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Kershaw County Markers
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Bethune — 28-7 — Pleasant Hill Baptist Church
[Front] The first Baptist Church in this area of Kershaw County was founded in a wooded area on Mecklenburg Road, two miles south of Lynchwood, now the town of Bethune. The church was founded in 1852 by Ellie Copeland and established on land owned by the Copeland family, who deeded most of the 1.68 acre lot in 1895. [Reverse] Five buildings have been used for worship services: a log and plank church about 1852-1897; a one room white frame building 1897-1951, sold at auction in 1951; a . . . — Map (db m28264) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Bethune — 28-16 — Tiller's Ferry
(Front) In 1760 Joseph Tiller received a grant for 100 acres on Lynches River, including this crossroads. James Tiller operated a ferry across the river 1 mi. N before 1806. He operated a toll bridge near the ferry, on the Stagecoach or Camden Road, beginning in 1830. A post office opened at Tiller’s Ferry in 1838, with James Tiller as its first postmaster; it closed in 1903. (Reverse) In 1865, as Gen. W.T. Sherman’s Federal army advanced NE, Gen. John A. Logan’s XV Corps . . . — Map (db m53977) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camdan — Kershaw House
This Georgian Mansion overlooking Camden was originally built c.1775-1780 by Joseph Kershaw. A wealthy merchant and leading citizen, Kershaw modeled his residence after the William Washington house in Charleston. During the British occupation of 1780-81, The unfinished structure was fortified and served as headquarters for General Cornwallis and other British officers. The house later served as an orphan school and Confederate supply depot, before being burned in 1865. Archeological excavations . . . — Map (db m23379) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — A Daring Plan
Outnumbered and with little hope of getting reinforcements, Lord Rawdon believed that it would be foolish to sit passively behind Camden’s fortifications. Instead, after an American deserter reported that Greene had no artillery, Rawdon chose to attack despite the Americans’ strong position on Hobkirk’s Hill. After arming every available man, including musicians, Rawdon could field almost 950 men. He led them out of Camden at ten o’clock on the morning of April 25. To deceive Greene, the . . . — Map (db m48692) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — A Final Encounter
Late in the afternoon of April 25, Greene sent William Washington’s cavalry and Captain Robert Kirkwood’s Delaware company back to Hobkirk’s Hill to gather wounded men and stragglers. Seeing Major John Coffin and his Loyalist cavalry on the hill, Washington and Kirkwood maneuvered in hopes of inducing Coffin to attack. The American ruse worked, Coffin charged into an ambush and his troops were routed. The Loyalists fled to Camden, while Washington and Kirkwood rounded up a number of . . . — Map (db m48737) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — Action at Logtown
Logtown was a cluster of log houses one mile north of the colonial town of Camden. The American army approached Camden from the northeast on April 19, 1781. General Greene ordered Captain Robert Kirkwood and his company of Delaware Continentals to probe the British forces by seizing Logtown that night. “At sun rise … had a smart skirmish, Beat in the Enemy.” Capt. Robert Kirkwood Kirkwood attacked at 10p.m. and after a two-hour battle drove out the British troops, who . . . — Map (db m48263) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — African Americans Choose Sides
At the start of the Revolution, South Carolina's slaves numbered over 100,000, compared to 70,000 white inhabitants. Most slaves labored on coastal plantations-only 6,000 lived in the backcountry. Slaves in the Camden area helped to build and fortify the town's powder magazine in 1780. Later, when the British occupied the town, slaves constructed an elaborate network of defenses. Many slaves hoped that the British would give them their freedom, and risked harsh retribution from rebel masters . . . — Map (db m23492) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — Agnes of Glasgow 1760 ~ 1780
Here sleeps Agnes of Glasgow, who tradition says followed her lover, of the British Army, across the ocean and through the wilderness to Camden. She was taken by death before she found him and buried here at night by King Haigler and his men. — Map (db m49276) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — 3 — All the King's Men
The force fighting under Gen. Charles, Lord Cornwallis at the Battle of Camden was as diverse as the foe they faced. At the core of the British Army were the “regulars.” That may not sound threatening, but these highly trained professionals were considered the best soldiers in the world. “Loyalists” ~ as the many colonists who remained loyal to King George III were called ~ often enlisted in Provincial regiments, receiving training and equipment from the Crown. . . . — Map (db m48000) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — American Commanders
Major General Horatio Gates (1728-1806) Born in England, Gates served as a staff officer during the French and Indian War (1754-1763), but later resigned from the British army. He moved to Virginia in 1772. At the outbreak of the Revolution, he was commissioned a brigadier general and helped organize the American army at Boston. In 1777 Gates commanded the American forces that defeated and captured General John Burgoyne’s British army at Saratoga, New York. Congress appointed him to . . . — Map (db m48895) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — 5 — Attack at Dawn
Following the tradition of positioning the best troops at the commander’s right hand, Gen. Horatio Gates placed one brigade of Continentals on his right, and held the second in reserve, leaving inexperienced militia on his left. Since Cornwallis also put his strongest troops to his right, America’s rookie militia faced Britain’s military finest. At first light, believing that the British were not yet in position, Gates ordered the militia to attack. Cornwallis countered by ordering Lt. . . . — Map (db m48006) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — Baron DeKalb
Baron DeKalb mortally wounded on this spot at Battle of Camden, Aug. 16, 1780. — Map (db m1700) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — 28-8 — Baruch Home
On this site stood the birthplace and boyhood home of Bernard M. Baruch (1870-1965), financier, philanthropist, and adviser to presidents. He was instrumental in establishing the Camden Hospital, with opened in 1913, as a tribute to his father, Dr. Simon Baruch, surgeon in the Confederate Army and later a pioneer in medicine in New York. — Map (db m27624) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — 28-1 — Battle of Camden
Near here on August 16, 1780, an American army under General Gates was defeated by British forces commanded by Lord Cornwallis. Major General Baron de Kalb was mortally wounded in this battle. British Troops Engaged Tarleton’s Legion, Twenty-third, Thirty-third and Seventy-first Regiments, Volunteers of Ireland, Royal Artillery, four light infantry companies, Royal North Carolina Militia, volunteer militia, and pioneers. American Troops Engaged Armand’s Legion, First and . . . — Map (db m11255) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — 28-2 (#1) — Battle of Hobkirk Hill
in the Revolutionary War took place on this ridge April 25, 1781. The British Amry was Commanded by General Lord Rawdon, the Continental Army by General Nathanael Greene. — Map (db m27617) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — 28-2 — Battle Of Hobkirk Hill
Battle of Hobkirk Hill in the Revolutionary War took place on this ridge April 25, 1781. The British Army was commanded by General Lord Rawdon, the Continental Army by General Nathanael Greene. — Map (db m27618) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — Battle of Hobkirk's Hill
Along this ridge, American and British armies clashed on April 25, 1781, in the Revolutionary War Battle of Hobkirk’s Hill. Major General Nathanael Greene’s American troops had occupied the hill to threaten Camden, the most important British post in the South Carolina interior. The British commander, Lieutenant Colonel Francis, Lord Rawdon, launched a surprise attack in hopes of driving off the Americans. The British attack began near here, at the eastern end of the hill. Fighting spread . . . — Map (db m48690) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — British Commanders
Lieutenant General Charles, Lord Cornwallis (1738 - 1805) Lord Cornwallis, a member of one of England’s most prominent noble families, began his military career in 1756. He distinguished himself during the Seven Year’s War (1756 - 1763). At the start of the American Revolution, Cornwallis held the rank of major general. He served in the South Carolina, New York, and New Jersey campaigns of 1776, the Philadelphia campaign of 1777, and at Charleston in 1780. In June 1780 he assumed . . . — Map (db m48894) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — 28-4 (#1) — Camden
This area, first held by Wateree and Catawba Indians, was laid out as Fredericksburg Township in 1733. Here on the Catawba Path the trading town of Pine Tree Hill was settled. In 1769 courts were set up and town named Camden in honor of Lord Camden, friend of the colonies. During the Revolution Camden was the center of British activity in this region. It was incorporated in 1791. — Map (db m27621) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — 28-4 — Camden
This area, first held by Wateree and Catawba Indians, was laid out as Fredericksburg Township in 1733. Here on the Catawba Path the trading town of Pine Tree Hill was settled. In 1769 courts were set up and the town named Camden in honor of Lord Camden, friend of the colonies. During the Revolution, Camden was the center of British activity in this region. It was incorporated in 1791. — Map (db m27622) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — Camden - Strategic Key
At the start of the American Revolution, Camden was located here, just south of the present city. It was home to at least thirty families, a Presbyterian church, and a Quaker meetinghouse. With its court house, stores, artisans, and grist mills to grind the wheat produced by local farmers, Camden was the political and economic center of the surrounding region. Joseph Kershaw and others made their fortunes doing business in the town. Camden’s importance increased during the Revolution . . . — Map (db m49034) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — Camden Battlefield
Camden Battlefield has been designated a National Historic Landmark This site possesses national significance in commemorating the history of the United States of America 1961 National Park Service United States Department of the Interior — Map (db m48179) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — Capt. Robert Kirkwood (1756-1791)
At the start of the American Revolution, Robert Kirkwood served as a lieutenant in Hazlet’s Delaware Regiment and in 1777 was promoted to captain and company commander in the 1st Delaware Continental Regiment. In the Battle of Camden (Aug. 16, 1780), his company won fame for its determined stand against the British. During the battle the Delaware Regiment suffered heavy losses, including 50 killed, and the survivors were consolidated into a single company under Kirkwood’s command. The unit . . . — Map (db m48688) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — 9 — Charge and Countercharge
After ordering Webster to attack, Cornwallis commanded Lt. Col., Lord Rawdon to advance on his left. Through heavy fire, they drove back the 2nd Maryland Brigade until Gen. Baron De Kalb succeeded in halting the British charge and leading a counterattack. For almost an hour, a bitter struggle raged with neither side able to gain the advantage. Cornwallis brought up his reserve, the 71st Regiment and loyal militia, but the Continentals held until their center gave way. The entire . . . — Map (db m48024) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — Citizen - Soldiers
In colonial America, all able-bodied men from teenagers to sixty-year-olds served in the militia, a local force that turned out for military service in times of emergency. Official training sessions, or musters, were held once or twice per year in peacetime. Training was often a social occasion with the men dispersing to taverns after a brief drill. "Our Militia exhibited... great zeal & fidelity; coming voluntarily from considerable distances to offer their Service." Lord Rawdon With . . . — Map (db m23387) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — Colonel Joseph Kershaw's Tomb
Joseph Kershaw (1727 - 1791) is buried in this family enclosure. He was a successful businessman, politician, district sheriff, and South Carolina Patriot militia colonel in the Revolutionary War. He helped mediate a peaceful settlement to the South Carolina Regulator movement in 1769 by advocating an expansion of law enforcement and courts into the backcountry. On June 20, 1779, he led his militia regiment against the British at the Battle of Stono Ferry. Kershaw County (est. 1791) is named . . . — Map (db m48183) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — Confederate War Memorial
This Monument is erected by the women of Kershaw County in memory of her brave sons who fell during the Confederate War defending the rights and honor of the South. — Map (db m23445) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — 8 — Defeat in the Center
Acrid smoke made it hard to breathe or see. The roar of gunfire and the death-cries of comrades made it hard to hear or think. The 1st Maryland Brigade and the NC militia battled the British 23rd and 33rd Regiments and light infantry in the center of the field. Realizing that infantry alone could not overcome the Americans, Cornwallis ordered Tarleton’s cavalry to charge. With Britain’s mounted troops joining the fray, the Continentals were overrun. Some pulled back along the Great . . . — Map (db m48019) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — Donald Truesdell MemorialMedal of Honor Recipient
Donald Leroy Truesdell Aug. 26. 1906 Sept. 21, 1993 Medal of Honor Recipient Place/Citation: Costancia, Northern Nicaragua 1932Truesdell, serving in Nicaragua as second in command of a guardia national patrol, was sent out on mission with orders to make contact with a previously discovered group of outlaws on the 24th of April 1932. During the search a rifle grenade fell from its carrier, struck a nearby rock, and ignited. Seeing that several patrol members were in danger, Truesdell rushed . . . — Map (db m62200) WM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — 10 — Driven from the Field
Defeated along the entire front, the remaining American troops lost all military organization and fled in confusion. Some Continentals from the 1st Maryland Brigade retreated along the Great Wagon Road. Others, including survivors of the 2nd Maryland Brigade, escaped through the swamp at the battlefield’s western edge. “Picture it as bad as you possibly can and it will not be as bad as it really is.” Gen. Edward Stevens Most of the militia who had broken ranks earlier . . . — Map (db m48031) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — 28 13 — E.H. Dibble Store / Eugene H. Dibble
E.H. Dibble Store This store, constructed in 1891 on what was then the corner of 6th Avenue (now Broad Street) and DeKalb Street, was the second home of E.H.Dibble and Brothers Grocery, which sold "general merchandise" as well as "heavy and fancy groceries" and operated in downtown Camden for more than fifty years. "The family is known all over the state," historian Asa Gordon wrote in 1929, "and its achievement in the mercantile business is of historic importance." Eugene H. Dibble . . . — Map (db m23442) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — Forced to Retreat
With the British troops holding the summit of Hobkirk’s Hill and his own army in disorder, Greene decided to retreat. In the confusion of battle, some of the American soldiers managed to carry off the army’s artillery, preventing its capture by the British. Greene withdrew three miles from the battlefield with some of Rawdon’s troops in pursuit. However, Rawdon believed that his force was too small to venture any farther from his fortifications. Later in the day he withdrew to Camden, . . . — Map (db m70789) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — Fruitless Victory
Lord Rawdon had defeated the American army at Hobkirk’s Hill, but the British gained nothing from the victory. Two days earlier, on April 23, South Carolina partisans under Francis Marion and Henry Lee’s Continental legion had forced the surrender of Fort Watson on the Santee River. The loss of this post cut the British line of communication between Charleston and Camden. With his supply line severed, Greene’s army to the north, Marion and Lee to the southeast, and other partisans active . . . — Map (db m48697) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — 28-5 — Gaol
On this corner stood the gaol, built in 1771 and burned in 1812. During the Revolution the British imprisoned in it many American soldiers and civilians. Among them, after his capture near the Waxhaws, was the boy Andrew Jackson, later seventh President. He is said to have watched the Battle of Hobkirk Hill through a hole he cut in the wall of the gaol's second story. — Map (db m27620) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — 6 — General Gate's Disgrace
When the militia fled before the initial British charge, Gates tried to rally them. However, the throng of panicked militiamen swept him up in their northward flight. Far removed from the battlefield, Gates assumed that his army had been defeated and he decided to go to Charlotte to regroup. Finding neither troops nor supplies there, Gates rode on to Hillsborough, NC to seek help from North Carolina’s state legislature. Although the Continental Congress initially backed Gates, his . . . — Map (db m48013) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — 28-3 — General Greene's Headquarters
150 yards to the east is where Gen. Nathanael Grenne had the headquarters of the American Army during the Battel of Hodkirk Hill April 25, 1781. — Map (db m27615) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — Greene's Counterblow
Seeing that the British line was much shorter than his own, Greene decided to counterattack. He ordered the 1st Maryland and 2nd Virginia regiments to make a frontal attack against the advancing British troops, while the 2nd Maryland regiment struck Rawdon’s right flank and the 1st Virginia assailed the British left. Greene also ordered William Washington and his cavalry to circle past the British right and strike them from the rear. The daring American charge halted the British . . . — Map (db m48733) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — Historic Camden Revolutionary War SiteWelcome to Historic Camden
Historic Camden Revolutionary War Site is located at the original site of Camden, the oldest inland town in South Carolina. Established in 1733, colonial Camden emerged as the trade center of the backcountry by the 1760s. On June 1, 1780, Camden’s citizens surrendered to General Charles, Lord Cornwallis and 2,500 British soldiers. For the next eleven months the garrisoned town served as the principal British inland post while the brutal 1780 - 81 Southern Campaign ravaged the Carolinas. . . . — Map (db m48897) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — In Honor and Rememberance
In honor and remembrance of the Heroes and Victims in the Fight Against Terrorism and to Celebrate the Enduring Spirit of All Americans Presented by Woodmen of the World — Map (db m48264) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — James Polk Dickinson
Side One In memory of James Polk Dickinson, a native of Camden born January 21st 1816. And died at Mixchoac Mexico Sept 12th 1847 Fearless of danger and undaunted by opposition he was an early active and zealous champion in the Floridian and Mexican Wars We consecrate this shaft to the heartfelt spirit of patriotism May the light of fame forever rest upon its summit Patria et civitas testantur in honore vestro neg tila nec vices belli ullas vitavisse. Side Two When the . . . — Map (db m49273) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — 28-10 — John C. West Boyhood Home
This farm was the boyhood home of John Carl West (b. 1922), governor of South Carolina 1971-75. West, a graduate of the Citadel and the University of S.C., served as an intelligence officer in World War II, as state senator 1955-66, and as lieutenant governor 1967-71 before his term as governor. He was later U.S. ambassador to Saudi Arabia 1977-81. — Map (db m27656) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — Josheph Kershaw (1728-1791)
A native of England, Joseph Kershaw came to South Carolina about 1755 and had moved to Camden (then called Pine Tree Hill) by 1758, where he established a store. As a member of the colonial legislator, Kershaw promoted Camden's development and secured its town charter in 1769. He introduced wheat cultivation to the area, making Camden an important commercial center. At the outbreak of the Revolution, Kershaw secured the Catawba Indians' allegiance to the Americans. He held the rank f . . . — Map (db m23382) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — King Haiglar Tower
   King Haiglar is often called the patron saint of Camden. From about 1750 until his murder by hostile Indians in 1763, this noble Catawba chief was a valuable friend to the pioneers of Pine Tree Hill, as Camden was then known.    Some time between 1815 and 1826, J.B. Mathieu executed this 5'1" iron effigy of King Haiglar and presented it to the town. It has stood as a weather vane at other locations since then and was placed here when the Opera House (since razed) and its tower were built . . . — Map (db m23408) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — Maj. Gen. Baron Johann de Kalb's Original Gravesite
Johann de Kalb (1721 - 1780) had a distinguished career in the French army and later served as a spy for the French Court, touring the British American colonies in 1768. He returned to America with the Marquis de Lafayette in 1777 to assist the American revolutionaries, and Congress appointed him a major general in the Continental Army. Having led the Maryland and Delaware Continental troops to the South in 1780, he fought heroically at the Battle of Camden, where he received 11 gunshot and . . . — Map (db m49354) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — 28-11 — Mather Academy
[Front] Mather Academy was founded in 1887 by the New England Southern Conference of the Women's Home Missionary Society of the Methodist Church. It succeeded a freedmen's school opened during Reconstruction by Sarah Babcock, who returned to Massachusetts, married Rev. James Mather, and became the corresponding secretary of the Southern Conference when it organized in 1883. The Methodists opened a "Model Home and Industrial School" on this site in 1887. [Reverse] Mather . . . — Map (db m27657) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — 2 — Meet the American Army of 1780
The Americans who fought the Revolutionary War reflected colonial society: an array of backgrounds, ages and skill. Professional soldiers mixed with non-military tradesmen, idealistic Europeans shared battlefields with illiterate farmers, Native Americans, slaves and freedmen. — Map (db m47997) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — 28-17 — Monroe Boykin Park
(Front) In the 1798 city plan, this five-acre park was laid out as a public square. In 1900 the Seaboard Air Line Railway built a passenger depot next to it, on the SW corner of Chesnut & Gordon Sts. The city beautified the square to welcome visitors and named it Seaboard Park. After the depot moved in 1937, the area near it was named Seaboard Park. The present name, first given to an African-American suburb absorbed into Kirkwood, honors Rev. Monroe Boykin. (Reverse) Rev. . . . — Map (db m54659) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — Native Allies
The Catawba Indians befriended and traded with the first English colonists who settled in the interior of South Carolina. In 1763, after a devastating smallpox epidemic, tribal leaders ceded most of their land in exchange for a reservation along the Catawba River. When the Revolution began, the Catawbas were the only southern tribe to ally with the Americans. The Catawbas provided warriors for the 1775 campaign against the Loyalists, and for the defense of Charleston and operations against . . . — Map (db m23393) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — Northeast Redoubt
This partially reconstructed redoubt was one of six small forts built by British forces during their occupation of Camden in 1780 - 1781. Manned by a detachment of infantry and supported by heavy artillery, these works served as the outer line of defense of the British base. The forts were later destroyed during the British evacuation of Camden in May 1781. Archaeological investigations at this site in 1967 yielded numerous military artifacts and provided the basis for reconstructing the southern third of the redoubt. — Map (db m49107) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — Nothwest Redoubt
In 1780 - 81, the British built a series of small forts or redoubts to serve as an outer line of defense for their headquarters at Camden. They were well fortified with troops and artillery, making Camden relatively impenetrable to attacks by the Colonial forces. The two western redoubts on Campbell St. protected Camden's important western flank from the Wateree river. This large redoubt spanned the intersection of Bull and Campbell Streets. It was destroyed by the British when they evacuated in 1781. — Map (db m49355) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — Old Camden Courthouse and Gaol
On this site stood the original Camden District Courthouse and gaol (jail), built in response to increased lawlessness in the South Carolina backcountry. Construction was completed in 1771 and the first term of criminal court convened shortly afterward. The jail stood across the Great Wagon Road (Waxhaw Road) from the courthouse. The first courthouse was probably a one-room wooden building which burned in 1779. The two stories and basement of the brick jail housed criminals and runaway slaves. . . . — Map (db m49353) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — Palisade Wall
This wall is a partial reconstruction of the wall erected by British forces during their occupation of Camden in 1780 - 81. The log wall completely surrounded the central portion of the town, which was located along both sides of Broad Street and consisted of about 80 structures. It served as the inner defense line of the fortified town and was destroyed when the British evacuated Camden. Archaeological excavations here in 1970 produced a variety of military artifacts some of which are on . . . — Map (db m49112) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — 7 — Panic and Valor
When ordering his militia to attack, Gates envisioned them marching forward and leaving their initial position vacant. He therefore instructed Gen. William Smallwood to advance his 1st Maryland Brigade to take their place. However, before Smallwood could proceed, the militia broke into retreat. Smallwood’s Continentals pushed forward through their fleeing comrades. Webster, seeing the American front collapse, wheeled his troops leftward to attack Smallwood. The Marylanders . . . — Map (db m48014) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — Pantheon
Generals C.S.A. Cantey Chestnut 1861 Deas 1865 Villepigue Kennedy Kershaw Natives of Camden — Map (db m51704) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — Powder Magazine
This structure was built in 1777 under the direction of Joseph Kershaw for the state of South Carolina. A storage facility for ammunition, the magazine had a vaulted roof, 48 inch walls, and supporting butteresses and pillars. Although local patriots fortified the structure with earthworks in 1780, British forces easily occupied the area and used the magazine for their own purposes. During the British evacuation of Camden the following year, the structure was destroyed. Archeological . . . — Map (db m23385) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — Presbyterian Meeting House
Near this memorial stood the Presbyterian Meeting House, first place of worship in Camden after that of the Quakers. It was built about 1774 on land given by Col. Joseph Kershaw and confirmed in his Will dated 1778. The first building was destroyed by the British and rebuilt after the Revolution. In 1805 a third church was erected here and called Bethesda, which was used until the present church on DeKalb Street was built in 1820 - 1822. This land was given by the Presbyterians to the Cemetery Association in 1915. — Map (db m49524) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — Prisoners of War
Captured Americans were confined in Camden throughout the British occupation. When the American army approached the town in August 1780, British troops locked the town’s patriot leaders in the jail (located on the southeast corner of Broad and King Streets) as a precaution against revolt. After the Battle of Camden, hundreds of captured American soldiers were brought to town and confined in wooden pens. Most were later sent to Charleston. Constant fighting in the backcountry brought a steady . . . — Map (db m49106) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — 11 — Pursued Beyond the Battlefield
After the battle, Cornwallis’s exhausted infantry held the field while Tarleton and his cavalry chased the Americans, capturing hundreds and killing untold others. Loyalists living north of Camden rounded up more patriot prisoners, turning them over to the British. Tarleton’s Legion horsemen also seized 150 wagons, along with valuable artillery, muskets, and ammunition. “The road for some miles was strewed with the wounded and killed. The number of dead horses, broken wagons and . . . — Map (db m48040) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — Quaker Burying Ground
Near here was the Meeting House built by the Quakers on four acres of land leased to them by Samuel Wyly on Sept. 6, 1759, for the term of 999 years at a yearly rental of one Pepper Corn, if lawfully demanded. This was their burial ground. The Quakers later leased this land to the Town of Camden for 99 years at a rental of $1.00 a year. In 1874 the Town conveyed its right, title and interest in this and other lands to the Cemetery Association of Camden. — Map (db m49685) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — Revolutionary War Memorial
This memorial is dedicated to American Revolutionary War heroes who were patriots of the Old Camden District … Markers are for Patriots buried in graves known and unknown … Patriots in marked graves in Quaker Cemetery are: Surgeon Isaac Alexander, Surgeon James Martin, Capt Benjamin Carter, Lt Joseph Brevard, and Privates Thomas Ballard, Samuel Mathis, Archelaus Watkins … Many patriots were executed in Camden during 1780 - 1781. Those known appear on the monument … Hundreds of patriots from . . . — Map (db m51707) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — Richard Kirkland
(West face): To Richard Kirkland C. S. A. in commemoration of his heroism at Fredericksburg, Dec. 13, 1862. Christlike compassion moved him to leap over the stone wall, a mark for hostile guns, and carry water, again and again, to the suffering foe fallen thick in front. “Greater love hath no man than this” He fell at Chickamauga, aged 20. A tribute from the school children of Camden. A.D. 1910 (East face): 1911 Presented by The National Humane Alliance Hermon Lee Ensign Founder — Map (db m48188) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — 4 — Shots in the Dark
Under a full moon in the dead of night, the advance guards of the two armies came upon each other on the Great Wagon Road. Britain’s Lt. Col. Banastre Tarleton, marching from Camden with his dragoons, promptly charged the American cavalry of Col. Charles Armand. Although they routed Armand’s troops, the British were soon driven back by fire from American light infantry under Lt. Cols. Charles Porterfield (VA) and John Armstrong (NC). Tarleton then called up the infantry and drove back . . . — Map (db m48004) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — Southeast Redoubt
This reconstructed small fort, guarding the southeastern approaches to Camden, was one of a ring of redoubts surrounding the fortified town. Typical of eighteenth century field fortifications, this redoubt used a combination of moat, earthen parapet, and palisade wall t defend against enemy attack. The interior of the work is equipped with firing steps for infantry and an earthen bastion platform for artillery. A small magazine also would have originally been located in the center of the . . . — Map (db m23383) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — Southwest Redoubt
In 1780 - 81, the British built a series of small forts to serve as an outer line of defense for their headquarters at the Town of Camden. They were fortified with troops and artillery, making Camden relatively impenetrable to attack by the Colonial forces. This redoubt was just outside the town’s palisade southwest of the Old Presbyterian Church, this graveyard, and a few yards south of this sign. It guarded the approach from the strategic Wateree Ferry. On May 10, 1781 the British evacuated, destroying it and much of Camden. — Map (db m49357) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — Struggle for the Hill
After Lord Rawdon reinforced his flanks, American and British soldiers exchanged musket volleys for several minutes. The battered British units on Rawdon’s left soon began to fall back. Just as American victory seemed assured, a sharpshooter killed Captain William Beatty of the 1st Maryland, throwing Beatty’s company and the one adjacent to it into confusion. The units retreated, and Colonel John Gunby halted the rest of the regiment and fell back to reorganize his troops. The 2nd . . . — Map (db m48734) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — The American Army
At Hobkirk’s Hill the American army numbered between 1,200 and 1,500 men. Col. Otho Holland Williams’s brigade held the left of the line. It consisted of two Maryland Continental regiments commanded by Col. John Gunby and Lt. Col. Benjamin Ford, along with 40 Delaware Continentals under Capt. Robert Kirkwood. On the right, Brigadier General Isaac Huger led two regiments of Virginia Continentals under Lt. Cols. Samuel Hawes and Richard Campbell. Each of the four Continental regiments . . . — Map (db m48268) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — The Americans Return
In late March 1781, Maj. Gen. Nathanael Greene made one of the most important decisions of the Revolutionary War. Rather than pursue Lord Cornwallis’s British force toward Wilmington, North Carolina, Greene resolved to lead the American army back to South Carolina. Greene knew that if Cornwallis followed him, North Carolina would be fairly secure. Should Cornwallis not return to South Carolina, Greene saw an opportunity to strike the British posts scattered across that state. He ordered . . . — Map (db m48185) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — The Battle of Hobkirk Hill
The Battle of Hobkirk Hill Revolutionary War April 25, 1781 Took Place on this ridge The Continental Army was commanded by General Nathaniel Greene and The British by General Lord Rawdon — Map (db m48266) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — The Bishop Davis Housecirca 1817
This Charleston Single House was built about 1817 by William Daniel(B. 1775 ~ D. 1828), a planter and owner of farm property at White Oak Creek about halfway between Camden and Liberty Hill. His vault type tomb is located there. In 1837 the house was sold to Chapman Levy, a prominent attorney, who served in both the State House of Representatives and the Senate. In 1854, the house was sold to Reverend T. F. Davis, who was Rector of Grace Episcopal Church and later Bishop and Founder of Camden . . . — Map (db m53974) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — The British Army
Lord Rawdon commanded less than 950 men at Hobkirk’s Hill. The majority were American Loyalists in the Volunteers of Ireland (140), the King’s American Regiment (160), New York Volunteers (160), the South Carolina Royalists (130), and Major John Coffin’s dragoons (60). There was also a company of 40 Loyalist riflemen. The British 63rd Regiment numbered 180 men, and Rawdon combed the hospital at Camden for another 50 soldiers whom he considered well enough to fight. They were formed into a . . . — Map (db m48271) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — The British Attack
Rawdon’s advance companies, the light infantry and grenadiers of the Volunteers of Ireland, struck the pickets on Greene’s left. The musket fire alerted the Americans, who hurried to get into battle formation. Meanwhile, Rawdon deployed the first three units in his line of march in attack formation: the British 63rd Regiment on his right, a detachment of the New York Volunteers in the center, and the King’s American Regiment on the left. As the British and Loyalists advanced, they . . . — Map (db m48735) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — The British Evacuation
The American capture of Fort Watson on the Santee River on April 23,1781,cut the supply line from Charleston to Camden. Lord Rawdon, commander of the British garrison, admitted that he was"completely dependent...for subsistence, for military stores, for horses, for arms" on Charleston. Having failed to drive Greene far from Camden after the Battle of Hobkirk's Hill, and unable to bring the Americans to battle on favorable terms, Rawdon knew that he would be surrounded and forced to surrender . . . — Map (db m23403) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — The Camden Oakcirca 1790
As a mere sapling, I witnessed the rebirth of Camden after the devastations of the American Revolution. The British had occupied our town as a supply post in June 1780. When they evacuated eleven months later, they left it “little more than a heap of ruins.” Our citizens, mainly Patriots, took to rebuilding our town with spirit. Originally native inhabitants, most recently the Catawba tribe, lived in the area and along the Wateree River west of where I stand. They traveled the . . . — Map (db m48739) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — The Cleveland School Fire
Erected to the memory of those who lost their lives in the Cleveland School Fire, on the night of May 17, 1923. Grace Arrants, Age 7 yr.; Ima Arrants, Age 17 yr; Mrs. Floride Brown, Age 47 yr.; Lottie Brown, Age 9 yr.; Eugene A. Brown, Age 57 yr.; Mrs. Eugene A. Brown, Age 49 yr.; Ellie Barnes, Age 17 yr.; Fannie Bowers, Age 16 yr.; Mrs. Lula Croft, Age 37 yr.; Dorothy Croft, Age 10 yr.; Hamilton Croft, Age 6 yr.; Mrs. Estelle Campbell, Age 20 yr.; Edline Campbell, Age 14 yr.; Ase R Davis, . . . — Map (db m48563) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — The Common
The area between the Kershaw House and Camden was the scene of numerous military exercises throughout the years. Occupying British troops used the field as a parade ground, and in 1825, Revolutionary War hero the Marquise de Lafayette reviewed troops here during his visit to Camden. The area served as a center for militia activities and a mustering point for local volunteers leaving for war. The name of the waterhead at the foot of the hill, Muster Spring, is a reminder of the field's military use. — Map (db m49109) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — The De Kalb Monument
(Front Face): To De Kalb Here lie the remains of Baron De Kalb, German by birth, but in principle, citizen of the world. (Left Face): He was second in command in the battle fought near Camden, on the 16th August, 1780, between the British and Americans; and there nobly fell covered with wounds, while gallantly performing deeds of valor in rallying the friend and opposing the enemies of his adopted country. (Rear Face): In gratitude for his zeal and . . . — Map (db m47858) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — The Fortified Post
The first fortifications at Camden were constructed in March and April, 1780, to protect the town's powder magazine from surprise attack by Loyalists. When British forces under Lord Cornwallis occupied the town on June 1, they strengthened the magazine's fortifications by did not construct additional defenses until after the Battle of Camden. "A retrenchment was thrown up round the Fail with Abbatis,...another work and Abbatis in form of a half Moon was also thrown up ner the road... and a . . . — Map (db m23390) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — The Loyalists
Many Americans opposed the Revolutionary movement, preferring to remain under British rule. These colonists called themselves "Loyalists". The Revolutionaries called them "Tories"or the "disaffected". When fighting began, state officials ordered all South Carolinians to take an oath of allegiance to the new government. Those who refused were banished and had their property confiscated. Some Loyalists took the oath in order to preserve their homes. Others, like Daniel McGirt who lived just . . . — Map (db m23384) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — 1 — The Road to Battle
See that flat depression in the ground? That’s the surviving imprint of the Great Wagon Road, a route used by thousands of settlers from the 1740s to the early 1800s. The road began in Philadelphia, carrying Quakers, Germans, Scots-Irish and Moravians westward and then down the Shenandoah Valley and across North Carolina. In South Carolina, it divided into an eastern fork that passed through Camden and a western fork that continued into Georgia. It was the interstate highway of . . . — Map (db m47993) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — The Southern Campaign, Apr 1781 - Dec 1782
Upon returning to South Carolina, Greene moved against Camden, where Lord Rawdon commanded the British garrison. Rawdon attacked the Americans at Hobkirk’s Hill on April 25, 1781, and defeated Greene. However, partisan forces cut the British line of communication with Charleston, forcing Rawdon to evacuate Camden on May 10. Greene then marched westward to attack the British post at Ninety Six. Greene’s army arrived at Ninety Six on May 22 and besieged the garrison. Rawdon marched from . . . — Map (db m49037) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — The Southern Campaign, Aug 1780 - Apr 1781
After the American defeat at Camden in August 1780, the remnants of the Continental Army regrouped in North Carolina. Lord Cornwallis decided to follow up his victory with an invasion of that state, and advanced from Camden on September 8. The British reached Charlotte on September 26, but were forced to withdraw the following month after American militia from west of the Appalachians destroyed a Loyalist force commanded by British Major Patrick Ferguson at Kings Mountain, South Carolina, on . . . — Map (db m49041) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — The Southern Campaign, Dec 1778 - Aug 1780
The American victory at Saratoga, New York, in October 1777, and France’s subsequent entry into the Revolutionary War as an American ally, forced British officials to abandon their effort to achieve victory in the northern colonies. Instead, they decided to strike at the southern colonies, where they believed that a relatively small force of British troops aided by southern Loyalists, Native Americans, and possibly slaves, could regain control of Georgia and the Carolinas. In December 1778, . . . — Map (db m49044) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — War in the Backcountry
A few weeks of peace followed the British capture of Charleston in May 1780 and their occupation of the South Carolina and Georgia backcountry. However, determined patriots like Francis Marion and Thomas Sumter soon organized partisan units and launched a guerrilla campaign against British posts and Loyalist militia. "The approach of General Gates's Army unveiled to Us a Fund of disaffection in this Province, of which we could have formed no Idea: And even the disperdion of that force, did . . . — Map (db m49113) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — West Redoubt
In 1780 - 81, the British built a series of small forts or redoubts to serve as an outer line of defense for their headquarters at Camden. They were well fortified with troops and artillery, making Camden relatively impenetrable to attacks by the Colonial forces. The two western redoubts on Campbell St. protected Camden’s important western flank from the Wateree river. This large redoubt spanned the intersection of Meeting and Campbell Streets. It was destroyed by the British when they evacuated in 1781. — Map (db m49356) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — William Washington's Ride
Lt. Col. Washington led his Calvary around the east side of the battlefield, then rode into the British rear at the base of Hobkirk’s Hill. There he found a large number of stragglers, wounded men, doctors, and other noncombatants. Washington took as many as 200 prisoners, granting most of them parole - released on their promise not to fight again until exchanged. “Part of the Enemy’s Calvary got into our rear, exacted paroles from several Officers who lay wounded … & . . . — Map (db m48736) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Camden — Women in the Revolution
Women lived difficult lives in the Revolutionary era. They cooked, wove cloth and sewed it into clothing, washed, mended, and raised children. They also usually helped their husbands on the farm or in the family business. The war forced women to take on additional tasks. Many had to take over farms and shops while their husbands were away on military service. They cared for sick and wounded soldiers, and some acted as spies and messengers for the armies. A few accompanied their husbands as . . . — Map (db m23402) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Cassatt — 28-9 — Midway High School
(Front) Midway School, established on this site in 1923 with grades 1-11, served Cassatt and other rural areas in Kershaw County near U.S. Hwy. 1 from Little Lynches River to the Shepard community. The high school later added grade 12, then closed in 1966, after forty-three years of service to the area.

(Reverse) Midway Elementary School continues to operate at this site. The original Midway School building, constructed in 1923, was demolished in 1976 to make way for a new building . . . — Map (db m47547) HM

South Carolina (Kershaw County), Cassatt — 28-12 — West's Crossroads / Donald H. Holland House
(Front): This crossroads, long owned by the West family, is the junction of the Georgetown and Porter Bridge Roads, both of which appear on Robert Mills's 1825 Atlas of S.C. In early 1865 opposing forces camped nearby as Gen. M.C. Butler's Confederates attempted to slow the advance of Gen. W.T. Sherman's Federals toward N.C., and fought a brief skirmish here on February 25th. (Reverse): The boyhood home of Donald H. Holland (b. 1928), Kershaw County lawyer and legislator, . . . — Map (db m28260) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Elgin — In Memory of All American Veterans
This memorial honors all American Veterans who, although separated by generations, shared a common, undeniable goal ~ to valiantly protect our country's freedoms. The memories of these American veterans will continue to live on whenever and wherever democracy exists. The American veteran ~ forever a symbol of heroism, sacrifice, loyalty and freedom. — Map (db m51961) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Liberty Hill — 28 - 15 — Peay's Ferry / Peay's Ferry Road
(Front) A ferry was operated on the Wateree River, at a point about 4 mi. W, as early as 1775. In 1808 ferry rights were granted to Thomas Starke, Jr. and Austin Ford Peay (d. 1841), planters with property in Fairfield and Kershaw Districts. Peay received ferry rights for another 7 years in 1825. Peay served in the S.C. House between 1812 and 1831 and in the S.C. Senate between 1832 and 1839. (Reverse) The road from the Wateree River E to Liberty Hill was known as Peay's . . . — Map (db m49352) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Liberty Hill — 28-14 — Warrenton Muster Ground
[Front] The Warrenton Muster Ground, originally known as Gardner's Old Field, was a nineteenth and early-twentieth century meeting place for local militia companies. The area was named Warrenton after thirty families from Warrenton, N.C. settled here shortly after the American Revolution. The Beaver Creek Militia and Liberty Hill Rifles met here for many years. [Reverse] The Beaver Creek Militia, made up of men from southern Lancaster and northern Kershaw counties, met . . . — Map (db m27658) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Lugoff — Our Honored Dead
(West Face): Dedicated to Lt. Gen. James Maurice Gavin, USA March 22, 1907 ~ February 23, 1990 And Our Honored Dead *** 1st Commander 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment Commanding General 82nd Airborne Division Ambassador to France *** A Courageous Leader A Trooper's Soldier *** Erected by Veterans of the 505th Parachute RCT Association World War II June 14, 1991 (South Face): Commemoration On this site on March 29, 1943 the 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment made the first . . . — Map (db m49770) HM
South Carolina (Kershaw County), Rembert — 28-6 — Battle of Boykin's Mill
Gen. Edward E. Potter commanding 2700 white and Negro Union troops left Georgetown April 5, 1865, to destroy the railroad between Sumter and Camden. Here on April 18, in one of the last engagements of the war, a small force of Confederate regulars and local Home Guard fought a defensive action which delayed their advance for a day. — Map (db m27623) HM
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