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Queen Anne's County Markers
Maryland (Queen Anne's County), Carmichael — “Cheston on Wye”
→ Surveyed as “Cheston” 1659 for John and William Coursey containing 800 acres—six generations of Courseys (who adopted the older spelling of DeCourcey) lived here and lie buried here. The original house was burned. — Map (db m3135) HM
Maryland (Queen Anne's County), Carmichael — “Wye Plantation”
→ Home of William Paca, signer of the Declaration of Independence and twice Governor of Maryland. Born at Chilbury Hall, Harford County 1740. Died and lies buried here, 1799. The unusual house probably dates about 1740. — Map (db m3137) HM
Maryland (Queen Anne's County), Carmichael — Governor Robert Wright
Born in Queen Anne's County, 1752, educated at Washington College. Rose to rank of captain in Revolutionary War. Served in State Assembly; elected to U.S. Senate 1801. Chosen 13th governor of Maryland 1806, twice re-elected, later member of U.S. Congress and Maryland Court of Appeals. Died 1826; buried at Cheston on the Wye. — Map (db m3896) HM
Maryland (Queen Anne's County), Carmichael — Stagwell
Patented to Thomas Stagwell 1649. Acquired by Richard Bennett 1706, one of the largest land owners in Maryland. His descendant Judge Richard Bennett Carmichael built the house about 1805. He presided over the convention of 1867, for a new constitution for the State of Maryland. — Map (db m3134) HM
Maryland (Queen Anne's County), Carmichael — Wye Island
→ Patented to Col. Philemon Lloyd as “Lloyd’s Insula” 1682, a combination of four earlier patents. Henrietta Maria Lloyd married Samuel Chew and their daughters married William Paca 3rd Governor of Maryland and John Beale Bordley, who inherited the island half to each from Philemon Lloyd Chew in 1770. — Map (db m5532) HM
Maryland (Queen Anne's County), Centreville — Birthplace of Charles Willson Peale
     First Free School of Queen Anne’s County erected near here 1724. Its sixth master was Charles Peale, father of the distinguished portrait painter and museum founder—born 1741 in living quarters near the school.      Luther Martin, renowned Barister, was among the school’s masters who later attained distinction in public service. The school’s visitors were local colonial leaders and among the pupils were many of the forefathers of the County’s prominent citizens. — Map (db m3110) HM
Maryland (Queen Anne's County), Centreville — Centrally Located
Although Centreville wasn't incorporated until 1794, colonial settlement of the county dates back to the 1630s. When officials decided to move the county seat and its supporting government functions, they chose a name that reflected its location and a spelling that signaled American's post Revolutionary War admiration of France. Street names such as Liberty and Commerce reflected the hopes of a newborn nation built on trade. If You Build It, They Will Come In 1796, the . . . — Map (db m62553) HM
Maryland (Queen Anne's County), Centreville — Honor • Valor • WWI • WWII • Korea • Vietnam
To honor the veterans of Queen Anne’s County who served their country in time of war and especially those who made the supreme sacrifice so that we and future generations may enjoy freedom. — Map (db m3106) WM
Maryland (Queen Anne's County), Centreville — Maryland's Eastern ShoreHundreds of Enslaved and Free Black Men Enlisted
Although isolated from Maryland's largest population centers, the Eastern Shore was important to the state's role in the Civil War and exemplified the citizens' divided loyalties. In the years before the war, enslaved African-Americans here began escaping bondage via the Underground Railroad to the North and Canada, helped on their way by sympathetic blacks and whites and such courageous "conductors" as Harriet Tubman, an Eastern Shore native. During the war, hundreds of enslaved and free . . . — Map (db m21455) HM
Maryland (Queen Anne's County), Centreville — Queen Anne’s County
In 1631 William Claiborne established the first settlement in Maryland. A fort and trading post on Kent Island, the westernmost part of Queen Anne's County. On April 18, 1706, during the reign of Queen Anne, the County received its name from the Colonial House of Delegates to which it sent its first delegate on September 12, 1708. The county seat, first located in Queenstown, was moved to Centreville circa 1784. — Map (db m3104) HM
Maryland (Queen Anne's County), Centreville — Site of Goldsborough HouseCirca 1798
By that year, a 2-story brick house, measuring 40 by 24 feet and described as “not yet fully complete,” was built on a 4-acre lot of “Chesterfield,” deeded in 1792 from Mary Nicholson to her daughter Henrietta. Henritta’s husband, Dr. John Bracco, died, and by 1799 she had married Dr. Robert Goldsborough. The property descended through the Goldsborough and McKenney families. The house was demolished in 1963. — Map (db m3109) HM
Maryland (Queen Anne's County), Centreville — The Brass Pin
The brass pin in the adjoining sidewalk marks the former location of the stone known as "P.G. No. 1", recognized since 1791 as the beginning point of the "Public Ground" now occupied by the Court House and the reference point for all of the original lots in the town of "Centre Ville". — Map (db m62294) HM
Maryland (Queen Anne's County), Centreville — The CourthouseQueen Anne’s County
Oldest courthouse in continuous use in the State of Maryland. The building was authorized by Acts of Assemby after the removal of the County Seat from Queenstown to Chester Mills, later Centreville. It was erected between 1791 and 1796 on land purchased from Elizabeth Nicholson on her portion of “Chesterfield,” the estate of her grandfather, William Sweatnam. — Map (db m3103) HM
Maryland (Queen Anne's County), Centreville — Wright’s Chance
Early plantation house with original paneling. Listed as an “old dwelling” in a 1744 resurvey of “Smith’s Forrest,” patented 1681. Moved 1964 by the Queen Anne’s County Historical Society to present site, part of “Chesterfield”, upon which the town of Centreville was founded. — Map (db m3107) HM
Maryland (Queen Anne's County), Chester — Maryland's Eastern ShoreHundreds of Enslaved and Free Black Men Enlisted
Although isolated from Maryland's largest population centers, the Eastern Shore was important to the state's role in the Civil War and exemplified the citizens' divided loyalties. In the years before the war, enslaved African-Americans here began escaping bondage via the Underground Railroad to the North and Canada, helped on their way by sympathetic blacks and whites and such courageous "conductors" as Harriet Tubman, an Eastern Shore native. During the war, hundreds of enslaved and free . . . — Map (db m8329) HM
Maryland (Queen Anne's County), Church Hill — Joshua Seney
Beneath this stone are interred the remains of Joshua Seney who was born near the spot which now contains his ashes March 4, 1756 and died October 20, 1798. From the commencement of the American Revolution at various periods of his life he filled, with ability, some of the highest stations and discharged, with integrity, some of the most important duties to which his native state could appoint him; preserving through the whole a character both private and public unstained by a single vice. . . . — Map (db m3101) HM
Maryland (Queen Anne's County), Church Hill — St. Luke’s Episcopal Parish
Founded 1728, when the Provincial Council in Annapolis granted a petition to establish the present parish. St. Luke’s, the oldest brick church in the State with its original structure, was completed, 1732, at the cost of 140,000 pounds of tobacco. From 1692 until 1732 services were held in the up river chapel, located on the present site. All records are preserved intact, including births, baptisms, marriages, burials, vestry meetings and special occasions. — Map (db m3099) HM
Maryland (Queen Anne's County), Cordova — St. Joseph’s Church
Originally a mission of Old Bohemia founded March 18, 1765, by Father Joseph Mosley, S.J. Oldest section built 1782, additions made 1848 and 1903. Father Mosley is one of three priests interred under Chapel. Since 1868, except during wars, annual jousting tournments held here on first Wednesday of August. — Map (db m3157) HM
Maryland (Queen Anne's County), Crumpton — Callister’s Ferry
Near this spot Henry Callister, Merchant, operated a rope and raft ferry across the Chester River during the 1750’s and 1760’s. Well into the next century the crossing at Crumpton continued to be known as “Callister’s Ferry.” It served as an important link in early overland transportation on the upper Eastern Shore. — Map (db m3254) HM
Maryland (Queen Anne's County), Grasonville — Island in the Marsh: a hummockChesapeake Bay Environmental Center
Rising above the salt marsh is a wooded island called a hummock. Here, loblolly pine, bayberry, and holly take root in the drier soil and protect wildlife from the challenging conditions of the open marsh. Who takes shelter in the hummock? *Deer and foxes hid in the undergrowth. *Red-bellied woodpeckers and northern flickers nest in the pines. *Bald eagles roost on high branches. — Map (db m69918) HM
Maryland (Queen Anne's County), Queenstown — "Clover Field"1622 Acres
Patented to William Hensley in 1730 as a resurvey of several earlier tracts granted in the sixteen hundreds. The house contains some fine woodwork. The Hemsley graveyard has some interesting tombs. — Map (db m3894) HM
Maryland (Queen Anne's County), Queenstown — “Bloomingdale”
Patented 7 June, 1665, by Captain Robert Morris as “Mount Mill.” Purchased by Jacob Seth 1685, acquired about 1820 by Edward Harris whose heirs Misses Mary and Sallie Harris renamed it “Bloomingdale.” It passed under will of Miss Sallie Harris to her cousin Severn Teakle Wallis, one of Maryland’s most distinguished sons. — Map (db m3130) HM
Maryland (Queen Anne's County), Queenstown — “Lord’s Gift”
1050 Acres. Granted to Henry Coursey, 1658. 1000 acres by order of Lord Baltimore for “conspicuous faithfulness to him during the late contest” (the Uprising of 1652 by Richard Bennett and William Claiborne). The 50 acres were for transporting himself into the Colony. This is the tract known as the “Thumbgrant” of legendary origin. — Map (db m3118) HM
Maryland (Queen Anne's County), Queenstown — “Morgan’s Neck” / Richard Bennett III and Elizabeth Rousby
“Morgan’s Neck” “Morgan’s Neck” (300 acres) was patented by Cecil Calvert on January 26, 1658, to “Henry Morgan, of the Isle of Kent, gentleman,” for transporting into the province Frances Malyn and Francis Ash. The tract descended to his daughter Frances Sayer, in 1674; and to Elizabeth Rousby, his granddaughter, in 1698. Elizabeth Rousby married Richard Bennett, III, grandson of the puritan Governor of Virginia. Their dwelling nearby was excavated in . . . — Map (db m3125) HM
Maryland (Queen Anne's County), Queenstown — Battle of Slippery HillAugust 13, 1813
American Videttes skirmished with approximately 300 British troops under the command of Col. Sir Thomas Sidney Beckwith as they advanced on Queenstown along this road. Two British soldiers and Beckwith’s horse were killed. Fearful of being cut off by a second British amphibious force, Maj. William H. Nicholson, commander of the Queen Anne’s County militia, withdrew to Centreville. — Map (db m3115) HM
Maryland (Queen Anne's County), Queenstown — Bennett’s Point Farm
Originally called “Morgan’s Neck.” Surveyed in 1658 for Henry Morgan of the “Isle of Kent” as two tracts of 150 acres each. Henry Morgan was given the land for transporting two indentured servants into the province. The tracts descended to Morgan’s wife Frances in 1663 and to his daughter Frances Sayer, wife of Col. Peter Sayer, in 1676. In 1698, the farm passed to Elizabeth Rousby, granddaughter of Henry Morgan, and wife of Richard Bennett III. It left ownership of . . . — Map (db m3128) HM
Maryland (Queen Anne's County), Queenstown — Bowlingly
     Estate patented to James Bowling, 1658, and present manor house built 1733. East-west wing added about 1830.      Before dawn, August 2, 1813, British troops under Sir Charles James Napier landed here and after defeating the local militia seriously damaged the manor house and its contents before reembarking. — Map (db m3116) HM
Maryland (Queen Anne's County), Queenstown — Bowlingly
→ Surveyed 15 September, 1658, for James Bowling as “Bowlingley.” Patented to John Tully May 29, 1660. On August 20-30, 1813, the attack on Queenstown by the British led by Sir James Napier under Sir John Warren took place here; the forces were landed at Blakeford, failing to capture American troops the British retired to Kent Island Narrows. — Map (db m3117) HM
Maryland (Queen Anne's County), Queenstown — Chesapeake College
This first regional college in Maryland and first two-year community college on the Eastern Shore was founded December 22, 1965, and classes began on the campus September 1969. the sponsors include the State of Maryland and Caroline, Kent, Queen Anne’s and Talbot Counties. — Map (db m3132) HM
Maryland (Queen Anne's County), Queenstown — Colonial Courthouse
The frame section of the structure dates to circa 1708 and is consistent with other Maryland courthouses in size, form, character and materials. The brick section was added circa 1820–40. Laws in the 18th century mostly were enforced by fines, but records show that more serious punishments were given. In 1718, a whipping post was erected at Queenstown. Records reveal that some offenders were subjected to lashing, time in the stocks, branding, or execution by hanging in gallows Field, . . . — Map (db m3111) HM
Maryland (Queen Anne's County), Queenstown — Governor William Grason
Born near this site in 1788. Took office January 1, 1839. As the first popularly elected Governor of Maryland. Remembered as an advocate of financial reform in government. Village of Grasonville named in his honor. He died near here on July 2, 1868. — Map (db m34225) HM
Maryland (Queen Anne's County), Queenstown — Historic Points
→ Cheston-On-Wye Stagwell Wye Plantation Wye Island — Map (db m3133) HM
Maryland (Queen Anne's County), Queenstown — QueenstownDivided Loyalties
Queenstown, like most of the Eastern Shore in 1861, was a slaveholding community, and the impending conflict was regarded with concern and fear. When war erupted, families were torn apart because of their conflicting loyalities. It was not uncommon for some family members to be in the Confederate army and others in the Union. The war took its toll on white Queenstown residents. With the Emancipation Proclamation of 1863 and the 1864 Maryland constitutions abolution of slavery, many slave . . . — Map (db m3113) HM
Maryland (Queen Anne's County), Queenstown — St. Peter’s Church(Roman Catholic)
Congregation first organized c 1639 on nearby Kent Island by Rev. John Altham, S.J. St. Peter’s was est. Feb. 3, 1765, by Rev. Joseph Mosely, S.J. of St. Joseph’s, Talbot Co. A 1760 bequest of 50 lbs. from Edward Neale of “Bowlingly” provided 1½ acre lot here, on which brick chapel was built before 1784. (Demolished 1960). Part of present structure begun 1823 by Rev. James Moynihan, completed 1827 by rev. Peter Veulemans. The aspe, nave and vestibule are major additions 1877 under Rev. Ed. Henchy. — Map (db m3129) HM
Maryland (Queen Anne's County), Queenstown — Surprise at Queenstown
The British set out from Kent Island to attack Queenstown on August 13, 1813. The land and water contingents numbered 300 troops each. Intending to surprise the Queen Anne's County militia, they mistakenly fired, warning the Americans. British barges missed their intended landing point at Bowlingly, arriving at Blakeford instead. These errors enabled the militia to escape to Centreville. The British retaliated by ransacking Bowlingly, a prominent home in Queenstown. The skirmish that foiled the . . . — Map (db m67254) HM
Maryland (Queen Anne's County), Queenstown — War in the Chesapeake
During the War of 1812 the young United States was embroiled in conflict with Great Britain. From 1812 to 1815 Americans fought to protect their rights and economic independence. They faced superior enemy forces on the homefront and the high seas. The strategically important Chesapeake Bay region felt the brunt of the war, choked by shipping blockades and ravaged by enemy raids. The evens in this region were crucial to the outcome of the war. Though there was no clear victor at the . . . — Map (db m67252) HM
Maryland (Queen Anne's County), Stevensville — Broad Creek Cemetery
Broad Creek was established as the site of Christ Church sometime between 1651 and 1684. At that time, Broad Creek was the center of colonial activity on the Island. From 1712 to 1826, three additions or entirely new church structures were built on the site, until the Church moved to the Stevensville location (Historic Christ Church) in 1880. The original church foundations at Broad Creek were excavated and marked in 1956. Broad Creek was also the site of the church cemetery. In 2003, . . . — Map (db m67251) HM
Maryland (Queen Anne's County), Stevensville — Christ ChurchTown of Broad Creek
First Christian congregation in Maryland organized 1632 by the Reverend Richard James at Kent Fort, south end of island. Church moved here ca. 1650. Rebuilt 1712 and 1826. This oldest continuous congregation in Maryland moved to Stevensville in 1880. — Map (db m3138) HM
Maryland (Queen Anne's County), Stevensville — Kent Island“The Isle of Kent”
William Claiborne of Virginia established a trading post, settlement and fort at the southern end of this island in 1631. Lord Baltimore’s rights were resisted, which led to serious controversy until taken by armed forces in 1637. — Map (db m3139) HM
Maryland (Queen Anne's County), Sudlersville — Dudley's ChapelBuilt in 1783 on land donated by Joshua Dudley
This is the first Methodist meeting house erected in Queen Anne’s County, as an outgrowth of a Society organized in 1774. It is one of the earliest surviving Methodist Churches in Maryland. Bishops Francis Asbury, Thomas Coke and Richard Whatcoat preached here. The brick Chapel was renovated and restored to its present appearance in 1883. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1979. — Map (db m3098) HM
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