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Powhatan County Markers
Virginia (Powhatan County), Powhatan — Z 50 — Cumberland County / Powhatan County
(Obverse) Cumberland County Area 293 square miles Formed in 1748 from Goochland, and named for the Duke of Cumberland, second son of King George II. The earliest call for independence came from this county, April 22, 1776. (Reverse) Powhatan County Area 273 square miles Formed in 1777 from Cumberland and Chesterfield and named for Powhatan, the noted Indian ruler. Many Huguenots settled in this county, 1699-1700. Here Robert E. Lee spent the summer of 1865. — Map (db m21144) HM
Virginia (Powhatan County), Powhatan — DerwentRest and Reconciliation
In the summer of 1865, Robert E. Lee and his family resided here at Derwent. Lee had reunited with his wife and children in a rented house in Richmond after he surrendered the Army of Northern Virginia at Appomattox Court House on April 9. Financially broken, uncertain of his future, and ill in health, Lee sought “some small little home in the woods” where he might live simply as a farmer and provide for his family. At the end of June, Mrs. Elizabeth Randolph Cocke offered him . . . — Map (db m18341) HM
Virginia (Powhatan County), Powhatan — Derwent
Built 1841. First called "Cottage Hill." Name changed to "Derwent" in 1859. Robert E. Lee with Mrs. Lee, son Custis and two daughters, Agnes and Mildred, lived here during the summer of 1865 as the guest of Mrs. E.R. Cocke. From this house he encouraged his fellow Southerners to unite in honest efforts to obliterate the effects of war and restore the blessings of peace, to take such work as they could find, to participate in elections, and to labor without needless repining for the . . . — Map (db m18344) HM
Virginia (Powhatan County), Powhatan — O 30 — Derwent
Ten miles north is "Derwent", where Robert E. Lee lived in the summer of 1865 as the guest of Mrs. E. R. Cocke. Lee arrived at "Derwent" early in July. While there he was offered the presidency of Washington College, Lexington, which he accepted on August 24, 1865. On September 15, he left "Derwent" for Lexington. — Map (db m18346) HM
Virginia (Powhatan County), Powhatan — O 25 — Dunlora Academy
Two and a half miles north, on Dunlora plantation then owned by Mrs. Ann Hickman, the Virginia Baptist Education Society established, in 1830, a school for ministers. This school, under the principalship of Rev. Edward Baptist, M.A., was known locally as Dunlora Academy. Edward Baptist resigned in 1832, and the school was removed to Henrico County and then to Richmond. From it developed Richmond College and, later, the University of Richmond. — Map (db m21137) HM
Virginia (Powhatan County), Powhatan — Ewell Crosses the AppomattoxRacing West — Lee’s Retreat
(preface) After Union Gen. Ulysses S. Grant broke through Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee’s lines at Petersburg on April 2, 1865, Lee ordered the evacuation of Petersburg and Richmond. The Army of Northern Virginia retreated west on several roads, with Grant in pursuit. Lee planned to turn south and join Gen. Joseph E. Johnston in North Carolina, but Grant kept part of his force between Lee and his objective. On April 9, surrounded at Appomattox Court House, Lee surrendered. On the . . . — Map (db m18839) HM
Virginia (Powhatan County), Powhatan — O 31 — Giles's Home
Five miles southwest is the Wigwam, the home of William B. Giles, Jefferson's chief lieutenant; United States Senator, 1804-1815, and Governor of Virginia, 1827-1830, an orator and famous political leader. Giles died there, December 4, 1830. — Map (db m21138) HM
Virginia (Powhatan County), Powhatan — O 33 — Huguenot Settlement
Huguenots, the largest single group of French Protestant refugees to come to Virginia, settled near here on the site of a deserted Monacan Indian village during the period 1700-1701. In 1700, the Virginia General Assembly established King William Parish, also known as Huguenot Parish. The Huguenots established a church at this site now known as the Manakin Episcopal Church. — Map (db m21141) HM
Virginia (Powhatan County), Powhatan — Huguenot SpringsConfederate Hospital & Cemetery
In 1862, the spa at Huguenot Springs Hotel became a convalescent hospital for Confederate soldiers. Trains brought patients from Richmond hospitals to Robious Station on the Richmond and Danville Railroad, where they were transferred to wagons for transportation here. Local women served as nurses and treated the men to roast chicken and homemade jellies. Ministers tended to the men’s spiritual needs. After the war, Harvey Hatcher, a Baptist army evangelist, wrote that, “In May, 1863, 1 . . . — Map (db m18331) HM
Virginia (Powhatan County), Powhatan — O 36 — Huguenot Springs Confederate Cemetery
Approximately 250 unidentified Confederate soldiers, who died at nearby Huguenot Springs Confederate Hospital, are buried in unmarked graves about a mile and a half southwest of here. Burial records have never been located. The former Huguenot Springs Hotel Resort/Spa, opened in 1847, was converted to a convalescent hospital during the Civil War. The building was burned about 1890. — Map (db m18332) HM
Virginia (Powhatan County), Powhatan — Lee’s Last BivouacApril 14, 1865
Although Gen. Robert E. Lee surrendered the Army of Northern Virginia at Appomattox Court House on April 9, 1865, the formal surrender ceremonies for his cavalry, artillery, and infantry occurred over the next three days. Lee did not attend. On April 12, after his infantrymen had stacked arms, Lee departed for Richmond and his family. Members of his staff rode with him, including Cols. Walter Taylor and Charles Marshall, as well as Maj. Giles Cooke, confined to an ambulance by wounds suffered a . . . — Map (db m18334) HM
Virginia (Powhatan County), Powhatan — Lee's Final BivouacApril 14, 1865
General Lee, on his journey to Richmond from Appomattox, stopped at Winsor, his brother's farm, to spend the night. But as the house was crowded, he pitched his tent here, the last night he spent under canvas. He took brekfast with the Gilliams, whose proprty he camped on before proceeding the next day. Cocke Camp, SCV — Map (db m18338) HM
Virginia (Powhatan County), Powhatan — OH 10 — Lee's Last Camp
Here Robert E. Lee, riding from Appomattox to Richmond to join his family, pitched his tent for the last time on April 14, 1865. He stopped here to visit his brother, Charles Carter Lee, who lived nearby at Windsor. Not wishing to incommode his brother, Lee camped by the roadside and the next day ended his journey at Richmond. — Map (db m18335) HM
Virginia (Powhatan County), Powhatan — Michaux Grant
Grant of 850 acres (1713) to French Huguenots Abraham Michaux II b. 1672, Cedent, d. 1717, and wife Susanna Laroche Rochet b. 1667, Sedan, d. 1744, seeking religious freedom. Michaux Grant Plantation (1735), operated by family for 260 years. Family: Son Jacob d. 1744 operated ferry; Jacob Michaux, Revolutionary Captain; Joseph Michaux, Member Constitutional Convention 1788; Joseph Michaux, CSA, killed during Lee's Retreat 3 days before Appomattox; Wm Walthall Michaux (d. 1944; Maidens Bridge) & Byrd Sublett Michaux. — Map (db m53563) HM
Virginia (Powhatan County), Powhatan — Mohemenco (A Monacan Village) and Drake House
Col Samuel Drake (1787-1863), justice of the peace, coroner, inn owner, militiaman, son of James Drake (1740-96, Revolutionary soldier, Methodist minister & blacksmith of Little Deep Creek), owned 1048 acres, inc Caxamalca Plantation and 18 slaves. In 1879 Martha Wood (1843-1920), Drake's mulatto ex-slave/nurse appeared in Court for violating miscegenation laws. Her ancestors were Bamileke people of Cameroon, W. Africa. In 1882, Frank Falcon, Belmead freedman/sharecropper, acquired 10 acres inc . . . — Map (db m53565) HM
Virginia (Powhatan County), Powhatan — Monocan Indians Village of Pineville (Michaux)
Capt. Christopher Newport visited here in 1608. The Massinacack Tribe of the Monocan Confederation inhabited this area. Near here are the remains of the once thriving village of Pineville (Michaux) settled by French Huguenots. Four homes built by the Michaux family still stand: Michaux Grant (Abraham Michaux, 1705), Hunters Fare (Jacob Michaux, 1796), Massinacack/Glendale (Miller Michaux, c. 1847), and Beaumont (William Walthall Michaux, 1811). Jacob Michaux operated a ferry across the . . . — Map (db m46889) HM
Virginia (Powhatan County), Powhatan — Mosby’s Tavern / Cumberland Old Courthouse
Mosby’s Tavern Benjamin Mosby operated a tavern on this site as early as 1741 in what was then Goochland County. In 1749 at the formation of Cumberland County, this tavern served as its Courthouse. The sessions were held here until Powhatan County was formed out of Cumberland in 1777; for a time court was held here for both counties. Benjamin Mosby’s son, General Littlebury Mosby Sr., 1729-1809, the most notable figure in early Powhatan politics was instrumental in having the . . . — Map (db m33105) HM
Virginia (Powhatan County), Powhatan — O 3 — Mowhemcho-Manakin Town
Near here stood the Monacan Indian town of Mowhemcho, noted on John Smith's map of 1612. The Monacan homeland encompassed much of Virginia's Piedmont. In 1670, Indian townspeople welcomed explorer John Lederer's party with celebratory "volleys of shot". Colonists destroyed the town and most of the Indian people were killed. French Huguenots settled here in 1700, and Monacan survivors visited them at the site., then called Manakin Town, to trade. By 1722, the Monacan had moved west, along the . . . — Map (db m21142) HM
Virginia (Powhatan County), Powhatan — Muddy Creek School
Muddy Creek School operated from 1875 to 1920. Built by Spencer Palmore of Poland Farm, it is constructed of heart-of-pine logs. The first teacher was Wesley Palmore and the school marked the beginning of formal education for children of the Trenholm area of Powhatan. Muddy Creek Church oversaw restoration and rededication of the school in 1978; much of the work and maintenance was done by Sam Hatcher. Muddy Creek Church was founded in 1774; Robert E. Lee worshipped here in 1865 during his stay at nearby Derwent. — Map (db m18400) HM
Virginia (Powhatan County), Powhatan — Powhatan Court HouseApril 4, 1865 — Lee’s Retreat
(preface) After Union Gen. Ulysses S. Grant broke through Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee’s lines at Petersburg on April 2, 1865, Lee ordered the evacuation of Petersburg and Richmond. The Army of Northern Virginia retreated west on several roads, with Grant in pursuit. Lee planned to turn south and join Gen. Joseph E. Johnston in North Carolina, but Grant kept part of his force between Lee and his objective. On April 9, surrounded at Appomattox Court House, Lee surrendered. Gen. . . . — Map (db m18347) HM
Virginia (Powhatan County), Powhatan — O 32 — Powhatan Courthouse
The first courthouse was built here about 1783 and around it grew the village of Scottville. Named for Revolutionary War Gen. Charles Scott, who was born in the area, the town eventually became known as Powhatan Court House. The present courthouse was designed by Alexander Jackson Davis, of New York, and built in 1849. It is a masterpiece of Greek Revival architecture. The oldest building in the court square is the clerk's office built about 1798 and nearby is a late-18th-century . . . — Map (db m18348) HM
Virginia (Powhatan County), Powhatan — Shiloh Baptist Church
The Church began in 1866 with seventy ex-slaves who met in a private home (Doc Walton), then under a brush arbor, followed by a log cabin church and later in a framed church; this burned in 1898 and was replaced by the present structure. The first pastor was Rev. Daniel White. “The River Jordan” mural, by Julien Binford (who was partly paid for his work with farm produce) graces the archway behind the pulpit (1942). Life magazine featured the mural in the Fall of 1942, which . . . — Map (db m46890) HM
Virginia (Powhatan County), Powhatan — Terre Haute Farm African American Cemetery
Approximately 1 mile southeast of here was a cemetery containing one hundred and sixteen graves associated with the African American community of Huguenot Springs. Historical and archaeological evidence indicates that the cemetery was established prior to the Civil War for enslaved African Americans residing at Terre Haute farm. After emancipation, the cemetery was used by the members of the Huguenot Springs community, with the last recorded interment in 1937. The cemetery was relocated to the . . . — Map (db m18399) HM
Virginia (Powhatan County), Powhatan — The Court HousePowhatan County, Powhatan, Virginia
This Court House 1848-1849 was erected by order of court in quarterly session entered on the 6th day of March 1848 whereby for that purpose were appointed commissioners John W. Nash - Wm. S. Dance R.F. Graves - Philip St. George Cocke The First Court House 1778 or thereabouts was erected at Scottville here, and 1796 the adjacent brick building standing in which was the office of Clerk of Court until 1950 1777 when the county was formed Richard Ligon . . . — Map (db m18349) HM
Virginia (Powhatan County), Powhatan — The Huguenot Monument
(left panel) Upon this tract of land, the Glebe Farm, and near this site was located the first church of the French Protestant refugees. The present and fourth church erected 1895, and dedicated April 13,1896 (center panel) This memorial erected by The Huguenot Society of the Founders of Manakin in the Colony of Virginia 1936 Dedicated April 1937 (right panel) King William Parish Manakintowne Church authorized by an act of the General Assembly held at Williamsburg, Virginia, December 5, 1700 — Map (db m21143) HM
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