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Richland County Markers
265 markers matched your search criteria. The first 250 markers are listed. Next 15
South Carolina (Richland County), near Irmo — 40-95 — St. Paul Church / Oak Grove
St. Paul Church One of the first black churches after the Civil War, St. Paul AME began as Oak Grove African Methodist Episcopal Church. Local tradition says that the original small congregation worshipped in the 1850s in the "Bush Arbor;" later in the 1880s building a church on present Kennerly Rd. In the 1930s this was moved to its present site 3/10 mi. N. Oak Grove By 1870 a substantial black settlement had developed in this area of the Dutch Fork Township known as Oak Grove. . . . — Map (db m35996) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Blythewood — 40-162 — Bethel Baptist Church
Bethel Baptist Church was founded in 1884 by black members of nearby Sandy Level Baptist Church seeking to organize a separate congregation. They met at first in a brush arbor, then built a frame sanctuary here in 1892. It was covered in granite veneer in 1952. The church also sponsored the Bethel School, which stood behind the church. The present sanctuary was built in 2003. — Map (db m43391) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Blythewood — 40-135 — George P. Hoffman House
(Front text) This house was built ca. 1855 for George P. Hoffman (1829-1902), a native of N.C. Hoffman ran a nearby sawmill and became the first postmaster of Doko (as Blythewood was first known) in 1856. This area was part of Fairfield County until 1913, when it was annexed into Richland County. Capt. John L. Kennedy owned the house during the Civil War; his widow Judith owned it afterwards. (Reverse text) This house was one of several ransacked by Gen. W.T. Sherman’s . . . — Map (db m42607) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Blythewood — 40-137 — Sandfield Baptist Church / Sandfield Cemetery
Sandfield Baptist Church Twenty-Five Mile Creek Church, a Primitive Baptist congregation, was organized in this area before 1772. It was renamed Sandfield Church by ca. 1830 and the mother church for Cedar Creek, Harmony, Jackson Creek, and Sawney’s Creek. After some members left in 1840 to organize a new church this congregation became Sandy Level Baptist Church in 1843. Sandfield Cemetery In 1856 Sandy Level Baptist Church built a new church 3 mi. W on Blythewood Rd. The . . . — Map (db m43103) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Blythewood — 40-138 — Sandy Level Baptist Church
(Front text) Twenty-Five Mile Creek Church, a Primitive Baptist congregation, was organized in this area before 1772. The mother church for several area Baptist churches, it was renamed Sandfield ca. 1830 and stood about 3 mi. E. Sandfield Baptist Church was renamed Sandy Level Baptist Church in 1843 and the congregation moved to this site in 1856. (Reverse text) This frame sanctuary, built in 1856 during the pastorate of Rev. A.K. Durham, was described at its dedication as . . . — Map (db m42996) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-4 — "Chesnut Cottage"
Temporary wartime home of Gen. and Mrs. James Chesnut. Here they entertained Jefferson Davis, president, C. S. A., and his staff, October 5, 1864. President Davis addressed the citizens of Columbia from the front steps of this cottage. — Map (db m27960) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-3 — "Commissioners' Oak"
In April 1786 Alexander Gillon, Henry Pendleton, Richard Winn, Richard Hampton, and Thomas Taylor, Commissioners appointed to lay out Columbia, are said to have met under an oak which grew near here. According to tradition the first court and jury in Richland County also met here. — Map (db m46449) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — "The Spirit of the American Doughboy "E. M. Viquesney
(Right panel) World War I was largly fought in trenches six feet deep along the Western Front which extended nearly four hundred miles, from Northern France to the French-Swiss border. Enemy trenches were close by and seperated from allied positions by barbed wire and open fields. By Armistance Day, November 11, 1918, the American forces commanded eighty-three miles of the Western Front, more than the Belgian, British, and British Commonwealth forces. Map (db m43912) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — "The Spirit of the American Doughboy"
Dedicated to The Memory Of Our Comrades Who Gave Their Lives In The World War ----------------- Presented by The people of the Pacific Community November 11, 1930 (Followed by list of 11 names) (Reverse side) Pacific Community Honor Roll 1917-1918 (Followed by list of 224 names in four columns) — Map (db m42065) WM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 1896 Power Plant
To meet growing demands for electricity, the Columbia Water and Power Company constructed this power plant, the Columbia Hydro Plant, in 1896. It replaced the 1894 power facility upstream. This Hydro Plant provided power for city lights, trolleys and manufacturing plants. Still operating with its original turbines, it is owned by the City of Columbia, and operated by SCG&E. The brick powerhouse contains seven turbine-generators with a total of 10,600 kilowatts, and produces about 48 million kilowatts per year. — Map (db m7351) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 9 -11 / First Responders
South Carolina Remembers the 2752 victims and 416 First Responders from New York City that gave their lives on September 11, 2001 — Map (db m50333) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — A Bridge to the Past
In 1819 a covered bridge was built to span this part of the Saluda River. Confederate Troops burned the bridge in 1865 hoping to stop the advance of General Sherman's army. The burning didn't halt Sherman -- he ordered the construction of a floating bridge built from timber cut at the Saluda Mill, located a few hundred yards upstream. Today, four granite abutments remain from the original bridge and can be seen on each side of the river and the islands in between. — Map (db m45031) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — A Tribute To All U.S. Military Personnel On This Day Of Infamy
In memory of the 2403 men who gave their lives in our military forces during the attack on Pearl Harbor and other military bases 7 December 1941 A tribute to all U.S. Military Personnel on this Day Of Infamy Dedicated 2 September 1995 by Members of Chapter 1 South Carolina Pearl Harbor Survivors Association who fought on to victory Remember Pearl Harbor Keep America Alert (Back side includes:) Thomas Aldridge    Frazier . . . — Map (db m45075) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-183 — A.S. Salley House
(side 1) Alexander Samuel Salley 1871-1961), the historian described as a “walking encyclopedia” of S.C. history, lived here from 1910 until his death. Salley, born in Orangeburg County, was secretary of the S.C. Historical Society in Charleston 1899-1905 and founding editor of the S.C. Historical & Genealogical Magazine. He was secretary of the Historical Commission of S.C. 1905-1949, preserving and publishing many state historical records. (Continued . . . — Map (db m72734) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — African-American History Monument
[South Panel]: Gang of 25 Sea Island Cotton and Rice Negroes by Louis De Saussure On Thursday, the 25th Sept., 1852, at 11 o'clock A.M. will be sold by Ryan's Mart, in Chalmers Street, in the City of Charleston, A prime gang of 25 Negroes accustomed to the culture of Sea Island Cotton and Rice Map (db m50922) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-152 — Allen University
(Front) Allen University, chartered in 1880, was founded by the African Methodist Episcopal (A.M.E.) Church. It had its origin in Payne Institute, founded in 1870 in Cokesbury, in Greenwood County. In 1880 the S.C. Conference of the A.M.E. Church voted to move Payne Institute to Columbia. It opened in Columbia in 1881 and was renamed in honor of Bishop Richard Allen (1760-1831), founder of the A.M.E. Church. The first university building on this site was in use by 1888. . . . — Map (db m53954) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — Arsenal Hill
Occupying the highest point in downtown Columbia, Arsenal Hill is named for the military academy established here in 1842 as a companion to The Citadel in Charleston. Since the late 1700s, this 30 block neighborhood has been home to black and white, elite and laborer, old and young. Within this once largely residential district stand enduring landmarks of the past and new additions to the capital city's skyline that are prized for thier proximity to downtown businesses and services. . . . — Map (db m41643) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — Arsenal Hill
Situated within the two-mile square grid that defined Columbia's original city limits in 1786, Arsenal Hill enjoys the distinction of being one of the second state capital's oldest neighborhoods. Established by the 1820's as a fashionable residential neighborhood, Arsenal Hill recieved its name from the Palmetto Armory, founded here in 1850. In 1869, the former officer's quarters of Arsenal Academy, a military school that operated from 1842 to 1865, began serving as the South Carolina . . . — Map (db m41837) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-90 — Assembly Street
In 1786, when Columbia was established as the State Capital, the General Assembly decided that two principal thoroughfares should run perpendicular to each other through the center of town. One of these, Assembly Street, was named for the General Assembly, which first met in Columbia in 1790 in South Carolina's new State House, a building designed by James Hoban, who later designed the White House. — Map (db m7498) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-105 — Barnwell Street
This street is named for General John Barnwell, St. Helena's Parish. He was elected to the Provincial Congress of 1775-76 and to the 1776 General Assembly.   A captain in the First Provincial Regiment, he was major, colonel and brigadier general in the militia, 1779-81. Barnwell was captured in Charlestown in 1780 and later imprisoned on the schooner Pack-Horse. From 1778 until his death in 1800, he served several terms in the S.C. Senate. — Map (db m51236) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — Battleship Maine Memorial
This gun came off the Battleship Maine The Sinking of the Maine resulted in the Spanish American War 1898 — Map (db m7503) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-147 — Benedict College
Front Benedict College, founded in 1870 by the American Baptist Home Mission Society to educate freedmen and their descendants, was originally called Benedict Institute. It was named for Stephen and Bathsheba Benedict of Rhode Island, whose bequest created the school. Mrs. Benedict donated money to buy land in Columbia for it. The institute was chartered as Benedict College in 1894. Its early presidents were all white Baptist ministers from the North. Reverse By the . . . — Map (db m52787) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — Benjamin Franklin Randolph Monument
In Memoriam B.F. Randolph Late State Senator for Orangeburg County, and Chairman Republican State Central Committee, who died at Hodges Station Abbeville County at the hands of assassins on Friday Oct. 13 A.D. 1868. — Map (db m50962) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — Benjamin Ryan Tillman
[North]: Born August 11, 1847 - Died July 3, 1918 Married Sallie Starke January 8, 1868 Patriot • Statesman Governor of South Carolina 1890-1894 United States Senate 1895-1918 In the World War, Chairman Senate Committee on Naval Affairs A Life of Service and Achievement [West]: In the Home Loving; Loyal to the State; Steadfast, True for the Nation. The country belongs to us and and we all belong to it. The men of the North, South, East and West . . . — Map (db m50899) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-150 — Bethel A.M.E. Church
(Front text) This church, founded in 1866, was one of the first separate African-American congregations established in Columbia after the Civil War. It met in buildings on Wayne St., at Lincoln & Hampton Sts., and at Sumter & Hampton Sts. before acquiring this site. This sanctuary, a Romanesque Revival design, was built in 1921 and was designed by noted black architect John Anderson Lankford (1874-1946). (Reverse text) John Anderson Lankford, one of the first registered . . . — Map (db m28074) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-123 — Bethel Methodist Church
This church was organized in 1835 in what was then rural Richland District. The first sanctuary here, built soon afterwards, burned in a forest fire in 1867; the cemetery dates from as early as 1862. The second sanctuary, built in 1868, was remodeled about 1890. As Forest Acres grew after World War II, the church expanded and built its first brick sanctuary in 1948; the present church was built in 1964. — Map (db m43709) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-25 — Birthplace of General Maxcy Gregg
Maxcy Gregg, Confederate General and leader in Southern Rights Movement, was born Aug. 1, 1815 in a house on this site. Member of committee which framed the ordinance of secession, Dec. 1860; Colonel 1st Regiment South Carolina Volunteers; Brigadier General in 1861. Mortally wounded at Fredericksburg Dec. 13, 1862; died two days later. — Map (db m21775) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-66 — Blanding Street
Originally named Walnut Street, Blanding Street was by 1869 renamed for Abram Blanding, a Massachusetts native who came to Columbia in 1797 to take charge of Columbia Male Academy. Blanding was admitted to the bar in 1802 and served two terms in the legislature. He built the city's first water works, was a Trustee of South Carolina College, and S.C. Superintendent of Public Works. His house was located on the NW corner of Blanding and Marion streets. Blanding died in 1839. — Map (db m21823) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-78 — Blossom Street
This street is thought to take its name from the cotton blossom. Cotton became an important commercial crop in South Carolina after the cotton gin was patented by Eli Whitney in 1794. A variety of cotton, known as Sea Island cotton and grown along coastal South Carolina, was especially prized for its long staple. — Map (db m21777) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-149 — Blossom Street School / Celia Dial Saxon School
Blossom Street School Blossom Street School, at the corner of what was then Blossom & Gates (now Park) Streets, was built in 1898 as the first public school in Columbia south of Senate Street. A frame building, it was originally a school for white children. After it burned in 1915, a brick school was built here the next year. Blossom Street became a school for black children in Ward One in 1929 and was renamed Celia Dial Saxon School in 1930. Celia Dial Saxon School Blossom Street . . . — Map (db m30075) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — Booker T. Washington High School
Booker T. Washington High School 1916 - 1974   From the day it opened its doors in 1916 Booker T. Washington High School played a major roll in the life of Columbia's black community. Originally a school with all grades, eventually it evolved into a Junior-Senior High School, until 1948 when Booker T. Washington was the only high school for blacks in the city. When the school closed its doors in 1974 nearly 90% of the of the black high school graduates in Columbia . . . — Map (db m58983) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — Boylston House & Boxwood Gardens
The National Register of Historic Places South Carolina Department of Archives and History: Boylston House & Boxwood Gardens — Map (db m50930) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-63 — Bull Street
This street was named for Brigadier General Stephen Bull (c. 1733-1800). Grandson of Lt. Gov. William Bull I, Stephen was a member of the Commons House of Assembly, the First Provincial Congress, the First General Assembly. He saw military action in the Battle of Beaufort and Savannah campaign and later served in the S.C. Senate and House of Representatives. He is buried at Sheldon Church, Beaufort County. — Map (db m21719) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-132 — Cain- Matthews- Tompkins House
(Front text) This house, built ca. 1910 for Columbia businessman John Jefferson Cain (1869-1929), was designed by William Augustus Edwards (1866-1939), a prominent regional architect. Cain, who moved to Columbia in 1899, became one of the state’s leading contractors and built such Columbia landmarks as the Arcade (1912) and the Palmetto Building (1913). He also financed, built, and owned the Jefferson Hotel (1913). (Reverse text) J. Pope Matthews, president of the Palmetto . . . — Map (db m29087) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-47 — Camp Jackson
Named in honor of Gen. Andrew Jackson. This cantonment site 1 ½ mi. north was approved by the War Dept. June 2, 1917. Maximum strength was recorded in June 1918: 3,302 officers; 45,402 men. 81st Division was trained here Aug. 29, 1917-May 18, 1918; the 5th Division stationed here Oct. 20, 1920-Oct. 4, 1921.Made a training camp for National Guard 1925. — Map (db m30740) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — Cap. Swanson Lunsford
Cap. Swanson Lunsford a native of Va. and for many years a resident of Columbia, Died August 7th, 1799. Aged about forty years. He was a member of Lee’s Legion in the eventful period of 76. This humble tribute to his memory has been placed by his only child, Mrs. M. L. and her husband, Dr. John Douglass of Chester, S. C. --------------- This memorial erected by Mary Craig Lorick Baker Great, great, granddaughter   April 1953 — Map (db m67778) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — Capitol Complex
[North]: Capitol Complex Dedicated to Robert Evander McNair Governor Of South Carolina 1965-1971 This Complex was Conceived and Planned During His Administration "South Carolinians have a special feeling for this complex which transcends the ages and generations." Robert E. McNair [South]: Capitol Complex State House 1855 — 1907 John C. Calhoun Building 1926 Wade Hampton Building 1939 — 1940 Edgar A. Brown . . . — Map (db m50901) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-140 — Carver Theatre
Carver Theatre, built about 1941, was one of Columbia’s two exclusively African-American theatres during the segregation era of the mid-20th century. It was run by black operators but owned by the white-owned Dixie Amusement Company for most of its history. Carver Theatre also hosted weekly talent shows based on the popular “Amateur Hour” in Harlem. The theatre, which closed in 1971, was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 2003. — Map (db m53952) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — Cecil Herbert Land D.D.
Son of Annie Black and Edward H. Lang Born Temple, Texas March 18, 1891 Died Columbia, SC July 9, 1974 Minister in the Presbyterian Church U.S over fifty years. Chaplain in World War I and II. First Chaplain in the Presbyterian Church U.S. to attain the rank of Colonel U.S. Army. A student of Life and God's purpose, a lover and servant of his fellowman, a man of God. . . . — Map (db m46395) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-11 — Cemetery of the Columbia Hebrew Benevolent Society
In this cemetery, 2½ blocks south, on Gadsden Street, are buried many distinguished Jewish citizens, including two mayors of Columbia: Mordecai Hendricks DeLeon (1791-1849) and Henry Lyons (1805-1858). The Benevolent Society was organized in 1822: charted 1834. — Map (db m28126) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — China - Burna - India Veterans
[China-Burma-India Seal Dedicated to the honor and memory of all World War II Veterans who served in the China - Burma - India Theatre December 7, 1941 - March 2, 1945 South Carolina Basha Dedicated November 11, 1990 — Map (db m50934) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-88 — Church of the Good Shepard
Beginning in 1883 with services held in nearby private homes by Trinity Church, this Episcopal church then constructed a building on Barnwell Street, was organized into a mission, and became a separate parish in 1886. Rt. Rev. Albert S. Thomas, 9th Bishop of S. C., was lay reader of Good Shepherd, 1893-1900. The church moved to this site after the present building was completed in 1901. — Map (db m28306) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-67 — College Street
This street, originally named Medium Street and part of the original 1786 Columbia Plan, bisected the area which was to be the campus of South Carolina College. The college, established in 1801 by an act of the General Assembly, later became the University of South Carolina. Medium Street was renamed College Street shortly after 1891. — Map (db m21848) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — Colonel Thomas Taylor1743 - 1833
This marker honors Colonel Thomas Taylor, Patriot of the American Revolution. It is erected during this bicentennial year of 1976 to commemorate his contribution to the educational, cultural, civic, and religious life of the people of Richland County. Taylor School Site 1905 - 1964 Board of School Commissioners Richland County School District One Sam E. McGregor, Chairman; Barbara A. Scott, Vice-Chairman; Edward F. Kimbrough, M.D., Secretary; Donald N. Upton; Rosalind G. Sargent; James L. . . . — Map (db m51187) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-86 — Columbia Bible College
Columbia Bible School classes began in 1923 in the towered building which once stood on this site (originally as Columbia Female College, later as the Colonia Hotel). Under the leadership of its first president, Robert C. McQuilkin, the school grew into Columbia Bible College and, in 1960, moved to its present campus NW of Columbia. Its alumni now serve in church-related ministries around the world. — Map (db m28303) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-139 — Columbia Bible College, 1937-1960 / Westervelt Home, 1930 - 1937
(Front Text): Columbia Bible College 1937-1960 In 1937 Columbia Bible College (now Columbia International University) acquired the Ainsley Hall House, designed by Robert Mills. The students housed here were trained for Christian service around the world. in 1960 CBC moved to its present campus in north Columbia. The Robert Mills House has been operated as a house museum since 1967 by the Historic Columbia Foundation. (Reverse text): Westervelt Home 1930-1937The . . . — Map (db m27963) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — S-6/40-37 — Columbia Canal
Completed 1824. Important link in the system of waterways transporting freight between the up country and Charleston. Supplanted by railroads for transportation after 1850. Leased to Confederate Government to run powder works. Enlarged 1880-95 and since sold to seccessive electric power companies. — Map (db m11319) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — Columbia City Hall
The National Register of Historic Places South Carolina Department of Archives and History: Columbia City Hall — Map (db m50960) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-124 — Confederate Printing Plant
(Front text) From April 1864 to February 1865 Confederate bonds and currency were printed and processed in this building, constructed in 1863-64 for the printing and stationery firm of Evans & Cogswell. That firm, founded in Charleston, produced bonds and currency for the Confederacy throughout the war and moved to Columbia in 1863. The Confederate Treasury Note Bureau moved its headquarters here as well in the spring of 1864. (Reverse text) After 1864 Evans and Cogswell . . . — Map (db m28531) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — Confederate Soldiers 1861-1865
(Front): Confederate 1861 - Soldiers - 1865 Erected by The Confederate Home Albertson, Maberry; Bethea, W. F.; Brooks, Robert; Brown, G. W.; Bozman, William; Bush, J. E.; Carter, F. M.; Cameron, W. C.; Chambers, H. A.; Connell, W. E; Connors, T. H.; Cockrell, J. E.; Coxe, J. T.; Denton, J. W.; Dowling, John; Driggers, Peter; Edwards, T. P.; Ellis, Henry; Foxworth, S. P.; Gardner, Thomas; Gregory, J. S.; Hart, E. N.; Harris, W. P.; Hodges, R. B.; Joyner, W. H.; Kelly, John; Love, . . . — Map (db m46844) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — Confederate Soldiers Home
Confederate Soldiers Home by an act of the General Assembly in 1908, an infirmary was established on this site for the infirm and destitute Confederate Soldiers and Sailors of the state in 1925. Eligibility for admission was extended to wives and widows of Confederate Veterans. The home was closed in 1957, when too few residents remained. — Map (db m46504) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-38 — Congaree River Bridges
This river took its name from the Congaree Indians, a Siouan tribe which occupied the valley until the Yamassee War in 1715. The first wooden bridge here was completed in 1827. It was burned to delay the advance of Sherman's Army in 1865, rebuilt in 1870. A concrete bridge was completed in 1927. — Map (db m7366) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-53 — Courthouse Square
Richland County's second court house was built in 1803-04 on the northeast corner of Richardson (Main) and Washington Streets. In the 1850s, it was razed and a new court house erected on the same site. On the southeast corner was located the Athenaeum, incorporated in 1856, which contained a lecture and exhibit hall and a library. The Athenaeum and the new court house were both burned by Union troops in 1865. — Map (db m30829) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-173 — Curtiss-Wright Hangar
(Front text) This hangar, built in 1929 by the Curtiss-Wright Flying Service, was the first building at Owens Field, a municipal airport then 3 mi. S of the city limits. Curtiss-Wright built and operated numerous airports across America for the next two decades, also offering flight training. The airport, named for Mayor Lawrence B. Owens (1869-1941), was dedicated in 1930 with an airshow seen by 15, 000 spectators. (Reverse text) Regularly scheduled flights began in . . . — Map (db m55106) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-15 — DeBruhl-Marshall House
A fine example of the classic style in Southern domestic architecture. Built in 1820, probably after a design of Robert Mills. For almost one hundred years the home of the DeBruhl and Marshall families. — Map (db m28629) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — Diamond HillThe home of Lt. General Wade Hampton, C.S.A.
Known as "Diamond Hill," which was burned by Union Troops during their invasion of Columbia, February 17, 1865, was located 125 feet due south of this spot. The stones in this monument formed part of the foundation of that home. — Map (db m46448) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — Doolittle Raiders
Symbolizing the strength and endurance of South Carolinians, these Palmetto trees commemorate the Columbia trained Doolittle Raiders whose courage and patriotism in the early hours of World War II rallied a beleagured nation to save Western civization and all mankind from a descent into another Dark Age. — Map (db m7370) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — Duke of Albemarle(1608-1670)
General George Monck Helped restore Charles II Commander of Royal Forces Colonel of Coldstream Guards — Map (db m50958) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — Earl of Clarendon(1609-1674)
Born Edward Hyde Lord High Chancellor for Charles II Persecuted the Dissenters Exiled for Private Life Daughter Married James II — Map (db m50956) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-48 — Early Columbia Racetrack
From early days horse racing was a favorite sport in Columbia and many famous horses were bred on neighboring plantations. Columbia Jockey Club was organized by Col. Wade Hampton II and Col. Richard Singleton in 1828. Congaree Race Course was located 300 yards north on present Epworth Orphanage property. — Map (db m30213) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-39 — Early Country Homes
In this malaria-free sandhill section were the antebellum summer homes of many Columbians: Quinine Hill (Dr. J. M. Taylor, Dr. James Davis); Hilltop (W. J. Taylor); Edgehill (B. F. Taylor); Laurel Hill (D. J. McCord); Cooper's Hill (Thos. Cooper); Windy Hill (Langdon Cheves); Rose Hill (Arthur Middleton); Diamond Hill (Singleton, McDuffie, Hampton). — Map (db m30246) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-112 — Early Howard School Site
On this site stood Howard School, a public school for blacks established after the Civil War. By 1869 there was a two-story frame building large enough for 800 pupils. Partially funded by the Freedmen's Bureau, the school reportedly was named for Oliver O. Howard, first commissioner, Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands. For years the only public school for blacks in Columbia, Howard was moved 5 blocks NW, 1924. — Map (db m30254) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-9 — Ebenezer Lutheran Church
First Lutheran congregation in Columbia. Church dedicated in this square in 1830 was burned by Union troops in 1865. It was rebuilt 1870, partly through aid of northern Lutherans, and used for Sunday School after present church was completed in 1931. — Map (db m28073) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — Elliott College1837
Named for Stephen Elliott, first president of the Bank of the State of South Carolina and noted botanist. Elliot College, a residence hall, was one of the first historic Horseshoe buildings to undergo extensive remodeling under the Horseshoe Restoration Program and served as a prototype of the restoration of other Horseshoe residences. — Map (db m22241) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-68 — Elmwood Avenue
This street , originally named Upper Street, was the northernmost street in the original Columbia plan. The plan of the city depicted an area two miles square divided into lots of one-half acre; eight acres were reserved for erecting public buildings. Upper Street was renamed Elmwood Avenue shortly after 1872 for adjacent Elmwood Cemetery, which was incorporated in 1854. — Map (db m21850) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — Elmwood Cemetery Confederate Soldiers
J Baker • Samuel Hill • J C Schroeder William Barefoot • W D Hutto • Sindal Joseph Burns • R Johnson • A Smith F Butler • P P Killebrew • J Smith R Campbell • D F McFarland • Scott Nimrod Smith A C Catlett • McMaster • Suber J Darrell • Charles Meany • J J Subler G M Davenport • A Murray • W Thompson J T Drake • P Pitts • Samuel Walker Thomas Furnance • H B Plummer • Thomas Walton J M Graham • M Prince • J Watkins F Hankins • J P Reedy • H Watts Q Hays • W Scott • . . . — Map (db m46632) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-26 — Entrance to Cemetery of the Columbia Hebrew Benevolent Society
The society has been in continuous existence since its organization in 1822. It was chartered 1834. Its charities are administered to the needs of the community without regard to creed or race. — Map (db m27965) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-158 — Fair-Rutherford House / Rutherford House
(Front text) The Fair-Rutherford House, a Greek Revival cottage, stood here from ca. 1850 until it was demolished in 2004. Built for Dr. Samuel Fair, it passed through several owners before 1905, when William H. Rutherford (1852-1910) bought and enlarged it. Rutherford, an African-American businessman born a slave, taught school, then made lodge regalia and supplies and briefly co-owned a local cigar factory. (Reverse text) The Rutherford House was built in 1924-25 . . . — Map (db m58789) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-17 — First Baptist Church
Congregation organized 1809. Original church, built 1811 on Sumter Street corner, was burned Feb. 17, 1865 by Union troops who mistook it for the present church, built 1859, where the Secession Convention had met Dec. 17, 1860. Because of reported smallpox in Columbia, the convention adjourned to Charleston. — Map (db m29209) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-22 — First Presbyterian Church
First congregation organized in Columbia (1795). The churchyard, allotted as a public burying ground in 1798, was granted to this church 1813. Here are buried: D.E. Dunlap, first pastor; Chancellor H.W. DeSaussure; Jonathan Maxcy, first President of S.C. College; Ann Pamela Cuningham, founder of Mt. Vernon Ladies' Association; U.S. Senators F.H. Elmore and Wm. F. DeSaussure, and the parents of Woodrow Wilson. — Map (db m29042) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 71000801 — First Presbyterian Church
(Upper Medallion) National Register of Historic Places First Presbyterian Church South Carolina Department of Archives and History (Lower Medallion) American Revolution Bicentennial * Richland County Committee * Landmark 21 — Map (db m32312) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — First Presbyterian Church Confederate Veterans Monument
Men who served in the Confederate States Army from the congregation of The First Presbyterian Church Columbia, South Carolina 1861-1865 Dedicated to those who died in gratitude to those who served [List of 64 names] ************ Members of this Congregation after 1865, who served in the Confederate Army [List of 22 names] Map (db m46440) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-40 — Fisher's Mill on Gill Creek
About 1800, Col. Thomas Taylor erected the small building, 1/4 mile upstream, where cotton goods were woven for his plantation needs. Here John and Edward Fisher later established one of the earliest spinning mills in Richland County, using slave labor and manufacturing cotton yarn. — Map (db m30454) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — Fleishman Family Chapel
Dedicated to the Fleishman Family, whose family members have served as officers of the Columbia Hebrew Benevolent Society over four generations covering three centuries. Their untiring and devoted service to the Society has been a mitsvah benefiting this beautiful historic cemetery and the entire Columbia Jewish community. Fleischman family members who have served as officers of the Society include: Barnett Berman (1887-1914) Sol Fleischman (1916-1925) Bernard Fleischman, Sr. . . . — Map (db m61562) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-6 — Former Site of Columbia Theological Seminary
Founded 1828 by Presbyterian Synod of South Carolina and Georgia. Located here 1831. Moved to Decatur, Georgia 1925. Woodrow Wilson's father and uncle were among faculty members. Central building, erected 1823, was designed by Robert Mills as home for Ainsley Hall (1783-1823), Columbia merchant. — Map (db m28842) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-106 — Gadsden Street
This street was named for Charlestonian Christopher Gadsden, member of the 1759 Cherokee expedition, the Commons House of Assembly, and the two Continental and Provincial congresses. He also served in several General Assemblies. During the Revolution he became a brigadier general and later served S. C. both as Vice-President and Lieut. Governor. He died in 1805 and is buried in St. Philip's churchyard in Charleston. — Map (db m28983) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — Geiger Ave. Cemetery
In loving memory this cemetery contains Confederate Veterans and their families in the central area and State Hospital patients in surrounding locations. — Map (db m51180) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — George Elmore
Sacred to the Memory of George Elmore who through unmatched courage, perseverance, and personal sacrifice brought the legal action by which black people may participate in South Carolina democratic party primary elections -- "Elmore vs. Rice," 1947 — Map (db m58187) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — George Washington (Statue)
During the occupation of Columbia by Sherman's army February 17-19, 1865, soldiers brickbatted this statue and broke off the lower part of the walking cane. — Map (db m46635) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — Gervais Street Bridge
The first bridge at Gervais Street was a covered wooden structure built in 1827 by the Columbia Bridge Company. It remained until 1865 when Confederate soldiers burned it and other bridges to delay the advance of Sherman's troops. Rebuilt in 1870, the bridge was privately owned until 1912 when Richland and Lexington counties bought it. The current 1,415-foot-long bridge opened in 1927. It was considered remarkable for its time due to its use of reinforced concrete and its status as . . . — Map (db m7365) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-92 — Gibbes Green
Named for Maj. Wade Hampton Gibbes (1837-1903) prominent Columbian who owned much of the land to the east, Gibbes Green consisted of an area of land bounded by Pendleton, Bull, Pickens, and Greene Streets. Acquired by S. C. College by 1838, the land was kept for many years as open space, serving as a playground, ball field, and park for several generations of Columbians. Davis College, which opened in 1910, was the first building in Gibbes Green. — Map (db m29169) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-99 — Gladden Home Site
States-rights advocate Adley Hogan Gladden, who lived here before the Civil War, served Columbia as postmaster 1841-45 and was later bursar of S. C. College, captain of the Governor's Guard, and intendant of Columbia 1851-52. In 1847 he assumed command of the Palmetto Regiment during the Mexican War and later rose to the rank of brigadier general during the Civil War. Gladden was killed in Tennessee at the Battle of Shiloh, 1862. — Map (db m30298) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — Gonzales Tribute
(West face) Erected By popular subscription A Tribute To the worth and service of N.G. Gonzales, Born August 5, 1858, Died January 19,1903. —–— "Faithful unto death." Gonzales (North face) A great editor An eminent citizen An honest man "Without fear and without reproach" His fellow citizens rear this monument to perpetuate his memory. (South face) Founder and first editor of The State —— For twelve years . . . — Map (db m21926) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-12 — Governor's Mansion
Arsenal Academy, converted from a state arsenal, occupied this square from 1842 to 1865 when Union troops burned all the Academy buildings except Officers' Quarters, erected 1855. Since 1868 this building has been the Governor's Mansion. — Map (db m28127) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-80 — Gregg Street
(Front text) Richard Winn, for whom this street was first named, was born in Virginia in 1750 and came to South Carolina as a young man. He fought throughout the Revolution (including the battles of Hanging Rock, Fish Dam Fords, Blackstock's) and became a brigadier general in 1783. One of Columbia's original commissionere, he later was lieutenant governor and also served in the General Assembly and Congress. He died in Tennessee in 1818. (Reverse text) Maxcy Gregg, native . . . — Map (db m21760) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-7 — Hampton - Preston House
Built about 1818 by Ainsley Hall. Purchased 1823 by Wade Hampton, I. Inherited by his daughter, Mrs. John S. Preston, 1863. Headquarters of Union Gen. J. A. Logan, 1865; residence of Gov. F. J. Moses 1872-74; Ursuline Convent 1887-90; College for Women 1890-1915; Chicora College for Women 1915-30. The gardens, developed during Hampton-Preston ownership, were adorned with work of Hiram Powers, sculptor. — Map (db m27999) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-91 — Harden Street
This street was named for William Harden, a native South Carolinian. In 1776 he was given command of Ft. Lyttelton near Beaufort by the Second Provincial Congress of which he was a member. In 1781, serving as colonel under Francis Marion, he commanded patriot forces which captured British troops both at Four Holes and Ft. Balfour at Pocotaligo. He died in 1785 while senator from Prince William's Parish, Beaufort District. — Map (db m21776) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — Harnessing Water Power
Downstream from where the current Gervais Street Bridge now stands, Dr. Frederick W. Green owned and operated a lumberyard, and ran a grist mill to grind flour and corn. A native of New England, Green came South in the 1830s. Water from the canal ran his businesses. Until the end of the 19th century, most communities had at least one gristmill. Larger towns, such as Columbia, had at least one lumber operation. This mill was one of several that existed along the Broad and Congaree Rivers . . . — Map (db m7362) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — Harper College1848
Erected on the site of an earlier building that had served as the campus dining hall, Harper was part of an extensive mid-century construction program undertaken to accommodate an increase in enrollment. The building was named for William Harper (1790-1847, class of 1808), the first matriculate of the South Carolina College and the first Euphradian Society president, who who went on to become a noted South Carolina judge and U.S. Senator. Harper College continues to serve as a resident hall and . . . — Map (db m22236) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-143 — Heidt - Russell House / Edwin R. Russell
Heidt - Russell House This house, with Greek Revival and Italianate architectural influences, was built about 1879 by William J. Heidt, builder and contractor who managed Heidlinger’s Steam Bakery. The Heidts lived here until 1912. Mary E. Russell, whose husband Nathaniel was a postman for the U.S. Post Office, bought the house in 1919. Edwin R. Russell Edwin Roberts Russell (1913-1996) spent his early years here. A research scientist, he was one of the few blacks directly involved . . . — Map (db m36018) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-82 — Henderson Street
This street is named for Brig. Gen. William Henderson who was in the Third S.C. Regiment at the fall of Charleston in 1780. He was captured, imprisoned, and later exchanged. In 1781, he was wounded while commanding a brigade at the Battle of Eutaw Springs. When General Sumter resigned in 1782, Henderson was named brigadier general of State Troops, a post he held until 1783. He served in the Second Provincial Congress (1775-76) and in the S.C. House. He died in 1788. — Map (db m21741) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — Henry Disbrow Phillips, D.D.Trinity Parish House — Trinity Episcopal Church
This building is dedicated in loving memory to Henry Disbrow Phillips, D.D. 1882 - 1955 Rector of this parish 1922-1938 Bishop of Southwestern Virginia 1938-1954 Founder and warden of La Grange settlement, La Grange Georgia an institution for the education and religious training of workers among mill people. 1906-1915 Chaplain and Professor of Bible at Sawanee 1915-1922 First Sewanee athlete and first Episcopal Bishop elected to National Football Hall of . . . — Map (db m45391) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — Here Stood The State House
Built 1786-1790 James Hoban Architect Burned By Sherman's Troops February 17, 1865 — Map (db m7386) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-24 — Horry-Guignard House
One of the oldest houses in Columbia; built before 1813, probably by Peter Horry (1747-1815), Colonel in Revolution, Brigadier General of S.C. militia. Later home of John Gabriel Guignard (1751-1822), Surveyor General of S.C., 1798-1802. — Map (db m29541) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-111 — Howard School Site
Established after the Civil War, this public school for blacks was located at the NW corner of Hampton & Lincoln streets by 1869 and was partially supported by the Freedmen's Bureau. It is said the school was named for Oliver O. Howard, commissioner of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands during Reconstruction. Moved here in 1924, Howard School was for many years the only public school for blacks in Columbia. — Map (db m46341) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-64 — Huger Street
This street was named for Brig. Gen. Isaac Huger, who fought in the Cherokee War of 1760 and during the American Revolution at Stono, Savannah, Siege of Charlestown, Guilford Court House, Hobkirk Hill. Born 1743 at Limerick Plantation in the parish of St. John's Berkeley, Huger was in the Commons House of Assembly and the First Provincial Congress, and later in the S. C. Senate and House of Representatives. He died in 1797. — Map (db m29214) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — I. DeQuincey Newman Freeway
Named in 1986 by Action of the Richland County Legislative Delegation and Highway Commission in recognition of one of this state's most distinguished citizens. A Civil Rights leader who worked unceasingly for equal rights for all, he helped keep the peace during the '50's and '60's as our state moved from segregation to integration He was the first black elected to the S.C. Senate in this century, serving 1983 ~ 1985 Born 1911 Died 1985 — Map (db m49771) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-175 — I. DeQuincey Newman House
Front Isaiah DeQuincey Newman (1911~1985), Methodist minister, civil rights leader, and state senator, lived here from 1960 until his death. Born in Darlington County, he attended Claflin College and was a graduate of Clark College and Gammon Theological Seminary. Newman, a long-time pastor, was also a major figure in the Civil Rights Movement in S.C. for more than forty years, beginning in the 1940s. Reverse In 1943 Newman helped found the Orangeburg branch of the National . . . — Map (db m57481) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — In Memory of the John H. Rose Family
In memory of the John H. Rose Family Property located to the north of this marker is part of a farm once belonging to John H. Rose an area pioneer from Fayetteville, N.C. A grist mill and saw mill on property was burned by Gen. Sherman's army. Buried in unmarked graves on the property are the remains of John H. "Jack" Rose died 1882, first wife Mary Cooper Rose died 1858, and a daughter Rhoda died 1862. Erected by L.B. Harmon, great grandson and L.A. Harmon, great-great grandson in cooperation with Clemson University. — Map (db m52370) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-151 — Israelite Sunday School / Columbia's First Synagogue
Israelite Sunday School The Israelite Sunday School, the first Jewish religious school in Columbia and the seventh in the United States, met in a building on this site until 1865. Founded in 1843 to give the city's Jewish children "an intimate... and full exposition of our faith," it was supported by the Columbia Hebrew Benevolent Society. Its 20-30 students first met nearby in space donated by a member of the society. Columbia's First Synagogue In 1846 the Columbia Hebrew . . . — Map (db m21925) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — J. Marion Sims
J. Marion Sims 1813 1883 Where the love of man is there also is love of the art. Hippocrates (Lower Left): The first surgeon of the ages in ministry to women treating alike empress and slave (Lower Right): He founded the science of gynecology * was honored in all lands * and died with the benediction of mankind — Map (db m49773) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — James F. Byrnes1879-1972
[Northeast Base]: Inscription: The Most Distinguished South Carolinian of His Time Plaque Erected in Grateful Appreciation of James F. Byrnes By His Friends in His Native State and Nation Executive Committee James Penet Hammond, Chairman W. Heyward Clarkson, Jr., Vice Chairman J. Bratton Davis, Secretary Henry C. Nelson, Jr., Treasurer [Northwest Base]: As Statesman, Jurist, Diplomat He Gave a Lifetime of Service to . . . — Map (db m50911) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-142 — James M. Hinton House
(Front text) This is the site of the home of James Miles Hinton (1891-1970), businessman, civil rights pioneer, and minister. Hinton moved to Columbia in 1939 and was elected president of the Columbia branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) that year. He was president of the S.C. State Conference of the NAACP from 1941 through 1958, as it grew from 13 chapters to 80 chapters. (Reverse text) Hinton helped overthrow the all-white . . . — Map (db m28084) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-130 — Jefferson Hotel
[Front]: The Jefferson Hotel, designed and built by Columbia entrepreneur and contractor John Jefferson Cain (1869-1929), stood here at the corner of Main and Laurel Streets from 1913 until 1968. The hotel (also sometimes called the Hotel Jefferson) was built in 1912-13 at a cost of $250,000. Notable features included Indiana limestone on the 1st and 6th story exteriors and mahogany, marble, and terra cotta tile throughout the lobby, dining room and ballroom. [Reverse]: . . . — Map (db m21895) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — Joseph D. Sapp Memorial Bridge
This bridge is dedicated to the memory of Joesph Daniel Sapp (1928-2000). As chair of the Columbia Development Corporation, he was instrumental in the development of the Vista. Elected to the S.C. General Assembly, he served as an advisor to state officials. As Chairman of the State Develpment Board he promoted economic growth and job creation for the Midlands and all of South Carolina. He labored his whole life to insure that all Columbians and all of South Carolinians would . . . — Map (db m45074) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — Korean War Memorial
Dedicated to the men and women of South Carolina who served in The Korean War 25 June 1950 to 27 July 1953 82,000 Palmetto State residents served in what has been called "The Forgotten War". Of that number, 26,000 served in the Far East, 1327 were wounded and 472 perished. These South Carolinians, part of the silent generation, are not forgotten! At the outset of "The Cold War", they fought against expansive communist regimes, thereby expressing a deep commitment to ideals . . . — Map (db m45073) WM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — Lace House
The National Register of Historic Places South Carolina Department of Archives and History: Lace House — Map (db m50929) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-14 — Ladson Presbyterian Church
Congregation originated in the Sabbath School for colored people organized by the First Presbyterian Church 1838, later conducted by the Rev. G. W. Ladson. A chapel for the Negro members of that church was built here 1868. Rebuilt 1896. The title was transferred to Ladson Church trustees in 1895. — Map (db m29385) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-79 — Lady Street
One of the original streets in the 1786 Columbia plan. Lady Street is thought to have been named for Martha Custis Washington, the new nation's first lady whom South Carolina wished to honor. Lady Washington presided over the President's home, Mount Vernon, a national landmark which was saved from destruction in 1859 by South Carolinian Ann Pamela Cunningham, organizer and first regent of the Mount Vernon Ladies' Association of the Union. — Map (db m21791) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-23 — Last Home of Wade Hampton
Wade Hampton, III, born March 28, 1818, was commander of Hampton Legion, 1861, with rank of Colonel; Lieutenant General, C. S. A., 1865; Governor of S. C. 1876-79; U. S. Senator 1879-91. He died April 11, 1902 in this house, given to him in 1899 by a grateful people. — Map (db m29564) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-73 — Laurel Street
This street probably takes its name from the cherry laurel (Laurocerasus caroliniana) and the mountain laurel (Kalmia latifolia), both of which are indigenous to South Carolina. Laurel Street is one of the original streets in the 1786 plan of Columbia. — Map (db m21844) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — Legare College1848
Originally designed as a residence hall, Legare College replaced a library and science building erected on this site in 1817. Legare College was named for Hugh Swinton Legare, a South Carolina College graduate who served as Attorney General of the United States. Federal military offices were located here after the Civil War. Today Legare College is a residence hall and houses administrative offices of the Department of Military Science. — Map (db m22151) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — Liberty Bell Reproduction
Dedicated to you, a free citizen in a free land This reproduction of the Liberty Bell was presented to the people of South Carolina by direction of The Honorable John W. Snyder Secretary of the Treasury as the inspirational symbol of the United States Savings Bonds Independence Drive from May 15 to July 4, 1950. It was displayed in every part of the state. The dimensions and tone are identical with those of the original Liberty Bell when it rang out our independence in 1776. In standing before . . . — Map (db m68072) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — Lieber College1837
Named for Francis Lieber (1800-1872), one of the most distinguished scholars in the history of the University. A native of Prussia, Lieber migrated to America in 1827 and was elected chair of history and political economy at South Carolina College in 1835. While at South Carolina, Lieber authored the Manual of Political Ethics, Legal and Political Hermeneutics, and On Civil Liberty and Self Government, establishing him as America's first systematic political scientist. . . . — Map (db m22122) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-76 — Lincoln Street
Gen. Benjamin Lincoln, for whom this street is named, was a division commander in the Saratoga Campaign. In 1778, he became commander of the Southern Department of the American Army and was in command at Charleston when the city surrendered to the British in 1780. After his exchange, Lincoln fought at Yorktown and was present at the British surrender. He served as Secretary of War (1781-83) and returned to his native Massachusetts where he died in 1810. — Map (db m29217) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — Lord Ashley(1621-1673)
Earl of Shaftesbury Anthony Ashley Cooper Two Rivers Names for Him Supporter of Political Freedom Friend of John Locke — Map (db m50948) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — Lord John Berkeley(1607-1678)
First Baron Berkeley of Stratton Supporter of the Stuarts Skillful Military Commander Loyal to the Royal Line Followed Charles II into Exile — Map (db m50953) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — Lord William Craven(1606-1697)
Colonel in the English Civil War Lord Proprietor of New Jersey Foreign Military Service On Privy Council of King Died at 89, Unmarried. — Map (db m50940) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-126 — Mann-Simons Cottage
(Front text) This cottage, built before 1850, with alterations and additions throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, was the home of Celia Mann (1799-1867) and her husband Ben Delane, among the few free blacks living in Columbia in the two decades before the Civil War. Mann, born a slave in Charleston, earned or bought her freedom in the 1840s and moved to Columbia, where she worked as a midwife. (Reverse text) Three Baptist churches (First Calvary, Second . . . — Map (db m28000) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-89 — Marion Street
This street was named for Francis Marion, one of the three S.C. Partisan Generals during the American Revolution. The guerrilla tactics against the British by Marion and his Partisan band earned for him the name of "Swamp Fox." Congress voted its thanks to Marion for distinguished service in the battles of Parkers Ferry and Eataw Springs, both fought in 1781. — Map (db m21715) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-141 — Matthew J. Perry House
(Front text) Matthew J. Perry, Jr. (b. 1921), lawyer, civil rights pioneer, and jurist, lived in a house on this site as a youth; the house was torn down in 1997. He served in the U.S. Army during World War II, then graduated from S.C. State College (now S.C. State University) in 1948. After graduating in the first class of the S.C. State Law School in 1951 Perry practiced law in Spartanburg, specializing in civil rights cases. (Reverse text) Perry returned to Columbia in . . . — Map (db m35789) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-174 — Maxcy Gregg Park
(Front) This city park, established in 1911, was named for Confederate General Maxcy Gregg (1814-1862). It was one of several parks in Columbia proposed by landscape architect Harlan P. Kelsey of Boston, whose 1905 plan was commissioned by the Civic Improvement League. The park, donated to the city by George R. Rembert (1875-1913), was the central portion of a tract originally bounded by Bull, Wheat, and Greene Streets and the Southern Railway. (Reverse) The park was later . . . — Map (db m54965) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — McCutchen House1813
McCutchen House, named for Prefessor George McCutchen, was the second faculty residence built on the South Carolina College campus. It continued in that capacity until 1945 when the University stopped providing faculty housing and the Registrar's Office moved into this building. McCutchen House later served as home of the College of Nursing. During the Horseshoe renovations in the early 1970s, the building's purpose was changed again, becoming the Faculty House Club. Today, a portion of the . . . — Map (db m22200) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — Memorial FountainSouth Caroliniana Library
This fountain in honor of The Carolina Patriots Who Fought In The American Revolution Given by The American Revolution Bicentennial Richland County Committee The University South Carolina Society The Lucy Hampton Bostick Charitable Trust May 30, 1986 — Map (db m50961) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — Memorial Youth Center
This Memorial Youth Center stands in memory of and in gratitude to the men of Richland County who gave their lives in World War II that the ideals of democratic living might be preserved. May the generous spirit of those youthful heroes commemorated in this center for youth, serve as an inspiration to succeeding generations. (List of names) — Map (db m53955) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — Memory of South Carolina Generals
To the Memory of South Carolina's Generals Sumter Marion Pickens and Her Patriot Sons Who Fought For Independence 1775 1783 [D.A.R. Medallion] — Map (db m27997) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — Mexican Border and World War Memorial
Dulce et decorum est pro patria mori These trees were planted in memory of the students and alumni of the University of South Carolina who gave their lives for their country and humanity on the Mexican Border and in the World War 1916 -1918 [Emblem Included] Erected by the South Carolina Department of The American Legion Auxiliary May 30th 1927 " There is a true glory and a true honor The glory of duty done , the honor of integrity of principle." . . . — Map (db m46173) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-148 — Modjeska Simkins House
(Front text) This house was for sixty years the home of Modjeska Monteith Simkins (1899-1992), social reformer and civil rights activist. A Columbia native, she was educated at Benedict College, then taught high school. Director of Negro Work for the S.C. Anti-tuberculosis Association 1931-1942, Simkins was the first black in S.C. to hold a full-time, statewide, public health position. (Reverse text) Simkins was a founder of the S.C. Conference of the National Asssociation for . . . — Map (db m36015) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-163 — Monteith School
(Front text) This African-American school, built nearby before 1900, was originally New Hope School, a white school affiliated with Union Church. It closed about 1914. In 1921 Rachel Hull Monteith (d. 1958) opened Nelson School as a black public school in the Hyatt Park School District. With about 100 students in grades 1-5, it later became a 3-teacher school with Monteith as its principal and added grades 6 and 7. (Reverse text) Nelson School was renamed Monteith School in . . . — Map (db m35946) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-161 — Nathaniel J. Frederick House
(Front text) Nathaniel J. Frederick (1877-1938), educator, lawyer, newspaper editor, and civil rights activist, lived here from 1904 until his death. This house was built in 1903 by Cap J. Carroll, a prominent businessman and city official whose daughter Corrine married Frederick in 1904. Frederick, who was educated at Claflin College and the University of Wisconsin, was admitted to the S.C. bar in 1913. (Reverse text) Frederick argued more cases before the Supreme Court of . . . — Map (db m56499) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-153 — North Carolina Mutual Building
(Front text) The North Carolina Mutual Building was built in 1909 by the N.C. Mutual and Provident Association, a black-owned life insurance company with an office here until the mid-1930s. Built as a two-story commercial building, with a third story added after 1927, it was part of the Washington Street business district, an important part of Columbia’s African -American community for most of the 20th century. (Reverse text) This building had stores on the first . . . — Map (db m56496) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-10 — Old State Fair Grounds
This square is part of the tract where state fairs were held 1856-61, 1869-1903. The buildings, used 1861-65 for Confederate barracks and hospital, as well as nitre and mining bureau in charge of Joseph LeConte and James Woodrow, were burned by Union troops in 1865. — Map (db m28022) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — Ordinance of Secession( First Baptist Church )
The Convention of the people of South Carolina which adapted an Ordinance Of Secession at Charleston, December 20, 1860 first met in this church at 12 o'clock M.[sic] December 17, 1860 and organized. It adjourned at 10 o' clock P.M. to meet in Charleston at 4 o'clock P.M. December 18, 1860. —— Tablet placed by South Carolina Division U.D.C. 1928 — Map (db m28950) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-52 — Original Site of Columbia College
This land was purchased in 1854 by the South Carolina Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church as the site of Columbia Female College, Chartered by S. C. General Assembly Dec. 21, 1854. Classes were held from 1859 to 1865. The college survived the burning of Columbia and was reopened in 1873. In 1905, the school was moved to its present site as the Columbia College. — Map (db m28763) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-5 — Original Site of Winthrop College
In 1886, chiefly through the efforts of D. B. Johnson, first superintendent of Columbia public schools, Winthrop Training School, later Winthrop College, was started here in a small brick building which had been the chapel of Columbia Theological Seminary. In 1936 this building was moved to the campus of Winthrop College, Rock Hill, S. C. — Map (db m28021) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — Palmetto Arsenal / Iron Works1880 Lincoln Street 1850
This sundried brick structure on a stone foundation was a arsenal which produced many guns and edged weapons for the state before and during the Civil War. Destroyed by General Sherman's army in 1865 it was soon rebuilt to manufacture iron works such as the grill works around the Governor's Mansion and Lace House. Deeded to the City of Columbia in 1941 it has been used as a community recreation center. Once known as "Big Top" in its beginning it is now known as Arsenal Hill Park. [ National . . . — Map (db m42724) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — Palmetto Regiment
East Face South Carolina To her sons of the Palmetto Regiment Who fell in the War with Mexico Anno Domini 1847. — Map (db m50256) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40 - 94 — Paul R. Redfern
Born in 1902, Paul Redfern at an early age showed a marked mechanical aptitude and excitement for aviation. Shortly after graduating from old Columbia High School in 1923, he built his own airplane and established the city’s first commercial aviation company and flying field on this site. Later, Redfern attempted a non-stop flight to Brazil, leaving from Brunswick, Georgia, August 25, 1927. He has never been heard from again. — Map (db m58991) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — Philip Simmons
Philip Simmons, renowned Charleston blacksmith, designed these wrought iron entrance gates and they were fabricated at the Simmons Blacksmith Shop by his apprentices Joseph Pringle (cousin) and Carlton Simmons (nephew). The men forged the gates into shape using hammers and an 18th century anvil. The design displays the symbolic "scales of justice" and the state's palmetto tree. The Simmon's signature folded ends and tight curves can be seen throughout the work. . . . — Map (db m50925) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-61 — Pickens Street( Columbia S.C. )
This street was named for Andrew Pickens (1739-1817). One of the three S.C. Partisan Generals in the Revolution, he fought in the battles of Cowpens and Eutaw Springs both in 1781. Pickens served fourteen years in the S.C. House of Representatives, four in the S.C. Senate and two in Congress. From 1785 to 1791, he was appointed several times by Congress to treat with the Indians. He is buried at Old Stone Church near Pendleton. — Map (db m21720) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — Pinckney College1837
Pinckney College, constructed in 1837, honors a prominent South Carolina family. Notables members include Charles Pinckney (1757-1824), who served as South Carolina governor and U.S. senator. He authored the "Pinckney Draft" at the Federal Constitutional Convention in 1787. Another noted family member is Charles Cotesworth Pinckney (1746-1825), a lawyer, soldier, statesman, and diplomat. He served as a delegate to the Constitutional Convention. A strong supporter of the efforts to establish . . . — Map (db m22124) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-172 — Pine Grove Rosenwald School
(Front text) This school, built in 1923 at a cost of $2,500, is one of 500 African-American schools in S.C. funded in part by the Julius Rosenwald Foundation from 1917 to 1932. It is a two-room school typical of smaller Rosenwald schools. From 1923 to 1950 an average of 40-50 students a year attended this school, in grades 1-7. (Reverse text) This school closed after the 1949-50 school year, when many districts were consolidated. It was sold to the Pine Grove . . . — Map (db m46343) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — President's House(University of South Carolina) — 1810
This building replaced the first faculty residence on campus which was destroyed by fire in 1854. Designed by P.H. Hammarskold, the presidents house introduced the Regency Style of Architecture to Columbia. It served as a faculty residence until the 1940's when it was converted to a woman's residence hall. At that time it was named for G.A. Wauchope. composer of the university's alma mater. In 1952 it was converted to a single dwelling to become the official president's house. — Map (db m62590) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — Quoin-Stones
The Quoin-Stones and basement cornice above were crumbled “by the proximity of the fire from the adjacent Old State House” — Map (db m67776) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-128 — R.L. Bryan Co. Warehouse
(Front) This warehouse was built in 1913 as the schoolbook depository for the R.L. Bryan Company. The company, founded in 1844 by R.L. Bryan (1823-1900) and his brother-in-law James J. McCarter (d. 1872), was originally a bookstore and stationery shop on Main St. known as Bryan & McCarter. In 1900 R.L. Bryan & Company merged with the Bryan Printing Company, founded in 1889, to become the R.L. Bryan Company. (Reverse) In 1901 the S.C. General Assembly, in an effort to improve . . . — Map (db m29752) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-133 — Randolph Cemetery
[Front]: Randolph Cemetery, founded in 1871, was one of the first black cemeteries in Columbia. It was named for Benjamin Franklin Randolph (1837-1868), a black state senator assassinated in 1868 near Hodges, in Abbeville County. Randolph, a native of Kentucky and a free black before the Civil War, had been a chaplain in the Union Army, an agent of the Freedmen’s Bureau, and a newspaper publisher before he was elected to represent Orangeburg County in the S.C. Senate in 1868. . . . — Map (db m29315) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40 - 176 — Redfern Field / Paul R. Redfern
Front This is the site of Redfern Field, established in 1923 as the first commercial airfield in Columbia. Paul Rinaldo Redfern (1902 ~ 1927?) had shown an early interest in and aptitude for aviation, building his first full-scale airplane in 1916, while still a student at Columbia High School. Though he soon left high school to gain experience working on and flying planes, Redfern returned in 1919 and graduated in 1923. Reverse Redfern built his own plane, opened his airfield . . . — Map (db m59061) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — Remembering Dr. King
Front The honorary designation of Harden Street and installation of markers in the name of the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd. recognizes the achievements of a man who inspired the world to embrace equality and non-violence to which he dedicated his life. Dr. King served as Pastor of Ebenezer Baptist Church, Atlanta, Georgia. At age 35, Dr. King was the youngest recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize. On April 4, 1968, he was assassinated at the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, . . . — Map (db m47684) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-160 — Richard Samuel Roberts House
(Front text) Richard Samuel Roberts (1880-1936), a photographer who documented individuals, families, and institutions in Columbia’s black community and across S.C., lived here from 1920 until his death. Roberts, a self-taught photographer, moved his family from Florida to Columbia and bought this house at 1717 Wayne Street for $3,000. Roberts and his wife Wilhelmina Williams Roberts (1881-1977) raised their children here. (Reverse text) Roberts, who was a full-time . . . — Map (db m53404) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — Richardson Square
This mall is named in honor of Richard Richardson 1704 - 1780 Brigadier General of militia in the American Revolution, Member of the First and Second Provincial Congresses, Commander of the 1775 Snow Campaign, and ancestor of six Governors of South Carolina. He was taken prisoner by the British in 1780 and became mortally ill while in captivity. Main Street in Columbia was first named Richardson Street. When this portion of Main Street was closed to create a mall, . . . — Map (db m40624) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-74 — Richland Street
One of the original streets in the 1786 Columbia plan. Richland Street was probably named after Richland County, which had been so designated by an act of the General Assembly in 1785. By November 1786, two town commissioners, Alexander Gillon and Thomas Taylor, owned lots on this street. The Governor's Mansion is located on Richland Street. — Map (db m21847) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — Robert E. Lee Memorial Highway
Erected 1938 Committee Mrs. Louis LeVander Walden, Chairman Mrs. D. McK. Winter · Mrs. Eugene R. Buckingham Mrs. J. Robt. Martin · Mrs. D. L. Husbands This marker donated by the City of Columbia — Map (db m7501) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — Rutledge College1805 — University of South Carolina Historic District
First building completed              originally known as South,          Named for John Rutledge.          Burned and rebuilt 1855.             Library first housed here.            Clariosophic and Euphradian    Literary Societies held first         meetings in chapel. Used as     hospital during Civil War.          East wing and chapel occupied by Colonel Green and staff         of Union Army, 1865. House of    Representatives held sittings    in chapel . . . — Map (db m62596) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — Rutledge College1805
Rutledge College was the first first building to be erected at South Carolina College. At that time it served as Residence Hall, Lecture Hall, Chapel, Library, Faculty Housing and Laboratory. Rutledge College was named for John and Edward Rutledge, both Governors of South Carolina. In 1855 the building was destroyed by fire and rebuilt immediately. After the Civil War the east wing was used as quarters by the Federal Military commander of the Columbia District. During that time the . . . — Map (db m62638) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-125 — Seaboard Air Line Passenger Station
[Front of Marker]: This depot, built by the Seaboard Air Line Railway in 1904, was the third passenger depot built in Columbia, following the South Carolina Railroad Depot on Gervais St., built about 1850, and the Union Station on Main St., built in 1902. This depot and its adjacent baggage room was an alternative to Union Station, which served passengers on the Atlantic Coast Line and Southern Railway. [Reverse of Marker]: This depot and baggage room were listed . . . — Map (db m7641) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-115 — Seibels House
(Front text) This house, listed in the National Register of Historic Places and probably built during the last decade of the 18th century, is one of the few remaining houses from this era in Columbia. It was purchased prior to 1860 by the Seibels family, pioneers in the insurance field, and remained in the family until 1984 when Seibels descendant George R. P. Walker donated it to Historic Columbia Foundation. (Reverse text) This house stands on plantation lands of Thomas . . . — Map (db m30419) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-77 — Senate Street
The South Carolina General Assembly created Columbia as the state's capital city in 1786, and Senate Street was named for the upper house of that legislative body. In 1790, the General Assembly, which designated that the town be located on the Congaree River near Friday's Ferry, first met in Columbia in the new State House, designed by James Hoban, who later designed the White House. — Map (db m21873) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-102 — Shandon
(Front text) In 1890 the Columbia Land and Investment Co. purchased farm land in this area for development, laying out streets and sidewalks in 1893. In 1894 the Columbia Electric Street Railway provided streetcars to the vicinity and built a public pavilion and park near Harden Street. By 1900 the area generally bounded by Woodrow, Wheat, Harden, College, and Greene streets, and Millwood Ave., was known as Shandon, for the Rev. Peter J. Shand. (Reverse text) The town of . . . — Map (db m30391) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — Sherman’s Artillery
February 16, 1865 Sherman’s Artillery, from the hills on the south side of the Congaree, got the range of the city by firing on this building then under construction, registering six hits which are separately marked by stars. — Map (db m67773) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-49 — Sherman's Headquarters
During the Federal occupation of Columbia February 17-19, 1865 commanding General William T. Sherman had his headquarters here. — Map (db m29124) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40~159 — Sidney Park C.M.E. Church
(Front) Sidney Park C.M.E. Church was founded in 1886 and has been at this site since 1889. It grew out of a dispute among members of Bethel A.M.E. Church, who left that congregation and applied to join the Colored Methodist Episcopal (now Christian Methodist Episcopal) Church. The congregation acquired this site in 1886 and built its first sanctuary, a frame building, in 1889. That church burned by 1892. (Reverse) This Gothic Revival brick church, built in 1893, was . . . — Map (db m54970) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — Sir George Carteret(1615-1680)
Of Old French Stock From the Isle of Jersey N.C. Cape, County Named for Him New Jersey Named for His Birthplace Honored by Charles II — Map (db m50957) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — Sir John Colleton(1608-1666)
Colonel in English Civil War Gallant Naval Officer Retired to Barbados County Named for Him — Map (db m50941) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — Sir William Berkeley(1606-1677)
Brother of John Berkeley Governor of Virginia Loyal to Charles II Hung Bacon's Supporters Opposed Schools and Printing — Map (db m50938) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-16 — Site of Blanding House
In this square stood the home of Colonel Abram Blanding (1776-1839) for whom this street was named. He was first principal, Columbia Male Academy 1798, a noted lawyer and philanthropist, ably served the state on Board of Public Works 1819-28. Financed and built city's first water works, 1820. — Map (db m28813) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-20 — Site of Columbia Female Academy
Authorized by legislature 1792, the Columbia Female Academy was located here from about 1820 to 1883, when this property was leased to Columbia Public School Commissioners, two of whom still represent the Academy Board. The remodeled academy became the first Columbia High School, in use until 1915. — Map (db m28042) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-97 — Site of Columbia High School
Described as "Collegiate Italian Renaissance" in style, this school was designed by J. Carroll Johnson, of Urquhart and Johnson, in Columbia. The cornerstone was laid in 1915 with Gov. Richard I. Manning as a featured speaker. Final classes were held here in December 1975, when Columbia High moved into a new building. Thus came the end of an institution of education and culture that meant so much to so many. — Map (db m28043) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-8 — Site of Columbia Male Academy
Trustees appointed by legislature 1792 were incorporated 1795 and served as trustees for male and female academies. School located here 1827 on land given by Gov. John Taylor. Though publicly endowed, the school was conducted as a private academy until 1883 when it was merged with public school system. Hugh S. Thompson, Governor of S. C. 1882-86, was principal of male academy 1865-80. — Map (db m28684) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-18 — Site of Gibbes House
On this corner stood the home of Dr. Robert W. Gibbes (1809-66) distinguished physician, scientist, historian, editor, antiquarian; Surgeon General of South Carolina 1861-65. The house with his notable library, art treasures and scientific collections was burned by Union troops February 17, 1865. — Map (db m35612) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — Site of Original President's House 1807( University of South Carolina )
On this spot stood the original President's House completed in 1807. The house served as the residence of every University president from Johnathan Maxcy to William S. Currell. It was the site of a variety of University and national events including the 1909 visit of U.S. President William Howard Taft. In 1922, the house was converted into offices and in the 1930s became known as the Extension Building. A collapsed roof in 1937 prompted abandonment of the building. . . . — Map (db m62715) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-13 — Site of Palmetto Iron Works
On the SW corner of this square was located the Palmetto Armory, later called Palmetto Iron Works, originally built for converting flint and steel muskets into percussion guns. Arms and munitions were manufactured here during the Confederate War, 1861-1865. — Map (db m21802) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-2 — Site of Parade Ground
During Federal military occupation of South Carolina 1865-1877, this square was part of the parade ground used by United States troops. The barracks were located on this and adjacent squares. — Map (db m45348) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — Site of the Surrender of Columbia, SC
Erected Feb. 17, 1914 by Wade Hampton Chapter, U.D.C. On the spot where Mayor T.J. Goodwyn surrendered the city of Columbia to Gen. W.T. Sherman Feb. 17, 1865 Councilmen O.Z. Bates • Samuel Leapheart John Stork • John McKenzie W.B. Stanley • Clark Waring — Map (db m46453) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-35 — Site of Wayside Hospital
Established March 10, 1862 by a group of Columbia women to care for sick and wounded Confederate soldiers. Supported by voluntary contributions. About 75,000 men were cared for before the hospital was closed February 15, 1865. "From this little nucleus spread the grand system of wayside hospitals." — Map (db m29805) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — Site where James Dickey Wrote Deliverance
Friends of Libraries U.S.A. Literary Landmarks Register University of South Carolina Site where James Dickey Wrote Deliverance and other major works from 1969-1997 is designated a Literary Landmark by Friends of Libraries U.S.A. Friends of South Carolina Libraries April 17, 1999 — Map (db m59166) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — South Carolina Confederate Monument
( West Face) To South Carolina's Dead Of The Confederate Army 1861 1865 ( North face) This monument perpetuates the memory , of those who true to the instincts of their birth, faithful to the teachings of their fathers, constant in their love for the State, died in the performance of their duty: Who have glorified a fallen cause by the simple manhood of their lives, the patient endurance of suffering, and the heroism of death, and . . . — Map (db m17048) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-33 — South Carolina Female Collegiate Institute
At Barhamville, about ½ mi. west of this point, a famous girls' school, founded by Dr. Elias Marks (1790-1886), was located 1828-65. Among the students were Anna Maria, daughter of John C. Calhoun; Ann Pamela Cuningham, founder of Mt. Vernon Ladies' Association; Martha Bulloch, mother of President Theodore Roosevelt. — Map (db m43644) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-165 — South Carolina Memorial Gardens
(Front text) This garden was established in 1944 by the Garden Club of South Carolina. It was the first memorial garden in the U.S. created by a state garden club in honor and in memory of those who served in World War II. Sarah P. Boylston donated part of her own garden for it, and noted landscape architect Loutrel W. Briggs (1893-1977) donated his landscape design. It opened in 1946 and was dedicated at its completion in 1957. (Reverse text) This garden was described in a . . . — Map (db m32784) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-28 — South Carolina State Hospital
Institution authorized 1821 by General Assembly, mainly through the work of two members, Samuel Farrow and William Crafts, Jr. The original building, on right, designed by Robert Mills, shows a pioneer grasp of the ideas of humanitarian treatment. — Map (db m37004) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — South Carolina State Hospital, Mills BuildingSouth Carolina Lunatic Asylum
(Upper Plaque) Original Building South Carolina State Hospital Designed by Robert Mills 150 Years Healing With Concern 1822 - 1972 South Carolina Department Of Mental Health (Lower Left Medallion) The National Register of Historic Places South Carolina Department of History and Archives South Carolina State Hospital Mills Building (Lower Right Medallions) American Revolution Bicentennial Richland County Committee 53 . . . — Map (db m36118) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — South Carolina State Vietnam War Memorial
In memory of the sons and daughters of South Carolina who lost their lives in the service of their country in Vietnam. — Map (db m13489) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — South Carolina Veterans Memorial
[Flag Base]: In Honor of South Carolina Veterans of the United States Armed Forces [South Bench Inscription] Dedicated - Veterans Day November 11, 2005 United States Army United States Marine Corps United States Navy United States Air Force United States Coast Guard POW-MIA [Assembly Street Inscription] The State of South Carolina is eternally grateful to her sons and daughters who honorably served in the Armed Forces of the United States of . . . — Map (db m46625) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — South Carolina Women of the Confederacy Monument
[North Face]: To The South Carolina Women Of The Confederacy 1861-1865 — Reared By The Men Of Their State 1909-11 [West face]: In this monument Generations unborn shall hear the voice Of a grateful people Testifying to the sublime devotion Of the women of South Carolina In their country's need. Their unconquerable spirit Strengthened the thin lines of gray. Their tender care was solace to the stricken. Reverence for God and . . . — Map (db m21928) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — Spanish-American War Cannon
The cannon that was mounted on this granite base of the Spanish-American War Monument was removed in 1942 and contributed as scrap-iron for use in World War II. — Map (db m46597) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — Spanish-American War Veterans Monument
[West Plaque]: Spanish War Veterans Insignia [South Plaque]: South Carolina Troops in the Spanish-American War First South Carolina Volunteer Infantry Second South Carolina Volunteer Infantry Anderson's Battery Heavy Artillery South Carolina Naval Militia ————— South Carolinians who volunteered for The Yellow Fever Test in Cuba were honored by the United States Congress with a special Gold Medal and a Lifetime . . . — Map (db m50923) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-34 — St. Peter's Church and Ursuline Convent
First church built 1824; present church 1906. In the churchyard is buried John R. Niernsee (1823-85), Major C. S. A.; architect of the State House. Ursuline convent located SE corner Main and Blanding streets 1858-65; Valle Crucis 1865-87; Hampton-Preston House 1887-90; erected here 1889. — Map (db m32749) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — #89001610 — St. Peter's Roman Catholic Church
(Upper Medallion) American Revolution Bicentennial * Richland County Committee * Landmark 78 (Lower Medallion) National Register of Historic Places St. Peter's Roman Catholic Church South Carolina Department of Archives and History — Map (db m32280) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-131 — State Dispensary Warehouse
(Front text) This building, built in 1863-64 and burned by Federal troops in 1865, was rebuilt in 1872 as a cotton batting factory and warehouse. It burned again in 1897, leaving only the outer walls. In 1898 the S.C. State Dispensary, created by Gov. Benjamin R. Tillman to ensure state control over the production and sale of alcohol, rebuilt it as a two-story building to serve as the State Dispensary Warehouse. (Reverse text) Though the State Dispensary system generated . . . — Map (db m29844) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — Strom Thurmond
[East Inscription]: A Century of Service Born December 5, 1902 in Edgefield, South Carolina, Strom Thurmond provided nearly a century of service to the Palmetto State and to this nation. Highlights of his extraordinary life include: Participation in the D-Day Invasion June 6, 1944 (World War II); five Battle Stars and eighteen military awards and decorations; the only person in American history to be elected to the United States Senate by write-in vote - 1954; the longest . . . — Map (db m46598) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-83 — Sumter Street
[Front text]: A Virginia native who came to South Carolina ca. 1765, General Thomas Sumter was a leader in civil as well as military affairs. He served in the First and Second Provincial Congresses, in the S.C. General Assembly, as U.S. Congressman and U.S. Senator. South Carolina's last Revolutionary War general, he died in 1832 at his Sumter District home in Stateburg, where he was a large landowner and planter. His tomb there notes him as a founder of the . . . — Map (db m7651) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — Taylor Burying Ground
In 1786 the State of South Carolina purchased for a part of the site of Columbia, the plantation of Col. Thomas Taylor (1743-1833), Revolutionary soldier. His house was situated near the S-E corner of Richland and Barnwell Streets, across from this walled enclosure, where he lies buried with his son, Gov. John Taylor, other members of his family and slaves. — Map (db m29870) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-81 — Taylor Street
[Front Text]: Named for the Taylor family, this street is one of the original streets in the 1786 Columbia plan. Thomas Taylor was a member of the first and second Provincial Congresses, the General Assembly, and was a trustee of S.C. College. In 1791 he escorted President Washington into Columbia. Taylor died in 1833. His son, John, was a planter. lawyer. Governor (1826-28), first intendant of Columbia, and a member of Congress (1807-16). He died in 1832. [Reverse . . . — Map (db m21812) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — The "Columbiad" Cannon10 inch
This 10 inch Columbiad Cannon defended Charleston Harbor from 1863 until the end of the War Between the States in 1865. It has a smooth, non-rifled, bore and fires a 10 inch round ball weighing 104 pounds. The markings on this cannon tell a story. The serial number 22 is stamped on the cannon’s muzzle. Manufactured in 1863, it weighs 13,028 pounds. The “BF,” also located on the muzzle, stands for the Bellona Foundry outside of Richmond, Virginia. This gun was made and then . . . — Map (db m51733) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-101 — The Big Apple
Originally built 1907-1910 as the House of Peace Synagogue and located 100 yards south, this building was sold in1936 and shortly thereafter became a black nightclub known as the Big Apple. A dance by this name originated here and soon swept the country, inspiring the song, "The Big Apple," which was recorded by Tommy Dorsey's Orchestra. "The Big Apple" became a best-selling hit in September of 1937. — Map (db m21900) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — The Boys of Richland County
In Memory of The Boys of Richland County who made the Supreme Sacrifice in World War II Erected by the Civic Department of the Woman’s Club of Columbia Dedicated April 20, 1947 — Map (db m52272) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — The Columbia (S.C.) Holocaust Memorial
זכרר Remember (Star of David) In Sacred Memory Of The 6,000,000 (Map Included) (Left Panel) During the Holocaust, 1933 - 45, six million European Jews were murdered by Nazi Germany and its collaborators. Millions more of the innocent suffered persecution and death as victims of the State-sponsored Nazi Tyranny. 1920 League Of Nations meets in Geneva.          Nazi Party meets in Munich. 1925 Adolph Hitler's Mein . . . — Map (db m44184) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-60 — The East-West Streets In The City Of Columbia - Gervais Street
The East-West Streets In The City Of Columbia The streets of Columbia running from east to west (with a few exceptions) were named for products important in the State's economy, for the two Taylor plantations on which the new Capitol was located and for prominent individuals such as Gervais, author of the bill establishing Columbia as Capitol. Gervais Street Named for John Lewis Gervais (c. 1742-1798) who was educated in Germany, emigrated first to England, arrived in Charleston . . . — Map (db m7487) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — The Figure Eight in South Carolina
The symbolism of the number "8" in South Carolina's history and government is probably a coincidence; it began with Charles II's appointment of eight (8) Lords Proprietors for the Carolinas. They are named in the fountain placques. Then there were eight (8) rulers of England's American colonies during the period of settlement and colonial rule in the Carolinas (1663-1776). And South Carolina was the eighth state to be admitted to the United States. And thus this fountain has been . . . — Map (db m50936) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — The Gonzales Fountain
The Fountain was Given to the People of South Carolina In Honor of William Elliott Gonzales 1866 - 1937 A Founder and Editor of The State Map (db m50955) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — The L. Marion Gressette Euphradian Society Hall
The Euphradian Society Hall, established in 1806, moved into an elegant new hall on the third floor of Harper College in 1848. The hall resounded with orations and debates for over one hundred and thirty years, until the Society became inactive in 1979. One of the Euphradian Society's most illustrious alumni was Lawrence Marion Gressette (1902-1984, class of 1924), who served as secretary and vice-president of the society. Gressette went on to distinguish himself both in private law practice . . . — Map (db m22237) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-144 — The Lighthouse & Informer / John H. McCray
(Front text) The Lighthouse & Informer, long the leading black newspaper in S.C., was a weekly published here from 1941 to 1954 by journalist and civil rights advocate John Henry McCray (1910-1997). McCray, who founded and paper “so our people can have a voice and some means of getting along together,” published articles covering every aspect of black life and columns and editorials advocating equal rights. (Reverse text) John H. McCray In 1944, after the . . . — Map (db m35824) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-59 — The North-South Streets in The City Of Columbia / Richardson Street
The North-South Streets in The City Of Columbia The north-south streets, laid out in the two mile square of the orininal city of Columbia in 1786, were named (except for Assembly) for generals and officers who fought in the American Revolution. Most of these were native Americans, but one was the Polish Count Pulaski. Richardson Street Columbia's chief business street, Main, was first named Richardson Street, for Richard Richardson (1704-1780). This Virginia native settled in . . . — Map (db m7476) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — The South Caroliniana Library
This was the first separate college library building erected in the United States.The architect of the exterior is not known, but the reading room is copied from Bulfinch's Library of Congress. The central portion was completed in May 1840, the fire proof wings were added in 1927. The building served as the library of the college and university until 1940, when it became the South Caroliniana Library. — Map (db m21938) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — The South Caroliniana Library1840
The central portion of this structure is the oldest freestanding college library in the United States and has served continuously as a library since its completion in 1840. It is based upon design elements by South Carolina native and nineteenth-century federal architect Robert Mills. Its reading room was inspired by Charles Bulfinch's 1818 design for the US Capitol's Library of Congress room, which was destroyed by fire in 1851. Known only as the College Library for its first 100 years, . . . — Map (db m22093) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-122 — The State House
(Front text): Columbia was founded in 1786, replacing Charleston as the state capital. The first State House here, built in 1789, was a small wooden building just W. of this site. Construction on this State House, designed by John R. Niernsee, began in 1855; exterior walls were almost complete when work was suspended in 1863 during the Civil War. In February 1865 Union troops burned the old State House, shelled this unfinished building, and raised the United States flag over it. . . . — Map (db m7381) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — The State House of South Carolina
(Left Inscription) Construction of this State House was begun in 1855 and continued uninterruptedly to February 17, 1865 when Sherman burned Columbia. Work was resumed in 1867 and carried on irregularly to 1900. (Right Inscription): The architect of this State House was John R. Niernsee born in Vienna, Austria, May 27, 1823 Died in Columbia June 7, 1885 Buried in St. Peter's Churchyard (National Historic Landmark Plaque): The State House of South . . . — Map (db m7372) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — The Statue of Liberty DivisionWorld War II
The 77th Infantry Division trained at Fort Jackson in 1942 and fought on Guam, Leyte, Kerama Retto, Ie Shima and Okinawa. Returning to Cebu, they took 6,500 Japanese prisoners. They then returned to occupy Hokkaido, Japan where the division was deactivated in 1946. The division suffered a total of 3,201 killed in action, 10,531 wounded and 133 missing in action. Liberty Does Not Come Cheap — Map (db m53923) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-51 — Thomas Taylor / Taylor Cemetery
Thomas Taylor 1743 - 1833 Member of Provincial Congresses 1775 and 1776; Colonel of Militia under General Thomas Sumter in the American Revolution; Senator in the Jacksonborough Assembly; member of S.C. Convention which ratified the United States Constitution; member S.C. Legislature; commissioner who helped plan the city of Columbia and one of the founders and first elders of the First Presbyterian Church. Taylor Cemetery In 1786 the State of S. C. bought as . . . — Map (db m30011) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-1 — Trinity Episcopal Church
Parish organized 1812. Original Church dedicated 1814; Present church 1846. In the churchyard lie buried three Wade Hamptons; Thomas Cooper, Educator; Henry Timrod, Poet; W.C. Preston, U.S. Senator; Five Governors of S.C.: Three Mannings, Hampton and Thompson; Soldiers of the Revolutionary and later American Wars, including Colonel Peter Horry, Generals Ellison Capers, John S. Preston and States Rights Gist. — Map (db m11246) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-27 — University of South Carolina
Chartered in 1801 as the S.C. College, opened January 10, 1805. Entire student body volunteered for Confederate service, 1861. Soldiers' Hospital, 1862 - 65. Rechartered as U. of S.C. in 1865. Radical Control 1873-77. Closed 1877- 80. College of Agricultural and Mechanical Arts 1880-82. S. C. College 1882 - 87. U. of S. C. 1887 - 90. S. C. College 1890 - 1905. U. of S. C. 1906. Faithful Index to the Ambitions and Fortunes of the State — Map (db m21918) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — Unknown Confederate Dead Monument
(East): Soldiers of the Confederate States (South): “The death of men is not the death of rights that urged them to the fray.” (West): A loving memory from the Richland Memorial Association (North): Deo vindice — Map (db m46628) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — USS Columbia CL-56( Light Cruiser )
U.S.S. Columbia CL-56 Commissioned 29 July 1942 Decommissioned 30 November 1946 Upper Plaque The Secretary of the Navy takes pleasure in commending the United States Ship Columbia For service as follows: " For outstanding heroism in action as a unit of Task Group 77, 2 operating in support of the initial landings at Lingayen Gulf, Luzon, Philippines from January 5 to 9, 1945. Engaged in bombardment of hostile shore defenses and in coverage of mine sweeping . . . — Map (db m44216) HM WM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — Vietnam Veterans & POWs
The flags and flagpoles on this building are dedicated to the men who served in Viet Nam and particularly to the gallant men who were prisoners or gave their lives in the defense of freedom. We recognize their devotion to their country and the part they played in world peace. — Map (db m50959) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-134 — Visanska-Starks House
(Front text) This house, built after 1900, was originally a two-story frame residence with a projecting bay and wraparound porch; a fire in 1989 destroyed the second story. Barrett Visanska (1849-1932), a jeweler, bought the house in 1913. Visanska, a native of Poland, was a leader in Columbia’s Jewish community and a founder of the Tree of Life Congregation. In 1938 Dr. John J. Starks, president of Benedict College, bought the house. (Reverse text) Dr. John Jacob Starks . . . — Map (db m63395) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — Wade Hampton
[East Face] Commander of The Hampton Legion Lieutenant General C.S.A. [Lower Plaques]: [Trevilian] [Seven Pines] [Burgess Mill] [First Manassas] [Gettysburg] [North Face] To Wade Hampton Born March 28 1818 Died April 11 1902 [West Face]: Governor of South Carolina 1876 - 1879 United States Senator 1879 - 1891 [Lower Plaques]: [Bentonville] [Brandy Station] [Sappon Church] [Cold Harbor] [Hawes Shop] . . . — Map (db m28797) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — Wade Hampton
B. ca. 1751 – D. 1835 Planter, Congressman, Soldier, served as: Col. Light Dragoons in Revolution Member S. C. General Assembly, 1779-84 Member Congress, 1795-97, 1803-05 U. S. Army, 1808-13, resigning as Maj. Gen. Erected, 1977 S. C. Society U. S. Daughters 1812 — Map (db m67481) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-71 — Washington Street
This street is named for George Washington, commander of the Continental Army throughout the Revolution, first President of the United States, and president of the 1787 Constitutional Convention. Early in his presidency, Washington toured the southern states. He visited South Carolina in 1791 and spent May 22-24 in the new capitol city, Columbia. While here, he attended a public dinner in the new State House. — Map (db m21768) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — Washington Street Methodist Church
Washington Street Methodist Church The Congregation Ministers Here Left Medallion United Methodist Historic Site No. 139 Center Medallion National Register of Historic Places Washington Street United Methodist Church (Building - #70000599) Right Medallion American Revolution Bicentennial Richland County Committee Landmark 24 — Map (db m28570) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-21 — Washington Street Methodist Church
A church was built here between 1803 and 1805; another church, erected 1832, was burned by Union troops in 1865 and reconstructed in 1866 of salvaged brick and clay mortar. Present church dedicated 1875. Bishop Wm. Capers (1790-1855), founder of missions to slaves in S. C., was pastor and is buried here. — Map (db m28794) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-157 — Waverly
(Front text) Waverly has been one of Columbia’s most significant black communities since the 1930s. The city’s first residential suburb, it grew out of a 60-acre parcel bought by Robert Latta in 1855. Latta’s widow and children sold the first lots here in 1863. Shortly after the Civil War banker and textile manufacturer Lysander D. Childs bought several blocks here for development. Waverly grew for the next 50 years as railroad and streetcar lines encouraged growth. (Reverse . . . — Map (db m53953) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-145 — Waverly Five and Dime / George Elmore and Elmore v. Rice
Waverly Five and Dime) The Waverly Five & Dime, located here until about 1957, was managed 1945-48 by George A. Elmore (1905-1959), the African American plaintiff in a landmark voting rights case soon after World War II. Elmore ran this store and two liquor stores, and also worked as a photographer and cab driver. In 1946, when he tried to vote in the all-white Democratic primary in Richland County, he was denied a ballot. George Elmore and Elmore v. Rice In 1947 the . . . — Map (db m58181) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-146 — Wesley Methodist Church
(Front text) Wesley Methodist Church is the oldest African American Methodist congregation in Columbia. It was founded in 1869 by Rev. J.C. Emerson and was a separate black congregation instead of forming from an established white church. First called the Columbia Mission, it met upstairs in a Main St. building and later built its own chapel. About 1910 the Columbia Mission bought this lot and was renamed Wesley Methodist Episcopal Church. (Reverse text) This Gothic Revival . . . — Map (db m29262) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — William Earle Berne Beltway
Named in 1980 by the South Carolina State Highways and Public Transportation Commission in recognition of Dr. Berne’s distinguished service during three terms as a member of the Highway Commission representing the Fifth Highway District (Richland and Kershaw Counties) 1960 ~ 64, 1968 ~ 72, 1976 ~ 1980, And three terms as Chairman, 1964, 1970 ~ 71, 1979 ~ 80. He was named in 1980 by the Commission as Honorary Chairman for life. Dr. Berne was one of several individuals whose efforts were . . . — Map (db m52107) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-62 — Williams Street / Gist Street
Williams Street This street was named for Otho H. Williams, Brig. Gen. Of Continental Army during the American Revolution. Williams served as adjutant general under Southern Army commanders Gates and Greene and saw military action in the battles of Camden, Guilford Courthouse, Hobkirk Hill, and Eutaw Springs. He commanded the light corps which protected Greene during a portion of his retreat across N.C. in 1781. Gist Street This street was named for Mordecai Gist, Brigadier . . . — Map (db m11247) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — Wilson Boyhood House
[ United States Emblem ] Woodrow Wilson World War President Lived here in the home of His parents Dr. and Mrs. Jos. Ruggles Wilson 1871- 1874 Erected as a memorial by the South Carolina Department of the American Legion Auxiliary December 28, 1925 [ American Legion Emblem ] — Map (db m28100) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-69 — Wilson House
Built by 1872, this house was the boyhood home of Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), twenty-eighth President of the United States (1913-21). It was constructed by his parents, the Reverend Joseph Ruggles Wilson and Jessie Woodrow Wilson, when they lived in Columbia. The Reverend Wilson was a professor at Columbia Theological Seminary from 1870 to 1874 and was minister of Columbia's First Presbyterian Church from 1871 to 1873. — Map (db m28019) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-46 — Woodlands and Millwood
1 ½ mi. south was Woodlands, built before 1800 by Wade Hampton, I (1752-1835), Colonel in Revolution, Major General in War of 1812. ¼ mi. north was Millwood, built before 1820 by Wade Hampton II (1791-1858), aide to Gen. Jackson, War of 1812. Boyhood home of Wade Hampton, III (1818-1902), Lieutenant General, C. S. A.; Governor of South Carolina 1876-79. Union troops burned both houses 1865. — Map (db m52477) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Columbia — 40-178 — Zion Chapel Baptist Church No. 1
This African-American church was organized ca. 1865 when four men left Sandy Level Baptist Church, founded before the Revolution with both white and black members, to form their own congregation. They elected Rev. Joe Taylor as their first pastor and held early services in a brush arbor nearby. (Reverse text) The first permanent church here, a log building, was replaced by a frame church 1907-1922, during the pastorate of Rev. T. H. McNeal. It . . . — Map (db m63303) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Dentsville — 40-116 — Camp Johnson
This Confederate camp of instruction was once located about 1 mi. NW at Lightwood Knot Springs, site of a popular resort prior to the War Between the States. — Map (db m30192) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Eastover — 40-170 — Eastover
(Front text) Eastover, so named for being “east and over” from Columbia, was a small rural community of the mid-19th century that grew into a town after the Wilmington, Columbia, & Augusta RR completed its line through this area in 1871. The town, chartered in 1880, was incorporated in 1907 with its limits designated as one-half mile in each direction from the tracks through the center of town. (Reverse text) Railroad lines to and through Lower Richland County . . . — Map (db m37364) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Eastover — 40-129 — Kensington
(Front text) This plantation on the Wateree River features a remarkable Italianate Revival house built in 1852-54. Designed by Charleston architects Edward C. Jones and Francis D. Lee, it was built for Matthew Richard Singleton (1817-1854) and Martha Kinloch Singleton (1818-1892). Jacob Stroyer described life as a slave here in his memoir, first published in 1879. (Reverse text) Kensington was owned by members of the Singleton, Hamer, and Lanham families until the late . . . — Map (db m33260) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Eastover — 40-121 — St. Phillip A.M.E. Church
This church, organized by 1835, met first in a brush arbor 1 ½ mi. N., then constructed a sanctuary on this site shortly thereafter. Its first pastor was Rev. Anderson Burns, and its original trustees were Joseph and Robert Collins, Barnes Flowers, Saylor Pope, Harkness Smith, and Red Stroy. A later sanctuary, built in 1952; burned in 1981; the present sanctuary was dedicated that year. — Map (db m29316) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Fort Jackson, Columbia — 40-54 — 100th Inf Division
At this site on 15 November 1942, Maj. Gen. W. A. Burress received the 100th Infantry Division colors, marking the official activation of the "Century Division." After a distinguished World War II record in southern France and Germany, the 100th was reorganized in the Army Reserve. It was the only USAR training division recalled during the 1961 Berlin crisis. — Map (db m59240) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Fort Jackson, Columbia — 40-??1 — 102nd Cavalry
Formed 1890 as the Essex Troop of Lt. Cavalry; mustered into the N.J. National Guard in 1893. After World War I service, became 102nd Cav. in 1921. Reorganized 1940 as 102nd Cav. (Horse- Mechanized); mobilized for active duty in World War II and trained here 1941-42. Saw more than 300 days of combat in France, North Africa, Italy, the Ardennes, the Rhineland, and Central Europe. — Map (db m59237) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Fort Jackson, Columbia — 40-57 — 106th Inf Division
Near this site on 15 March 1943 the 106th Infantry Division was officially activated and became known as the "Golden Lion Division." Although badly mauled in the "Battle of the Bulge," the division stubbornly continued to fight on. The 106th saw action in the Ardennes, the Rhineland, and Central Europe. — Map (db m59236) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Fort Jackson, Columbia — 40-??2 — 108th Division
The “Golden Griffon” Division was created in 1946 as the 108th Airborne Division of the Army Reserve. It was reorganized as an infantry division in 1952, as a training division in 1956, and as an institutional training division in 1993. It has trained Fort Jackson soldiers since the early 1950s and mobilized units here for active service in 1991 and 2001. — Map (db m59234) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Fort Jackson, Columbia — 40-117 — 26th Inf Division
The "Yankee" Division, which saw extensive combat in World War I, was mobilized for active duty in World War II in January 1941. It trained here in 1942-43 and again in 1944, leaving 16 August 1944 for Europe. As part of 3rd Army the division was credited with 210 days of combat in France, the Ardennes, the Rhineland, and Central Europe, and was particularly distinguished for its role in the Battle of the Bulge. — Map (db m59251) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Fort Jackson, Columbia — 40-55 — 30th Inf Division
(Front text) After a brilliant combat record in World War I and 14 years of dedicated National Guard service, the "Old Hickory" Division was mobilized at Fort Jackson, S. C. on 16 September 1940. During World War II, the 30th Division distinguished itself in combat in the campaigns through Normandy, Northern France, the Ardennes, the Rhineland, and Central Europe. (Reverse text) For its illustrious combat record throughout World War II, this "Work Horse of the Western Front" . . . — Map (db m59247) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Fort Jackson, Columbia — 40-119 — 31st Inf Division
"It shall be done" The "Dixie" Division, created in 1917, spent most of World War II as a training division, with some units training at Ft. Jackson, but later saw combat in the Philippines 1944-45. The postwar "Dixie" Division, composed of National Guard units from Alabama and Mississippi, was mobilized for active service in 1951 and served here as a training division during the Korean War. — Map (db m59248) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Fort Jackson, Columbia — 40-96 — 4th Infantry Division
Organized in 1917, the 4th Infantry Division was stationed in this area at Ft. Jackson during World War II and received its final training here for the June 6, 1944 D-Day invasion of Normandy. The division was one of the first on the beaches. The 4th was also in other campaigns, including the Siegfried Line, Hurtgen Forest, and Battle of the Bulge. — Map (db m59246) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Fort Jackson, Columbia — 40-93 — 77th Inf Division
The "Statue of Liberty Division" was reviewed by England's Winston Churchill and President Franklin D. Roosevelt after it was reactivated here in 1942. The 77th fought in World War II Pacific campaigns of Guam, Leyte, Kerama Retto Islands, and Okinawa. It was inactivated after occupying Hokkaido, Japan, in 1946. War correspondent Ernie Pyle was killed in action with the 77th. — Map (db m59252) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Fort Jackson, Columbia — 40-56 — 87th Inf Division
Activated at Camp McCain, Miss. in 1942, the "Golden Acorn" Division trained at this site in 1944. The division distinguished itself in the Ardennes, the Rhineland, and Central Europe during the Battle of the Bulge, the assault of the Sauer, Moselle, and Rhine rivers, capture of Coblenz, the cracking of the Siegfried Line, and the final assault into Czechoslovakia. — Map (db m59253) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Fort Jackson, Columbia — 40-98 — 8th Infantry Division
Activated in 1918 and inspected by Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower and Lt. Gen. George S. Patton during World War II, the 8th landed in France 28 days after D-Day (the invasion of Normandy) and participated in three other campaigns during the war. The division occupied this area at Ft. Jackson after being reactivated in 1940; they were also here 1950-54. — Map (db m59249) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Fort Jackson, Columbia — Bridge at Remagen Stone
This stone was part of the piers supporting the historic Ludendorff Bridge which once spanned the Rhine River at Remagen, Germany. A forward patrol of the US 9th Armored Division captured the bridge in a surprise attack on March 7, 1945, thereby aiding the Allies with a foothold in Germany. The bridge at Remagen played a key role in the final chapter of World War II. — Map (db m59296) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Fort Jackson, Columbia — Darby Field
Darby Field Named in honor of Brigadier General William O. Darby, U.S.Army Killed in action 1945 Erected June 1979 By his West Point classmates, USMA 1933 And the William O. Darby Ranger Memorial Foundation To honor his leadership and courage as Ranger Force founder and commander And his inspiration to all Americans As the foremost Ranger of his time. — Map (db m59297) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Fort Jackson, Columbia — 40-?? — Fort Jackson Elementary School / Hood Street Elementary School
Fort Jackson Elementary School Fort Jackson Elementary School was one of the first public schools in S.C. to desegregate when classes began on September 3, 1963. The first school on post and one of the first permanent buildings at Fort Jackson, it was built in only three months. A new federal policy required all schools on military bases to admit African-American students instead of sending them to separate schools off-base. Hood Street Elementary School This school . . . — Map (db m59230) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Gadsden — 40-31 — Gadsden
Named in honor of James Gadsden President of the Louisville, Cincinnati and Charleston Railroad. Station built here 1840 was the first railroad station in Richland County. A stage line ran to Columbia until 1842 and to Camden until 1848. — Map (db m29943) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Gadsden — 40-114 — James H. Adams
Gov. of S.C. 1854-56, lived near here in his home named Live Oak, which burned ca. 1910. Adams is buried nearby at St. John's Church. — Map (db m30928) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Gadsden — Robert H. Morrell Road
Air Base Road between Old Hopkins Road and Bluff Road Named in 1990 by action of the General Assembly in honor of General Robert Hanly Morrell lifetime resident of Horrell Hill whose military career spanned 40 years 1936 — 1976 and who served as Chief of Staff McEntire Air National Guard Base from May 1961 until September 1976 — Map (db m31981) HM
South Carolina (Richland County), Gadsden vicinity — 40-87 — Richland Presbyterian Church
(Front text) This church building was dedicated in May 1884 by Dr. John L. Girardeau. The congregation of 11 members, including 2 elders and 1 deacon, was organized on the Sabbath Day, November 16, 1883 by the Charleston Presbytery. In 1914, the church became a charter member of Congaree Presbytery, moving to Eastover in August 1922. (Reverse text) The eleven charter members of this church were Thomas and Lula B. Auld, Augusta H. Bates, Joseph and Clair H. Bates, Elise M. . . . — Map (db m43707) HM
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