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Pima County Markers
Arizona (Pima County), Ajo — Old Clarkston Cemetery
Pursuant to judgment rendered in the superior court of the Sate of Arizona, in and for the county of Pima, Case no. 30813, The bodies of persons buried in the Old Clarkston Cemetery which lay approximately 1700 feet northwest of this point, have been removed to what is known as the Ajo Cemetery, Ajo, Arizona. Following are the names of the persons, so far known, who were buried in this old cemetery, and whose bodies have been removed to the Ajo Cemetery: Column A: Juana Abballo . . . — Map (db m30762) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Ajo — The Ajo Mining District
Americans first worked the copper deposits at Ajo in 1854, one year after the Gadsden Purchase. These early American miners found abandoned workings and crude mining tools as mute evidence of earlier mining in the district. During the next half century mining was confined to veins and other small bodies of high grade copper ore. Some ore was transported by mule train across the desert to Yuma for shipment to smelters in Swansea, Wales. Much of the mineralized ground in the district was . . . — Map (db m30802) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Ajo — The City of Ajo
Ajo was first located on the ground that later became the open pit mine. The modern city was founded in its present location in 1917 coincident with the beginning of large scale mining of the copper deposits. Ajo is the home of the New Cornelia Mine of the Phelps Dodge Corporation which is one of the great copper mines of the world. The open pit mine is located one mile south of the city and the concentrator, smelter and shops are adjacent to the town site on the east. 1917 . . . — Map (db m30759) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Ajo — 10 — The Mine Managers HouseAjo, Arizona
The mine manager’s house was built in 1919 by John O. Greenway, General Manager of Calument & Arizona Mining Co. Michael Curley, the first occupant lived here until his retirement in 1939. Of the 14 subsequent managers, 12 lived in this house. It was converted to ‘The Mine Managers House Inn” Bed and Breakfast in 1987. ―――――― Ajo ore was first used by area Indians and miners from Mexico. Arizona Mining and Trading Co. operated in 1854. A number . . . — Map (db m32905) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Green Valley — Titan II Intercontinental Ballistic Missile Museum
Tucson Air Museum Foundation of Pima County Titan II Intercontinental Ballistic Missile Museum Established May 8, 1986 571st SMS, 390th SMW Davis-Monthan AFB Strategic Alert July 1963 – November 1982 National Historic Landmark April 6, 1994 Dedicated October 14, 1994 — Map (db m26926) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Lukeville — Kris Eggle
On August 9, 2002 While protecting visitors from harm, United States Park Ranger Kris Eggle Was slain in the line of duty. His service and sacrifice To the National Park Service And the people of this country Will never be forgotten. — Map (db m7003) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Oro Valley — Cañada Del Oro
For early travelers the road through this canyon was one of the most dangerous in Arizona. Indians attacked lone riders and wagon trains along this route from Tucson to Old Camp Grant on the San Pedro River. Despite the canyon's name, very little gold was ever found here. Source: Historical Markers within the Arizona Department of Transportation Right of Way. Prepared by: Roadside Development Section, April 1, 1997 Map (db m48999) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Sikul Himatk — Quijotoa
This is a Papago word meaning, mountain shaped like a carrying basket. Discovery of a pocket of gold and silver ore led to a fabulous boom development here in 1883. The desert has reclaimed the original site and its suburbs of Logan City, New Virginia, Brooklyn and Allen City. The mine was a complete failure—a tiny pocket of riches on the mountain. — Map (db m7002) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Summerhaven — Lemmon Rock Lookout TowerCoronado National Forest
Lemmon Rock Lookout Tower was erected in 1928. It is the oldest lookout still in use on the Forest. This general locale has been used as a fire lookout since the Coronado Forest Reserve was established in 1902. The current lookout structure was constructed according to 1920's standard plans. It contains a work area, kitchen, sleeping area, and fire finder in the same room. This lookout played a role in the first aerial fire patrols which flew over the Santa Catalinas beginning in 1921. The . . . — Map (db m55554) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Agua Caliente Ranch and Hot Springs
Agua Caliente Ranch In 1873, Peter B. Bain filed the first formal claim to the land surrounding Agua Caliente Spring. Bain and a partner, Marion T. Beckwith, began a dairy cattle operation by bringing cows north from Sonora. Bain built a house, several outbuildings and corrals at the spring. In 1875 he sold Agua Caliente Rancho to James P. Fuller, a produce salesman from Hermosillo, Mexico for $300. James Fuller planted an orchard, constructed ditches and ponds to harvest water for . . . — Map (db m34592) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Alameda StreetCalle de la Milpes — Cemetery Street
Named Calle de la Milpes ("Road Which Leads to the Corn Fields") during Tucson’s Spanish period; the street linked the presidio with adjacent agricultural fields. Renamed Cemetery Street in the mid-1800s, the street was the main thoroughfare between downtown and the local military cemetery. By 1875 the cemetery was moved and the street was renamed Alameda Street ("Tree-Lined Street"). — Map (db m69624) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Alameda StreetCalle de la Milpes — Cemetery Street
Named Calle de la Milpes ("Road Which Leads to the Corn Fields") during Tucson’s Spanish period; the street linked the presidio with adjacent agricultural fields. Renamed Cemetery Street in the mid-1800s, the street was the main thoroughfare between downtown and the local military cemetery. By 1875 the cemetery was moved and the street was renamed Alameda Street ("Tree-Lined Street"). — Map (db m69811) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Allande Footbridge
Memorial to Pedro Allande, first resident commander of the Royal Presidio of Tucson and energetic captain of the Mexican Dragoons, regular Spanish army. Near this site he was wounded severely in his right leg during the attack of May 1, 1782, by 600 warrior Apaches. He dragged himself around the circuit of sentry posts and continued to direct the defense of Tucson with only 20 presidial soldiers, saving the infant settlement from total destruction. Spanish Translation: Puente de . . . — Map (db m26421) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Arizona's First Public School
On November 18, 1867, the Pima County Board of Supervisors created Tucson School District 1. An old adobe building at this location was refitted for classes. Desks and benches were built, new windows were installed in the 25' x 40' classroom, and school supplies were purchased from Hermosillo, Sonora. The semester opened in January, 1868, with an enrollment of 55 boys. Augustus Brichta, formerly a clerk in the Territorial Legislature, taught for six months, though he was paid for only four. . . . — Map (db m26419) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — August 20th Park
This park is a memorial to the founding of Tucson. On August 20, 1775, Lt. Col. Don Hugo Oconor, Commandant Inspector of the Frontier Provinces of New Spain, in the company of Fr. Francisco Garces and Lt. Juan Carmona officially established the location of a Spanish Presidio on the site of a very old Indian village. As part of a reorganized frontier defense plan, he ordered the transfer of the Spanish garrison from Tubac to the new presidio, San Agustin del Tucson – the northernmost . . . — Map (db m26435) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Bicentennial Moon Tree
This seeding was grown from the very seeds that journeyed to the moon and back on board Apollo 14. It symbolizes the major role forests played in developing our American Heritage and the vital role forests have in our future. This planting made possible by: State Forester of Arizona, U.S. forest Service and NASA — Map (db m43302) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Broadway BoulevardCamp Street
In 1862, Union soldiers took possession of a former Confederate camp located in what is now Armory Park neighborhood. The camp, originally named Military Plaza, was reactivated in 1866 as Camp Lowell. During its occupation, soldiers traveled between the camp and the village of Tucson using a path called Camp Street. Today, remnants of the eastern half of the alignment follow modern day Broadway Boulevard. — Map (db m69704) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Camp Lowell 1866-1873
Camp Lowell was established at this location in 1866 by the U.S. Army in recognition of the strategic military importance of Tucson. The local populace was fearful of Apaches, and the camp provided military protection as well as bringing financial benefits to the residents of Tucson. The two principal purposes of this military installation were to supply other army outposts south of the Gila River and to protect the citizens of the southern Arizona territory. Camp Lowell consisted . . . — Map (db m38989) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Cannon-Douglas Residence
Dr. William Austin Cannon had this house built during 1904-1905. He was the first resident botanist with the Carnegie Desert Laboratory in 1902, and worked there until 1926. Dr. Cannon sold the house in 1913 to Dr. Andrew Ellicott Douglass, an astronomer, who in 1896 had located the site for Lowell Observatory in Flagstaff. Dr. Douglass, founder of dendrochronology, also built the Steward Observatory at the University of Arizona. Due to his early leadership, the University of Arizona is one of . . . — Map (db m31529) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Carlos Ygnacio Velasco House
This house dating from the 1870s was purchased by Carlos and Beatriz Velasco in 1878. In the same year, Velasco began publication of the newspaper "El Fronterizo," which continued until his death in 1914. This building was the office and print shop. The house at the rear was the Velasco residence. Prominent in civic affairs, Velasco was a principal founder of Alianza Hispano Americana, a national fraternal insurance society. This site is on the National Register. Spanish . . . — Map (db m26388) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Carrillo Intermediate School
Carrillo School was named for the prominent Tucson businessman, Leopoldo Carrillo. During the 1880's, the site contained the Carrillo Gardens, the city's first park with eight acres of spring-fed artificial lakes, gardens and a recreational center. In 1910, Emmanuel Drachman converted the park to the Elysian Grove. In 1912 the first airplane in Tucson landed on the site and Theodore Roosevelt spoke on the site. Carrillo School was built in 1930. Its traditional Christmas presentation, Las . . . — Map (db m55228) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Catalina Federal Honor CampGordon Hirabayashi Recreation Site
Why Put A Prison On A Mountain? Honor Camp prisoners built the Mt. Lemmon Highway In the early 20th century, the only road to Mt. Lemmon began at the town of Oracle and snaked up the north face of the mountain. Construction of the Mt. Lemmon Highway, a much shorter route from Tucson, began in 1933. To cut cost, prisoners supplied most of the labor, and a "Federal Honor Camp" was built here in 1939 to replace the temporary prison camps along the route. At first, . . . — Map (db m34595) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Chapel of San Pedro at Fort Lowell
A tiny chapel, built here in 1915, served the Barriada del Rillito, a community now called El Fuerte. The fifteen immigrant Mexican families of this village gathered outside under mesquite trees to hear Mass. In 1917, Senora Josefa de Mule donated land for a larger building. The second chapel, Santo Angel de la Guarda, was destroyed by a tornado in 1929. The present structure, also built by the men of El Fuerte, was dedicated in 1932. Carmelite fathers from Tucson's Holy Family church served . . . — Map (db m26195) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Charles O. Brown House
A small adobe house stood on the south side of this lot when it was purchased by Charlie Brown in 1868. Brown, a pre-Civil War settler and prominent citizen, built the Congress Hall Saloon, the town's most popular gaming place and meeting hall. The house was expanded between 1876 and 1888, until it covered three sides of a square. It represents a classic blending of Mexican building designs and materials, with American Victorian trim. The property was given to the Arizona Historical . . . — Map (db m26247) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Commemorating the Raising of the First American Flag within the Walled City of Tucson
Commemorating the raising of the First American Flag within the Walled City of Tucson Dec 16, 1846 — Map (db m74174) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Congress StreetCalle de la Alegria
Originally named “Street of Joy” during Tucson’s Spanish period. In 1869, its name changed to Congress Street, derived from Charles O. Brown’s Congress Hall Saloon. In 1867, Arizona’s territorial capital was moved to Tucson and Brown’s saloon served as one of three meeting places for the Territorial Legislature. — Map (db m69810) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Congress StreetCalle de la Alegria
Originally named “Street of Joy” during Tucson’s Spanish period. In 1869, its name changed to Congress Street, derived from Charles O. Brown’s Congress Hall Saloon. In 1867, Arizona’s territorial capital was moved to Tucson, and Brown’s saloon served as one of three meeting places for the Territorial Legislature. — Map (db m70187) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Congress StreetCalle de la Alegria
Originally named “Street of Joy” during Tucson’s Spanish period. In 1869, its name changed to Congress Street, derived from Charles O. Brown’s Congress Hall Saloon. In 1867, Arizona’s territorial capital was moved to Tucson, and Brown’s saloon served as one of three meeting places for the Territorial Legislature. — Map (db m70191) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Convent Street
Named in 1869 for the convent located adjacent to San Augustín Cathedral. When the seven Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet finally arrived in 1870, they opened the city’s first parochial school for girls next to San Augustín. Three years later they opened a school at San Xavier Mission, followed a year later by the establishment of the St. Augustine’s Parochial School for Boys. — Map (db m69563) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Convent Street
Named in 1869 for the convent located adjacent to San Augustín Cathedral. When the seven Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet finally arrived in 1870, they opened the city’s first parochial school for girls next to San Augustín. Three years later they opened a school at San Xavier Mission, followed a year later by the establishment of the St. Augustine’s Parochial School for Boys. — Map (db m69589) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Convent Street
Named in 1869 for the convent located adjacent to San Augustín Cathedral. When the seven Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet finally arrived in 1870, they opened the city’s first parochial school for girls next to San Augustín. Three years later they opened a school at San Xavier Mission, followed a year later by the establishment of the St. Augustine’s Parochial School for Boys. — Map (db m69812) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — 1991 — Coronado Hotel
1928 — Built by the T.C. Triplett Company for Harold M. Brooks as a 46-room hotel. 1928-1974 — Remained in operation as an active hotel. 1982 — Listed on the National Register of Historic Places. 1991 — Restored and re-dedicated by the Downtown Development Corporation of Tucson, Arizona as low income elderly and handicapped housing. — Map (db m27078) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Corral Street
Named in the late 1860s for the location of the U.S. quartermaster’s corral where Camp Lowell’s military horses were held. The corral was located west of Camp Lowell near South Scott Avenue. — Map (db m69623) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Cottonwood Lane
Planted shortly after Fort Lowell was established in 1873. The trees were irrigated by acequias or open ditches with water diverted from Pantano Wash. The beautiful shade trees made Fort Lowell an oasis in an otherwise barren area. After the fort was abandoned in 1891 the trees died and were cut up for firewood. Now they have been replanted as they originally were in the heyday of Fort Lowell. Presented by The Conservation Dept. Tucson Womens Club Mrs. H.M. Merritt, President 1964-65 Map (db m26197) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Council StreetMiltenberg Street
Although they share the same alignment, during Arizona's Territorial period, Council Street and Miltenberg Street were divided by Stone Avenue. The alignment between Stone Avenue and Meyer Street was named Council Street, in reference to Tucson's town council, while the alignment east of Stone Avenue was named Miltenberg Street, after German immigrant, bakery owner, and politician, Frank Miltenberg (b.1854 – d.1913). today, only Council Street remains. — Map (db m69635) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Court Street
In 1856, Tucson’s presidio walls made navigating the local streets difficult. In an effort to circumvent the walls and avoid having to re-enter the presidio through the main gate, a section of the south wall was opened and Court Street was established, affording a direct route through the presidio. — Map (db m69632) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Cushing Street
Named in 1872 for First Lieutenant Howard B. Cushing (b.1838- d.1871). During his early military career, Cushing participated in many notable Civil War battles, including Shiloh, Fredericksburg, Gettysburg and Hatcher’s Run. In 1871, while in pursuit of Apache leader Cochise, Lieutenant Cushing was killed by Apache Indians. — Map (db m69562) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — De Grazia Gallery In the Sun
Has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places October 12, 2006 By the United States Department of the Interior — Map (db m29479) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Desert Homes
Safford Freeman and his family settled in this area in the early 1930s after applying for a patent under the Homestead Act. They were granted 640 acres to farm, graze, or mine. Here Mr. Freeman constructed a three room adobe home, along with several outbuildings and a well. The mound of dirt before you is what's let of their home. In the early 1950s, the Freeman Homestead, along with many other home sites, was purchased by the National Park Service to protect all the lands within Saguaro National Park. — Map (db m58146) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Desert Laboratory
Has been designated a National Historic Landmark This site possesses national significance In commemorating the history of the United States of America 1975 National Park Service United States Department of the Interior — Map (db m63672) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Edward Nye Fish House
E.N. Fish came to Arizona as an enterprising merchant in 1865. Three years later he built this adobe house which served as the family residence for the next half century. Fish developed many successful businesses and his wife Maria was prominent in public education. They contributed much to the growth and prosperity of early Tucson. Their home, one of the grandest of the day, was a social center for the community. It has been preserved by the Tucson Heritage Foundation and the Tucson Museum of Art. — Map (db m26387) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — El Conquistador Water Tower
Constructed in 1928, the tower is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and has been designated as a Tucson Landmark. The tower's Spanish colonial revival sheathing was designed by Tucson architect Roy Place and added in 1932. In 1994, the tower was restored by the City of Tucson and the Tucson-Pima County Historical Commission with the assistance of the Arizona Heritage Fund. — Map (db m26288) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — El Parque de Orlando y Diego Mendoza
English In 1981, two young brothers, Orlando and Diego Mendoza, died when a drunk driver ran a stop sign at this intersection hitting the car in which the two children were riding. Orlando was 2 years old; Diego was 17 months. The accident left behind their heartbroken parents, Frank and Mary Mendoza. This rock and concrete shrine was built by neighbors in memory of these two young children. Today this park serves as a quiet respite and a reminder of how precious life is. The . . . — Map (db m57758) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — El Paso & Southwestern Depot and Park
Th El Paso and Southwestern Railroad, originally owned by the Phelps Dodge Company, was extended from El Paso into Tucson in the fall of 1912. The handsome depot of classical design, featuring a large rotunda with a stained glass dome, was completed in December, 1913. a park commissioned by Mr. and Mrs. Walter Douglas separated the passengers and freight depots. Landscaped by Cammillo Fenzi, it featured many rare and unusual trees and shrubs. In 1924 the E.P. & S.W. Railroad became part of the . . . — Map (db m26242) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — El Tiradito(The Wishing Shrine)
This is the only shrine in the United States dedicated to the soul of a sinner buried in unconsecrated ground. It is affectionately called "El Tiradito"- the castaway. The many legends about its origin all involve a tragic triangle love affair in the early 1870s. The mysterious powers of "El Tiradito" are still an important part of local Mexican lore and culture. This site is on the National Register of Historic Places. — Map (db m55227) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Epes RandolphAugust 16, 1856 – August 22, 1921
[ Four markers are mounted on the four sides around the base of the monument. ] Side A: Southern Pacific Railroad Map Epes commanded the "Randolph Lines" that connected Phoenix and southern Arizona's outlying communities with Tucson. He also headed the Southern Pacific railroad's push through the rough barranca country south of Guaymas, Sonora, Mexico toward Guadalajara. Randolph envisioned a great agricultural and mineral bonanza along Mexico's western coast, . . . — Map (db m38936) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Eusebio Francisco Kino, S. J.1645-1711
Pioneer Jesuit missionary, Explorer of Northwestern New Spain, Cartographer, historian and mission builder. The other original casting, representing Arizona, is located in the capitol, Washington, D.C. Sculptor-Suzanne Silvercruys — Map (db m27077) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Exchange at the PresidioThe Mormon Battalion Enters Tucson, 16 December 1846
Near this site on December 16 – 17, 1846, the U.S. 101st Infantry ("Mormon") Battalion under the command of Colonel Philip St. George Cooke peacefully occupied the Presidio San Agustin del Tucson. Organized in Council Bluffs, Iowa, to reinforce General Stephen Watts Kearny's Army of the West during the Mexican – American War, the battalion marched 2,000 miles to San Diego, probably the longest march in the U.S. military history. By the time the battalion reached Tucson, it . . . — Map (db m73983) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — First Municipal Airport in the United StatesArizona Historic Site
[Marker Front:] This ground was the location of the First Municipal Airport in the United States The Tucson City Council approved the financing for the airport, July 21, 1919 and the City of Tucson in cooperation with the Tucson Chamber of Commerce established and constructed the airport. The first plane landed Nov. 20, 1919 Swede Myerhofer, Pilot [Marker Rear:] Upon receipt of an official letter from Brig. Gen. “Billy” . . . — Map (db m8432) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Fort Lowell
The military post, established in 1862 near downtown Tucson, was moved to this location in 1873. One of many active forts on the Arizona frontier, Lowell served also as a major supply depot, influencing the economy and social life of the community. At its peak in the 1880's, three companies of infantry and two troops of cavalry - more than 250 officers and soldiers - were stationed here. The need for Fort Lowell steadily declined after Geronimo's surrender in 1886 and, despite . . . — Map (db m26191) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Fort Lowell
Largest of the early Arizona military installations this was the supply base for military posts in southern Arizona during the long warfare against the Apaches. Built in 1873, it was Gen. Nelson A. Miles' headquarter in the final campaign against Geronimo, and was abandoned in 1891. — Map (db m26198) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Fourth Avenue UnderpassConstructed 2009
Tucson City Engineer ― Jim Clock Design Engineer ― Cannon & Associates, Inc. TranSystems Corp. Contractor ― Sundt Construction, Inc. Long known as the Gateway to the East End of Downtown, the Fourth Avenue Underpass in a vital link between the University of Arizona, the Fourth Avenue merchants and the Downtown Tucson Business District. In 1988, as part of a movement to revitalize the Downtown area, the City of Tucson moved to reconstruct the historic underpass to . . . — Map (db m31527) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Fox Tucson Theatre
The Fox Tucson Theatre, the country's only southwestern art deco movie palace, was designed by California architect Eugene Durfee. Construction began in 1929 for the Tower Theatre, the crown jewel of the Diamos Brothers Southern Arizona Movie Theatre chain. Fox West Coast Theatres leased the building from the Diamoses and renamed it the Fox Theatre, opening on April 11, 1930, it soon became the community center of Tucson. In 1936, it became the city's first public building to have refrigerated . . . — Map (db m26483) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Franklin Avenue
Named in the 1870s after the military scout and surveyor, Charles Franklin (b. ca.1844-d.1924). In 1871, he served as a scout for General Crook, and a year later, helped Sidney W. Foreman complete the first formal survey of Tucson. “Charles Franklin” appears to have been an alias, and his real name was Albert Franklin Banta. — Map (db m69698) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Garcés Footbridge
Memorial to Francisco Garcés, explorer and first Franciscan missionary to the Pima village at the foot of Sentinel Peak. In 1770 Garcés and the Pimas constructed at that site the first substantial building in Tucson, a mission residence with two rounded towers for defense. On August 20, 1775, he led Lt. Col. Hugo Oconor to this present site, designated for the founding of the Royal Spanish Presidio of Tucson. Garcés and the Pimas helped in the construction of the new presidio. A principal . . . — Map (db m55224) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — George E. P. Smith Residence
Dr. Smith built this house in 1904 in anticipation of his marriage to Maud North, a Tucson teacher. The house, which he designed, was the first building on the north side of Speedway. Dr. Smith was a University of Arizona professor of engineering and physics from 1900-1906, of irrigation engineering from 1906-1955, and emeritus to 1975. He pioneered in measuring Arizona's groundwater and brought recognition to the University as a center for the study of water use in arid lands. . . . — Map (db m31528) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Granada Avenue
Its name derives from the Spanish word meaning “pomegranate.” The area between what is now Interstate-10 and Main Avenue once supported irrigated agricultural fields during Arizona’s Territorial period. — Map (db m69620) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Granada Avenue
Its name derives from the Spanish word meaning “pomegranate.” The area between what is now Interstate-10 and Main Avenue once supported irrigated agricultural fields during Arizona’s Territorial period. — Map (db m69703) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — AQHHMP #2 — Hacienda MoltacquaAmerican Quarter Horse Historical Marker
The first World's Championship Quarter Horse Speed Trials were held just north of this site in 1941 at the newly-constructed Hacienda Moltacqua Racetrack. Bob Locke, owner of the track, was a member of the Southern Arizona Horse Breeders Association. He, along with other SAHBA members J. Rukin Jelks, Jake Meyer, Clancy Wollard and Joe Flieger, hosted the trials in conjunction with the Tucson Horse Show. As a five-year-old, Clabber, owned by A.A. (Ab) Nichols of Gilbert, Arizona, defeated . . . — Map (db m40473) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Hiram S. Stevens House
Hiram Sanford Stevens came west as a soldier, settling in Tucson in 1856. Three years later, he married Petra Santa Cruz, great granddaughter of a Spanish Pioneer. In 1865 the couple built this residence, which featured an aviary, orchard, carriage house and stables. Stevens, an astute businessman with interests in cattle, mining, merchandising and real estate, was also a respected politician, serving two terms in the Territorial Legislature and twice as Arizona's Delegate to the U.S. . . . — Map (db m26154) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Historic Fourth Avenue UnderpassConstructed 1916 – Demolished in 2008
Tucson City Engineer ― J. Mos Ruthrauff Design Engineer ― L. R. Walker Contractor ― Bent Brothers In 1913, in an effort to separate pedestrians, vehicles, bicycles and wagons from trains, the City of Tucson embarked on a major grade separation project to have Fourth Avenue, a major thoroughfare in Downtown Tucson, travel beneath the Southern Pacific Railroad. The original underpass consisted of two 12-foot-wide lanes and 6-foot-wide raised pedestrian walkways on . . . — Map (db m31526) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Honorable Frank Harris Hitchcock
This beautiful highway was made possible by his sincere interest and unceasing efforts. It is dedicated to him and shall be known as"Hitchcock Highway" — Map (db m30020) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Hotel Congress
The venerable Hotel Congress, designed by well-known architect, Roy Place, is the last surviving historic hotel in downtown Tucson. This three-story landmark was built in 1919 with exposed masonry construction and marble details. The hotel, south of the railroad depot, was convenient to railroad passengers arriving in Tucson. The elegant lobby and dining room provided a degree of refinement for winter visitors on their western adventure. A January 1934 fire destroyed the original third floor . . . — Map (db m27248) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Hugo O'Conor
Commandant Inspector of the Interior Provinces of New Spain Hugo O'Conor Founder of the Presidio San Agustin de Tucson August 20, 1775 Hugh O'Conor was born in Ireland in 1734 during a time in Irish history when England dominated the existence of the Irish people. To escape the oppression of English rule, O'Conor left his homeland at the age of 16 to serve in the Spanish military. Many Irishmen of this time opted to serve under the Spanish government in return for Spain's . . . — Map (db m31548) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Jackson Street
Named in 1872 after John A Jackson (ca 1835-d.1870), a rancher and farmer who lived at the San Pedro settlement near Tucson. On 16 April 1870, he was ambushed and killed by Apache Indians as he return to his ranch. — Map (db m69588) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Jácome’s
[ Four markers are mounted to a four sided kiosk. ] Side A: Jácome’s Department Stores, Inc. 1896 – 1980 This area was the final location of Jácome’s Department Store from 1951 to 1980. For twenty-nine years the people of Tucson and our neighbors in Mexico frequented this site. The concept of retail clustering began in the Tucson area when business rival, Harold Steinfeld agreed to build and lease a store to Jácome's in order to create a retail hub downtown. . . . — Map (db m40049) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — John Campbell Greenway1872-1926
Rough Rider, mining engineer, developer of the Ajo copper mines and designer of the town of Ajo for Calumet and Arizona Mining Co., Brigadier General, Army Reserve, and Regent, University of Arizona. The other original casting, representing Arizona, is located in the Capitol, Washington, D.C. Sculptor - Gutzon Borglum Map (db m41974) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — La Casa Cordova
This adobe house incorporates portions of one of the oldest standing structures in Tucson. The two west rooms are believed to have been built before the Gadsden Purchase of 1854. Four front rooms were added in 1879. The house was named for Maria Navarette Cordova, whose family acquired it in 1896. It was restored by the Junior League of Tucson, Inc., for the Tucson Museum of Art in 1975 and is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. — Map (db m26228) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — La Catedral de San Agustin1863 – 1897
On this site stood the Catedral de San Agustin, the first church near the Tucson Presidio, Arizona Territory. The adobe and stone structure was built under the direction of Bishop Salpointe in 1883. — Map (db m51618) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Leonardo Romero House
This house is named for its first known residents, living here in 1868. Although construction dates are not known, the Washington Street wing lies along the course of the Presidio wall, completed in 1783. Leonardo Romero, a carpenter whose shop was located on the Meyer Street side, was well-known for his work on such landmarks as San Augustine Cathedral, the Convent of the Sisters of St. Joseph, and early restoration at San Xavier Mission. The house, much altered, has variously served as . . . — Map (db m55231) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Locomotive 1673
Locomotive # 1673, a Mogul 2 – 6 – 0 type engine, was built by Schenectady Locomotive Works in 1900 and logged over 1,000,000 miles for the Southern Pacific Company, primarily in southern Arizona. In 1955 it was donated to the City of Tucson to mark the 75th anniversary of the arrival of the railroad to the community. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1992. Railroad Impacts The Southern Pacific Railroad arrived in Tucson on March 20, 1880. . . . — Map (db m49938) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Main AvenueCalle Real — El Camino Real
Originating during Mexico’s Spanish period, “Royal Road” connected Spain’s southern and northern territories. The route linked Mexico City, Guadalajara, Mazatlan, and Culiacan, Magdalena to Spain’s northern outposts. Eventually, Calle Real extended to Yuma, San Diego and San Francisco, remained the primary route linking Mexico and the United States. In 1872, the street name was changed to Main Avenue. — Map (db m69631) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Main AvenueCalle Real — El Camino Real
Originating during Mexico’s Spanish period, “Royal Road” connected Spain’s southern and northern territories. The route linked Mexico City, Guadalajara, Mazatlan, and Culiacan, Magdalena to Spain’s northern outposts. Eventually, Calle Real extended to Yuma, San Diego and San Francisco, remaining the primary route linking Mexico and the United States. In 1872, the street name was changed to Main Avenue. — Map (db m70193) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Main Gate
The main gate of the presidio was located near what is now Alameda Street, just north of this spot. The gate was built from mesquite timbers and had a platform above, where a guard stood watch. In the late 1860's, the families of Milton Duffield, Hiram Stevens, and Edward Nye Fish lived in the Sonoran row houses that still stand along Main Street, north of Alameda Street. — Map (db m51488) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Mansions of Main Avenue
From the 1860s to the early 1900s, many of the wealthiest families in Tucson built homes along Main Avenue (El Camino Real), from Alameda Street north to 6th Street. "La Vecindad cerda del centro" or, "the neighborhood near downtown" soon earned the nickname "Snob Hollow." Most of these architecturally unique mansions survived the urban renewal programs of the 1960s, and El Presidio Historic District became one of the first Tucson neighborhoods to be listed in the National Register of Historic . . . — Map (db m51456) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — McCormick Street
Named during Arizona’s Territorial period after territorial delegate to Congress, Richard McCormick (b.1832 – d.1901). In the 1870s he sponsored legislative measures to reduce discrimination against Mexicans in the Arizona territory. With support of Governor Anson P.K. Safford, McCormick also helped establish Arizona’s first public school system. — Map (db m70212) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Meyer StreetCallejon de las Flores
Originally named “Flower Alley” during Tucson’s Spanish period, its name was later changed to honor German-born soldier and politician, Charles H. Meyer (b.1829- d.1907). He came to Arizona with the US Army and settled in Tucson in 1858. While living in Tucson, he was the town druggist, a justice of the peace, and implemented chain gang labor to clean city streets. — Map (db m69592) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Meyer StreetCallejón de las Flores
Originally named “Flower Alley” during Tucson’s Spanish period, its name was later changed to honor German-born soldier and politician, Charles H. Meyer (b.1829- d.1907). He came to Arizona with the US Army and settled in Tucson in 1858. While living in Tucson, he was the town druggist, a justice of the peace, and implemented chain gang labor to clean city streets. — Map (db m69696) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Mission San Xavier del Bac
Mission San Xavier del Bac was founded by the Jusuit missionary, Fr. Eusebio Kino in 1692. The present church was built under the direction of the Franciscans. Construction began in 1783 and was completed in 1797. The church continues to serve as the parish church for the Tohono O'odham. This plaque was donated in loving memory of Jeanette C. Checola Jan 1, 1939 – Mar. 4, 2004 R.I.P. — Map (db m26930) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — N. W. Corner Adobe Wall of Spanish Presidio of Tucson
N. W. Corner Adobe Wall of Spanish Presidio of Tucson Marked 1926 by D.A.R. — Map (db m26462) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — N.E. Corner Adobe Wall of Spanish Presidio of Tucson
N.E. Corner Adobe Wall of Spanish Presidio of Tucson Marked 1926 by D.A.R. — Map (db m26460) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Ochoa Street
Named during Arizona’s Territorial period to honor Estevan Ochoa (b.1831 – d.1888), whose ancestors arrived in Mexico with the Cortez expedition. He was born in Chihuahua, Mexico to a wealthy mining and ranching family. Before settling permanently in Tucson in 1860, he lived in Mesilla, New Mexico. He was a prominent Tucson businessman, politician, and philanthropist, helping fund the construction of the city’s first schools. — Map (db m70211) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Old Main
On March 12, 1885 Governor Frederick A. Tritle signed legislation creating the University of Arizona. Selim M. Franklin and C.C. Stephens, Pima delegates to the 13th Territorial Legislature fathered this Bill. Jacob S. Mansfeld solicited the 40-acre site from William S. Read, E.B. Gifford and Ben C. Parker. James M. Creighton was architect; M.J. Sullivan, contractor. Groundbreaking was October 27, 1887. Classes started October 1, 1891, with 6 faculty, 6 freshmen and 26 preparatory students. . . . — Map (db m26386) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — One Story from the Barrio ViejoThe History of Room 6
1914 Room 6 (originally addressed 202 W. 18th Street, and later 709 S. 8th Avenue), on the southeast corner of the excavated row house on Lot 10 (see map), housed several businesses throughout its history. In 1914, it was a blacksmith shop, while around 1919 it became a store and residence. 1951 By 1951, Room 6 was a secondhand shop owned by Bruce and Suzie Draper, who had lived in Tucson since 1929. The Drapers were among the many African Americans who have played an . . . — Map (db m57789) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Padre-Eusebio-Francisco-Kino, S.J.
Born Segno, Italy, 1645 – Educated at Jesuit Colleges Entered society of Jesus, 1665 – His petition to be sent upon a distant and dangerous mission granted, 1678 – Began missionary labors in Lower California, April 1, 1683 – Among Pimas, March 13, 1687 During 24 years in Pimeria Alta made 50 missionary and exploring expeditions inland - Founded missions – Established ranches – Introduced domestic animals and European plants into Arizona – Made . . . — Map (db m26394) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Pearl Street / Ott StreetCalle del Correo
Originally located between Granada Avenue and Church Street during Arizona's territorial period, "Post Office Street," was where postmaster and mayor, Mark Aldrich (b.1801 – d.1873) lived and worked. The southwestern half of the street was alternatively called Pearl Street after a madam who ran a brothel south of Pennington Street. In 1872, the name was changed to Ott Street to honor Sheriff Hylor Ott (b.1830-d.1881). — Map (db m70190) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Pennington Footbridge
Memorial to Elias Pennington, pioneer rancher, farmer, miner, freighter and lumberman. In 1857, he came from Texas with his twelve children settling in various locations around southern Arizona for several years. Near this site, in 1863, Pennington set up a pit for whipsawing timber in the arroyo just south of the old presidio wall. Tragically, by 1870, Elias and five members of his family were dead – victims of the hardships and dangers of frontier life. "Calle del Arroyo" was later . . . — Map (db m26431) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Pennington StreetCalle de la Misión — Calle del Arroyo
Named in the late 1600s after the route connecting Tucson’s Presidio with mission San Cosme de Tucson. The street was also called Calle del Arroyo, referencing the arroyo immediately south of the presidio walls. The street was renamed in 1871 to honor businessman and Arizona pioneer Elias Green Pennington (b.1809-d.1869) who used the arroyo for his saw-mill business. — Map (db m69816) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Pima County CourthouseHistoric Site
The first Pima County Courthouse, a single-story adobe structure built in 1868, was replaced in 1881 by a large two-story stone and red brick victorian building which, in turn, was removed in 1928 to make way for the present structure. This distinctive building, designed by Tucsonian Roy Place and completed in 1929, reflects the Spanish colonial and Moorish influences on the architectural heritage of the southwest. It is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. — Map (db m55222) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Plaza de la Mesilla
One of the few remaining sites which recall the Mexican heritage of Tucson, it acquired its name after the Gadsden Purchase (1854) as the terminus of the wagon road joining Tucson to the territorial capital, then at Mesilla. When San Agustin, the first cathedral church in Arizona, was erected just east of the plaza, it became known as La Placita de San Agustin. It is now called "La Placita." Spanish Translation: Plaza de La Mesilla Uno de los pocos sitios restantes que . . . — Map (db m55225) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Plaza de las Armas
The largest plaza within the Spanish presidio of San Agustin del Tucson, founded in 1775, this area was originally used for military formations and drill. After construction of the first Pima County courthouse (1870), the name was changed to Court Plaza. Here traditional fiestas, circuses and other public events have been held since the 18th century. — Map (db m26241) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Plaza Militar
Once an open space, this area was within the original Spanish presidio. The plaza was probably named in the Mexican years (1821-1854), when soldiers drilled here. Saddle horses for the troops were stabled along the north side, next to the presidio wall. Houses were built over the site beginning in the 1860's. — Map (db m26165) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Presidio San Agustín del Tucson
For about 80 years, the adobe walls of the Tucson Presidio protected the residents of the area from attacks by Apache groups, who opposed Spanish and Mexican peoples and their native allies beginning in the 1600s. The Spanish military designated the site in 1775 on the location of a prehistoric native village site. The fort housed 100 soldiers at its height, and 300 civilians lived in the area, with several hundred O'odham and Aravaipa Apache allies in the vicinity. The main gate for the fort . . . — Map (db m55221) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Presidio Wall
This marker locates the northwest corner of the adobe wall which surrounded the Royal Spanish Presidio San Agustin del Tucson, In 1776 the new outpost was garrisoned by seventy Spanish cavalry troopers and Indian scouts, transferred from Tubac under the command of Lt. Col. Juan Bautista de Anza. The first fort, a crude wooden palisade, was replaced by adobe walls begun about 1778 and completed in 1783. For 80 years presidial soldiers provided protection for San Xavier mission and for settlers who farmed the Santa Cruz valley. — Map (db m26466) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Presidio Wall & Pithouse
This marker locates the northeast corner of the adobe wall which surrounded the Royal Spanish Presidio San Agustin del Tucson. It is thought that a bastion, used as a lookout and as a defensive position, stood here. The site was excavated in 1954 by archaeologists who discovered beneath the wall a prehistoric Hohokam Indian dwelling, part of a village which existed here about 800 A.D. This pithouse, so named because the floor is below the level of the ground, provides evidence that Tucson is . . . — Map (db m26463) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Presidio Wall Camino Real
Near this site was the southwest corner of the adobe wall that surrounded the Spanish Presidio, an enclosure of 11 ¼ acres which included most of the present city – county governmental complex and the Art Museum block. Tucson was the largest fort in a chain of Spanish frontier posts extending from the Gulf of Mexico to the Gulf of California., designed to protect the northern border of New Spain. Main Street, originally the "Camino Real," paralleled the west side of the presidio and . . . — Map (db m26465) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — AQHHMP #8 — Rillito Race TrackAmerican Quarter Horse Historical Marker
This famous track on the banks of the Rillito River was the birthplace of many racing innovations still in use today. The Southern Arizona Horse Breeders Association, the organization that pioneered Quarter Horse Racing in Tucson, had been hosting races at the Hacienda Moltacqua track since 1941. When Moltacqua was sold in 1943, J. Rukin Jelks volunteered the use the training track on his ranch. Under the direction of Melville Haskell, an American Quarter Horse Hall of Fame inductee, and . . . — Map (db m40295) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Rugged Pioneer Soldiers
Lest we forget those rugged pioneer soldiers who tamed the west, this memorial is erected to perpetually remind us of their service. — Map (db m28419) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — S. E. Corner Adobe Wall of Spanish Presidio of Tucson
This disc marks the southeast corner of the old adobe wall that protected Tucson from the Indians in the early days - prior to 1845 Moved to this location in 1955 — Map (db m26461) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Saint Mary’s RoadSeven Sisters Lane
Named in 1880 in reference to Arizona’s first hospital, Saint Mary’s Hospital. Established by the Sisters of Saint Joseph of Carondelet, the hospital housed 11 patients, four sister-nurses, and one doctor. — Map (db m70791) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Scott Avenue
Named during Arizona’s Territorial period after businessman and Tucson pioneer, William F Scott (b.1831-d. ca.1914). In the 1870s, he operated a flour mill adjacent to his home at the corner of Main and McCormick (since demolished). — Map (db m69622) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Scott Avenue
Named during Arizona’s Territorial period after businessman and Tucson pioneer, William F. Scott (b.1831-d. ca.1914). In the 1870s, he operated a flour mill adjacent to his home at the corner of Main and McCormick (since demolished). — Map (db m69817) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Scott Avenue
Named during Arizona’s Territorial period after businessman and Tucson pioneer, William F Scott (b.1831-d. ca.1914). In the 1870s, he operated a flour mill adjacent to his home at the corner of Main and McCormick (since demolished). — Map (db m70214) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Sentinel Peak
Below this 2900-foot peak the Santa Cruz valley was farmed by the Hóhokam Indians as early as 800 A.D. When the Spaniards arrived in the 17th century, the Hóhokam had vanished and settlements of Piman people dotted the valley. One called "Schuk-Shon," meaning "at the foot of the Black Mountain," was pronounced "Tucson" by the Spaniards. The hill was a lookout for these early Indian and Spanish settlers, who lived in fear of hostile raiders. The whitewashed stone "A" was constructed by . . . — Map (db m28194) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Sentinel Peak
Used as a lookout and for signal fires by the Indians prior to and since 1692 and later by early settlers — Map (db m38401) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Si We:begi Ha ÑeidLa Primera Vista • The First Sighting
This monument represents the first sighting of Europeans by the O'odham who lived on the traditional sacred ground at the base of Chuk Shon (known today as Sentinel Peak). The O'odham and their ancestors, the First People of the Tucson Basin, have lived here for over 4,000 years. The first recorded visit to the Tucson region by a European was made by Padre Eusebio Francisco Kino in 1692 when he visited O'odham villages in the area, including what is known today as Mission San Xavier del Bac. — Map (db m75931) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Siqueiros-Jácome House
The Siqueiros-Jácome family built this adobe brick structure between the mid-1860's and the late 1870's. It is an example of a Sonoran row house. Built close to the street with an interior courtyard, the house has flat saguaro rib and packing crate ceilings hidden beneath a later pitched roof. The doorways were positioned to allow air to circulate and cool the interior. Soledad Jácome lived in the house from 1866 to 1911, supporting her daughters by working as a seamstress. An 1883 map . . . — Map (db m51494) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Site of Arizona's Second Territorial Capitol
An adobe building at this site housed Arizona's Government from 1868 – 1877, when Tucson was capitol of the territory. One of the meeting rooms of this second territorial capitol became the home of the pioneer Drachman family. Source: Historical Markers within the Arizona Department of Transportation Right of Way. Prepared by: Roadside Development Section, April 1, 1997 Map (db m51454) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Sosa-Carillo-Frémont House
The earliest documents for this property indicate that the pioneering Sosa family lived here in the 1850s. In 1878, Manuela Sosa and her husband, Michael McKenna, sold the property to Jesus Suarez de Carrillo, wife of businessman Leopoldo Carrillo, who completed this house in 1880. In 1881, the daughter of Territorial Governor John C. Fremont lived here. Carrillo family members occupied the house until 1968, when the city cleared the area for a community center. The Tucson Heritage Foundation . . . — Map (db m55226) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Southern Pacific Railroad
The S.P.R.R., building the nation's second transcontinental rail line eastward from California, reached Tucson on March 20, 1880. It was the occasion for one of the greatest celebrations in the history of the city and foretold the coming of a new era of fast, reliable and inexpensive transportation, bringing increased growth, development and prosperity. The original station, built in 1880, was a large wooden structure with offices, freight and passenger accommodations. It was replaced by the present depot, built on the same site in 1907. — Map (db m73901) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Southwest Corner of the Presidio
Excavations beneath this lawn in 1998 located the west adobe wall of the Tucson Presidio and a portion of the presidio blacksmith shop. The tower at the southwest corner remains buried beneath the nearby city hall parking lot. Soldiers stood guard here, watching over the field on the Santa Cruz River floodplain below. The soldiers accompanied women as they washed clothes in an irrigation acequia (canal) and men as they tended crops and herds, located a short distance from the main gate. . . . — Map (db m51490) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Spanish War Veterans Monument1898-1902
In Memory of Those Who Served Spanish American War 1898-1902 Cuba – Porto Rico – Philippines – China Lest You Forget — Map (db m38993) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — St. Philip's in the Hills
This Property is Listed in the National Register of Historic Places By the United States Department of the Interior St. Philip's in the Hills 1936 — Map (db m31524) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Stone Avenue
Named during Arizona’s Territorial period for Colonel John Finkle Stone (b. ca.1836-d.1869). He was a colonel in the Union Army and owner of the first house on Stone Avenue at McCormick Street. Stone also operated a mine near Apache Pass, where he later died during an Apache attack. Between 1926 and 1990, Stone Avenue was part of U.S. Highways 80 and 89. — Map (db m69621) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Stone Avenue
Named during Arizona’s Territorial period for Colonel John Finkle Stone (b. ca.1836-d.1869). He was a colonel in the Union Army and owner of the first house on Stone Avenue at McCormick Street. Stone also operated a mine near Apache Pass, where he later died during an Apache attack. Between 1926 and 1990, Stone Avenue was part of U.S. Highways 80 and 89. — Map (db m69700) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Stone Avenue
Named during Arizona’s Territorial period for Colonel John Finkle Stone (b. ca.1836-d.1869). He was a colonel in the Union Army and owner of the first house on Stone Avenue at McCormick Street. Stone also operated a mine near Apache Pass, where he later died during an Apache attack. Between 1926 and 1990, Stone Avenue was part of U.S. Highways 80 and 89. — Map (db m69702) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Teatro Carmen
Named for its founder, Carmen Soto Vásquez, this was one of the first theaters in Tucson devoted exclusively to the presentation of dramatic works in Spanish. From the opening night, May 20, 1915, with a performance of "Cerebro y Corazón" by the Mexican playwright Teresa Farias de Isassi, Teatro Carmen served as an important cultural center. Hundreds of performances were staged by local and internationally known companies from Spain and Mexico. After 1922, it became a cinema, meeting hall, . . . — Map (db m55229) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Temple Emanu-El
Jewish pioneers, among Arizona's earliest settlers, began arriving in the 1850's and for half a century they worshipped in private homes and rented quarters. In 1904, the Hebrew Ladies Aid Society, now the Sisterhood of Temple Emanu-El, was established formally to provide for social services and religious needs. One of its goals was realized when Temple Emanu-El, the Territory's first synagogue building, was erected at a cost of $4712. It opened on the eve of the Jewish New Year, "Rosh Ha . . . — Map (db m26248) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Temple of Music and Art
This cultural center was built through the efforts of the Saturday Morning Music Club. The grand opening October 28, 1927, starred violinist Jascha Heifetz. Many world-renowned artists followed upon the stage and in the galleries while local talent also gave recitals and concerts. Original home of the Tucson Fine Arts Association and the Tucson Boys Chorus. Restoration was begun in 1976. Listed in the National Register of Historic Places. Spanish Translation: Templo de Música y . . . — Map (db m26442) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — The First Presbyterian Church in Tucson
On this site stood the first Presbyterian Church, and the second Protestant Church in Arizona. It was organized in 1874 for Presbyterian Missions in the Territories by the Reverend Sheldon Jackson and constructed by the Reverend J. A. Anderson, with financial support from the citizens of Tucson. The cornerstone of the Gothic style, adobe church was laid June 13, 1878 on land purchased from the City of Tucson within Courthouse Plaza. The building was sold to the Congregational Church in 1881. . . . — Map (db m26422) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — The Korean War Memorial
Side A: We were those whom others did not want to be. We went where others feared to go and did what others feared to do. June 25, 1950 – July 27, 1953 Side B: The United States Marines Sgt Raul B. Babasa • Sgt Jesus R. Carrasco • Pfc Raymond C. Hubbard • Pfc William H. Jones • Col Peter D. Lambrecht • Pfc Alfonso E. Lopez • Sgt Johnson McAfee, Jr. • Sgt Norberto N. Mesa • Pfc Manuel H. Moreno • Pfc Pedro R. Moreno • Pfc Richard L. Nickles • Pfc Emilio A. . . . — Map (db m66999) WM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — The Manning House
A Landmark of the National Register of Historic Places Original Construction 1907-08 By Levi Howell Manning — Map (db m31530) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — The Stork's Nest
The Sanborn Fire Maps for the City of Tucson first recorded this building in 1883 as an adobe dwelling with an attached ramada. Between 1901 and 1930 additions were made to the main building and construction was completed on the outbuilding behind you. The original building was constructed in the idigenous Sonoran style characterized by a flush-fronted adobe facade, a flat mud roof with parapet walls, stone foundations, canales (projecting roof-drains) and a horizontal mass with recessed . . . — Map (db m31200) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — The Tucson Plant Materials Center
The Tucson Plant Materials Center Has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places By the United States Department of Agriculture 1997 — Map (db m31525) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — The Tucson Tragedy
Honoring the victims of the event of January 8, 2011 The Tucson Tragedy - - - we shall never forget — Map (db m51467) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — These Immortal Chaplains
Catholic, Protestant, Jewish Interfaith in Action Lt. Goode – Lt. Poling Lt. Fox – Lt. Washington Sacrificed their lives for men of all faiths February 3, 1943 — Map (db m66998) WM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — To The Mormon Battalion
Which, under command of Col. Cooke, in the course of their 2,000 mile infantry march to the Pacific coast, arrived and raised the first American flag in Tucson. December 16, 1846 — Map (db m27281) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Toole Avenue
Named during Arizona’s Territorial period after Tucson’s mayor, Dr. James Toole (b.1824-d.1884). Before serving in politics, he acted as Adjutant General for the Arizona Territory. He was also a surgeon and later a banker. Upon collapse of his bank, Toole took his own life. — Map (db m69809) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Tucson Old Walled City
Founded 1776 by the Spanish Government as a Presidio. Became part of U.S. after Gadsden Purchase 1853 — Map (db m26399) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Tucsonans Killed in Action"Easy" Company 13th Infantry Battalion USMCR — Korean War
Top row: Pfc. Corbett B. Robertson, Pfc. Emilio A. Ramirez, Pfc. Raymond C. Hubbard, Sgt. Jesus R. Carrasco, Pfc. Richard L. Nickles, Pfc. Joe M. Valenzuela Bottom Row: Sgt. Johnson McAfee, Pfc. Manuel H. Moreno, Sgt. Raul B. Babasa, Pfc. Malcolm J. Schaeffer, Pfc. Antonio Y. Urbalejo, Pfc. Alphonso E. Lopez — Map (db m67152) WM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — U.S.S. Arizona 1916 - Wilber L. "Bill" Bower U of A Outstanding Achievement Awards
The bell in this clock tower is one of the two original ship's bells salvaged from the battleship U.S.S. Arizona following the attack on Pearl Harbor, December 7, 1941. In 1944, Wilber L. "Bill" Bowers, UA Class of 1927, discovered the bell about to be melted down at the Puget Sound Naval Yard in Bremerton, Washington. Bowers was instrumental in saving the bell from destruction and in acquiring the bell for the University of Arizona. On November 17, 1951 the bell was rung for the first . . . — Map (db m31199) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — University Streetcar Line
Across from the Main Gate on May 12, 1898, Charles F. Hoff, Manager of the Tucson Street Railway Company, drove the final spike completing tracks to the downtown business district and residential areas farther south. Mule-drawn streetcars traveled a five-mile route along Third Street (University Boulevard) and Stone Avenue; the fare was a nickel. On June 1, 1906, the Tucson Rapid Transit Company inaugurated an electric streetcar system which played a significant role in residential development . . . — Map (db m26194) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Veterans MemorialFort Lowell Park
Dedicated to the enduring memory of the men and women who faithfully served in the military forces of the United States of America and in grateful acknowledgment of their contribution to this nation, which in time of peril, found in them its protectors. — Map (db m28932) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Veterans of the Battle of the BulgeArdennes
Front of monument: World War II December 16, 1944 January 25, 1945 Triumph of Courage Rear of monument: The Battle of the Bulge was fought by the U.S. Army in the heavily forested Ardennes region of eastern Belgium and northern Luxembourg from December 19, 1944 through January 25, 1945. Winston Churchill, Prime Minister of Great Britain, called it "the greatest American battle of World War II" Six hundred thousand American fought in bitter cold and . . . — Map (db m66974) WM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Vietnam War Memorial
In honor and memory of the 616 Arizonans who gave their todays for our tomorrows during the Vietnam War. Names are listed on either side of the marker text Map (db m66975) WM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Villa Catalina
Tucson's first "own your own" apartment homes Circa 1957 National Register of Historic Places US Dept. of the Interior — Map (db m30139) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Warner's Mill
Solomon Warner, a pioneer merchant who came to Tucson in 1856, constructed a two-story flour mill here in 1875. To the south, he built a dam across the Santa Cruz River, creating a small lake. From there, a flume ran along the base of the mountain feeding the raceway and waterwheel which turned two sets of heavy millstones capable of grinding about 100 bushels of locally grown wheat a day. A small stamp mill, powered by the same waterwheel, was used to crush ore from Warner's mines. — Map (db m26344) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — World War I Memorial
1917 World War 1918 Dedicated to Those Who Served Lest We Forget — Map (db m38994) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Tucson — Wyatt Earp Shot Frank Stilwell...
Wyatt Earp joined his four brothers in the silver-boom town of Tombstone in 1879 where brother Virgil was deputy U.S. marshal. Wyatt was a sometimes-lawman himself, and hoped to become sheriff of the newly formed Cochise County in 1881. He withdrew from the race when the other candidate, John Behan, promised to make him chief deputy. Behan was associated with a rowdy element known as the 'cowboys,' who were involved in periodic rustling forays, robberies and similar unscrupulous pursuits. . . . — Map (db m28929) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Vail — Cienega BridgeBuilt 1921
Has been listed in the National Register of Historic Places By the United States Department of the Interior September 30, 1988 — Map (db m67763) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Vail — Colossal Cave Mountain Park
This Property has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places By the United States Department of the Interior Colossal Cave Mountain Park 1934 — Map (db m30613) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Vail — Historic Empire Ranch
Behind you are many of the original buildings of the historic Empire Ranch, established in the 1870s by Edward Nye Fish on 160 acres with a four-room adobe ranch house and corral. In 1876, Walter L. Vail and Herbert R. Hislop purchased the ranch and expanded the original land holdings, livestock and buildings. The Vail family operated the ranch until 1928 when it was purchased by a partnership of the Boice, Gates and Johnson families. Frank Boice and his family lived on and managed the . . . — Map (db m41418) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Vail — The CCC WorkerCamp SP-10-A — Colossal Cave Mountain Park 1934 – 1937
Honoring the young men who served in the Civilian Conservation Corps here and across the nation. With shovel and hammer, trowel and chisel, they moved earth, planted trees, crafted stone, and built structures that shape our landscape and remain a lasting legacy of their service. — Map (db m30614) HM
Arizona (Pima County), Vail — Vail Sonoita Highway
Located and constructed in 1918 by Lamar Cobb First State Engineer of Arizona Member of the Constitutional Convention Born 1870 -- Athens, Georgia Died 1926 -- Phoenix, Arizona Erected to his memory George P. Hunt – Governor — Map (db m27293) HM
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