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Lexington County Markers
South Carolina (Lexington County), Batesburg-Leesville — 32-10 — Hartley House
This house was built before 1800 for John Pierson Bond, according to local tradition. It later came into the possession of John Bates, of the family for whom Batesburg derives its name, and has been owned for over a century by Lodwick Hartley and his family. It was the first meeting place of the Batesville Masonic Lodge and was a stagecoach mail stop. — Map (db m21880) HM
South Carolina (Lexington County), Batesburg-Leesville — 32-9 — Lee's Tavern Site
Mills's Atlas of 1825 shows this site on the Augusta-Columbia road as the location of John W. Lee's Stage Tavern. According to local tradition, this vicinity was the probably site of President George Washington's breakfast stop on May 22, 1791. The Town of Leesville derives its name from the family of John W. Lee, who were early settlers of this area. — Map (db m21884) HM
South Carolina (Lexington County), Batesburg-Leesville — Moorefield Memorial Highway
In Memory of Charles Henry Moorefield State Highway Engineer of South Carolina 1920 - 1935 — Map (db m21876) HM
South Carolina (Lexington County), Batesburg-Leesville — 32-33 — Pinarea / Quattlebaum Sawmill, Flour Mill, and Rifle Factory
Pinarea Pinarea, the plantation owned by soldier, statesman, and manufacturer Paul Quattlebaum (1812-1890), was a mile E. Quattlebaum was a captain in the Seminole War and a brig. gen, in the S.C. militia by 1843. He was a state representative 1840-43, state senator 1848-52, and delegate to the Secession Convention and signer of the Ordinance of Secession. He is buried in the cemetery at Pinarea. Quattlebaum Sawmill, Flour Mill, and Rifle Factory The Quattlebaums operated a . . . — Map (db m21869) HM
South Carolina (Lexington County), Cayce — 32-30 — Battle of Congaree Creek
(Front text) On February 15, 1865, as Gen. W.T. Sherman's Federal army advanced to Columbia, Gen. O.O. Howard's Army of the Tennessee found its way blocked by Confederates entrenched behind Congaree Creek and defending the Old State Rd. bridge. Gen. George G. Dibrell's dismounted cavalry brigade, supported by infantry and artillery, manned the nearby earthworks, portions of which survive. (Reverse text) Gen. Charles R. Woods' 1st Div. of Gen. John A. Logan's XV Corps pushed . . . — Map (db m39818) HM
South Carolina (Lexington County), Cayce — 32-1 — Congaree Fort
In 1718, at a site 2.7 miles east, near the place where the Cherokee Path crossed Congaree Creek, the first frontier outpost in central South Carolina was established under the command of Captain Charles Russell. The fort was abandoned in 1722, but the trading factory was soon revived as a private venture by Thomas Brown, an Indian trader. — Map (db m21711) HM
South Carolina (Lexington County), Cayce — Emily Geiger
Emily Geiger Heroine of the Revolutionary War captured while delivering secret message from Gen. Greene to Gen. Sumter held captive at Fort Granby July 3, 1781 — Map (db m59067) HM
South Carolina (Lexington County), Cayce — Guignard Park
Gift to the City of Cayce on March 13, 1961, by the heirs of John G. Guignard to be maintained as a public park in a state of natural beauty. This park established to conserve wild flowers, native shrubs and trees and to provide a place of quiet and restfulness. — Map (db m59069) HM
South Carolina (Lexington County), Cayce — 32-6 — Old State Road
This route follows an old Indian trail path and later in 1747 a public road from Charleston to Granby and points west. The State Road laid out by the newly established Board of Public Works in 1820 from Charleston to Columbia and on to the mountains perpetuated one of the oldest and most travelled routes in the development of the South Carolina back country. — Map (db m21697) HM
South Carolina (Lexington County), Cayce — The Post at the Congarees
In 1175 the building upon the ground adjacent hereto was used as a store. Upon the fall of Charles Town in 1780 the British seized the store, fortified it, and established here "The Post at the Congarees." Attacked Feb. 19, 1781, by Gen. Sumter, who on the 21st, destroyed the magazine and supplies in sight of Rawdon's Army across the river, he having come from Camden to relieve the post. Captured by Lee, May 15, 1781 Reoccupied by Rawdon, July 1, 1781 Reoccupied by Greene, July 4, 1781 . . . — Map (db m59065) HM
South Carolina (Lexington County), Cayce — World War II Monument and Memorial
1941 WWII 1946 A Tribute to give our military veterans the honor and respect due them They hit the line and they hit it hard They ran the ends of fame They passed and kicked to distant goals When they starred in competitive games But when they heard the bugles of war that called To a much rougher and tougher test And now they sleep under foreign sods The stars who have earned their rest They played the game the good old way That . . . — Map (db m22227) HM
South Carolina (Lexington County), Chapin — 32-26 — St. Peter Church
SC Gen. Assembly incorp. this Lutheran church 17 Dec. 1794. Frederick Josephus Wallern served as 1st pastor. Today's church, dedicated 1936 is the 3rd building. — Map (db m21507) HM
South Carolina (Lexington County), Gilbert — 32-31 — Lewie Chapel (Old Gilbert Methodist Church) / The Lewie Family
(Front) Lewie Chapel, a Methodist church founded on this site in the 1870s by Solomon R. Lewie (1835-1878) and others, was later known as Lewiedale Methodist Church and after 1910 as Gilbert Methodist Church. The original sanctuary, replaced in 1960 by a new sanctuary about 1 mi. W, burned in the early 1970s. (Reverse text) The town of Gilbert, also known as Gilbert Hollow, was called Lewiedale from 1886 to 1899 after the family of Samuel (1802-1865) and Nancy Hendrix Lewie . . . — Map (db m30372) HM
South Carolina (Lexington County), Gilbert — 32-18 — Revolutionary Skirmish Near Juniper Springs
A party of Sumter's soldiers, harassing a rear guard of British foragers under Lord Rawdon (en route to relieve besieged Ninety Six), was ambushed several miles north of here on June 18, 1871. The state troops, under Col. Charles S. Myddelton, were dispersed and the British continued unimpeded to Ninety Six. — Map (db m21894) HM
South Carolina (Lexington County), Irmo — 32-14 — St. Andrew's Lutheran Church
These four acres were conveyed to St. Andrew's Lutheran Church in 1835, and by November of that year the congregation had built and dedicated a building. It is believed that the community of St. Andrews derived its name from this church. In 1949, the church moved to its present location on Broad River Road. — Map (db m21532) HM
South Carolina (Lexington County), Irmo — 32-19 — Town of Irmo
[Front]: The Town of Irmo was established in a small farming community when the Columbia, Newberry and Laurens Railroad constructed its line here in february of 1890. The town was incorporated by the SC General Assembly in December of 1890. The original town limits extended 1/2 mile north, south, east, and west from the depot, which was located near here. [Reverse]: Irmo was incorporated in 1890 and according to tradition, took its name from the last names of C.J. . . . — Map (db m21525) HM
South Carolina (Lexington County), Lexington — Cotton Gin
This c. 1850 building once stood north of the Saluda River in the Dutch Forks Pineridge area. Turned by one or two mules or horses, the wooden gears underneath powered the saw-toothed gin upstairs to extract seed from raw cotton. Working eight hours, this cotton engine (i.e., "gin") could clean 400 lbs. of cotton, the standard weight of one bale in the 1850s. Relocated here in 1970, damaged in the 1994 tornado, restored in 1995. — Map (db m22042) HM
South Carolina (Lexington County), Lexington — Daniel Koon House
This c. 1810 cottage was built on Bear Creek southeast of present Chapin by the family of Daniel Koon (1810-1876) who, with a secession of three wives, fathered 14 children. Self-taught, he spoke four languages and was well-known for his talent in "using," a folk practice of faith-healing brought to the Dutch Fork by German settlers and widely practiced here until modern times. — Map (db m21967) HM
South Carolina (Lexington County), Lexington — Hazelius House
Built c. 1820 by the Gross family and bought by the Lutheran Synod in 1834, this house served as home to the Lutheran Seminary's headmaster, Dr. Ernest Hazelius, during that school's location here 1834-1858. Theologian, historian, author, and educator, Dr. Hazelius (1777-1853) was its most important occupant. In 1891, Charlie Tilman, a traveling evangelist, wrote the hymn, "Old Time Religion," while a guest here of the Leaphart family. The house is listed on the National . . . — Map (db m21954) HM
South Carolina (Lexington County), Lexington — John Fox House
Built on this site c. 1832, this vernacular farm house was home to the family of John Fox (1805-1884), whose plantation, The Point, was located 3 miles northwest of here. Fox served as Sheriff, Clerk of Court, Representative, and Senator for Lexington District. In 1969, the house was acquired and restored for the county museum and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. — Map (db m22026) HM
South Carolina (Lexington County), Lexington — John Fox House
Built on this site c. 1832, this vernacular farm house was home to the family of John Fox (1805-1884), whose plantation, The Point, was located 3 miles northwest of here. Fox served as Sheriff, Clerk of Court, Representative, and Senator for Lexington District. In 1969, the house was acquired and restored for the county museum and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. — Map (db m22032) HM
South Carolina (Lexington County), Lexington — Kitchen
This kitchen, built c. 1825 in Batesburg-Leesville by planter Joel Ridgell (1798-1870) whose second wide was a sister of John Fox, is almost identical to the kitchen that originally stood here from 1832 until demolished c. 1920. Each kitchen served around 30 persons including the family and their household slaves. The kitchen was detached from the main house because of heat, noice, and danger of fire. — Map (db m22034) HM
South Carolina (Lexington County), Lexington — Lake Murray
So named by special act of the General Assembly of South Carolina April 6, 1927 in honor of William Spencer Murray who projected and as chief engineer built this great dam and associated hydro-electric works. — Map (db m22218) HM
South Carolina (Lexington County), Lexington — 32-28 — Laurence Corley House
[Front]: This log house was built ca. 1771 by Laurance Corley (1742-1815), whose plantation of over 1700 acres occupied much of present-day Lexington. Corley later served in Capt. Gabriel Friday's militia company during the Revolution. The house stood on two previous locations near Twelve Mile Creek, approximately 1 mile east, and was moved here on part of the original tract in 1974, then restored by the Lexington Co. Museum. [Reverse]: Laurance Corley was the father . . . — Map (db m22010) HM
South Carolina (Lexington County), Lexington — 32-22 — Lexington Baptist Church
This church was constituted May 21, 1893, with ten charter members. The original one-room frame building, dedicated 1894 and located on land given by James C. Fort, was across Main Street about 600 feet east of here. The congregation of about 150 with W.C. Wallace as pastor, moved here June 6, 1926, upon completing this house of worship. — Map (db m22198) HM
South Carolina (Lexington County), Lexington — Lexington County Confederate Monument
[Southeast] Lexington's valiant sons who went forth to battle for their country's cause. And gave their lives in the service of the Confederate States. A.D. 1861-1865. [Crossed Swords] [List of Names] To Our Confederate Dead [Northeast] Their deeds are not forgot; in deathless fame our grateful hearts enshrine their memories. [List of Names] [Southwest] These are our dead. Sleep on in silent rest. . . . — Map (db m22182) HM
South Carolina (Lexington County), Lexington — Lexington County Veterans Monument
Obelisk [South] "I do not believe that the men who served in uniform in Vietnam have been given the credit they deserve. It was a difficult war against an unorthodox enemy." Gen. Wm. C. Westmoreland [East] "In this column I want to tell you what the opening of the second front entailed, so that you can know and appreciate and forever be humbly grateful to those both dead and alive who did it for you." Ernie Pyle, June 12, 1944 . . . — Map (db m22217) HM
South Carolina (Lexington County), Lexington — Lexington County World War I Monument
[Southeast] A tribute to the soldiers, sailors, and marines of Lexington County who gave their lives in the World War. 1917 ----- 1918 [Northwest] African-American Veterans Allen, James A.; Buzard, Fred; Dreher, Walter; Ealey, Horace; Etheredge, John; Felder, Joseph L.; Fogel, John; Gantt, Davis; Gervais, Elliott; Harris, George Jr.; Garris, Willie H.; Jeffcott, James N.; Jones, Tom; Keisler, Robert; Kenley, Isaiah; Lumpkin, Jake; Nichols, Ira W.; . . . — Map (db m22184) HM
South Carolina (Lexington County), Lexington — 32-2 — Lexington Courthouses
On this site or close by have stood five courthouses of Lexington District or County. In 1820 Barbara Corley deeded land in the present town for a centrally located courthouse. A later ante-bellum building was burned Feb. 17, 1865 by Sherman. Two successive buildings were in use before the present one was dedicated on Jan. 15, 1940. — Map (db m22053) HM
South Carolina (Lexington County), Lexington — Oak Grove Schoolhouse
This old field-school was built c. 1815 in the Oak Grove area approximately five miles east of here. Typical of early educational facilities in South Carolina, it was a private community school somewhat subsidized with state funds from the Free School act of 1812. 10 to 20 students of both sexes were taught here by various male teachers prior to 1865 and by female teachers thereafter. It was replaced by a new two-room building about 1890 and was used as a barn until moved here for restoration in 1984. — Map (db m22012) HM
South Carolina (Lexington County), Lexington — Old Time Religion
Around 1888 near this site, Charles D. Tillman was conducting a tent revival and first heard the local Negro spiritual "Old Time Religion." Tillman had the song leader assist him in notating the music and lyrics. It is now seen in nearly every Gospel Song book and sung in languages around the world. — Map (db m22199) HM
South Carolina (Lexington County), Lexington — Post Office
Built c. 1790 as a lawyer's office at Granby on the Congaree River, this building was rolled to the new county seat called Lexington Courthouse in 1820 and was used as a medical office for Dr. Thomas Simmons (1794-1853). His widow, Mary, kept the Post Office here, 1866-67, and their daughter, Mrs. Mary S. Harth, 1868-1894, during their tenures as Postmistresses for the town. It was re-located to the Museum from the Courthouse square in 1975. — Map (db m21937) HM
South Carolina (Lexington County), Lexington — 32-20 — Providence Church
Lutheran church said est. 1862. Admitted to the synod 1866. Present remodeled building, built by 1869, is on land deeded church by Jacob Rauch family. — Map (db m21936) HM
South Carolina (Lexington County), Lexington — 32-24 — St. Stephen's Church
This Lutheran Church, founded by 1830, and the earliest church in Lexington, dedicated its first-known house of worship on this site in 1831. In 1865 Union troops under Wm. T. Sherman burned the structure. The congregation's second building, dedicated 1870, was destroyed by fire in 1898. The third church, built by 1901 on the present site, was replaced by the current edifice, dedicated in 1958. — Map (db m22208) HM
South Carolina (Lexington County), Lexington — 32-11 — The Sycamore Tree
This tree was planted from a cutting of the old sycamore tree that stood several hundred feet west of here on the historic Two Notch Road. Local tradition holds that there had been a succession of sycamore trees at that site used as a landmark or point of reference since the road was an Indian path and that George Washington rested there in 1791. — Map (db m47549) HM
South Carolina (Lexington County), Lexington — 39-12 — Tomb of Dr. E.L. Hazelius
At this site is the grave of the Reverend Ernest L. Hazelius, 1777-1853, Lutheran clergyman, Doctor of Divinity, teacher, and author of several books on church history and theology. From 1834 to 1853, he was professor of theology in the Lutheran Classical and Theological Seminary, and resided in a house near the campus, ¼ mile north. — Map (db m22211) HM
South Carolina (Lexington County), Lexington — 32-36 — World War II Bombing Ranges
[Front]: Lake Murray islands, most notably Lunch Island (since 1945 also called Bomb Island or Doolittle Island), Shull Island, and Dreher Island, were used as bombing ranges during World War II. B-25 crews from the Columbia Army Air Base (now Columbiana Metropolitan Airport) flew thousands of training missions here 1942-1945. [Reverse]: These islands were used for many types of practice runs, in which crews dropped flare, incendiary, and demolition bombs. Five B-25s . . . — Map (db m21535) HM
South Carolina (Lexington County), Lexington — 32-16 — Zion Lutheran Church / Dreher's Fort
Zion Lutheran Church This congregation, the oldest continuing church in Lexington County, originated with pioneers who settled in this area in the 1740s. Organized at Zion in 1787 was the "Corpus Evangelicum," consisting of fifteen congregations to supervise the German churches in the state's interior. The church was located at two previous sites near the river before moving here in 1922. Dreher's Fort An early frontier fort was built near here by Godfrey Dreher on land that he . . . — Map (db m21558) HM
South Carolina (Lexington County), Peters — 32-29 — St. Peter's (Meetze's) Lutheran Church
This church, organized in 1780, held services in German and English until 1874. In 1835 it aligned with the Tennessee Synod and remained in it until 1922, when St. Peter's reunited with the South Carolina Synod. This 1953 sanctuary is the fourth house of worship. Among St. Peter's most prominent ministers were Revs. John Yost Meetze, who served 1810-33, and J.A. Cromer, who served 1883-1921. — Map (db m46123) HM
South Carolina (Lexington County), Pine Ridge — 32-25 — Camp Moore
This military post, also known as Camp Styx,was begun here in 1913 as a National Guard training center. The base sent men to a Mexican border disturbance after Pres. Woodrow Wilson mobilized the guard, 1916. The 1st Infantry Regiment, later the 118th, was based at Styx and served in World War I, playing a significant role in breaking the Hindenburg line of defense, thought to be impregnable. The camp closed in the early 1920s. — Map (db m39078) HM
South Carolina (Lexington County), Sandy Run — Herman Geiger
Dedicated to the Memory of Herman Geiger Father ~ Hans Jacob Gyger, Born 1679, at village of Wydnau, Parish of Diapololsau, Switzerland. Mother ~ Margareta Fearin Gyger of same place, born 1684. Herman Geiger (Gyger) Born (or Christened) Dec. 18, 1707, Married Feb. 26, 1734, Elizabeth Habluzel, Died 1751 Erected 1958 by the descendents of Herman Geiger (Front left panel): Herman Geiger and his father, Hans Jacob Geiger, former Cantonal Governor in Switzerland, departed . . . — Map (db m52469) HM
South Carolina (Lexington County), Springdale — 32-35 — Springdale
This community, which was incorporated as Springdale in 1955, was known as Long Branch for many years and named for a nearby branch of the Congaree River. At the turn of the twentieth century it was a farming community along both sides of Platt Springs Road. In 1955 residents who opposed plans to annex Long Branch into West Columbia voted to incorporate as a town, named for the many springs in the area. Job B. Roof was elected the town’s first intendant, or mayor. — Map (db m39160) HM
South Carolina (Lexington County), West Columbia — “City of Columbia” Anchor
Anchor from C. S. N. “City of Columbia” ---------- Donated by Mrs. Lemuel Hall In memory of Lemuel Hall Mayor of West Columbia for 24 years — Map (db m67489) HM
South Carolina (Lexington County), West Columbia — 32-17 — 319th Bombardment Group
Activated in 1942 and stationed here at Columbia Army Air Base February through April of 1945, the 319th participated in many World War II campaigns in Europe and the Pacific. The group has recieved numerous honors, including two Presidential Unit Citations and France's Croix de Guerre from General Charles de Gaulle. — Map (db m10741) HM
South Carolina (Lexington County), West Columbia — 32-21 — Bombardment Groups
In 1942 the 310th, 321st, 340th groups trained here at Columbia Army Air Base for World War II. All participated in 9 campaigns and each received 2 Distinguished Unit Citations. — Map (db m10901) HM
South Carolina (Lexington County), West Columbia — 32-13 — Columbia Army Air Base / The Doolittle Raiders
Columbia Army Air Base Built during 1941 as the Lexington County Airport, this airfield became the Columbia Army Air Base shortly after the U.S. entered World War II in December, 1941. The base was used to train crews for medium bombardment groups flying B-25s and A-26s. reaching a military population of 7,800 in February of 1945, the base reverted to standby status after the war. The Doolittle Raiders In February 1942, twenty-four B-25 bomber crews of the 17th Bombardment . . . — Map (db m10680) HM
South Carolina (Lexington County), West Columbia — Delingo SchoolPineview Historical Recognition Site
From 1900 until 1916 Lexington County School District No. 68 operated a public school on this site. The building consisted of a single room where one teacher taught an average of 30 students of all grades. — Map (db m69553) HM
South Carolina (Lexington County), West Columbia — Friday’s Ferry
This ferry was named after the German settler Martin Fridig, who changed his name to Friday. He came to the area about 1735. In 1754 Friday received permission from the Colonial assembly in Charleston to operate a ferry across the Congaree near this location. The ferry probably was a flat boat that was poled across the river. Colonial rules required that to operate the ferry, Friday had to give ordained ministers, those going to and from church, Indians, and public servants free passage. All . . . — Map (db m67762) HM
South Carolina (Lexington County), West Columbia — Gervais Street Bridge
This 1,412-foot-long arch bridge opened in 1927. At the time, the bridge was considered exceptional because of its innovative use of reinforced concrete and because it was the widest roadway in South Carolina. The Gervais Street Bridge was the only bridge for motor vehicles that crossed the Congaree River in Columbia from 1927 until the Blossom Street bridge was built in 1953. Its cast iron pedestals and lamps were designed by the U.S. Treasury Department , and feature the two state flag symbols, the crescent moon and palmetto tree. — Map (db m67761) HM
South Carolina (Lexington County), West Columbia — Milestones
A milestone was one of a series of numbered markers placed along a road or other type of boundary at intervals of one mile, or occasionally, parts of a mile. These stone markers indicated either the distance traveled or the remaining distance to a destination. The markers were alternately known as mile markers, mileposts or mile posts. The milestones that are along the Riverwalk Trail are spaced at quarter mile intervals. — Map (db m67771) HM
South Carolina (Lexington County), West Columbia — 32-15 — Mt. Hebron United Methodist Church / Temperance Hall
Mt. Hebron United Methodist Church This congregation, organized ca. 1800 in the home of Martin Hook, built its first house of worship at the Half Way Ground, near here. In 1837 a new church was erected at this site on land donated by John and Elizabeth Roof. Another structure was built here in 1907 and was replaced in 1963 by the present sanctuary. Temperance Hall The frame building behind the church was built 1862 by Saludaville Sons of Temperance, a society charted in 1858 that . . . — Map (db m21598) HM
South Carolina (Lexington County), West Columbia — Old Congaree River Bridges
Before a bridge was attempted at this location, earlier bridges farther down river had been built, but were washed away in floods. Consequently, for more than 30 years only ferry service provided transportation across the river. In 1827 the Columbia Bridge Company built a wooden bridge at Gervais Street. It remained there until 1865 when Confederate soldiers burned it and other bridges to delay the advance of Sherman’s troops. A steel bridge with wooden flooring was built in 1870, using most . . . — Map (db m67766) HM
South Carolina (Lexington County), West Columbia — River Inn, c. 1740s
The transacting of Public Business on Saturdays . . . are executed at Taverns [where] there is more Company of a Saturday, than in the Church on Sunday.”The Rev. Charles Woodmason. “Sermon at the Congarees.” C. 1768 This nearby structure was modeled after a 1740s inn. The Colonial government strongly encouraged inns (or taverns) be constructed at ferry crossings. Such establishments were a popular site for business and entertainment, which were often done . . . — Map (db m67758) HM
South Carolina (Lexington County), West Columbia — 32-32 — Saluda Factory Cemetery
This cemetery, thought to contain graves of supervisors and workers in the post-Civil War community of Saludaville, includes 31 marked graves and between 525 and 900 total burials. The Saluda Factory was a modest success before the war and was burned by Union troops in 1865. Rebuilt as the Saluda Manufacturing Company in 1874, it employed about 100 workers before it burned in 1884. — Map (db m39236) HM
South Carolina (Lexington County), West Columbia — Saluda Factory Ruins
The Saluda Factory, built in 1834, was one of the first water-powered textile mills in South Carolina. During the Civil War the mill manufactured material used in making shirts and woolen uniforms for the Confederate Army. This area saw considerable military activity during February 1865. General William T. Sherman used the site as a staging area before the burning of Columbia. — Map (db m45045) HM
South Carolina (Lexington County), West Columbia — 32-5 — Shelling of Columbia
Prior to the capture of Columbia by Gen. William T. Sherman, Federal artillery shelled the city on February 16, 1865, from the batteries on this hill and in the road at this end of the Congaree River bridge. Shots were fired at the Arsenal (site of the Governor's Mansion) and the State House, which still bears scars of the bombardment. — Map (db m21652) HM
South Carolina (Lexington County), West Columbia — 32-7 — The Cherokee Path
Before the Revolution, two major trading routes came together near here. Branching to the west was the road to New Windsor Township on the Savannah. The Cherokee Path extended north to Ninety Six and south through Saxe Gotha Township on the Congaree. George Washington passed here in 1791 on his way from Augusta to Columbia via Friday's Ferry. — Map (db m43791) HM
South Carolina (Lexington County), West Columbia — 32-13B — The Doolittle Raiders
In February 1942, twenty-four B-25 bomber crews of the 17th Bombardment Group at Columbia Army Air Base volunteered to take part in a secret project headed by Lt. Col. James H. Doolittle. This group was the nucleus of the Doolittle Raiders who, taking off from the aircraft carrier "Hornet," bombed Tokyo on April 18, 1942. — Map (db m11984) HM
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