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Prince William County Virginia Historical Markers

423 markers matched your search criteria. The first 200 markers are listed. Next 223
 
Colonial Road Marker image, Click for more information
By Kevin White, August 30, 2007
Colonial Road Marker
Virginia (Prince William County), Aden — 33 — Colonial Road
The road bed here follows the south branch of the Dumfries Road, in use before 1740, which crossed Cedar Run at Tacquet’s Ford. This route connected the Port of Dumfries with Red Store, now known as Warrenton, and interior settlements beyond. Dower . . . — Map (db m2260) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Aden — G-17 — Second Prince William County Courthouse
In 1743, the second Prince William County Courthouse was built near here along Cedar Run, replacing the first county courthouse in Woodbridge. After the creation of Fairfax County, the Cedar Run location, owned by Philemon Waters, became the center . . . — Map (db m2487) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Antioch — Antioch Church
Organized April 22, 1837, the nineteen original members of Antioch Baptist Church worshipped in a small log building until the stone church was erected in 1842. Baptisms were held in the creek behind the church. In 1901, the congregation tore down . . . — Map (db m40091) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Antioch — Hopewell GapMountain Pass and Mosby's POW Camp
During the Civil War, this narrow pass in the Bull Run Mountains was a strategic avenue for military movements. On August 28, 1862, during the Second Manassas Campaign, Confederate Gen. James Longstreet directed Gen. Cadmus Wilcox’s division through . . . — Map (db m11834) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Batestown — Little Union Baptist Church
In Memory of John and Mary Thomas Sept. 1901 Little Union Baptist Church [Original Cornerstone]: Little Union Baptist Church Estb. 1903 — Map (db m7305) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Bethel — 26 — Old Bethel Church
In 1850, the people of this area decided to build a church where the Word of God could be preached and expounded. Burr and Emsey Glascock donated the land and were the main leaders. Private donations by the people of the community were a large . . . — Map (db m2332) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Brentsville — Brentsville ”The houses generally are in ruin …”
Brentsville was the Prince William County seat during the Civil War. In response to John Brown’s raid on Harpers Ferry in 1859, the Prince William Cavalry (Co. A, Virginia Cavalry) was formed here on the courthouse lawn in January 1860. The ladies . . . — Map (db m2781) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Brentsville — Brentsville - County Courthouse
This building was constructed by 1822 as Prince William County’s fourth courthouse. The County seat was moved to Brentsville from Dumfries to centralize its location within the county. The Courthouse design is typical of 1800s Virginia courthouses. . . . — Map (db m2797) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Brentsville — Brentsville - County Jail
Built by 1822 with the Courthouse and Clerk’s Office, the Prince William County Jail, or gaol, was larger than most jails built in Virginia at that time. Debtors, runaway slaves, thieves and murderers awaited trial here in timber-lined rooms. . . . — Map (db m2796) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Brentsville — Brentsville - One-Room School
(caption of upper, left picture) The Brentsville School as it appeared ca. 1940. Lucy Walsh Phinney Collection, Gift of Steve and Cynthia Phinney in Memory of Lucy Phinney This school was built in 1928 over the original location of the . . . — Map (db m2827) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Brentsville — Brentsville - The Gallows
The County gallows was located in this area. The gallows was erected when needed then disassembled. It was a grim symbol of the ultimate price of lawbreaking. Gallows were widely used in America to execute the convicted. In 19th-century . . . — Map (db m2746) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Brentsville — Brentsville - The Public Lot
(caption of upper, left picture) Prince William County’s surveyor, Thomas Nelson Jr., recorded this plat of Brentsville on November 30, 1822. The Public Square is outlined in red. The Courthouse, Jail, and Clerk of the Court’s Office . . . — Map (db m2828) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Brentsville — Brentsville - Union Church
Brentsville Union Church was built ca. 1880. The church sits on a lot deeded to The Trustees of the Union Church in 1871 by George M. Goodwin, who owned Tavern Square. It was erected “for the use of the Congregation of the Methodist Episcopal . . . — Map (db m2761) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Brentsville — Brentsville – 1822 Tavern Site
Brentsville – 1822 Tavern Site If you had stood in this spot between 1822 and about 1900, you would have seen a large structure to your right, bustling with activity. This is the site of the Brentsville Tavern, also know as the Brentsville . . . — Map (db m2778) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Brentsville — Brentsville – 1822 Tavern Site
If you had stood in this spot between 1822 and about 1900, you would have seen a large structure to your right, bustling with activity. This is the site of the Brentsville Tavern, also know as the Brentsville Hotel. You would have also seen the . . . — Map (db m2812) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Brentsville — Brentsville – Clerks’ Office
Built by 1822 with the Courthouse and Jail, the Clerk’s Office was located here. The three buildings created a symmetrical design within the Public Lot. The Clerk’s Office was built to be “…26 feet by 16; pitch 18 feet; walls of the foundation . . . — Map (db m2813) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Brentsville — Brentsville – Outbuildings
Tavern Activities The Brentsville Tavern depended on many people working in numerous buildings. Outbuildings likely included a dairy, a smokehouse, a laundry, and housing. The November 22, 1828 Alexandria Gazette described the lot . . . — Map (db m2811) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Brentsville — Brentsville – Tavern Square
Well Improved… The Brentsville Tavern was among many buildings on the Tavern Square. Owner Thomas Hampton’s 1828* notice read: SALE OF VALUABLE PROPERTY AT BRENTSVILLE, PRINCE WILLIAM C.H., VA. On Thursday the 18th day . . . — Map (db m2779) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Brentsville — Brentsville – The Tavern
The Brentsville Tavern was a substantial building. It served a variety of people- from Magistrates to farmers. A notice in the November 22, 1828 Alexandria Gazette advertising the sale of THE BRENTSVILLE HOTEL described the Tavern: . . . — Map (db m2809) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Brentsville — Brentsville –Tavern Cellar
Here, you can see the edges of a large depression. It is located inside ropes that mark the Tavern’s foundation. This feature was one of two cellars underneath the ca. 1822 Tavern building. These cellars were beneath two rooms that flanked the . . . — Map (db m2810) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Brentsville — John W. Hall Home
In 2000, this ca. 1830 “log cabin” home was moved to the Brentsville Courthouse Historic Centre from the Braemer area in Gainesville to save it from demolition. It was the home of John William Hall (1840-1931) who was a Civil War . . . — Map (db m2732) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Bristow — G-20 — Battle of Bristoe Station
In the autumn of 1863, Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia, with Lt. Gen. A. P. Hill’s III Corps in the lead, pursued Maj. Gen. George G. Meade’s Union army as it withdrew towards Washington. On the afternoon of 14 October, Maj. Gen. . . . — Map (db m782) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Bristow — 41 — Brentsville
Fourth seat of the Prince William County government. Courthouse, jail, Episcopal Chapel, and White House were built in 1822 on land originally part of the Brent Town tract confiscated from Robert Bristow, a Tory, in 1779. ♦ St. James Church . . . — Map (db m780) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Bristow — Bristoe StationBristoe 1861-1862 Trail
Welcome to Bristoe Station Battlefield Heritage Park. The park interprets three important Civil war events that took place around Bristoe Station. This trail focuses on the fall 1861 Confederate encampment known as “Camp Jones” and the . . . — Map (db m59032) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Bristow — Bristoe StationRoads to Bristoe Station
In June of 1862, fighting in Virginia was focused around the Confederate Capital in Richmond. In a series of battles known as the Seven Days Campaign, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee beat back Maj. Gen. George B. McClellan’s Federal Army of the . . . — Map (db m59036) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Bristow — Bristoe StationCamp Jones
From August through November of 1861, thousands of Confederate soldiers filled the acres surrounding Bristoe Station. These men belonged to the brigades of Brig. Gens. Henry Whiting and Cadmus Wilcox. This encampment was named Camp Jones after Col. . . . — Map (db m59038) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Bristow — Bristoe StationConfederates in Bristoe
On the afternoon of August 26, 1862, about 350 yards ahead, you would have witnessed a long line of freight trains containing dusty Federal infantrymen passing from the marshalling yards of Alexandria (to your left) on their way to the Federal camps . . . — Map (db m59301) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Bristow — Bristoe StationPreparing for Battle
As dawn broke on August 27, 1862, Stonewall Jackson moved two of his divisions up the railroad to the main Federal supply depot at Manassas Junction, leaving three brigades of Maj. Gen. Richard S. Ewell’s Division as a rear guard at Bristoe. Ewell’s . . . — Map (db m59325) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Bristow — Bristoe StationBattle Along the Railroad
The devastating crossfire provided by the 60th Georgia to your right on the other side of the railroad tracks had nearly an entire Federal brigade pinned down in this field. The Georgians used the cuts and fills along the railroad as a parapet to . . . — Map (db m59402) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Bristow — Bristoe StationDeadly Day for Excelsior Brigade
Prior to the action along the railroad, Brig. Gen. Nelson Taylor’s New York brigade, better known as the “Excelsior Brigade” came into the field here. Knowing little of the situation before arriving on the field, Taylor observed the . . . — Map (db m59407) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Bristow — Bristoe StationThe “Tigers” of Louisiana
In this creek bed, three Louisiana regiments made a stand. These men, many recruited from the wharves of New Orleans, had already established a reputation as hard fighters and were labeled “Tigers” by their comrades. Their brigade . . . — Map (db m59428) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Bristow — Bristoe StationCemeteries
The area around Bristoe became the final resting place for hundreds of soldiers who died in Northern Virginia. Soldiers from Alabama, Mississippi, North Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia created state cemeteries to bury their comrades. Burial details . . . — Map (db m59485) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Bristow — Bristoe StationAlabama Cemetery
In 1862, Federal soldiers in the area found as many as 82 men buried here. Here is a list of known burials in this cemetery as of 2012. As many as 41 are still unknown. William P. Adams Jesse Frank Nabors James Barber William Nunnelly J.G. Booker . . . — Map (db m64198) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Bristow — Bristoe Station“We Shall Bag the Whole Crowd”
By 4:30 pm, Ewell saw the approach of Hooker’s two regiments to the north and the withdrawal of the 60th Georgia along the railroad. In the center, Forno’s Louisianans were already slowly pulling back. The arrival of Federal artillery and more . . . — Map (db m68482) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Bristow — Bristoe StationDavis Family Farmstead
In this vicinity stood the home of Thomas K. Davis and his family. Davis purchased 136 acres in 1858 and by 1861 had built a substantial home, barn and outbuildings here. Davis also operated a store in the village of Bristoe Station at the northwest . . . — Map (db m68483) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Bristow — Bristoe Station Battlefield Heritage Park
Bristoe Station Battlefield Heritage Park is one of Prince William County's most treasured open spaces. This peaceful landscape features over 2.7 miles of walking and equestrian trails. Wildlife abounds in the fields, woods and ponds. Evidence of . . . — Map (db m20177) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Bristow — Confederate Cemeteries
During the late summer of 1861, Confederate troops from Alabama, Mississippi, North Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia camped in the vicinity of Bristoe Station. Typhoid, measles, and other contagious diseases quickly swept through these camps . . . — Map (db m40090) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Bristow — E-54 — Road to the Valley
By the first quarter of the 1700s, revisions to the road laws in the colony mandated more convenient travel routes over land. In conjunction with new settlement pushing west through the Piedmont region to the Blue Ridge, a series of old Indian . . . — Map (db m781) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Broad Run — Chapman's MillHeart of the Battle of Thoroughfare Gap
Beginning late in 1861, the Confederate Subsistence Department used this mill for a meat curing and distribution center and surrounded it with livestock pens. On March 9, 1862, as the Confederate army evacuated northern Virginia to protect Richmond, . . . — Map (db m31312) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Broad Run — Thoroughfare GapA “Dark, Gloomy Cleft” — Mosby’s Confederacy and Second Manassas Campaign
The gap to your left between Biscuit Mountain (the northern promontory of Pond Mountain) on the south and Mother Leathercoat Mountain on the north, described as “that dark, gloomy cleft” in an 1862 issue of Frank Leslie’s Illustrated . . . — Map (db m606) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Catharpin — 61 — Jennie Dean
Jennie Dean (1852-1913) was born in slavery near here. A pioneer in the advancement of education and religion among the black citizens of Prince William County and neighboring counties, Miss Dean founded the Manassas Industrial School for Colored . . . — Map (db m7618) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Catharpin — 60 — Sudley Methodist Church
The site for the first church, a small brick building, was donated by Landon Carter of Woodland in 1822. During the battles of Manassas (Bull Run), it was used as a field hospital by both the North and the South, but was so badly damaged that it was . . . — Map (db m874) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Dale City — 22 — Benita Fitzgerald Drive
Named in honor of Benita Fitzgerald, Olympic Gold Medalist – 100 Meter Hurdles, XXIII Olympiad – 1984 • Pan American Games Champion – 1983 • U.S. National Champion – 1983 and 1986. Benita was born in Warrenton, . . . — Map (db m2333) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Dumfries — “Camp Fisher” Civil War Campsite
The 2nd & 11th Mississippi Infantry Regt’s. (C.S.A.) camped here from Oct 1861 to Mar 1862. They named their camp in observance of the 6th North Carolina’s Camp Fisher (1 Mile to the NW). The 6th N.C. was the first Reg’t. to establish quarters in . . . — Map (db m3820) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Dumfries — Carey M. Perkinson
This building is dedicated to Carey M. Perkinson for his years of service to the Dumfries-Triangle Vol. Fire Dept. & Auxiliary and the Dumfries-Triangle Rescue Squad August 1993 — Map (db m86256) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Dumfries — Colonial Dumfries - Williams Ordinary
Williams Ordinary is believed to have been built in the 1760s, although the exact construction date is unknown. The building’s symmetrical façade features header bond, a brick pattern rarely found in Virginia. This building was one of the most . . . — Map (db m3297) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Dumfries — Dumfries - Love’s Tavern
Dumfries, an important Potomac River port chartered in 1749, became strategically significant in the autumn of 1861 when Confederate forces built batteries along the Potomac River nearby to blockade Washington, D.C. Gen. William H.C. Whiting, . . . — Map (db m3207) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Dumfries — Dumfries Cemetery
At this location stood the Quantico Chapel, a log church, serving the first settlers of Overwharton Parish ca. 1667 — Map (db m7301) HM
Virginia (Prince WIlliam County), Dumfries — E 82 — Dumfries Raid
On 26 December 1862, Maj. Gen. J. E. B. Stuard led 1,800 cavalry out of Fredericksburg on his third and last major raid. Stuart divided his column and on 27 December launched a two-pronged attack on Dumfries, a major Union supply base. The garrison . . . — Map (db m2177) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Dumfries — Dumfries Rest Area
Dedicated May 11, 1965 by Mrs. Lyndon B. Johnson — Map (db m7398) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Dumfries — 15 — Graham Park
Just east of this location along the Quantico creek was the plantation known as Graham Park. This property was patented by John Graham (1711-1787) who came to Virginia from Scotland about 1733. Graham is known as the founder of Dumfries since the . . . — Map (db m519) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Dumfries — E 83 — History of Dumfries
Dumfries, first settled in the early 18th century, became in 1749 the first town in Prince William County chartered by the House of Burgesses. It soon grew in wealth and importance as a major port, rivaling Alexandria, Baltimore, and New York in . . . — Map (db m520) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Dumfries — In Memory — Anderson
In Memory of those who sacrificed their lives in defense of our country — Map (db m7303) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Dumfries — Montclair Veterans Flagpole
Dedicated to the brave Montclair residents who served our country in Operation Desert Storm. — Map (db m7395) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Dumfries — G-18 — Neabsco Mills Ironworks
The Neabsco Mills Ironworks complex, under the ownership of three generations of the Tayloe family, of Richmond County, operated between 1737 and 1828. Located near this site, it was one of the longest continually operating ironworks in present-day . . . — Map (db m2105) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Dumfries — Potomac Path
The Potomac Path, or King’s Highway, was a major transportation route linking the northern and southern colonies in colonial America. Following an ancient Indian trail, the road assumed great importance for overland travel between the colonies and . . . — Map (db m5365) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Dumfries — Prince William County Court House
Dumfries - 1760–1822. Forty yards southerly of this spot stood the third court house of Prince William County. The brick in this monument came from the foundation of this old court house, and was donated present owners of said court house . . . — Map (db m2274) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Dumfries — Quantico Church
This site was the location of the 1745 stone church and the frame edifice of the Dettingen Parish in the twentieth century. Here lies the mortal remains of the Dumfries pioneers, from 1667. — Map (db m7296) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Dumfries — E 53 — Revolutionary War Campaign of 1781
The roads through Prince William County were important routes for the Revolutionary War campaign of 1781. In April, the Marquis de Lafayette passed through the county on the King's Highway with a portion of Gen. George Washington's Continental Army. . . . — Map (db m522) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Dumfries — Revolutionary War Patriots and War of 1812 Veterans
Revolutionary War Patriots and War of 1812 Veterans known to be interred in Historic Dumfries Cemetery Revolutionary War QM Timothy Brundige 1754 - 1822 PVT George Smith 1765 - 1822 Patriot Thomas Cave 1745 - 1802 PVT William Ford - . . . — Map (db m85566) WM
Virginia (Prince William County), Dumfries — Rippon Lodge
Built by Richard Blackburn of Ripon, England circa 1745, Rippon Lodge was home to many noted individuals including Colonel Thomas Blackburn, a former aide to General George Washington, Judge Wade Ellis, a Federal Judge in Washington, D.C., and . . . — Map (db m5366) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Dumfries — 19 — Troop Movements and Camp
Prince William militia opened a road nearby in preparation for the Yorktown Campaign of 1781. French and American cavalry, wagon trains, and cattle unable to use the ferry at Woodbridge, traveled this road, fording the river at Wolf Run Shoals on . . . — Map (db m2166) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Dumfries — Weems Botts Museum
The Weems-Botts House offers a fascinating history on Virginia’s oldest chartered town and two of the more colorful personalities to have lived here: the Rev. Mason Locke Weems and attorney Benjamin Botts. Weems, biographer of George Washington, was . . . — Map (db m5371) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Dumfries — Weems-Botts House
Weems-Botts House Dumfries, Virginia Marked by Bill of Rights Chapter, NSDAR October 6, 1996 Also on the house: This Property has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places by the United States Department of the . . . — Map (db m2360) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Dumfries — Weems-Botts House
Built in 1747, the Weems-Botts House is one of the oldest surviving structures in Dumfries. The smaller, original section of the house comprised two rooms and served as the Quantico Church vestry until the town confiscated it during the American . . . — Map (db m101526) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Dumfries — William Grayson Bandstand Memorial
Erected by The Prince William County Historical Commission in observance of the American Independance Bicentennial 1976 — Map (db m2362) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Dumfries — Williams Ordinary
Built in the form of an eighteenth century mansion, neither a construction date nor a builder for the Ordinary is known. It has been suggested that it was built around 1765 by James Wren because of the many stylistic parallels between it and the . . . — Map (db m5368) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Dumfries — Willoughby Tebbs
Revolutionary War Soldier Willoughby Tebbs 2 LT, QM, Grayson's Regt, VA 1759 - 1803 — Map (db m6129) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Gainesville — Battle of Buckland Mills
On October 19, 1863, 12,000 Confederate and Union cavalry clashed at Buckland. Gen. J.E.B. Stuart, screening the Confederate withdrawal following the Battle of Bristoe Station, blocked the advance of Union Gen. H. Judson Kilpatrick's cavalry . . . — Map (db m58794) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Gainesville — Buckland Mills BattleCuster's Position
(Preface): On October 19, 1863, 12,000 Confederate and Union cavalry clashed at the Battle of Buckland Mills in the last large-scale Confederate victory in Virginia. Gen. J.E.B. Stuart, screening the Confederate infantry’s march to Culpeper . . . — Map (db m19785) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Gainesville — C 31 — Bull Run Battlefields
Just to the east were fought the two battles of Manassas or Bull Run. — Map (db m2013) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Gainesville — C 28 — Campaign of Second Manassas
On 25 Aug. 1862, Maj. Gen. Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson with half of the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia began a wide flanking march around Union Maj. Gen. John Pope’s Army of Virginia on the Rappahannock River near Warrenton. . . . — Map (db m2012) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Gainesville — Lee, Longstreet and Jackson Meeting
This marker erected by the Haymarket Agricultural Club, indicates the spot where General R.E. Lee, General Longstreet, and General Jackson, met on August 29th, 1862, about 12.30 P.M. As certified by Lieut. Col. Edmund Berkeley, sole survivor of the . . . — Map (db m536) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Gainesville — C 33 — Rock Fight
In Aug. 1862, during the Second Battle of Manassas, Confederate Maj. Gen. Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson’s command occupied an unfinished railroad grade northeast of here, including “the Dump,” a gap in the grade heaped with . . . — Map (db m2014) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Gainesville — 27 C — Second Battle of Manassas
The center of Lee’s army rested here on August 30, 1862; Jackson was to the north of this road, Longstreet to the south. Late in the afternoon, after Jackson had repulsed Pope’s assaults, Longstreet moved eastward, driving the Union forces facing . . . — Map (db m2263) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Gainesville — The Macrae School
Between 1914 and 1953, African-American children of the surrounding area attended a two-room schoolhouse a short distance east of here along the Warrenton Turnpike. This was the final location for the Macrae School, originally established in 1870 as . . . — Map (db m40118) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Gainesville — The Shirley Cemetery
This small family cemetery is the final resting place of Richard O. (1802-1857) and Susan (1813-1880) Shirley and possibly several of their six children. Richard Shirley was a farmer and tavern keeper who owned approximately 400 acres of land . . . — Map (db m2168) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Gainsville — 66 — Buckland
The town of Buckland, named for William Buckland, Architect, was chartered in 1798 with streets and lots on both sides of Broad Run near the mill of John Love. Tranquility, future site of Buckland Hall nearby, was John Love’s seat. This property was . . . — Map (db m1083) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Groveton — Attack at Deep CutSecond Battle of Manassas — Day Three - August 30, 1862 - 3 p.m.
Full-throated cheers greeted the order to attack. More than 6,000 Union soldiers under General Fitz John Porter poured across the road into the fields of Lucinda Dogan's farm. As the blue-clad lines traversed the open ground, a massive concentration . . . — Map (db m58856) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Haymarket — Ambush at Ewell’s ChapelHis Men Quickly Scattered
Acting on good intelligence, Union Gen. George G. Meade ordered a trap set here for Maj. John Singleton Mosby and his band of partisan rangers on the morning of June 22, 1863. With a small detachment of the 17th Pennsylvania Cavalry exposed as bait, . . . — Map (db m1562) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Haymarket — 65 — Colonial Roads
The town of Haymarket, chartered in 1799, owes its location to the junction of the Old Carolina Road and the north branch of the Dumfries Road at the site of the Red House. The Carolina Road developed from the Iroquois hunting path which was . . . — Map (db m766) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Haymarket — Haymarket During the Civil War“Pass Around Their Army Without Hindrance” — Gettysburg Campaign
On June 25, 1863, Confederate Gen. J.E.B. Stuart and about 5,000 of his cavalrymen approached Haymarket. They acted on orders from commanding Gen. Robert E. Lee, who was on the western side of the Bull Run Mountains marching north to invade . . . — Map (db m1551) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Haymarket — Haymarket During the WarCivilian Hardships
Throughout the Civil War, Haymarket and its residents endured the consequences of occupying an important geographical location. Marching armies passed through the town during the First and Second Battles of Manassas, the engagement at Thoroughfare . . . — Map (db m768) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Haymarket — Haymarket Post OfficeCirca - 1885
What we now call The Haymarket Post Office has served this community in many ways. The land was purchased by George A. Hulfish in 1883 and the structure was erected in 1885 with a recorded tax assessment of $350. It is believed that the . . . — Map (db m69639) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Haymarket — F 14 — Simon Kenton’s Birthplace
Near Hopewell Gap, five miles west, Simon Kenton was born, 1755. Leaving home in 1771, he became an associate of Daniel Boone and George Rogers Clark in Indian fighting. He won fame as a scout and as one of the founders of Kentucky. Kenton died in . . . — Map (db m106) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Haymarket — St. Paul's, Episcopal
The oldest church in continuous service in Prince William County. Erected in 1801, this building was a district courthouse for four counties 1803-09; Hygeia Academy 1814-1816. Bought by William Skinker 1822, thence used by Episcopaleans and . . . — Map (db m60675) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Haymarket — 63 — The Carolina Road
The Carolina Road, earlier an Indian hunting path, roughly approximating Route 15 at this point, derived its name from trade between Frederick, Maryland, and Georgia. Later the road was used by settlers emigrating to western lands. Because of . . . — Map (db m105) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Independent Hill — Quantico Baptist Church
Site of an early 19th Century Meeting House. In 1888 it became a Primitive Baptist Church under Pastor William M. Smoot. It was commonly known as Smootite Church. Foundation stones and an octagonal tapered bearing post remain. — Map (db m83869) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Kopp — Belle Haven Baptist Church
December 20, 1885 – September 30, 1945 Property donated by Thomas Woolfenden, Sr. who moved from Baltimore in 1880, after serving three years in the Civil War, to Prince William County and he named it wonderful Prince William County. . . . — Map (db m77138) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Kopp — Range 14 Training Complex
Dedicated to the Memory of Eric Paul Bertaud Second Lieutenant, USMC Company D, The Basic School February 20, 1970 - July 29, 1993 — Map (db m4173) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Leesylvania State Park — "A Pacific Paradise on the Potomac"
"A Pacific Paradise on the Potomac," suggests the type of atmosphere that existed at Freestone Point in July, 1957. The S.S. Freestone, a gambling ship, was the main attraction of an exciting new recreational resort. Even though it was illegal to . . . — Map (db m5334) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Leesylvania State Park — "At the Point of Rock"
“At the point of rock,” the translation of the American Indian word Neabsco, describes clearly the high bluff of land in front of you known as Freestone Point. The location of Freestone Point is indicated on maps from the 18th Century . . . — Map (db m5333) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Leesylvania State Park — 9 — "Light Horse Harry" Lee
Henry Lee III "Light Horse Harry" 1756 - 1818 1776 - 1781 Cavalry Commander 1779 Awarded Congressional Medal 1786 - 1788 Member, Continental Congress 1791 - 1794 Governor of Virginia 1799 - 1801 Member, U.S. Congress . . . — Map (db m5303) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Leesylvania State Park — A Fight on the Potomac
A Fight on the Potomac took place here on September 25, 1861. According to Confederate Sgt. Wilmot Walter Curry, his unit was ordered to construct a battery at Freestone Point in order to deflect attention from larger, more permanent batteries . . . — Map (db m70917) HM WM
Virginia (Prince William County), Leesylvania State Park — A Railroad Runs Through It
The railway line that lies between Neabsco and Powells Creek was completed in 1872 by the Alexandria and Fredericksburg Railroad. This was no easy taks considering the steep terrain, which required numerous deep cuts and fills to maintain a gentle . . . — Map (db m5252) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Leesylvania State Park — Freestone Point EarthworksBlockading the Potomac
On August 22, 1861, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee issued orders to blockade the Potomac River by building a series of artillery positions that would command the sailing channel. One of these positions was on the grounds of his ancestral home, . . . — Map (db m4820) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Leesylvania State Park — Powells Creek Crossing
Efforts began in 1864, but it wasn’t until July 2, 1872, with the aid of the Pennsylvania Railroad, that this section of rail line opened for service. The crossing at Powell’s Creek was 1,100 feet in length and constructed of heavy timber supplied . . . — Map (db m5251) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Leesylvania State Park — The Freestone Point Hunt Club
The Freestone Point Hunt Club was established in 1926 by a group of businessmen from New York. The large waterfowl populations found along the Potomac, and the proximity of the railroad made Freestone Point both attractive and accessible to hunters . . . — Map (db m5332) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Leesylvania State Park — The Lee and Fairfax Family Cemetery
The Lee and Fairfax Family Cemetery is located on this ridge top overlooking the Occoquan Bay. The Lees established the cemetery with the death of Henry Lee II on August 15, 1787. His wife Lucy Lee, the only other member of the Lee family to be . . . — Map (db m5254) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Leesylvania State Park — The Lee Family Cemetery
This is the burial site of Henry Lee (d. 1787) and his wife Lucy Grymes (d. 1792). They were married in 1753, and their home, Leesylvania, stood on the ridge to the east. Henry Lee was County Lieutenant and Presiding Justice of Prince William County . . . — Map (db m5328) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — "...Like a Stone Wall" — First Battle of Manassas
On the brow of the hill Brig. Gen. Bernard Bee was desperately trying to rally his men when he caught sight of Thomas J. Jackson with fresh troops here at the edge of the pine thicket. "Look!" Bee shouted. "There stands Jackson like a stone wall! . . . — Map (db m8304) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — "The Very Vortex of Hell"Second Battle of Manassas — Day Three - August 30, 1862 - 4:15 p.m.
From their position atop this ridge, the soldiers of the 5th New York Infantry listened to the crash of battle. It appeared the regiment had escaped combat that day. Most of the fighting raged one mile to the north near Deep Cut. Around 4 p.m. an . . . — Map (db m58858) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — “The Unfinished Railroad”
These cuts and fills are what remain of the Independent Line of the Manassas Gap Railroad. The Independent Line was constructed in the mid-1850s to connect Gainesville, 5 miles to the west, with Alexandria, 25 miles to the east. After completing the . . . — Map (db m658) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 10th New York Vol. InfantryNational Zouaves
Erected by the State of New York, to commemorate the patriotic services of the 10th Reg't New York Volunteers National Zouaves Mustered into the U.S. Service April 27th 1861. Reorganized as a Battalion, April 27th 1863. Participated in 23 . . . — Map (db m9836) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 13th New York InfantrySecond Battle of Manassas
August 30, 1862 3:15 p.m. 1st Brigade (Roberts), First Division (Morell) Fifth Corps (Porter), Army of the Potomac, USA 13th New York Infantry ("Rochester Regiment") Col. Elisha G. Marshall "The Rebel infantry poured in their volleys, and we . . . — Map (db m18310) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 15th Alabama InfantrySecond Battle of Manassas
August 30, 1862 3:15 p.m. Trimble's Brigade (Brown) Ewell's Division (Lawton) Left Wing (Jackson) Army of Northern Virginia, CSA 15th Alabama Infantry Maj. A. A. Lowther "On the right the Federals were in an old field in plain view, and the . . . — Map (db m18360) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 15th Alabama InfantrySecond Battle of Manassas
August 28, 1862 7:15 p.m. Trimble's Brigade, Ewell's Division Left Wing (Jackson) Army of Northern Virginia, CSA 15th Alabama Infantry Maj. A. A. Lowther "My position in line at this fence was in the immediate rear of Alonzo Watson. We were . . . — Map (db m39316) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 19th Indiana Infantry — Second Battle of Manassas
August 28, 1862 7:00 p.m. 4th Brigade (Gibbon), First Division (King) Third Corps (McDowell), Army of Virginia, USA 19th Indiana Infantry Col. Solomon Meredith "The enemy was secreted under cover of a fence and did not make their appearance . . . — Map (db m8430) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 20th New York State Militia"Ulster Guard" — Second Battle of Manassas
August 30, 1862 3:15 p.m. 3rd Brigade (Patrick), First Division (Hatch) Third Corps (McDowell) Army of Virginia (Pope), USA 20th New York State Militia (80th New York Volunteers) "Ulster Guard" Col. George W. Pratt "The order was given to . . . — Map (db m18359) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 21st Georgia InfantrySecond Battle of Manassas
August 28, 1862 7:15 p.m. Trimble's Brigade, Ewell's Division Left Wing (Jackson) Army of Northern Virginia, CSA 21st Georgia INfantry Capt. Thomas C. Glover "The fence being reached, the work of death commenced at short range. From this fence . . . — Map (db m18298) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 21st North Carolina InfantrySecond Battle of Manassas
August 28, 1862 7:15 p.m. Trimble's Brigade, Ewell's Division Left Wing (Jackson) Army of Northern Virginia, CSA 21st North Carolina Infantry Lt. Col. Sanders Fulton "We halted at this fence, quickly tore it down, and piled the rails in front. . . . — Map (db m39432) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 24th New York InfantrySecond Battle of Manassas
August 30, 1862 3:15 p.m. 1st Brigade (Sullivan), First Division (Hatch) Third Corps (McDowell), Army of Virginia, USA 24th New York Infantry ("Oswego Regiment") Maj. Andrew Barney "Those of us on the embankment were too few to even attempt to . . . — Map (db m18317) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 26th Georgia InfantrySecond Battle of Manassas
August 28, 1862 7:15 p.m. Lawton's Brigade, Ewell's Division Left Wing (Jackson) Army of Northern Virginia, CSA 26th Georgia Infantry Maj. Eli S. Griffin "We were ordered in just after dark. We marched steadily across an open field for about . . . — Map (db m18358) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 2nd New Hampshire Infantry — First Battle of Manassas
July 21, 1861 11:00 a.m. 2nd Brigade (Burnside), Second Division (Hunter) Army of Northeastern Virginia, USA 2nd New Hampshire Infantry Col. Gilman Marston "With the 71st New York State Militia on its left, the 2nd New Hampshire rushed to . . . — Map (db m9734) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 2nd Rhode Island Infantry — First Battle of Manassas
July 21, 1861 11:00 a.m. 2nd Brigade (Burnside) Army of Northeastern Virginia, USA 2nd Rhode Island Infantry Col. John S. Slocum "The 2nd was hotly engaged and made so gallant a fight as to push the enemy off the plateau and partly down . . . — Map (db m9737) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 2nd Wisconsin InfantrySecond Battle of Manassas
August 28, 1862 7:00 p.m. 4th Brigade (Gibbon), First Division (King) Third Corps (McDowell), Army of Virginia, USA 2nd Wisconsin Infantry Col. Edgar O'Conner "Rebel infantry poured from the woods by the thousands. We were precisely on the . . . — Map (db m8467) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 4th Alabama Infantry — First Battle of Manassas
July 21, 1861 11:00 a.m. 3rd Brigade (Bee) Army of the Shenandoah (Johnson), CSA 4th Alabama Infantry Col. Egbert J. Jones "Our regiment had scarcely emerged from the timber before a murderous fire was opened on us by the Yankees. Our . . . — Map (db m9730) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 4th South Carolina Infantry — First Battle of Manassas
July 21, 1861 6:30 a.m. 7th Brigade (Evans) Army of the Potomac (Beauregard), CSA 4th South Carolina Infantry Col. J.B.E. Sloan "Just before day on Sunday morning those of us on post nearest the Warrenton Turnpike heard the enemy . . . — Map (db m9740) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 5th Regiment New York Volunteer InfantryDuryee Zouaves
Erected by the State of New York September 29, 1906, to commemorate the heroic services of the 5th Regiment New York Volunteer Infantry (Duryee Zouaves) ———————————— Here, . . . — Map (db m9839) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 6th Wisconsin InfantrySecond Battle of Manassas
August 28, 1862 7:00 p.m. 4th Brigade (Gibbon), First Division (King) Third Corps (McDowell), Army of Virginia, USA 6th Wisconsin Infantry Col. Lysander Cutler "When at short range, Colonel Cutler ordered the regiment to halt and fire. We were . . . — Map (db m39317) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 71st New York State Militia — First Battle of Manassas
July 21, 1861 11:00 a.m. 2nd Brigade (Burnside), 2nd Division (Hunter) Army of Northeastern Virginia, USA 71st New York State Militia Col. Henry P. Martin "The Alabama 4th, which had long ago expressed, in print, their desire to meet the . . . — Map (db m9733) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 73rd Ohio Infantry — Second Battle of Manassas
August 30, 1862 5:00 p.m. 2nd Brigade (McLean), First Division (Schenk) First Corps (Sigel), Army of Virginia, USA 73rd Ohio Infantry Col. Orland Smith "The enemy in our front, moving in concert with those on our flank, came out of the . . . — Map (db m9788) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 76th New York InfantrySecond Battle of Manassas
August 28, 1862 7:15 p.m. 2nd Brigade (Doubleday), First Division (King) Third Corps (McDowell), Army of Virginia, USA 76th New York Infantry ("Cortland County Regiment") Col. W.P. Wainwright "Waving their colors defiantly, the rebels advanced . . . — Map (db m18278) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 7th Georgia Markers
Sometime after 1903, veterans of the 7th Georgia Infantry erected at least six markers on the Manassas battlefield to locate battle positions. Only this marker and one other approximately 350 yards southeast of here survive. Colonel Francis S. . . . — Map (db m8236) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 7th Georgia Markers
Veterans of the 7th Georgia Infantry selected Manassas Battlefield as the site of their annual reunion in 1905. During their visit the group erected seven marble markers to denote the different positions occupied by the regiment at both battles. All . . . — Map (db m90619) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 7th Georgia Regiment
5th Position 7th GA Regt. July 21, 1861. — Map (db m101444) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 7th Wisconsin InfantrySecond Battle of Manassas
August 28, 1862 7:00 p.m. 4th Brigade (Gibbon), First Division (King) Third Corps (McDowell), Army of Virginia, USA 7th Wisconsin Infantry Col. William W. Robinson "We soon found that we had to deal with General Ewell's whole division of . . . — Map (db m39372) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 83rd Pennsylvania InfantrySecond Battle of Manassas
August 30, 1862 3:30 p.m. 3rd Brigade (Butterfield), First Division (Morell) Fifth Corps (Porter), Army of the Potomac, USA 83rd Pennsylvania Infantry Capt. Thomas F. McCoy "The whole brigade went back pell mell together. It is probable that . . . — Map (db m18314) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 8th Georgia Infantry — First Battle of Manassas
July 21, 1861 11:00 a.m. 2nd Brigade (Bartow) Army of the Shenandoah (Johnson), CSA 8th Georgia Infantry Lt. Col. W.M. Gardner "Away we went straight into the teeth of the murderous fire. We entered a thicket and were within 100 yards of . . . — Map (db m9731) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — A Debt Repaid
The stone rubble is all that remains of Christian Hill, the postwar home of Amos and Margaret Benson. Following the First Battle of Manassas, the Bensons discovered a wounded Union soldier, Private John Rice of the 2nd New Hampshire Infantry, left . . . — Map (db m62052) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — A Stand Up FightSecond Battle of Manassas — Day One - August 28, 1862 - Nightfall
Union Brig. Gen. John Gibbon advanced through the woods with his men intent on driving off the Confederate artillery. Discovering Stonewall Jackson's infantry in force and "...finding that the regiment had become badly involved I ordered the . . . — Map (db m58808) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — G-19 — Action at Bristoe Station
On 26 August 1862 Maj. Gen. Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson’s command, led by Col. Thomas T. Munford’s 2d Virginia Cavalry and Maj. Gen. Richard S. Ewell’s division, arrived here at sunset after marching 54 miles in two days around Maj. . . . — Map (db m4852) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Archeology at Brawner Farm
Once the scene of bloody combat, Brawner Farm sits today in a quiet corner of Manassas Battlefield. Archeologists have conducted multiple investigations of the property, which have uncovered the site of several structures and unearthed thousands of . . . — Map (db m88513) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Artillery DuelFirst Battle of Manassas — July 21, 1861 2 p.m.
General Irvin McDowell felt confident that victory was at hand. The Federal flanking column had marched around and behind the Confederate defenses along Bull Run. Nearly 18,000 troops were at, or en route, to the front. Confederate resistance on . . . — Map (db m90819) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Attack From Matthews HillCannoneer's-Eye View — First Battle of Manassas
From the ridge beyond Stone House 15,000 Federals were swiftly advancing in this direction. Confederate Capt. John Imboden rushed four cannon into position here, to try to slow the Federal attack. Behind this slight rise the artillerists had some . . . — Map (db m8229) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Battery HeightsSecond Battle of Manassas — Day One - August 28, 1862 - 6:30 p.m.
As General Rufus King's Union division marched eastward along the Warrenton Turnpike (U.S. Route 29 today), they came under fire from Confederate artillery on the distant ridge. Captain Joseph Campbell's Battery B, 4th U.S. Artillery wheeled off the . . . — Map (db m58895) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Battlefield of Bull Run or First Manassas
July 21, 1861. Confederates under General Beauregard defeated Federals under General McDowell. General Jackson given name of “Stonewall” on this field. Generals Bee and Bartow killed. Old stone house used as hospital. This marker erected . . . — Map (db m840) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Battling for the Rocky KnollSecond Battle of Manassas — Day Two - August 29, 1862
Stonewall Jackson's defensive line extended nearly two miles - from Sudley Church to the Brawner Farm. Many of his 24,000 troops were posted behind the cuts and fills of the unfinished railroad grade before you. The formidable position enabled . . . — Map (db m88517) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Ben LomondPringle House Hospital
On July 21, 1861, as elements of the Stonewall Brigade marched to the Manassas battlefield on the road behind you, officers converted the Pringle house (also called Ben Lomond) into a temporary field hospital. Soon wounded Confederates flooded the . . . — Map (db m43311) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — 49 — Ben Lomond Farm
The Federal style stone, “Manor” house and its accessory buildings are the visible reminders of Ben Lomond Farm, which was begun in about 1830 by Benjamin Tasker Chinn, the grandson of Robert “Councillor” Carter. Ben Lomond . . . — Map (db m43313) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Blocking the Union Advance — First Battle of Manassas
Knowing they were badly outnumbered, Evans' 900 Confederates stared across this open field, waiting for the enemy to appear over the crest of the hill. Their only hope was to slow the 15,000-man Federal column long enough for reinforcements to . . . — Map (db m9660) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Blocking the Union AdvanceFirst Battle of Manassas — July 21, 1861 10:30 a.m.
After Departing their position near the Stone Bridge, Confederate troops under Colonel Nathan Evans deployed on this ground to intercept the enemy flanking column advancing southward on the Sudley Road. Knowing they were outnumbered, their only hope . . . — Map (db m101452) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Brigadier General Francis Stebbings Bartow
Born Savannah Georgia, Sept. 16, 1816 Mortally wounded on this spot, July 21, 1861 Commanded 7th, 8th, 9th & 11th Georgia & 1st Kentucky Regiments The first Confederate officer to give his life on the field. — Map (db m593) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Brooklyn Fourteenth
14th Regiment N.Y.S.M. (84th Regiment N.Y. Vols.) This monument is erected in commemoration of the dead of the regiment in the battles of First Bull Run, July 21, 1861 • Gainesville, August 28, 1862 • Groveton, August 29, 1862 • Second Bull Run, . . . — Map (db m14082) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Brownsville
During the Civil War, the William M. Lewis plantation “Brownsville” consisted of 400 acres of land, a large family residence, and numerous outbuildings. Four of the buildings housed a total of twenty-two slaves. Here stood the main . . . — Map (db m14174) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — C-48 — Campaign of Second Manassas
Here Taliaferro, of Jackson’s force, came into the highway in the late night of August 27, 1862. He was marching from Manassas to the position about a mile and a half to the north held by Jackson in the Second Battle of Manassas. — Map (db m604) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Carter Cemetery
Over 70 members of the Carter family rest in this cemetery – spanning multiple generations and two centuries of continuous ownership. The graves are arranged in a linear pattern, although none are marked with an inscribed headstone. The . . . — Map (db m62819) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Cavalry Clash — Second Battle of Manassas - Day Three - August 30, 1862
These open fields and low hills make idea terrain for a cavalry fight. Here on the Lewis property, John Buford's cavalry was guarding the Union Army's left flank during the retreat from Henry Hill. Scouts reported Rebel cavalry approaching fast. . . . — Map (db m9758) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Cavalry ClashSecond Battle of Manassas — Day Three - August 30, 1862 - 6 p.m.
As fighting stalled along Sudley Road, Union and Confederate cavalry partook in the final drama of the battle here on the grounds of Portici. Southern horsemen attempted to dash behind the Union army and cut their escape route. Anticipating this . . . — Map (db m59008) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Charge on Griffin’s GunsRaw Recruits: The 33rd Va. Infantry — First Battle of Manassas
The Virginians were waiting, tense, here at the wood’s edge—their first time under bombardment. Shells from Ricketts’ battery exploded in the boughs overhead and plowed up the ground in front. When the two Union cannon rolled into position on . . . — Map (db m895) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Chinn RidgeSecond Battle of Manassas - Day Three — August 30, 1862
The massive Confederate counterattack appeared unstoppable. General James Longstreet’s wing of the army – upwards of 28,000 troops – steadily pushed east toward Henry Hill. If the Confederates occupied that plateau, ironically the same . . . — Map (db m88714) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Church During WartimeFirst Battle of Manassas
People were on their way to worship—some already in the church yard—when thousands of Federal soldiers suddenly appeared marching south Sudley Road. Within minutes the sound of gunfire came from the direction of Matthews Hill. As wounded . . . — Map (db m878) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Colonel Cameron
of the 79th New York Regiment was killed here on July 21, 1861. Battle of First Manassas (Bull Run) — Map (db m8231) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Colonel Fletcher Webster
In memory of Colonel Fletcher Webster Who here fell August 30, 1862 while gallantly leading his regiment the 12th Mass. Volunteers This memorial was dedicated Oct. 21, 1914 by survivors of his regiment and Fletcher Webster Post, G.A.R. of . . . — Map (db m8469) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Colonel Thomas
of Johnston's staff was killed here July 21, 1861. Battle of First Manassas (Bull Run) — Map (db m8238) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Company B, 4th U.S. ArtillerySecond Battle of Manassas
August 28, 1862 6:30 p.m. 1st Division (King), Third Corps (McDowell), Army of Virginia, USA Company B, 4th U.S. Artillery Capt. Joseph B. Campbell Six 12-pounder Napoleons "Campbell's pieces came up on the gallop, these fences along the pike . . . — Map (db m17476) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Confederate CounterattackSecond Battle of Manassas — Day Three - August 30, 1862 - 4 p.m.
Generals Robert E. Lee and James Longstreet both concluded the moment had arrived to launch a massive Confederate offensive at Second Manassas. Longstreet's wing of the army - nearly 30,000 troops - stood primed to sweep forward and sever the Union . . . — Map (db m58861) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Confederate HeadquartersPortici — First Battle of Manassas
Fought in civilian's fields and front yards, the battle had a terrible intimacy. At this site stood the Lewis home, "Portici" (Por-TEE-cee) - a large plantation. Most Confederate regiments passed through the Lewis property during the twelve hours of . . . — Map (db m9757) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Confederate HeadquartersFirst Battle of Manassas — July 21, 1861
Portici made an idea headquarters for Confederate General Joseph E. Johnston. From here he had a commanding view of the main roads and surrounding countryside. Throughout the day Confederate regiments passed through the Lewis property en route to . . . — Map (db m59007) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Confederates Rally — First Battle of Manassas
This field was a scene of confusion. Shells were exploding all around. Hot, tired, shot-up during the retreat from Matthews Hill, Confederate units had fallen out of line and were milling about. They felt they'd lost the battle and maybe the war. . . . — Map (db m8206) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Confederates RallyFirst Battle of Manassas — July 21, 1861 12:30 p.m.
Many Confederates felt they had lost the battle - perhaps the war. At that moment Generals Johnston and P.G.T Beauregard arrived on Henry Hill and began to rally the scattered regiments. The fugitives started to reform behind fresh reinforcements . . . — Map (db m101441) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Counterattack — First Battle of Manassas
Dead cannoneers lay in rows between their cannon, dead horses along the back slope; the Union guns were immobilized yet still a magnet for both armies. Up this slope marched the 14th Brooklyn, resplendent in Zouave uniforms. They managed to . . . — Map (db m896) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Death of Fletcher Webster — Second Battle of Manassas - Day Three - August 30, 1862
On the morning of the 30th, Col. Fletcher Webster wrote his wife: "If a fight comes off, it will be to-day or to-morrow & will be a most dreadful & decisive one. This may be my last letter, dear love, for I shall not spare myself..." About 5 p.m., . . . — Map (db m9828) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Death of Fletcher Webster
Colonel Fletcher Webster fell mortally wounded near here, leading his regiment in support of the cannon on Chinn Ridge. The colonel, son of the famous orator and statesman Daniel Webster, commanded the 12th Massachusetts Infantry - a regiment he . . . — Map (db m94601) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Deep CutPorter's Attack — Second Battle of Manassas - Day Three - August 30, 1862
Before the attack, soldiers massed in the woods behind the present day road - 10,000 men under Maj. Gen. Fitz John Porter. This would be the major Union attack of Second Manassas. At 3 p.m., a lieutenant in Berdan's Sharpshooters addressed his . . . — Map (db m18361) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Defeat and DisarrayFirst Battle of Manassas — July 21, 1861 5 p.m.
By day's end the Confederates held Henry Hill, capturing eight of the eleven Union cannon brought atop this plateau. Rebel reinforcements extended the battle lines across Sudley Road to neighboring Chinn Ridge (one-half mile ahead of you). Federal . . . — Map (db m89201) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Defending the Cannon5th Maine Battery — Second Battle of Manassas - Day Three - August 30, 1862
Picture Longstreet's advance - gray lines of Confederates as far as you can see, driving Ohio troops from the rail fence across the field toward this position. Here four gun crews from Maine were trying to load and fire faster than they ever had in . . . — Map (db m9806) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Defending the CannonSecond Battle of Manassas — Day Three August 30, 1862 5:30 p.m.
As the Ohioans strived to delay the Confederates, Federal reinforcements rushed to Chinn Ridge in support. With these troops came the 5th Battery, Maine Light Artillery, under the temporary command of Lt. William F. Twitchell. The five guns . . . — Map (db m94600) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Dunklin Monument
T. L. Dunklin, of Co. E. 4th. Texas Regt. Born at Abberdeen Miss. March 25th. 1841, Fell at 2nd. Battle of Mannassas, Aug. 30th. 1862; Defending his Country. ——— — Map (db m14418) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Dying in LineSecond Battle of Manassas — Day One - August 28, 1862
At Brawner Farm there was little maneuvering. Union and Confederate infantry stood in parade-style lines fifty yards apart. At that range they could not miss. The soldiers fired volley after volley for two hours, with only a few fence rails and ruts . . . — Map (db m8402) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Farm Ford — First Battle of Manassas
July 21, 1861 Here, about 11:00 a.m., Col. William T. Sherman led his four regiments across Bull Run and joined the Union drive toward Henry Hill. Later that day the ford was used again, this time by the retreating Union army. — Map (db m9738) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Farm FordFirst Battle of Manassas — July 21, 1861 - 11 a.m.
Colonel William T. Sherman spent the morning searching for a location suitable for his brigade to cross Bull Run. He ruled out the Stone Bridge - its narrow span stood too exposed, and rumors circulated that the bridge was mined. Turning his . . . — Map (db m63040) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Federal Artillery Position — Second Battle of Manassas
August 29 & 30, 1862 Federal Artillery Position A succession of Union artillery batteries occupied this ridge throughout August 29 and 30, 1862. August 29 Company I, 1st Ohio Light Artillery Capt. Hubert Dilger (9-11 a.m.) 2nd Battery, New . . . — Map (db m9855) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Federal Artillery Positions — Second Battle of Manassas
August 29 and 30, 1862 Federal Artillery Positions From the John Dogan House northward to this point, Union batteries occupied this ridge throughout the Second Battle of Manassas. At one time on August 30 more than thirty guns were firing from . . . — Map (db m15919) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Field Hospital
After both battles U.S. Army surgeons used the small frame house and outbuildings that stood on this property: "In about two hours, Sudley Church was completely filled and I was obliged to take possession of three other unoccupied buildings. As . . . — Map (db m9749) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Fight at the Fence LineSecond Battle of Manassas — Day Three August 30, 1862 4:30 p.m.
Colonel Nathaniel McLean braced his men for the coming onslaught. The Union officer, a civilian attorney with no prewar military background, commanded 1,200 Ohioans on Chinn Ridge. The ground directly in front of his brigade was open at the time of . . . — Map (db m94597) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Fight at the Fenceline — Second Battle of Manassas - Day Three - August 30, 1862
From the left and rear came wave after wave of Confederates. At that moment the only troops facing them were two regiments of Ohio infantry taking cover behind the rail fence. (The Ohioans knew what was coming: they had witnessed the few surviving . . . — Map (db m9759) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Fighting in TwilightThe Hatch-Hood Collision — Second Battle of Manassas - Day Two - August 29, 1862
Officers said the Rebels were retreating. Hatch’s Division was ordered to pursue. Marching double-quick west on the turnpike, the Federals reached this hill just after sundown. Suddenly the ridge erupted with fire. In the . . . — Map (db m873) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Final StruggleFirst Battle of Manassas — July 21, 1861 3 - 4 p.m.
Up the slope marched Federal troops, determined to retake the cannons lost moments earlier. The bodies of slain artillerists and infantrymen littered the landscape. The Yankees recaptured Griffin's two guns and attempted to drag the two pieces to . . . — Map (db m89145) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — C-34 — First Battle of Manassas
Henry Hill lies just to the south. Here the Confederates repulsed the repeated attacks of the Union army under McDowell. July 21, 1861. Here Jackson won the name “Stonewall” and from here began McDowell’s retreat that ended at Washington. — Map (db m596) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — C-44 — First Battle of Manassas
On the Matthews Hill, just to the north, the Confederates repulsed the attack of the Unionists, coming from the north, in the forenoon of July 21, 1861. The Union forces, reinforced, drove the Confederates to the Henry Hill, just to the south. There . . . — Map (db m602) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — First Brigade(The Stonewall Brigade) — Second Battle of Manassas
August 28, 1862 7:00 p.m. Jackson's Division (W. B. Taliaferro) Left Wing (Jackson) Army of Northern Virginia, CSA First Brigade (The Stonewall Brigade) Col. William S. Baylor 2nd Virginia 5th Virginia 4th Virginia 27th Virginia 33rd Virginia . . . — Map (db m8465) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — First Brigade(The Stonewall Brigade) — Second Battle of Manassas
August 30, 1862 3:15 p.m. Jackson's Division (Starke) Left Wing (Jackson) Army of Northern Virginia, CSA First Brigade (The Stonewall Brigade) Col. William S. Baylor 2nd Virginia 5th Virginia 4th Virginia 27th Virginia 33rd Virginia "The . . . — Map (db m18300) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — First ContactFirst Battle of Manassas — July 21, 1861 - 10 a.m.
The head of General Irvin McDowell's flanking column reached Matthews Hill shortly after 10 a.m. Progress had been slow. The rookie soldiers frequently broke ranks to rest. Some stopped to pick blackberries. More than 13,000 Union troops lagged . . . — Map (db m58975) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Fourth BrigadeSecond Battle of Manassas
August 30, 1862 3:15 p.m. Jackson's Division (Starke), Left Wing (Jackson) Army of Northern Virgina, CSA Fourth Brigade Col. Leroy A. Stafford 1st Louisiana 10th Louisiana 2nd Louisiana 15th Louisiana 9th Louisiana Coppens' Battalion "The . . . — Map (db m18333) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Frank Head
Frank Head, Color Bearer of the 14th Brooklyn Regiment, was killed here on July 21, 1861. Battle of First Manassas (Bull Run) — Map (db m94608) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — General Barnard Elliott Bee
General Barnard Elliott Bee of South Carolina Commander, Third Brigade Army of the Shenandoah was killed here July 21, 1861 Just before his death to rally his scattered troops he gave this command “Form. form. There stands Jackson like a . . . — Map (db m540) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — George T. Stovall
This marble marks the spot where fell George T. Stovall of the Rome Light Guards, 8th Regt. Georgia Volunteers in the battle of July 21, 1861. Born at Augusta, GA, April 25, 1835. His life he devoted to his God and sacrificed in his country's . . . — Map (db m1996) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Groveton – Second Battle of Bull Run
August 30, 1862. Confederates under Generals Lee, Jackson and Longstreet defeated Federals under General Pope. General Longstreet dined at Old Dogan House. Fierce fight of R.R. cut half mile northwest. — Map (db m871) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Groveton Confederate Cemetery
Neither side had anticipated the war's cost in blood. After the fighting at Manassas, burial details dug shallow graves where soldiers had fallen. There was little time for ceremony. Crude wooden headboards sometimes noted the soldier's name and . . . — Map (db m58897) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Groveton Monument
Like its companion monument on Henry Hill, this obelisk was constructed by Union soldiers at the close of the Civil War. It honors the Federal dead of the Second Battle of Manassas. The monument was dedicated on June 11, 1865. Souvenir hunters later . . . — Map (db m90825) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Hazel Plain
In 1860, Benjamin Chinn and his family lived here in a two-and-a-half story frame farmhouse. Known as "Hazel Plain," the modest plantation comprised several hundred acres. The property was typical of those in Prince William County, yielding wheat, . . . — Map (db m58865) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Henry HillFirst Battle of Manassas — July 21, 1861
Today's serene and peaceful fields belie the carnage that occurred here on July 21, 1861, when Union and Confederate troops clashed at the first major land battle of the Civil War - the First Battle of Manassas (Bull Run). The Heaviest and most . . . — Map (db m90820) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Henry Hill Walking TourRetracing the Battle — First Battle of Manassas
On the tour route you follow in the footsteps of charging Union and Confederate troops, and stand where they loaded cannon or braced for a bayonet assault. Terrain and tree lines have changed little since that day. As you walk imagine deafening . . . — Map (db m8270) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — G-15 — Henry House
These are the grounds of the Henry House, where occurred the main action of the First Battle of Manassas, July 21, 1861, and the closing scene of the Second Battle of Manassas, August 30, 1862. — Map (db m600) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Historic Farm Road Trace — First Battle of Manassas
Brig. Gen. Thomas J. Jackson's First Virginia Brigade, plus artillery, marched from Confederate headquarters at the Lewis House ("Portici") along this wagon path to Henry Hill, arriving here about noon. — Map (db m8299) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Historic Landscape Restoration
In 1997 the National Park Service and the Smithsonian Institution began to develop a proposal at Manassas National Battlefield Park to mitigate the loss of wetlands resulting from the construction of the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, a National Air . . . — Map (db m8374) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Historic Road TraceManassas National Battlefield Park
The road trace before you once linked the Spring Hill Farm (Henry Hill) and the Portici plantation. Both of these properties figured prominently at First Manassas and the narrow path connecting them became a conduit for Confederate troop movements. . . . — Map (db m101440) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Honoring the Dead — First Battle of Manassas
Union Soldiers built Henry Hill Monument to commemorate those who died at First Bull Run (Manassas). For many Civil War veterans this had been their first battle. Intense memories drew both Union and Confederate soldiers back to this scene years . . . — Map (db m33211) HM
Virginia (Prince William County), Manassas — Honoring the Dead
One of the earliest endeavors to remember the fallen occurred soon after the war concluded. Union troops stationed at nearby Fairfax Court House, many of whom had recently served on burial duty at the battlefield, recognized the need for a fitting . . . — Map (db m94594) HM

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