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Monmouth County Markers
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Allenhurst — Jersey Central Power & Light Employees
July 4, 1941 Dedicated to our fellow employees who serve in the Armed Forces of the United States of America — Map (db m10557) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Allenhurst — New Era Anchor
In memory of the nearly 300 German immigrants who lost their lives when the sailing ship New Era wrecked off Deal Lake, November 13, 1854. In honor of Abner Allen, Allenhurst's earliest settler, keeper of the local lifeboat house, and first rescuer to the scene of the shipwreck. In solemn reverence of this disaster's role in establishing the U.S. Lifesaving Service, known today as the U.S. Coast Guard. It is hoped that this memorial shall inspire a permanent and prominent appreciation of our local heritage. — Map (db m14132) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Asbury Park — President Wilson’s Asbury Park Executive Offices
Woodrow Wilson, 28th President of the United States, used the entire fifth floor of this building for his executive offices during the late summer and early fall of 1916 while he vacationed at Shadow Lawn, the Summer White House at West Long Branch. It was in the offices here that many of president Wilson’s plans for re-election were formulated and it was here that his staff counted the returns which were to show that President Wilson had defeated his Republican opponent, Charles Evans Hughes, . . . — Map (db m5240) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Asbury Park — S.S. Morro Castle Disaster
In Memoriam S.S. Morro Castle September 8, 1934 This monument is dedicated to the 137 passengers and crew of the S.S. Morro Castle who lost their lives on September 8, 1934 when the ship burned off the Jersey Coast when returning from Havana, Cuba to New York City. It is also dedicated to the many courageous Jersey Shore residents who risked their own lives or provided assistance to rescue Morro Castle survivors from rough seas and recover the victims who washed ashore or were . . . — Map (db m22309) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Asbury Park — Soldiers’ Monument
In Memory Of Those Who Fought in Defence of the Union. War of Rebellion 1861-1865 Erected by C.K. Hall Post No. 41 G.A.R. Dept. of N.J. And Womens Relief Corp No. 25 — Map (db m5241) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Atlantic Highlands — British Campsite
For a week following the Battle of Monmouth, the main British Army under Gen. Sir Henry Clinton spread its encampment both sides of this road while awaiting transport from Sandy Hook. They embarked for New York July 5, 1778. — Map (db m5804) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Atlantic Highlands — Friends of Monmouth County 9/11 Memorial
On September 11, 2001, many came to this site to witness the horrific tragedy just a few miles away in Lower Manhattan, and, for days afterward, they continued to come to view the smoke spiraling up from the site, most still in shock, not believing what they were seeing. From their beginning, the World Trade Center Towers dominated the view from here. Through the years, many have come to visit this site and enjoy the view. Now, the towers no longer in view, we remember a loved one, a relative, . . . — Map (db m5981) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Atlantic Highlands — Henry Hudson Springs
In 1609, Henry Hudson drew water from this spring. Before the White Man's arrival, Lenni Lenape Indians obtained water from this site. Packet ships continued to use the spring into the 1800's. — Map (db m5678) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Atlantic Highlands — Highest Point on the Atlantic SeaboardMount Mitchill — Coastal Habitats
Mount Mitchill, at an elevation of 266 feet above sea level, is the highest natural point on the Atlantic Seaboard between southern Maine and the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico. Cartographers (map makers) named the prominence, located in the southwest corner of the park, in honor of Dr. Samuel Latham Mitchill (1764-1831), a New York physician, naturalist, educator, and U. S. Congressman. Mitchill was part of an 1816 expedition to measure the height of the Navesink Highlands. Mount Mitchill and . . . — Map (db m22716) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Atlantic Highlands — Longshore Sediment MovementLittoral Drift — Coastal Habitats
Most shore bathers soon realize the back-and-forth motion of the waves breaking on the shore not only stirs the sand but also persistently carries them down the beach. This unseen force is called a “longshore or littoral current.” In general, the direction of this current along the East Coast is from north to south, although there are many variations. When combined with the turbulence of breaking waves, the current can carry large amounts of sand for miles. The sand is redeposited . . . — Map (db m22742) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Atlantic Highlands — Navesink
Middletown Township Historic District. Summer camping ground of the Indians on their Minisink Trail, which became part of the King’s Highway. Location of the Burge’s Mill in Colonial Times; British campsite after the Battle of Monmouth. A bustling center of mills, stores and taverns in the Nineteenth Century, known as Riceville from 1830 to 1866. — Map (db m5805) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Atlantic Highlands — Raritan Bay & New York HarborIndustry & Trade — Maritime History
Boating is a popular activity on Raritan and Sandy Hook bays. These waters provide both shelter from and access to the Atlantic Ocean. Over the past three centuries, maritime traffic in the Raritan Bay – New York Harbor area has increased significantly. On warm summer days, commercial fishing boats, container ships, sport fishing, pleasure, and military vessels, as well as dredgers and barges crowd the harbor. Smaller sport fishing boats must constantly be on guard to avoid collisions. . . . — Map (db m22730) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Atlantic Highlands — The Hartshorne Legacy
Hartshorne Woods Park is named in honor of the Hartshorne family. Richard Hartshorne (1641-1722), an English Quaker, settled in Middletown in 1669 and became one of Monmouth County’s most prominent early settlers. By the late 1670s he had acquired extensive landholdings of over 2300 acres, including Sandy hook and the Highlands of Navesink. Richard Hartshorne was active in community and colonial affairs, and served in the Provincial Assembly. He was known as a skilled statesman and . . . — Map (db m40751) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Belmar — Breslin War Memorial1941 - 1945
To the glory of god and to those who served fought and died that our flag may ever fly in honor and in peace. This shrine is reverently dedicated by Pat and Sandy Aug. 15, 1949 — Map (db m37972) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Belmar — Korean - Vietnam - Persian Gulf Monument
When our Nation called, They served... In bitter cold, in sweltering heat, In burning desert sands. Dedicated on November 11th, 2001 by The grateful citizens of Belmar In honor of our Veterans. Korea • Vietnam • Persian Gulf Killed in action Carl Foster 1947 - 1967 — Map (db m5556) WM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Belmar — Malta Shipwreck
Why is this pole here? This pole is actually a part of Belmar's maritime history. It is the foremast (front mast) of the Malta, a ship that was wrecked off 8th Ave. in Belmar on November 24, 1885. The foremast was salvaged and mounted here as a standpipe for the sewer system. The remains of the shipwreck are located across the street, about 100 yards offshore. The sternpost can be seen at low tide. If you look closely at the foremast, you can see the guide rail which was used to . . . — Map (db m32325) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Belmar — Shark River Salt Works
April 8, 1778 Destruction of Shark River Salt Works On this date some 150 men, composed of British Highlanders and loyalists, landed south of Shark River and completely destroyed the salt-works which produced this commodity essential to the well-being of the American soldiers. They were driven off by some fifteen Monmouth Militia, whom they thought to be scouts for a larger group, in such a panic that they swamped some of the longboats used to ferry them to the three British vessels . . . — Map (db m8251) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Belmar — The Spirit of the American DoughboyBelmar World War I Memorial
Dedicated in honor of those who entered the service of their country from Belmar, New Jersey and in memory of those who gave their lives in the World War. Presented by The citizens of Belmar, New Jersey Joseph Mayer Mayor Thomas S. Dillon                 Thomas D Joeck Commissioner                                     Commissioner Map (db m5530) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Belmar — World War II Monument
1941 – 1942 For God and Country This tablet is erected in Honor of The men and women of Belmar Who answered their country's call In World War II And to the eternal memory of The following comrades Who made the supreme sacrifice Frederick L. Abbott • Joseph J Horton • Edward Becker • Frank X. Joyce • Malcolm Bigelow • Walter L. Larrison, Jr. • James J. Burton • Dominick Lorusso • Francis E. Class • Joseph R. Mc Connell • John R. Ferris • Milton E. Schneider • . . . — Map (db m5557) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Bradley Beach — Bradley Beach World War I Monument
. . . — Map (db m5627) WM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Colts Neck — Capt. Joshua Huddy
In tribute to Capt. Joshua Huddy of Colts Neck   1750 – 1782 Monmouth County Revolutionary War hero. Erected by the citizens of Colts Neck August 27, 1977 — Map (db m76469) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Colts Neck — Captain Joshua Huddy's Homestead
Site of the home of Revolutionary Hero Captain Joshua Huddy and his wife, the Widow Hart. In 1780, a party of Tories set fire to the home. — Map (db m15626) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Colts Neck — Colts Neck Inn (c. 1717)
Tavern and stagecoach stop on The Burlington Path—from the Atlantic Coast to the Delaware River. Owned by the widow Hart, the wife of Joshua huddy. — Map (db m15630) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Colts Neck — Colts Neck War Memorial
Colts Neck Township honors its citizens who made the supreme sacrifice for their country. World War II James Comerford Alex Grabelewski Timothy Lott James K. Moreau Edward Oryll Mitchell Zaleski Korea Robert L. Cox Vietnam John J. Boese — Map (db m76331) WM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Colts Neck — Montrose School House (c. 1812)
One of 6 "one room" schoolhouses, originally known as the Barrenton School was moved to its present site, and became the Montrose School. Operation ceased in 1922 with the construction of the Atlantic School on Rt. 537. — Map (db m15628) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Colts Neck — Pvt. Michael Field1st Reg. N. J. Militia
Born in Bound Brook, N.J. Aug. 30, 1758 son of Benjamin & Margaret Field. Wounded and captured in the Battle of Monmouth Court House. Left in this area by the British in their retreat. Whether he died of his wounds or was slain by his captors is not known. Died June 28, 1778 Erected by Frank J. Cahir   1963 — Map (db m76329) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Eatontown — Eatontown Grist Mill
At this place did one Thomas Eaton build a grist mill 1670 — Map (db m5346) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Eatontown — Eatontown, New Jersey Fire Department and World War II Memorial
Dedicated to the members of Eatontown Fire Co. Who served in World War II * Russell Elgrim * Joseph J. Finn the names of 31 members who served follow the two names of those killed during the war Map (db m7336) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Englishtown — An Inspiring Commander in Chief
The Battle of Monmouth 26 June 1778 The Commander in Chief was every where, his Presence gave Spirit and Confidence and his command and authority soon brought every thing into order and Regularity." Major General Nathanael Greene, 2 July 1778 For hours, through a rain of shot and shell, General George Washington rode back and forth along this hill, encouraging his men, seeing to the care of the wounded, and, as the British began withdrawing, directing the counterattack. Tall, . . . — Map (db m6170) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Englishtown — Combs Hill Cannonade
During the early afternoon, the Continental and British Armies were stalemated as they cannonaded each other across Spotswood Middle Brook. Major General Greene then appeared on this hill with four artillery pieces and began bombarding the British. Caught in a crossfire from the Continental guns, the British were forced to pull back. The British artillery withdrew, then the British infantry withdrew as quickly as their troops could be collected. General Washington sent men forward to . . . — Map (db m6165) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Englishtown — Hold the Hedgerow!
Major General Charles Lee had only 800 men to try to stall more than 2,000 advancing British troops. The Continentals beat back one cavalry charge before the British grenadiers were upon them. After 3 to 5 minutes of firing at each other at point blank range, the British dragoons broke through the fence south of the Continental line. Outflanked, the Continentals abandoned the hedgerow and fled across the bridge, but not before decimating the ranks of British grenadiers. The ground east of . . . — Map (db m6186) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Englishtown — Home of Moses Laird
Guide to General George Washington before the Battle of Monmouth and host to the General on the night of June 29, 1778 the days following the battle Placed by Francis Hopkinson Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution 1970 — Map (db m8970) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Englishtown — Mary “Molly” Hays
"You girls should have been with me at the battle of Monmouth and learned how to load a cannon." - Mary Hays Mcaary to Susan Hackendorn, c. 1830 As the temperature approached 100 degrees, and gunners collapsed from heat exhaustion, a plucky Irish water carrier stepped forward to help work Captain Francis Proctor’s cannon. Memories of her heroism evolved into myth of “Molly Pitcher.” When the British infantry pursued General Scott’s Continentals across the Sutfin . . . — Map (db m6187) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Englishtown — The Great Cannonade
The Battle of Monmouth 28 June, 1778 1:15 PM – 5:30 PM “… Shot and Shells flying as thick as Hail.” Major General Nathanael Greene For several long, hot and exhausting hours during the afternoon of June 28, 1778, the largest land artillery battle of the American Revolution raged. The climax of the battle took place here when, for almost three hours, ten Continental guns positioned on this hill fired upon then British guns located along the hedgerow on the . . . — Map (db m6168) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Englishtown — Village InnEst. 1732
Here, on June 30, 1778 General George Washington drafted court martial orders against Major – General Charles Lee for his conduct during the Battle of Monmouth Placed by Francis Hopkinson Chapter Daughters American Revolution 1964 — Map (db m8965) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Englishtown — Village Inn
Built in 1732. Here, after the Battle of Monmouth, Washington ordered the arrest of Lee, who had disobeyed battle orders. — Map (db m9004) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Farmingdale — Charcoal Depot: warehouse & staging areaIndustry & Trade   Historic Settlements
On this site once stood the huge three story charcoal depot. This brick building had open, arched bays along its length to allow for the flow of air to keep the tons of charcoal inside from spontaneously catching fire. The depot was also used as storage for the other materials used in the furnace: bog iron ore and flux (seashells). A large wooden ramp allowed access to the top floors. Into the early 19th century, charcoal was the only fuel source available in America to use in the iron . . . — Map (db m74236) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Fort Hancock State Park — Sandy Hook Light
Upper Marker: This light was completed in 1764 and is the oldest continuously operating lighthouse in the United States. New York merchants petitioned their assembly to raise money for the light by lotteries and tonnage taxes on ships entering New York. In 1739 the Federal Government formed the U.S. Lighthouse Service, later incorporated into the U.S. Coast Guard to operate this light and all other aids to navigation in U.S. Waters. Sandy Hook Light is 29 feet in diameter at the . . . — Map (db m5092) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Fort Monmouth — Army Signal Corps World War II Memorial
In Memory of Our Dead World War II — Map (db m5218) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Fort Monmouth — Battle of the Bulge Monument
Dedicated to the gallant men and women of the United States Armed Forces who participated in the “Battle of the Bulge,” fought in Belgium and Luxembourg during World War II. The greatest battle ever engaged in by the United States Army lasted from 16 December, 1944, through 25 January, 1945. — Map (db m6964) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Fort Monmouth — Centennial Time Capsule
Beneath this plaque lies a time capsule installed 16 September 1960 to commemorate the first centennial of the United States Army Signal Corps. The time capsule is to be opened in the year 2060 on 21 June, the birthday of the corps. This time capsule contains items depicting the status of military communication in 1960, as well as historical material showing origins of the corps and progress during the first hundred years. Pro Patria Vigilans — Map (db m32158) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Fort Monmouth — Dunwoody Park
Named in memory of Brigadier General Henry H.C. Dunwoody 1842-1933. General Dunwoody was Chief Signal Officer in Cuba from 22 Dec 1898-24 May 1901. Under his leadership, the United States Army Signal Corps reconstructed, extended, and modernized the entire Cuban Telegraph System. — Map (db m6614) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Fort Monmouth — Myer Park
This area is designated Myer Park in honor of Brigadier General Albert James Myer, First Chief Signal Officer, organizer and founder of the United States Army Signal Corps. While serving as an assistant surgeon in the Army, he developed a simple visual signaling system which in 1860 was adopted by the Army. In 1860 Myer became the first signal officer with the rank of Major and when the Signal Corps was established in 1863 as a separate branch of the Army, he was promoted to Colonel. In 1865 . . . — Map (db m6833) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Fort Monmouth — Soldiers Park
Dedicated to the Fort Monmouth Soldiers and Civilians Who deployed and fought worldwide, and to the families who kept the home fires burning bright. Operation Just Cause 19 Dec 89 - 12 Jan 90 Operation Desert Storm 12 Aug 90 - — Map (db m6836) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Fort Monmouth — Tribute to Combat Pigeons
A Memorial to Homing Pigeons In Combat Courage • Loyalty • Endurance — Map (db m5219) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Fort Monmouth — Van Kirk Park
In memory of John Stewart Van Kirk Lieutenant 141 Armored Signal Company 1st Armored Division Killed in Action 30 November 1942 Djedeida, Tunisia — Map (db m6859) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Freehold — Abraham Lincoln
With malice toward none with charity for all. This bust a gift of Maurice Podell, sculptor — Map (db m53134) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Freehold — Battle of Monmouth Monument
There is no plaque on this monument. There are titles under the brass reliefs of historic events that surround the column. Map (db m7123) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Freehold — Columbia Triumphant Park and StatueLiberty Triumphant
Monmouth County Historical Site Columbia Triumphant Park This granite carving of Columbia Triumphant–also known as Liberty Triumphant–was part of the original statue placed atop the monument located on nearby Court Street commemorating the June 28, 1778 Battle of Monmouth, a major turning point in the American Revolutionary War. Damaged by lightning in 1894, the statue was removed and this bust then served as a model for the 1896 replica which stands in its place today. — Map (db m7066) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Freehold — Corp. James A. Gere
This tree planted Nov. 11th, 1928 in memory of Corp. James A. Gere Co. G   39th Inf.   4th Div. Died of wounds received in action at Chateau Thierry, France, Aug. 30, 1918. Presented by John Gere and David V. Perrine — Map (db m53139) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Freehold — Historic St. Peter’s Episcopal Church
Listed on the New Jersey Register of Historic Places December 22, 1997 Listed on the National Register of Historic Places March 19, 1998 First Service – October 10, 1701 Construction begun on this site – July 1771 Restoration program 1996-2002 Made possible by grants from The New Jersey Historic Trust, State of New Jersey The Monmouth County Historical Commission and the gifts of members and friends. — Map (db m53138) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Freehold — Monmouth Battle MonumentMonmouth County Historical Site
This monument commemorates the pivotal June 28, 1778 Battle of Monmouth which began near this site. A campaign to erect the memorial, led by Freehold native Governor Joel Parker and Major James S. Yard, began in 1877. Its cornerstone was laid on the battle’s 100th anniversary and its unveiling took place on November 13, 1884. Surrounding the 90 foot granite column are bas-reliefs sculpted by James Edward Kelly depicting Revolutionary War scenes and the seals of the 13 colonies. The figure of . . . — Map (db m53132) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Freehold — Monmouth Court House Site
Site of Monmouth Court House Used as Hospital June 28, 1778. — Map (db m7065) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Freehold — Retreat?The Battle of Monmouth     28 June 1778 — 12:00 PM – 12:15 PM
On this hill, an angry George Washington, Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Armies, met his second-in-command, Major-General Charles Lee, and demanded “What is all this? What all that confusion was for, and retreat?” Washington had sent Lee with twelve cannon and 5,000 men to stage a hit-and-run attack on the rear of the British Army. However, the British had counter-attacked with 10,000 men – forcing Lee to retreat. As Washington led the main body of the . . . — Map (db m37518) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Freehold — Revolutionary Ancestors of Monmouth Court House
In memory of the Revolutionary ancestors of Monmouth Court House Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution Freehold, New Jersey. 1937 — Map (db m53135) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Freehold — St. Peter’s ChurchEpiscopal
The oldest building in continuous use in downtown Freehold 1702   First service (at Topanemus) 1736   Charter from King George II 1771   Construction began on the present building 1778   Local lore says the building sheltered wounded during the battle of Monmouth — Map (db m53136) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Freehold — Washington Checked Lee’s Retreat
In memorium June 28, 1778 This tablet is erected on the field of the Battle of Monmouth to commemorate the imperishable deeds of valiant Americans “at the turn of the tide” in the American Revolution. Near this spot Washington checked Lee’s retreat and brought victory out of confusion. New Jersey Society Sons of the American Revolution Sesquicentennial of the Battle of Monmouth 1928 — Map (db m37517) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Highlands — British Embarkation
On July 5, 1778 armies under General Sir Henry Clinton passed this point to reach British ships, at anchor off Horseshoe Cove, which evacuated them to New York. This completed their withdrawal through Middletown from Freehold after the Battle of Monmouth seven days earlier. — Map (db m41719) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Highlands — Captain Joshua Huddy — Prisoner of War
Here Captain Joshua Huddy of the Monmouth County Artillery A Prisoner of War Captured March 24, 1782 while defending the Block House at Tom's River. Was hung by Torries without warrant April 12, 1782 The British authorities repudiated but did not atone for that crime. The Sons of the Revolution in New Jersey have set up this stone to the memory of the patriotic victim. — Map (db m5657) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Highlands — Highlands Doughboy World War I Monument
Veterans We Will Never Forget Erected by Friends and Citizens of Highlands, New Jersey — Map (db m5695) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Highlands — Just Like A Small TownCoastal Defense — Maritime History
Fort Hancock was established in 1895 as an Army coastal defense post. Its huge concrete gun batteries were designed to protect New York Harbor from attack by sea. Although it was never attacked, Fort Hancock’s garrison kept busy with work details, guard duty, drilling, training, and target practice with the big guns. It functioned like a small town. As military operations expanded, a school, movie theater, two chapels, and a YMCA were added. The post even had its own baseball team. The . . . — Map (db m41712) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Highlands — Marconi at Twin Lights
Messages from the first practical demonstration of wireless telegraph were sent from this site on September 30, 1899 by famous Italian inventor Guglielmo Marconi. Marconi had been invited to America by Gordon Bennett Jr., the owner of the New York Herald Newspaper, to report on the America’s Cup sailboat race using his wireless telegraph. An antenna mast was erected on top of the north Twin Lights tower. The America’s Cup race was, however, preempted by a naval review organized by . . . — Map (db m22615) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Highlands — Navesink Light Station
. . . — Map (db m22584) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Highlands — Nike Missile Site
Missiles emerged from silos beneath the pavement, and waited on launching racks while radar tracked the skies. During the 1950’s – the Cold War Era – Nike missiles were stationed here to defend the New York-Philadelphia corridor against long-range bombers. The peninsula of Sandy Hook provided an isolated location for newly-developed forms of radar. Like other batteries in the area these weapons were mounted as deterrent rather than aggressor. The missile base was closed in 1974, . . . — Map (db m41714) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Highlands — Powerhouse
The building in front of you is the powerhouse. Inside the large double doors to your right were the engines and dynamos used to produce electrical power to light the lamp for the 1898 south tower Fresnel lens. This brick building, built in 1909, replaced a temporary wooden structure. The noise from the engines housed inside was incredibly loud. Local residents complained about this and also about the intensity of light coming from the south tower. Blackout panels were installed on the . . . — Map (db m22681) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Highlands — Spermaceti Cove Lifeboat Station
In 1848, eight lifeboat stations were built along the New Jersey coast between Sandy Hook and Little Egg Harbor. You are looking at the only surviving structure of the original eight. It was moved here from its Sandy Hook location in 1954 to be preserved as part of the Twin Lights Historic Site. Lifeboat stations were placed on the beach because the rescue equipment was too heavy and awkward to be hauled long distances. A keeper and volunteers staffed the buildings to provide rescue . . . — Map (db m22620) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Highlands — Telegraph and Radar at Twin Lights
This was a significant site for more than just the lighthouse. In this strategic location, Marconi demonstrated wireless telegraph, the US Navy established a wireless station and the US Army tested various radar units. The Navy’s Bureau of Equipment had the responsibility of establishing wireless radio stations for communications with Navy ships. Unable to reach an agreement with Marconi for use of his wireless equipment, the US Navy had, by 1902, established their own wireless station . . . — Map (db m22614) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Highlands — The Navesink Highlands Light Station
At almost 200 feet above sea level, the Navesink Highlands Light Station, also known as Twin Lights, is positioned on one of the highest points on the Atlantic coast. Lighthouses on this site have guided mariners safely into New York Harbor since 1828. The present lighthouse was built in 1862. Twin Lights is famous as the first lighthouse in the United States to be fitted in 1841 with the revolutionary Fresnel lenses. These lenses create an intense and bright light that was visible at . . . — Map (db m22588) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Highlands — The Old North Tower
The Navesink Highlands Light Station originally consisted of two octagonal stone towers 320 feet apart. You are standing directly on the site of the 1828 north tower. Its replacement, completed in 1862, is behind you. — Map (db m22621) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Highlands — Twin Lights Mystery Cannon
During construction of the present lighthouse in 1861, a cannon was found buried on the grounds. It was placed in front of the keeper’s house and for a century was the “mystery” cannon of Twin Lights. There are still unanswered questions about the gun, but this is known. The cannon is a twelve-pounder ship’s cannon of the third quarter, 17th century and of Dutch or Danish manufacture. A comparable specimen, although an eight-pounder, is in the Jøjhusmuseet Museum, Copenhagen, . . . — Map (db m22672) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Holmdel — Karl Jansky Radio Astronomy Monument
At this location in 1931, Karl Jansky, a Bell Laboratories physicist and radio researcher, recorded for the first time radio signals from beyond the Earth. The source of these signals—radio noise at a wavelength of 14.6 meters—was the center of our Milky Way Galaxy. This sculpture commemorates Jansky's discovery, first announced in 1933, which gave birth to the science of radio astronomy. The sculpture is oriented as Jansky's antenna was at 7:10 p.m. on September 16, 1932, at a . . . — Map (db m17286) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Holmdel — Radio Astronomy
Near this site in 1932, Bell Labs. scientist Karl Jansky first discovered radio waves coming from outer space, thus beginning the science of radio astronomy. — Map (db m17386) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Keyport — Civil War · Spanish War · World War Memorial
A memorial to those who in the spirit of self sacrifice, enrolled themselves in the service of their country in: The Civil War 1861 – 1865 Spanish War 1898 World War 1914 – 1918 — Map (db m6010) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Keyport — Roll of Honor
To commemorate the patriotic men and women who served in the Armed Forces of their country and to honor those listed below who made the supreme sacrifice. Erected by the citizens of The Borough of Keyport Dedicated March 30, 1957 World War I Frederick E. Post · Willard Maloney Luke E. Slover · Thomas Weeden World War II James W. Beatty · John Archibald MacEwan, Jr. Jerome V. Carney · James Joseph Morley, Jr. Kenneth C. Demlin · Reynhold Nicholson Harold . . . — Map (db m6011) WM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Long Branch — Church of the PresidentsSt. James Episcopal Church
Built in 1879. Named for the seven U.S. Presidents who attended services here: Ulysses S. Grant, Rutherford B. Hayes, James A. Garfield, Chester A. Arthur, Benjamin Harrison, William McKinley, and Woodrow Wilson. Deconsecrated in 1953, it became the Long Branch Historical Museum. Named to the National Register of Historic Places in 1976. Preservation funding made possible in part by The Garden State Historic Preservation Trust administered by The New Jersey Historic Trust / State of New . . . — Map (db m14049) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Long Branch — James A. Garfield
James A. Garfield Twentieth President of The United States Born Nov 19, 1831 at Orange, Ohio Died on this site, Sept. 19, 1881. — Map (db m6891) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Long Branch — Mansion House1845 — 1910 — West side of Ocean Avenue between Laird Street and Chelsea Avenue
The Mansion House was considered to be the finest hotel of its day. On August 22, 1861, the wife of Abraham Lincoln visited Long Branch and stayed at the Mansion House. A thrilling demonstration of an ocean rescue by the Life-Saving Service, which later became the Coast Guard, was arranged for Mrs. Lincoln by former Governor William A. Newell. That night, a "Grand Hop" was held at the hotel in her honor. First Lady Mary Todd Lincoln's visit drew the Nation's eye to the city as a fashionable . . . — Map (db m46931) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Long Branch — Steinbach's Cobblestones
These cobblestones, on the perimeter border, were saved from the alleyway behind Steinbach's, later Vogel's Department Store, Broadway, Downtown Long Branch, dating back to at least 1903. Installed October 2002 during refurbishing by the city of Long Branch and the Moss Mile Commission. Landscape design by Mary Ellen O'Donnell — Map (db m51626) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Manalapan — Battle at the ParsonageThe Battle of Monmouth — 28 June 1778, 5:00 PM – 5:30 PM
Desperate fighting took place here as retreating Continental infantry held off a battalion of British grenadiers. “General Wayne, occupying a barn and orchard in front, gave them a very warm reception.” Dr. James McHenry, Secretary to George Washington. In the last action of the Battle, Brigadier-General Anthony Wayne led 400 Continentals across the bridge toward the withdrawing British Army. Seven hundred yards to your right, Wayne attacked the 1st Battalion of British . . . — Map (db m14408) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Manalapan — Battlefield ArchaeologyThe Battle of Monmouth – 28 June 1778
Where Was Molly Hays during the Battle of Monmouth? Documents and Archaeology provides clues. During the Battle, Commander-in-Chief George Washington watched approvingly as Captain Francis Proctor’s artillery company cannonaded the British. Joseph Plumb Martin noted that it was a 4-pounder “which kept up a constant fire upon the enemy.” Later, one of Washington’s subordinates, Major-General Lord Stirling, described how the British “Infantry appeared also in . . . — Map (db m8976) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Manalapan — D’Annae: A French, Swedish-Style 4-pounderThe Battle of Monmouth – 28 June 1778
In 1777, the Continental Army was in desperate need of more field artillery. When 31 Swedish-style 4-pounders arrived in New Hampshire in April, Commander-in-Chief George Washington directed that “they will be forwarded to Camp, as fast as circumstances permit.” The French welcomed the war between their British enemies and the Americans. To support the rebellion, in 1776, the French royal arsenals released tons of surplus weapons. Their conduit to America was a fictitious . . . — Map (db m8972) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Manalapan — General von Steuben — September 17, 1730 – November 28, 1794
Friedrich Wilhelm August Heinrich Ferdinand Baron von Steuben was born September 17, 1730 in Magdeburg, Prussia (Germany) to a military family. Reared in the rigorous military school of Frederick the Great, von Steuben served with distinction in the Seven Years’ War (1756-1763) and as an Aide-de-Camp to the Prussian King. In the fledgling US, after the Declaration of Independence, the Continental Congress sought foreign assistance in the struggle against the British. In 1777, Benjamin . . . — Map (db m7259) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Manalapan — Highlanders Decline CombatThe Battle of Monmouth — 28 June 1778,   4:10 PM – 4:20 PM
What a pity it is to throw away such men as these”   Captain – Lieutenant John Peebles, Royal Highland Regiment Here, in what was Derick Sutfin’s cider orchard, 300 Royal Highlanders found themselves in an awkward position. Over 700 Continental infantry were approaching their right flank (up the hill behind you), while a Continental cannon fired round after round into the treetops above their heads. Should they stay and fight? The hardy, brave Scots were too . . . — Map (db m37723) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Manalapan — Molly Hays McCauleyMary Ludwig Hays
After the Battle of Monmouth, Molly basked in the glory of having fought here. At first, there was little recognition, as Molly Hays was only one of many women who had accompanied Continental armies. However, as Revolutionary War veterans become fewer and interest in the Revolution increased, Molly became a minor celebrity. When she died in 1832, at the age of 79, the town militia turned out to bury her with military honors. Two years after the battle, a son, John was born to Mary and William . . . — Map (db m38843) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Manalapan — Molly Pitcher
In honor of the Battle of Monmouth heroine, Molly Pitcher, June 28, 1778 Gift of the Historical Societies of Monmouth County, N.J., D.A.R., Monmouth County Heritage Committee, and friends. Dedicated October 28, 1978 — Map (db m7261) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Manalapan — Molly PitcherAmericas First Heroine
During the Revolutionary War, on June 28, 1778. A blistering hot day at the Battle of Monmouth. A woman who was with her husband, John Casper Hays, who served in the Pennsylvania Regiment carried water to the thirsty American soldiers who shouted “MOLLY, Molly Pitcher” when they needed water. Through heavy bombardment Molly carried the water to the parched soldiers during the artillery duel. Her husband was wounded and she immediately helped load and fire the cannon continuing the . . . — Map (db m38842) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Manalapan — Monmouth Battlefield
Has been designated a Registered National Historic Landmark Under the provisions of the Historic Sites Act of August 21, 1935 this site possesses exceptional value in commemorating or illustrating the history of the United States U.S. Department of the Interior National Park Service 1966 — Map (db m7262) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Manalapan — Monmouth Battlefield State ParkThe Battle of Monmouth — 28 June 1778
During the afternoon of Sunday, June 28, 1778, the hills and meadows in front of you disappeared under clouds of gun smoke. When the firing subsided, over 600 men were dead, dying or wounded, and the Continental Army held the field. The Battle of Monmouth was a turning point in the American Revolutionary War. In 1776 and 1777, the British Army had repeatedly defeated the main Continental Army. By the beginning of 1778, General George Washington and the Continental Army desperately needed . . . — Map (db m37741) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Manalapan — Old Tennant Church1778 - 1901
In grateful remembrance of patriots who, on Sabbath June 28,1778, gained the victory which was the turning point in the War for Independence, and to mark a memorable spot on the battlefield of Monmouth. [Plaque located opposite main marker]: This edifice was erected in 1751, and was used as a hospital during the Battle of Monmouth, June 28, 1778. — Map (db m6172) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Manalapan — Perrine Hill Front LineThe Battle of Monmouth — 28 June 1778, 12:30 PM
Seeking to avoid a bloody battle with the approaching British, Washington selected this strong defensive position. Here, a circle of brooks and swamps protected the Continental troops. Commander-in-Chief Washington and Major-General Lord Stirling organized their men in three lines. You are standing where two battalions of light infantry were posted. To their right were Pennsylvania troops. Behind you, two-thirds of the way up the hill, was a line of cannon and several more brigades of . . . — Map (db m14404) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Manalapan — Perrine Hill SpringThe Battle of Monmouth — 28 June 1778
During the Battle of Monmouth, thirst and heat killed almost as many men as cannons and muskets. Everyone was desperate for water. Hundreds of men – and probably Molly Hays – filled canteens and buckets from this spring. June 28, 1778 was hot, very hot – over 100º in the fields. On this hill alone, 7000 men were stationed, most trapped in the baking sun. The only water available to them were the wells at farmhouses, the two brooks, and the springs flowing into the brooks. . . . — Map (db m37724) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Manalapan — Tennent Church — Erected 1751
This famous church was the pastorate of Reverend William Tennent. It stands on the famous Battlefield of Monmouth. — Map (db m15106) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Manalapan — The British GrenadiersThe Battle of Monmouth — 28 June 1778. 12:45 PM – 1:00 PM
Grenadiers were the heavy infantry of 18th-century armies. Normally, British regiments were composed of 10 companies – 8 line companies, 1 light infantry company, and 1 grenadier company. Agile, intelligent men were chosen for the light infantry while the regiment’s biggest men were placed in the grenadier company. Tall bearskin caps made the grenadiers appear even larger. During most of the Revolution, the British grouped their light infantry companies and grenadier companies into . . . — Map (db m14411) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Manalapan — The British Rush the HedgerowThe Battle of Monmouth — 28 June 1778. 12:45 PM - 1:00 PM
“Riding like a New Market Jockey,” British Commander-in-chief, Sir Henry Clinton rushed his men forward hoping to crush the Continental advance force against Spotswood Middle Brook. If he could destroy the Continental Army, he might win the war and promotion. The British pursued Major General Charles Lee’s Continentals across the fields behind you. As they climbed the hill, Clinton rode in front “crying out ‘Charge, Grenadiers, never heed forming’.” If . . . — Map (db m14410) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Manalapan — Washington Resumes the OffensiveThe Battle of Monmouth — 28 June 1778, 4:00 PM – 5:00 PM
As the enemy withdrew their artillery and began withdrawing their infantry, Commander-in-Chief George Washington began a cautious offensive designed to boost American morale without risking the destruction of the Continental Army. First, Washington sent two battalions of light infantry circling through the valley to your left to harass the British detachments retreating across the Sutfin Farm. Later, south of the Middle Brook, Brigadier-General Anthony Wayne attacked the British . . . — Map (db m14406) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Manasquan — Manasquan Fire Bell
In honor of those men who have volunteered their services in the Manasquan Fire Dept. This bell has served since the 1870s to summon firemen to fires. — Map (db m5309) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Matawan — Philip Morin Freneau1752 – 1832
“Poet of the Revolution”           Eloquently fired the spirit of the people with poems and ballads promoting the cause of liberty. Friend of James Madison and Thomas Jefferson, published the Jersey Chronicle, first newspaper in Monmouth County. — Map (db m76324) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Matawan — Poet’s Grave
Philip Freneau Died Dec. 18th 1832 Aged 80 years 11 months and 16 days He was a native of New York but for many years a resident of Philadelphia and New Jersey. His upright and benevolent character is in the memory of many and will remain when this inscription is no longer legible. Heaven lifts its everlasting portal high, and bids the pure in heart behold their God. ( Back of Monument : ) AGNES Relict of Peter Freneau, Mother of Philip Freneau, and late widow of James . . . — Map (db m76327) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Middletown — British Campsite
For a week following the Battle of Monmouth, the main British Army under Gen. Sir Henry Clinton spread its encampment both sides of this road while awaiting transport from Sandy Hook. They embarked for New York July 5, 1778. — Map (db m5806) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Middletown — British Campsite
For a week following the Battle of Monmouth, the main British army under Gen. Sir Henry Clinton spread its encampment both side of this road while awaiting transport from Sandy Hook. They embarked for New York July 5, 1778. — Map (db m5842) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Middletown — British Campsite
For a week following the Battle of Monmouth, the main British army under Gen. Sir Henry Clinton spread its encampment both sides of this road while awaiting transport from Sandy Hook. They embarked for New York July 5, 1778. — Map (db m22608) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Middletown — British Retreat Route
Seeking the Protection of Middletown's hills on the 29th of June 1778, the day after the Battle of Monmouth, the Main British Army under Gen. Sir Henry Clinton withdrew along this road toward Sandy Hook, whence they embarked for New York a week later. — Map (db m5808) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Middletown — Chapel Hill
Middletown Township Historic District. An early Hamlet on the King’s Highway, known until 1809 as High Point. British Campsite after the Battle of Monmouth. Chapel, built in 1809, became the center of strife between temperance forces meeting there and drinkers from the taverns either side. — Map (db m5807) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Middletown — Fairview Cemetery Veterans Monument
[Front]: In honor of those who served their country [Back]: Cpl Horace M Thorne "Bud" World War II Troop D 89th Cav Sqd 9th Armd Div Died In Service Of His Country [When facing the back, just to the right]: Brig Gen Peter E. Genovese Jr. US Army (Ret) 1937-2002 "Can Do Let's Go" [Around the base of the memorial are engraved 310 names (as of March 1, 2008)] [Panel 1:] Fred J. Aichele • John F. Cuffari • William P. Burke . . . — Map (db m13045) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Middletown — Middletown Township Locust Historic District
Settled circa 1715 by David Burdge of Hempstead, L.I. Significant as an early farming and fishing village, and center of local oyster trade to New York in the 19th c. Steamboats brought visitors as Locust evolved into an important estate area in the late 19th century. — Map (db m22607) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Middletown — Shoal Harbor
First known as Strawberry Hill, Home of Thomas Whitlock, the first permanent settler of record in New Jersey under British Rule, who scouted the land in 1663. Shoal Harbor was an early sailing port and center for fishing and agriculture. — Map (db m5788) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), New Bedford — Marconi American Wireless Company Tower
Marconi American Wireless Company Tower "WW2GM" 1913 - 1924 Presented here is only a small top portion of the original tower. There were a number of these towers in this area. They constituted the first commercial transatlantic communication installation. — Map (db m5243) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Ocean Township — Brinley Grist Mill
Site of the Brinley Grist Mill. Built about 1725 the mill on Whalepond Brook was the first business in the area. The settlers brought their grain here until the early 1900's. — Map (db m24425) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Red Bank — 1941-2007 Red Bank Veterans Monument
Four sided monument ingraved with names of veterans serving from 1941 through 2007. Map (db m12974) WM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Red Bank — Red Bank War Memorial
"Handing Down Old Glory" In Honor and Memory of All Civil War Veterans and Arrowsmith's Post, No. 61, Grand Army of the Republic Organized at Red Bank, New Jersey, 1881 and Association Of Civil War Veterans. Their Names May Be Forgotten But Their Sacrifices and Deeds On Land and Sea are Recorded in the Annals of Their Grateful Country. This monument was erected through the efforts of the Red Bank Volunteer Fire Department, May 30th, 1926 Navesink Hook & . . . — Map (db m5769) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Rumson — 1945 - 2005 Rumson Veterans Monument
1945 - 1955 Berlin Cold War Korea [127 names are engraved for the decade 1955-1965] 1955 - 1965 Berlin Cuba Lebanon Taiwan Vietnam [72 names are engraved for the decade 1955-1965] 1965 - 1975 Cambodia Laos Thailand Vietnam [102 names are engraved for the decade 1965-1975] 1975 - 1985 Cold War Lebanon Grenada [18 names are engraved for the decade 1975-1985] 1985 - 1995 Kuwait Panama . . . — Map (db m13042) WM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Rumson — Battle of Black Point
On June 10, 1779, a British raiding party under Lieutenant James Moody marched from Tinton Falls to Black Point. When embarking for Sandy Hook they were attacked by a detachment of the Continental Army. The Americans lost eleven, killed or wounded, including Captain Chadwick and Lieutenant Hendrickson. The engagement was broken off under a flag of truce, both forces returning to their own lines. — Map (db m16584) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Rumson — Huddy’s Leap
On September 1, 1780 Captain Joshua Huddy was captured at Colts Neck by a band of Tories. While being conveyed across the river to what is now Sea Bright, the boat was fired upon by Colonial forces. Although wounded, Captain Huddy escaped by jumping from the boat and swimming to the western shore. Subsequently he was captured by the British and hanged on April 12, 1782 at the Highlands. — Map (db m54429) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Rumson — Jumping Point Park
This is the site of the first of a series of bridges that linked Rumson and Seabright. The initial structure was a pedestrian toll bridge constructed in 1870 through the efforts of the Jumping Brook Drawbridge Company. Subsequently, metal swing bridges spanned the Shrewsbury River at this location. — Map (db m54431) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Sandy Hook — H.M.S. Assistance Tragedy MemorialHalyburton Monument
On this spot were buried the remains of the Honorable Hamilton Douglas Halyburton, 1st Lieutenant, Royal Navy, son of the Earl of Morton, and James Champion, Lieutenant of Marines. Together with twelve members of the crew of H.M.S. Assistance who died here at Sandy Hook in line of duty on December 31, 1783. — Map (db m5658) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Sandy Hook — 200 Years of ServiceAids to Navigation — Maritime History
From the first federally funded lifesaving stations built in 1849 to today’s busy bases, the history of the United States Coast Guard can be traced along New Jersey’s coast. In 1915, the Life-Saving Marine Service were combined to form the U.S. Coast Guard. The new federal agency eventually assumed the combined responsibilities of the Steamboat Inspection Service, the Lighthouse Service, and the Bureau of Navigation as well. Coast Guard missions today revolve around maritime safety, . . . — Map (db m22665) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Sandy Hook — A Last Tragic Episode of the American Revolution
On New Years Eve 1783, British forces were evacuating New York City as part of their final withdrawal from the new American Nation. The British warship H.M.S. Assistance was anchored in Sandy Hook Bay when 11 seamen deserted the ship. 1st Lieutenant Hamilton Douglas-Halyburton led a party of 13 seamen to apprehend them. While searching Sandy Hook, a blizzard overcame the Halyburton detachment. They were discovered frozen to death in a salt marsh meadow along the bay, and buried in a . . . — Map (db m22579) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Sandy Hook — 29 — A Late Addition to Officers Row
When Officers Row was built, this site was left vacant to allow space for the West Beacon Range Light. Ships traveling across Raritan Bay would line up the lighthouse and beacon lights to mark their way. After the West Beacon was demolished in the 1930s, this home was built to fill the empty space. Fort Hancock was in operation from 1895 to 1974. — Map (db m54511) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Sandy Hook — 23 — Army Docks
The first wharf built here was used to bring in granite blocks for the Fort at Sandy Hook. Later, cannon to be tested at the Sandy Hook Proving Ground were received here. In the 1890s barges arrived carrying the materials to build Fort Hancock. Today, the docks are used by the U.S. Coast Guard. Sandy Hook Proving Ground operated from 1874 to 1919. Fort Hancock was in operation from 1895 to 1974. — Map (db m54505) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Sandy Hook — 9 — Athletic Field
The army encouraged sporting events and friendly competition between units on the post and among neighboring forts. Fort Hancock had its own baseball, football, bowling, basketball, and weight lifting teams, which competed with posts in the region. Fort Hancock was in operation from 1895 to 1974. — Map (db m54482) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Sandy Hook — 31 — Bachelor Officers’ Quarters
The BOQ housed unmarried officers. Captains and majors lived on the second floor in their own suites with private baths and sitting rooms. Lieutenants occupied single bedrooms and shared a bathroom on the top floor. The first floor was the original Fort Hancock Officers’ Club with a dining room, billiard room, and bar. Fort Hancock was in operation from 1895 to 1974. — Map (db m54519) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Sandy Hook — 12 — Baked Fresh Daily!
Every day at the Post Bakery, fresh bread was made for the mess halls and for sale at the Post Commissary. At 3 a.m. each morning soldiers would begin baking bread to feed the hundreds of troops who would report to the mess hall at 6 a.m., noon, and 5 p.m. Fort Hancock was in operation from 1895 to 1974. — Map (db m54496) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Sandy Hook — 30 — Barracks Row
Enlisted men lived on Barracks Row facing the parade ground. The four identical buildings each held a full battery of 80 soldiers. The U-shaped double barracks on the far right, built in 1909, held two batteries. Each barracks had its own mess hall, latrine, and barber and tailor shops. Fort Hancock was in operation from 1895 to 1974. — Map (db m54516) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Sandy Hook — 21 — Barracks, School, Headquarters
This barracks was built for the enlisted men at the Sandy Hook Proving Ground. After the proving ground moved to Aberdeen, Maryland, in 1919, it became the Fort Hancock School and later Headquarters for the 7th Coast Artillery Regiment. Sandy Hook Proving Ground operated from 1874 to 1919. Fort Hancock was in operation from 1895 to 1974. — Map (db m54534) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Sandy Hook — Battery Granger
Granger’s 10-inch rifle could strike a battleship eight miles out to sea. A simple counterweight system quickly raised and lowered the gun, and a well-trained crew could fire off two rounds a minute. Protected in front by fifty feet of earth and concrete, this 1897 battery was almost immune to the flat trajectory fire of 19th century warships. The Disappearing Gun Recoil lowers the gun behind the parapet. To conceal and protect coastal guns and crews from increasingly accurate fire of . . . — Map (db m22697) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Sandy Hook — Battery Potter
The army operated its first and only lift gun battery here from 1893 to 1906. Inside its cavernous galleries, two 12-inch guns could be raised to the surface for firing and lowered for loading and servicing. Concealed and protected from enemy fire, Potter’s rifled artillery could hammer battleships eight miles away. The Lift Guns Giant boilers fired, building up steam to power the guns’ hydraulic lifts. Half-ton projectiles brought from the magazine by rail cart are hoisted to the second . . . — Map (db m22695) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Sandy Hook — British Embarkation
On July 5, 1778 armies under General Sir Henry Clinton passed this point to reach British ships, at anchor off Horseshoe Cove, which evacuated them to New York. This completed their withdrawal through Middletown from Freehold after the Battle of Monmouth seven days earlier. — Map (db m22575) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Sandy Hook — 18 — Chemical Laboratory
Cannon and artillery projectiles were not the only weapons tested at the Sandy Hook Proving Ground. Rifles, machine guns, and new types of gun powder and explosive fuses were tested there. At the chemistry lab, explosive and propellant compounds were developed. In 1935, the building became the Fort Hancock School. Sandy Hook Proving Ground operated from 1874 to 1919. Fort Hancock was in operation from 1895 to 1974. — Map (db m54529) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Sandy Hook — 39 — Chow Time!
Fort Hancock’s barracks originally included barber and tailor shops, a kitchen, and a mess hall. After a few years, the army wanted more bunk space and these operations were moved to new detached mess halls built directly behind each barracks. Fort Hancock was in operation from 1895 to 1974. — Map (db m54439) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Sandy Hook — 36 — Company, Attention!
The parade ground is one of the most important fixtures of any military post. Here troops drilled, formed for inspection, held morning calisthenics, and paraded and reviewed for senior military officers and visiting dignitaries. Fort Hancock was in operation from 1895 to 1974. — Map (db m54451) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Sandy Hook — 3 — Fill’er Up!
The Fort Hancock Gas Station was operated by the Post Exchange. It was the only filling station on post where soldiers with privately owned vehicles could buy fuel or have them serviced. Fort Hancock was in operation from 1895 to 1974. — Map (db m54438) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Sandy Hook — 13 — Fire House Number 1
Fort Hancock’s first fire station was manned by enlisted soldiers who were the post’s firefighters. The tower at the rear of the building was used for drying hoses. Today this is the National Park Service Sandy Hook fire fighting station. Fort Hancock was in operation from 1895 to 1974. — Map (db m54497) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Sandy Hook — 2 — Fire House Number 2
Fort Hancock’s soldiers doubled as firefighters. This firehouse was built close to Barracks Row so the soldiers who lived there could quickly get to the fire fighting equipment. Fort Hancock was in operation from 1895 to 1974. — Map (db m54437) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Sandy Hook — Fort HancockCoastal Defenses of Sandy Hook — Maritime History
Sandy Hook has been fortified to defend New York Harbor for more than two centuries – first by British Loyalists occupying the Sandy Hook Lighthouse during the American Revolution and the American troops constructed a wooden palisade fort during the War of 1812. By the 1890s, concrete gun batteries were constructed to defend against long-range naval cannon. The batteries were continually improved and remained operational through World War II. Nike missiles, placed here in the 1950s, were . . . — Map (db m22645) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Sandy Hook — 15 — Fort Hancock Officers’ Club
This stately structure was officers’ quarters for the Sandy Hook Proving Ground until it moved to Aberdeen, Maryland, in 1919. It housed Fort Hancock officers until 1936, then it became the Officers’ Club and its red brick exterior was painted yellow to match the rest of the post buildings. Sandy Hook Proving Ground operated from 1874 to 1919. Fort Hancock was in operation from 1895 to 1974. — Map (db m54521) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Sandy Hook — 4 — Handball Court
In 1941, a new gymnasium was built on the other side of the YMCA. The smaller gym that stood here was demolished and the site was converted to a handball court. Fort Hancock was in operation from 1895 to 1974. — Map (db m54443) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Sandy Hook — 22 — Hasty Additions in Wartime
When World War II began in Europe in 1939, the U.S. Army numbered 175,000 men. By the time of Pearl Harbor in December 1941, the army had swelled to over 1.5 million. To accommodate this influx, temporary wooden “mobilization” building like these were built at forts across the nation. Today, these buildings are residences for National Park Service staff. Please respect their privacy. Fort Hancock was in operation from 1895 to 1974. — Map (db m54536) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Sandy Hook — 27 — History House
This officer’s home, designed for a lieutenant and his family, was a testament to the rank and privilege of officers in the small peacetime army of the late 19th century. Fort Hancock was in operation from 1895 to 1974. — Map (db m54508) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Sandy Hook — 34 — Hospital Steward’s Quarters
The chief steward was responsible for maintaining and running operations of the Post Hospital under the directions of the Chief Medical officer. Today, the building is the NJ Audubon Society’s Sandy Hook Bird Observatory. Fort Hancock was in operation from 1895 to 1974. — Map (db m54477) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Sandy Hook — Keeping the LightGateway Natl Rec Area — Sandy Hook
For more than a century, Sandy Hook Lighthouse keepers lived in isolation at the end of this windswept peninsula. In the 1890s, the U.S. Army began building massive concrete gun batteries here to defend the entrance to New York harbor. Fort Hancock was established to man the guns. The current two-family keeper’s quarters was built in 1883 and is the fifth house to stand near this site. The keeper and his assistant climbed the spiral stairs to the lens house every day before sunset to light the . . . — Map (db m22591) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Sandy Hook — Lighting the WayGateway National Recreation Area — Sandy Hook
When the Sandy Hook Lighthouse was built in 1764, ships entered New York Harbor through a natural channel that ran close to the Sandy Hook shore. Sandbars were a constant danger and the merchants of New York built the Lighthouse to protect their shipping interests. Today, the Light remains a part of the system of navigational aids that guide ships through the harbor. Lighting the Tower In early days, the tower was lighted by whale oil lamps and by mirrors that reflected the lamps’ lights. . . . — Map (db m22756) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Sandy Hook — 1 — Lights Out!
The beacon on the Sandy Hook Lighthouse was extinguished on December 8, 1941, the day after the attack on Pearl Harbor. It remained dark until the end of World War II in 1945. — Map (db m54432) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Sandy Hook — 6 — Lock’em Up!
Like any small town, Fort Hancock had a jail. Military life was strict and a soldier could be punished for an offense as minor as being outside his barracks after lights-out. Military penalties could include loss of rank, heavy fines, assignment to a work detail, or imprisonment for a few days in one of the cells in the Post Guardhouse. Fort Hancock was in operation from 1895 to 1974. — Map (db m54466) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Sandy Hook — 19 — Locomotive Engineer’s House
The senior railroad engineer, who ran Sandy Hook’s locomotives, lived here. An extensive military railroad system carried guns and ammunition to the Sandy Hook Proving Ground and later supplied all of Fort Hancock. Today, the building is used as a residence for National Park staff. Please respect their privacy. Sandy Hook Proving Ground operated from 1874 to 1919. Fort Hancock was in operation from 1895 to 1974. — Map (db m54532) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Sandy Hook — Mortar Battery
Four mortars occupied a single pit. With twelve other mortars in nearby pits, they were designed to fire simultaneously, lobbing 12-inch, 800-pound shells in high arcs, to penetrate ships’ lightly-armored decks. Built in the early 1890’s, this was the first battery of its kind in the United States. Batteries or Forts? Although masonry forts looked intimidating, bristling with cannon, they were no match for the new battleships with their increased mobility and firepower. Gun batteries were . . . — Map (db m22648) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Sandy Hook — 14 — Mule Barn
In the days before automobiles, armies moved by horse and mule power. Fort Hancock stabled its army mules in this building. The teamsters, or mule skinners who drove the mule teams, lived in the house next door. In later years, the barn was converted to a barracks and after that, a service club. Fort Hancock was in operation from 1895 to 1974. — Map (db m54498) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Sandy Hook — Navigating Sandy Hook WatersAids to Navigation — Maritime History
The broad expanse of New York Harbor is misleading. Shoals and sandbars pose underwater threats to navigation and ships must stay in channels for safe passage. Until the Ambrose Channel was created, all ships entered the harbor through a natural channel around the tip of Sandy Hook. Currents here are treacherous and coming “round the Hook” was a challenge to seamen. Lighthouses, lightships, floating buoys, fog bells, and horns have all served as sentinels to guide ships through the harbor. — Map (db m22693) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Sandy Hook — 38 — New York Yankees vs. Hometown SluggersFort Hancock
On Monday, April 5, 1943, the New York Yankees played the Fort Hancock baseball team on this very field. While future Hall of Famers Joe DiMaggio and Phil Rizzuto were serving their country in the Armed Forces, others, including Joe Gordon and Bill Dickey, played for the Yankees and helped boost the nation’s morale. The Fort Hancock team was comprised of soldiers. The Yankees, led by manager Joe McCarthy, competed against some of the fort’s finest athletes. Despite the best efforts of the . . . — Map (db m54460) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Sandy Hook — Nike Ajax Explosion Memorial
Nike Ajax Explosion Battery B. 526th Missile Battalion Leonardo, New Jersey In Memoriam 22 May 1958 Sgt. Daniel J. Lavengood Sgt. Jerome W. Mould SP3 Walter E. Berry SP3 William I. Cochran PFC Donald L. Marsh Pvt. Nicklos J. Composino Ord. Corps Civilians Joseph Arciere Joseph F. Brokos Lee A. Parker Charles Romanow — Map (db m22642) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Sandy Hook — NOAA Fisheries ServiceJames J. Howard Marine Sciences Laboratory
Established in September 1961, the Sandy Hook Marine Laboratory was the first Federal scientific laboratory devoted solely to research on marine recreational fish and fishing. It was originally located on the bay approximately 300 ft from here in the former Ft. Hancock Post hospital building. The 1959 passage of the Marine Game Fish Act enabled the beginning of the Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife, and the naming of the Laboratory’s first director, vanguard biologist Dr. Lionel A. . . . — Map (db m54553) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Sandy Hook — 25 — Officers Row
Eighteen houses comprise Officers Row; each was home to an officer and his family. Traditionally, officers’ homes faced toward the parade ground. Here however, army architects placed them facing Sandy Hook Bay to take advantage of the cool summer breezes and the splendid evening sunsets. Fort Hancock was in operation from 1895 to 1974. — Map (db m54503) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Sandy Hook — 24 — Post Chapel
Weddings, christenings, funerals, and services of all faiths took place here in Fort Hancock’s chapel. It is one of the few surviving buildings from the pre-World War II mobilization period of 1940-41. First Sergeant Lawrence Markle, 7th Coast Artillery Regiment, and Private 1st Class Margaret Bechill, Fort Hancock’s Women’s Army Corps detachment, were married here on October 8, 1943. Fort Hancock was in operation from 1895 to 1974. — Map (db m54501) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Sandy Hook — 10 — Post Commissary
The commissary was a storage warehouse for provisions such as sugar, flour, coffee, canned meats, and other food stuffs needed at the mess halls. The commissary also had a small shop where army personnel and civilian employees living on post could make purchases. Fort Hancock was in operation from 1895 to 1974. — Map (db m54489) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Sandy Hook — 8 — Post Exchange
This building was Fort Hancock’s original gymnasium and in 1941 became the Post Exchange or PX. Soldiers could buy personal items here or go bowling at the four-lane alley located in the basement. The cost for a game in 1942 was 15 cents. Fort Hancock was in operation from 1895 to 1974. — Map (db m54470) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Sandy Hook — 32 — Post Headquarters
Here the commanding officer and his staff ran the day-to-day operations of Fort Hancock. A post of this size was usually commanded by a colonel. During World War II, Fort Hancock was headquarters for all New York Harbor Defenses under the command of Brigadier General Philip S. Gage, Sr. Fort Hancock was in operation from 1895 to 1974. — Map (db m54483) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Sandy Hook — 26 — Post Theater
Soldiers could catch the latest films of the day at the Post Theater, which seated 300. The average ticket price in the 1930s and 1940s was ten cents. Fort Hancock was in operation from 1895 to 1974. — Map (db m54506) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Sandy Hook — Protecting American CoastsCoastal Defense — Maritime History
Established in 1943, to store and supply ammunition for the Atlantic fleet, the Earle Naval Weapons Station plays a key role in protecting American coastal cities and ports. Its deep-water pier is 2.9 miles long and can service several naval vessels at a time. It is located at the confluence of several major transatlantic routes and easily accessible to the open waters of the Atlantic Ocean. Earle is one of several military bases that have ringed the New York Harbor over the past two . . . — Map (db m22664) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Sandy Hook — 20 — Proving Ground Foreman’s House
This was the home for one of the foremen at the Sandy Hook Proving Ground. After the proving ground closed in 1919, it was used for housing noncommissioned officers and their families. Today, this building is a residence for National Park Service staff. Please respect their privacy. Sandy Hook Proving Ground operated from 1874 to 1919. Fort Hancock was in operation from 1895 to 1974. — Map (db m54533) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Sandy Hook — 11 — Quartermaster Storehouse
This warehouse was used to store uniforms, blankets, furniture, and other personal supplies for Fort Hancock’s garrison. The “Fort Hancock” painted on the roof was a marker for pilots. This was originally a two-story building and the third story was added in 1910. If you look closely, you can see the original roof line in the bricks. Fort Hancock was in operation from 1895 to 1974. — Map (db m54491) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Sandy Hook — Rodman Gun
Developed in the Civil War era, this type of 20-inch gun gave the U.S. the largest muzzle-loading cannon ever made. At the same time, however, rifled guns were being developed which made all smoothbore cannon obsolete. With spin from spiral grooves inside the barrel, pointed projectiles from rifled cannon could travel farther and with greater accuracy than cannonballs from smoothbore weapons. During the Civil War, rifled artillery easily penetrated the thick masonry walls of several coastal . . . — Map (db m22651) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Sandy Hook — Sandy HookGateway National Recreation Area — Sandy Hook Unit
Stretching off the northern tip of the New Jersey Shore, the 1,650 acre peninsula preserves six miles of ocean beaches enjoyed by more than two million visitors a year. But there’s much more. Beyond its well-known beaches, sand dunes and salt marshes extend to Sandy Hook Bay. These coastal environments support and array of wildlife, including more than 300 species of migratory and native birds. Offshore, dozens of fish species and other aquatic life thrive in these waters. Sandy Hook has . . . — Map (db m22754) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Sandy Hook — Sandy Hook Barracks Building #22 Built 1899
Listed in The National register of Historic Places: 1980 Barracks Building #22 is a contributing structure in the Fort Hancock and Sandy Hook Proving Ground National Historic District. Throughout its history, Fort Hancock played a major role in the defense of New Jersey's shoreline and New York/New Jersey Harbor. British and loyalist troops occupied Sandy Hook during the revolutionary War. As methods for warfare modernized, Fort Hancock evolved from a permanent masonry fort manned . . . — Map (db m36891) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Sandy Hook — 7 — Sergeants’ Row
Noncommissioned Officers and their families lived in this row of houses. Single NCOs lived in the barracks with their men. Today, these homes are residences for National Park Service staff. Please respect their privacy. Fort Hancock was in operation from 1895 to 1974. — Map (db m54469) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Sandy Hook — 17 — Site of Master Mechanic’s Quarters
Fort Hancock was home to both military personnel and a civilian population of contractors and specialists. The civilians who lived on post worked, shopped, and went to school alongside their military neighbors. The building that stood here was home of the civilian master mechanic at the Sandy Hook Proving Ground. Sandy Hook Proving Ground operated from 1874 to 1919. Fort Hancock was in operation from 1895 to 1974. — Map (db m54528) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Sandy Hook — Spermaceti Cove Station No. 2Aids to Navigation — Maritime History
Sandbars, shallow waters, and winter storms off the New Jersey Shore were a constant danger to early sailing vessels. In a storm, wind and waves could destroy a helpless grounded ship, its cargo, and crew and passengers. Commerce in and out of New York Harbor made the waters off Sandy Hook the busiest in the country. Surfmen stationed on Sandy Hook rescued hundreds of passengers and crew from ships wrecked along the coast. The Spermaceti Cove station, built in 1894, replaced an earlier one . . . — Map (db m22613) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Sandy Hook — 33 — The Best of Care
During World War II the Post Hospital became the focal point of a medical complex that served not only the garrison stationed here but also troops returning home from Europe. Fire destroyed the hospital in 1985. Fort Hancock was in operation from 1895 to 1974. — Map (db m54478) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Sandy Hook — 35 — The Dead House
This was the morgue for the Post Hospital. The soldiers called it the Dead House. It was later used as a U.S. Army recruiting office. Fort Hancock was in operation from 1895 to 1974. — Map (db m54479) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Sandy Hook — The Guns of Sandy Hook
The guns and missiles are silent now, most of them gone to scrap metal. But from colonial times until 1974, a series of defenses stood on Sandy Hook to guard New York Harbor. Here, for almost fifty years, the Army tested all its guns. And for eighty years Fort Hancock was the home of a full military community – with chapel, theater, jail and school. — Map (db m22635) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Sandy Hook — 16 — The World War II Years
During World War II, Fort Hancock’s population swelled to over 10,000 and dozens of temporary wooden barracks and mess halls were built. More than 3,000 coast artillerymen were stationed here for New York Harbor defense, and thousands of others passed through for staging and training before shipping out to Europe. Fort Hancock was in operation from 1895 to 1974. — Map (db m54524) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Sandy Hook — 37 — This Is Why It’s Called Sandy Hook!
Fort Hancock was built on sand. To stabilize the ground, topsoil was imported in the early 1900s. A layer of earth several inches deep was added to the parade ground and to other areas around the post. Fort Hancock was in operation from 1895 to 1974. — Map (db m54453) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Sandy Hook — 28 — World War II Victory GardenFort Hancock
Plant a Victory GardenAfter World War II began, nearly all of America’s industries converted to wartime production. Companies that built radios, cars and refrigerators began to manufacture jeeps, trucks and planes. This placed a great strain on the resources families needed. Rationing of gasoline, food and other goods was necessary to guarantee materials for factories and troops overseas. Americans were asked to conserve food. The U.S. Department of Agriculture distributed literature to . . . — Map (db m54509) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Sandy Hook — 5 — Young Men’s Christian Association
YMCAs on military posts were places for rest and recreation and were built by private contributions. The Fort Hancock Y offered refreshments, game rooms, and a reading room. Visiting families could stay in rooms on the top floor. The one-story wing on the right side in photograph was an earlier wooden gymnasium torn down in 1941 when the new gym was built. Fort Hancock was in operation from 1895 to 1974. — Map (db m54446) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Sea Girt — 100th Anniversary of the Sea Girt Lighthouse
Commemorating the 100th Anniversary of the Sea Girt Lighthouse 1896 – 1996 Dedicated Dec. 10, 1996 — Map (db m53131) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Sea Girt — Sea Girt Lighthouse
Restored 1981 Built 1896 — Map (db m53130) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Shrewsbury — This Sycamore
Planted by the early colonists in the Royal Province of New Jersey marked the Delaware Trail used by the indians and later by Washington's troops on the Burlington Path. Memorialized by Monmouth Chapter, D.A.R. June 28, 1935 — Map (db m5305) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Spring Lake — Presbyterian ChurchEast Lake & Essex Avenues
Mrs. Anna Baird, developer of Hastings Square, donated the land on East Lake Avenue for this church. A 1,500 pound bell was donated by Mr. George Griffins. The structure was built of granite and interiors of light woods. It had a seating capacity of 500 and cost $16,500. Funds were donated by Mrs. Baird and members of the church. — Map (db m6700) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Tinton Falls — Wayside War Memorial
In grateful tribute to the sons and daughters of Wayside who served in the Armed Forces in all wars These our dead in honored glory rest Daniel R. Covert · Louis S. Gimbel, Jr. — Map (db m7122) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Upper Freehold Township — Ye Olde Robbins Burial Place1695
Erected 1938 by James & C. Palmer West great grandsons of Joseph & Elizabeth Robbins & George & Charlotte Robbins Sproule — Map (db m36133) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Wall Township — 3-Sided Watchman’s Shanty
Built 1881 by NY & Long Branch RR for Warren Ave, Spring Lake NJ Station Crossing Moved to NJMT 1965 Served as NJMT’s first Souvenir Shop 1966 to 1971 Before electronic lights and gates, watchmen manned railroad crossings to protect cars and pedestrian traffic from trains. Most of these men were near retirement or partially disabled. — Map (db m53195) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Wall Township — A Salute to the Boy Scouts of America
From 1929 to 1940 Arthur Brisbane made available this land as the official scout camp for Monmouth County Boy Scouts. Thousands of boys camped here enjoying the natural beauty of the woods while receiving scout training in self-reliance and kindred virtues. This plaque commemorates the distinguished service rendered by the Scouts and Scouters of Monmouth Council, Boy Scouts of America, in the early rehabilitation of the buildings at Allaire, with the help of individuals, service clubs and . . . — Map (db m53140) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Wall Township — Allaire Village
. . . . . posthumously named in honor of its most successful owner and operator . . . James P. Allaire. The site today is a testimony to historic preservation and modification to leisure time activities. Fortunately, ownership of these 3000 acres passed to caring people: first to Arthur Brisbane and then to the State of New Jersey, Department of Environmental Protection, Division of Parks and Forestry. Allaire Village represents a significant chapter in America’s industrial growth from the . . . — Map (db m53142) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Wall Township — Allentown Station
Built 1943 by Pennsylvania RR Closed and abandoned 1964 at close of passenger service on PRR line. Donated to NJMT and moved to Allaire 1975 Allenwood NJ is 3 miles east of Allaire, on PRR’s Freehold & Jamesburg Agricultural RR, that ran from Sea Girt, through Allaire, to Jamesburg and Monmouth Jct. Due to wartime shortages, much of this building was constructed of recycled lumber. — Map (db m53189) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Wall Township — Church
This building was constructed in two parts with the front portion being erected about 1832 from timbers taken from the earlier Monmouth Furnace buildings. The rear section containing the altar, steeple, and bell tower, was added in 1836. A most unusual feature of the Church is the location of the bell tower at the rear. The front section could not support the weight, thus, necessity forced the placement. Church met on Sundays, but during the week the pulpit was closed off by sliding doors . . . — Map (db m53170) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Wall Township — Freneau Station
Built 1907 for Freehold & Atlantic Highlands Rwy, later CRR of NJ Located at mile post 1.64 of Central RR of NJ’s Freehold Branch, first station south of Matawan, at Route 79 road crossing. Closed April 1953, donated and moved to Pine Creek RR, Marlboro NJ, June 1955, moved to Allaire December 1964 Originally named Mount Pleasant, town name changed 1890 for poet, journalist, and Revolutionary War patriot Philip Freneau. — Map (db m53193) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Wall Township — Millpond
The Mill Pond, fed by the stream named Mill Run, was built to hold water which served as a source of power for Allaire’s Mill located along the stream bank, below this dam was a grist mill and a screw factory – both operated by water power. — Map (db m53169) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Wall Township — PRR Watchman’s Shanty
Built ca 1905 by Pennsylvania RR for Allenwood NJ Station Crossing Moved 1930 to Broad St, Manasquan NJ Abandoned 1964, rescued and served as garden shed at private residence, donated and moved to NJMT November 1991 Crossings were guarded by watchmen to protect traffic from trains. Most of these men were near retirement or partially disabled. — Map (db m53187) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Wall Township — Songs Of The SeasonSongbird Migration – Wildlife Migration
Migrating songbirds fill the air with light melodies in the Spring and Fall. These international travelers stop to rest here and feed on insects and fruit during the flight from their tropical wintering habitat to their northern breeding habitat. Some will remain here to nest. Most can be seen along the northbound route from April to June and southbound from August to September. You might be surprised to learn that the number of songbirds is in decline. Each year fewer birds return. Habitat . . . — Map (db m53176) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Wall Township — Stone Blocks from the Camden and Amboy Railroad
These stone blocks, which were cut by hand by prisoners at Sing Sing Prison, were originally intended to support wooden rails, topped with iron straps, as was common practice at the time (c. 1830). This would have sufficed if the traffic consisted of light, horse-drawn vehicles. One of the founders, Robert Stevens, intending to use locomotive power, realized that iron rails would be needed to support the greater weight involved, set about designing the first “T” rails, similar to . . . — Map (db m53205) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Wall Township — The Garden StateEastern Deciduous Forest — Coastal Habitats
When Europeans first came to the eastern shores of North America they encountered a vast, virgin forest that seemingly stretched westward forever. First viewed as barriers and places for hiding, the trees soon became cabins, gunstocks and cradles, wagon wheels, and eventually newsprint and prefabrications – and economic and recreational treasure. One of the major forest classifications is called the Eastern Deciduous forest – the type to which the forests of New Jersey belong. . . . — Map (db m53183) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Wall Township — The Manasquan FloodplainFloodplains – Coastal Habitats
Sediments deposited by the Manasquan River provide moist, fertile soils for plants. Ironwood, ash, and hickory trees flourish. Many of the wildflowers bloom before the tree leaves block the sunlight – producing a striking display of spring color. Millions of years of erosion and flooding helped form the valley. Heavy rains would periodically cause the river to overflow, spreading silt, soil, and water onto the valley floor. These floodplains slow the momentum of raging floodwaters that . . . — Map (db m53172) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Wall Township — Union Newsstand
Built ca. 1910 by Union News Co. Newsstand was located at Manasquan NJ NY&LBRR Station. Moved to Allaire November 1969 The Union News Co. of New York had newsstands at most large rail stations, terminals and hotels in the NY Metropolitan area, operating from 1908 to 1969. Smaller newsstands such as this were built to be portable and hauled by train, wagon, or truck to wherever they were needed. — Map (db m53191) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Wall Township — Wandering WarblersWood Warbler Migration — Wildlife Migration
To the careful observer, warblers are delightful splashes of color that decorate the foliage in the spring and fall. Although several species breed here in the summer, most warblers only stop briefly in New Jersey during their migration from breeding to wintering grounds. As many as thirty species can be seen in New Jersey during the spectacular fall migration. Warblers over-winter in the tropics. In the spring, they follow rivers, coastlines, and mountain ranges northward, aided by the sun . . . — Map (db m53182) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), Wall Township — WatershedsCoastal Habitats
A Limited Resource Water covers almost three quarters of the earth’s surface, but only three percent of it is fresh water, and less than one third of that is usable. The remaining fresh water is locked up as snow and ice at the polar regions. All living things depend on water to survive. It is important to realize that our water resources are limited, and that we impact water quality and availability in subtle and sometimes far reaching ways. For example, mercury (a poisonous metal) is . . . — Map (db m53179) HM
New Jersey (Monmouth County), West End Long Branch — Dorothy Parker Birthplace
Site of the summer cottage of Dorothy Parker. Short story writer, critic and poet. Member of the Algonquin Round Table. Champion for social justice. Born here in West End, New Jersey. August 22, 1893 is designated a Literary Landmark by Friends of Libraries U.S.A. — Map (db m49756) HM
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