confederate Right Wing made five attacks on Union positions to the left, March 19, 1865. They were thrown back by the XX Federal Corps. — Map (db m34638) HM
North Carolina (Johnston County), Four Oaks — HHH-7 — Confederate Cemetery
The remains of 360 Confederates who fell in the Battle of Bentonville lie here. They were moved to this plot from other parts of the battle- field in 1893. the monument was erected at that time. — Map (db m34632) HM
North Carolina (Johnston County), Four Oaks — Confederate Dead Monument
In memory of the Confederate dead Erected under the auspices of Goldsboro Rifles October 10, 1894. ♦♦♦ [ Left of Monument: ] On this spot and in this vicinity was fought the Battle of Bentonville March 19, 1865. ♦♦♦ [ Right of Monument: ] Twenty three of those buried here had their last hours soothed by the loving care of John Harper and his noble wife Amy A. Harper. ♦♦♦ [ Rear of Monument: ] Nor shall your glory be forgot . . . — Map (db m34675) HM
North Carolina (Johnston County), Four Oaks — HHH-3 — Confederate Hospital
Following the battle, 45 Confederate wounded were hospitalized in the Harper House. Nineteen of these men died here. Surgeons moved others to regular Confederate hospitals. — Map (db m34627) HM
North Carolina (Johnston County), Four Oaks — Confederate Line of March“ … on this wretched road … ” — Carolinas Campaign
(Preface): The Carolinas Campaign began on February 1, 1865, when Union Gen. William T. Sherman led his army north from Savannah, Georgia, after the “March to the Sea.” Sherman's objective was to join Gen. Ulysses S. Grant in Virginia to crush Gen. Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia. Scattered Confederate forces consolidated in North Carolina, the Confederacy's logistical lifeline, where Sherman defeated Gen. Joseph E. Johnston's last-ditch attack at Bentonville. . . . — Map (db m14720) HM
North Carolina (Johnston County), Four Oaks — HHH-11 — Confederate Main Charge
After overrunning two Union lines above this road, the Confed- erates crossed here in the main assault of March 19, 1865. Union reinforcements halted their advance in the woods below the road. — Map (db m34642) HM
North Carolina (Johnston County), Four Oaks — HHH-22 — Confederate Works
Remains of breast- works on this hill mark a line of works built by the Confed- erates to protect Mill Creek Bridge. — Map (db m34669) HM
North Carolina (Johnston County), Four Oaks — HHH-9 — Federal Artillery
Union batteries (26 guns) formed a line here, March 19. These guns covered retreating Federals during the Confederate charges and finally halted the advance of the Confederate Right Wing. — Map (db m34636) HM
North Carolina (Johnston County), Four Oaks — General Joseph Eggleston Johnston
“Defender of the Southland to the end” In memory and honor of Confederate soldiers who fought at Bentonville Battlefield, North Carolina during March 19-21, 1865 Erected by Sons of Confederate Veterans Dedicated March 20, 2010 Sculptor: Carl W. Regutti — Map (db m34181) HM
North Carolina (Johnston County), Four Oaks — Hannah’s Creek BridgeSaving the Colors — Carolinas Campaign
(Preface): The Carolinas Campaign began on February 1, 1865, when Union Gen. William T. Sherman led his army north from Savannah, Georgia, after the “March to the Sea.” Sherman's objective was to join Gen. Ulysses S. Grant in Virginia to crush Gen. Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia. Scattered Confederate forces consolidated in North Carolina, the Confederacy's logistical lifeline, where Sherman defeated Gen. Joseph E. Johnston's last-ditch attack at Bentonville. . . . — Map (db m14714) HM
North Carolina (Johnston County), Four Oaks — HHH-25 — Hardee’s Charge
Near this point Gen. William J. Hardee led the charge of the 8th Texas Cavalry and other Confederates, repulsing the advance of Mower’s Division, March 21, 1865. — Map (db m34661) HM
North Carolina (Johnston County), Four Oaks — Honoring the Dead of the Battle of Bentonville
Time may teach us to forgive, but it can never make us forget.”     - Confederate Lt. Gen. Wade Hampton, memorial address at Bentonville, March 20, 1895. By the evening of March 22, 1865 both the Union and Confederate armies had vacated the village of Bentonville. The Union army advanced towards Goldsboro, while the Confederates moved to nearby Smithfield. Not only did local citizens have to cope with hundreds of wounded Confederate soldiers left behind after the battle, . . . — Map (db m34407) HM
North Carolina (Johnston County), Four Oaks — HHH-15 — Main Confederate Line
The Confederate Left Wing, part of a long hook-shaped line de- signed to trap the Union forces, extended across the road here on March 19. This sector, occupied by Maj. Gen. R. F. Hoke’s Division, was evacuated on March 20. A new line parallel to the road was established 500 yards north. — Map (db m34647) HM
North Carolina (Johnston County), Four Oaks — HHH-20 — Main Confederate Line
Crossed the road at this point, March 20- 21. Gen. R. F. Hoke’s Division occupied this sector. Scene of much skirmishing but no heavy fighting. Earth- works remain. — Map (db m34657) HM
North Carolina (Johnston County), Four Oaks — HHH-19 — Main Union Line
Advanced to this point during the afternoon of March 21. The XV Corps established a line of works across the road here. Earth- works remain. — Map (db m34656) HM
North Carolina (Johnston County), Four Oaks — HHH-23 — Mill Creek
The flooded state of this creek upstream prevented an attack by Wheeler’s Confederate cavalry on the rear of Sherman’s Army, March 19, 1865. A bridge here was the Confederates’ sole line of retreat after the battle. — Map (db m34668) HM
North Carolina (Johnston County), Four Oaks — HHH-26 — Mower’s Attack
Advancing toward Mill Creek Bridge, Johnston’s only line of retreat, Maj. Gen. J. A. Mower’s Union Division broke the Confederate line near this point, March 21. Mower’s Division reached a point 200 yards from Johnston’s headquarters before it was driven back by Confederate infantry and cavalry. — Map (db m34662) HM
North Carolina (Johnston County), Four Oaks — HHH-16 — N. C. Junior Reserves
Held the line along this road and repulsed the assault of Hobart’s Union Brigade, March 19, 1865. This line was evacuated, March 20. — Map (db m34652) HM
North Carolina (Johnston County), Four Oaks — North Carolinians at the Battle of Bentonville
In memory of the North Carolinians who fought and died in the Battle of Bentonville March 19-21, 1865 — Map (db m34358) HM
North Carolina (Johnston County), Four Oaks — HHH-4 — Union Headquarters
Maj. Gen. A. S. Williams, commanding the XX Corps, established his headquarters here on March 19. In the woods to the north, the XX Corps erected breast- works which remain. — Map (db m34630) HM
North Carolina (Johnston County), Four Oaks — HHH-8 — Union Headquarters
Maj. Gen. H. W. Slocum, commanding Sherman’s Left Wing, had head- quarters in this field, March 19-21, 1865. — Map (db m34635) HM
North Carolina (Johnston County), Four Oaks — HHH-28 — Union Headquarters
Sherman’s headquarters were located in the field 400 yards to the rear of this marker, March 20-21, 1865. Head- quarters of the XVII Corps, which included Mower’s Division, were 250 yards to the left rear. — Map (db m34660) HM
North Carolina (Johnston County), Four Oaks — HHH-2 — Union Hospital
The Harper House was used as a hospital by the XIV Corps, March 19-21, 1865. About 500 Union wounded were treated here. — Map (db m34629) HM
North Carolina (Johnston County), Four Oaks — HHH-6 — Union Hospital
Field hospital of the XX Corps during the Battle of Bentonville was located here. Four hundred Union soldiers, wounded in the Battle of Averas- boro (16 miles west) on March 16, were brought here for treatment. — Map (db m34633) HM
North Carolina (Johnston County), Four Oaks — HHH-29 — Union Line, March 20
Trenches in the woods behind this marker formed the extreme right of the Union line on March 20. This sector was occupied by the XVII Corps, commanded by Maj. Gen. F. P. Blair. — Map (db m34666) HM
North Carolina (Johnston County), Four Oaks — HHH-27 — Union Line, March 21
After withdrawing from the advance against Mill Creek Bridge, Mower’s Federals re- formed here and threw up works. This was the extreme right of the Union line on March 21. Earthworks remain. — Map (db m34664) HM
North Carolina (Johnston County), Kenly — Tram Railroad
From the Dennis Simmons Lumber Company, located just to the east, from 1900-1918, a 22-inch gauge tram railroad ran northwest to present NC 222 and along that route nine miles to Dixie and beyond toward Buckhorn. The tram, fired by lightwood knots, brought virgin timber to the sawmill and local farm families. to and from town for commerce. The lumber company and tram played a vital role in Kenly's early history, as did the 1886 building of the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad. — Map (db m43457) HM
North Carolina (Johnston County), Newton Grove — HHH-12 — Cole Farmhouse
Stood in this field. Scene of heavy fighting, March 19. Destroyed on March 20 by Con- federate artillery to prevent sniping. — Map (db m34645) HM
North Carolina (Johnston County), Newton Grove — HHH-5 — Federal Earthworks
Constructed by First Michigan Engineers and others, March 19, 1865. Occupied by Federals throughout the battle. Works begin 75 yards behind this marker. — Map (db m34634) HM
North Carolina (Johnston County), Newton Grove — HHH-18 — Federal Junction
Sherman’s Left and Right Wings joined forces here during the afternoon of March 20, 1865. They constructed works across the road and skirmished with the Confederates. — Map (db m34655) HM
North Carolina (Johnston County), Newton Grove — HHH-13 — Fighting Below the Road
One-half mile south of this point, across the road, Brig. Gen. J. D. Morgan’s Union Div- ision halted the main Confederate charge, March 19, 1865, in one of the fiercest engage- ments of the battle. — Map (db m34644) HM
North Carolina (Johnston County), Newton Grove — HHH-14 — First Union Attack
Brig. Gen. W. P. Carlin’s Division attacked the Confederate line above the road here on March 19. Repulsed, they threw up works but were driven out by the Con- federate charge. — Map (db m34646) HM
North Carolina (Johnston County), Newton Grove — Michigan Engineers Original Field Works
The depression in front of you is the remnant of trenches dug by the 1st Regiment Michigan Engineers and Mechanics. In addition to field works such as trenches, the members of the regiment built bridges, warehouses, and blockhouses. Perhaps most importantly, they were experts at the repair, construction, and even the destruction of roads and railroads. Mustered into United States service on October 29, 1861, they carried weapons to defend themselves, but were generally not used as front line . . . — Map (db m34345) HM
North Carolina (Johnston County), Newton Grove — Naval Stores
God Bless the Tar Heel Boys   -   Quote attributed to Gen. R. E. Lee in R. B. Creecy’s Grandfather Tales of North Carolina History, 1901. Many people know that North Carolina is nicknamed the “Tar Heel State,” but not everyone may know that the phrase likely originated from North Carolina’s most important nineteenth-century industry, naval stores. Naval stores included tar, pitch, rosin, and turpentine. All were produced from longleaf pine sap and most commonly used . . . — Map (db m34347) HM
North Carolina (Johnston County), Selma — Mitchener StationThe Last Review — Carolinas Campaign
(preface) The Carolinas Campaign began on February 1, 1865, when Union Gen. William T. Sherman led his army north from Savannah, Georgia, after the March to the Sea. Sherman’s objective was to join Gen. Ulysses S. Grant in Virginia to crush Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia. Scattered Confederate forces consolidated in North Carolina, the Confederacy’s logistical lifeline, where Sherman defeated Gen. Joseph E. Johnston’s last-ditch attack at Bentonville. After Sherman was . . . — Map (db m70391) HM
North Carolina (Johnston County), Selma — The Battle of BentonvilleMarch 19, 20, and 21, 1865
At Bentonville, General William T. Sherman's Union Army, advancing from Fayetteville towards Goldsboro, met and battled the Confederate Army of Generla Joseph E. Johnston. General Robert E. Lee had directed the Confederates to make a stand in North Carolina to prevent Sherman from joining General U.S. Grant in front of Lee's Army at Petersburg, Virginia. Johnston had been able to raise nearly 30,000 men from South Carolina, Alabama, Mississippi, Tennessee, and eastern North Carolina. His . . . — Map (db m74852) HM
North Carolina (Johnston County), Selma — The Last Grand Review
On this site, April, 1865, the last grand review of the Confederate Army was held. The troops were reviewed by General J.E. Johnston, Governor Vance and others. — Map (db m70393) HM
North Carolina (Johnston County), Smithfield — H 63 — Edward W. Pou
Congressman, 1901-1934. Chairman House Rules Committee during parts of administrations of Wilson, F.D. Roosevelt. Grave is 200 yds. south. — Map (db m70388) HM
North Carolina (Johnston County), Smithfield — Federal Line of March“Poor North Carolina …” — Carolinas Campaign
(Preface): The Carolinas Campaign began on February 1, 1865, when Union Gen. William T. Sherman led his army north from Savannah, Georgia, after the “March to the Sea.” Sherman's objective was to join Gen. Ulysses S. Grant in Virginia to crush Gen. Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia. Scattered Confederate forces consolidated in North Carolina, the Confederacy's logistical lifeline, where Sherman defeated Gen. Joseph E. Johnston's last-ditch attack at Bentonville. . . . — Map (db m14712) HM
North Carolina (Johnston County), Smithfield — Hastings HouseJohnston’s Headquarters — Carolinas Campaign
(Preface):The Carolinas Campaign began on February 1, 1865, when Union Gen. William T. Sherman led his army north from Savannah, Georgia, after the “March to the Sea.” Sherman's objective was to join Gen. Ulysses S. Grant in Virginia to crush Gen. Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia. Scattered Confederate forces consolidated in North Carolina, the Confederacy's logistical lifeline, where Sherman defeated Gen. Joseph E. Johnston's last-ditch attack at Bentonville. After . . . — Map (db m14654) HM
North Carolina (Johnston County), Smithfield — Occupation of Smithfield“cheering … rolled along the lines” — Carolinas Campaign
(Preface):The Carolinas Campaign began on February 1, 1865, when Union Gen. William T. Sherman led his army north from Savannah, Georgia, after the “March to the Sea.” Sherman's objective was to join Gen. Ulysses S. Grant in Virginia to crush Gen. Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia. Scattered Confederate forces consolidated in North Carolina, the Confederacy's logistical lifeline, where Sherman defeated Gen. Joseph E. Johnston's last-ditch attack at Bentonville. After . . . — Map (db m14659) HM
North Carolina (Johnston County), Smithfield — Sherman Receives News of Lee's Surrender in SmithfieldJohnston County Courthouse — 1843 1921
In the early morning hours of April 12, 1865, two Union officers arrived here and delivered a telegram from General Ulysses S. Grant to General William T. Sherman, who was quartered in the Old Johnston County Courthouse, which stood on this site (depicted above). After reading the telegram, General Sherman issued the following dispatch to his army: "The general commanding announces to the army that he has official notice from General Grant that General Lee surrendered to him his entire army . . . — Map (db m28543) HM
North Carolina (Johnston County), Smithfield — H 74 — Sherman’s March
Enroute from Goldsboro to Raleigh, Sherman’s army camped 1 mile east and on April 12, 1865, celebrated the news of Lee’s surrender. — Map (db m14628) HM
North Carolina (Johnston County), Smithfield — The Town of SmithfieldRiverwalk Gives Founder's Commons New Life
The Town of Smithfield was founded ten months after the signing of the Declaration of Independence in 1776. Its origins, however, date back to the 1750s with the arrival of John Smith, one of the area’s earliest settlers. Neuse River Ferry Landing In 1759 Smith petitioned to operate a ferry where the Neuse River cut through the land he owned. The site became known as Smith’s Ferry. In 1762, Smith’s son, John Smith, Jr. purchased 228 acres of his father’s tract, including the ferry. . . . — Map (db m70389) HM
North Carolina (Johnston County), Smithfield — Town of Smithfield1777-1977
The Town of Smithfield was chartered April 23, 1777 The Bicentennial of the founding was commemorated with a series of events during April, 1977. The capsule herein contains momentos of our time We ask that this time capsule be opened in April, 2077 at Smithfield's Tricentennial celebration — Map (db m70387) HM
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