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Battle of Beaver Dam Creek or Mechanicsville by markers. Use the “First >>” button above to see these markers in sequence.
Virginia (Henrico County), Richmond — Chickahominy BluffRichmond Battlefield — Richmond Nat’l Battlefield Pk – 1862/64
On this ridge overlooking the Chickahominy River, General Lee, President Davis, and many other prominent Confederate officers gathered to await the start of the operations that came to be called the Seven Days Campaign. They expected “Stonewall” Jackson’s 20,000-man army to get behind the Union position near Mechanicsville, to force the Federal Fifth Corps out of its defenses. General A. P. Hill then would clear the river crossings, allowing the bulk of Lee’s army to unite with . . . — Map (db m14977) HM
Virginia (Henrico County), Richmond — Defending Richmond
"The fortifications constructed by the Confederate army in this vicinity & about Richmond are miles in extent & I must add that they are as strong, if not the strongestin the world." - Julian Scott, Union Army Veteran May 1865 From the war's beginning, Confederate authorities struggled with the question of how to defend Richmond. It lay vulnerable to approaches from every direction. Engineers eventually devised an integrated series of earthen fortifications. The Exterior Line nearly . . . — Map (db m55720) HM
Virginia (Henrico County), Richmond — The Seven Days BeginChickahominy Bluff – 1862
June 26, 1862 “We expect to be in Richmond in a fortnight,” writes a young officer in the 7th Maine. With Federal troops close enough to set their watches by Richmond’s church bells, General Robert E. Lee orders his men to strengthen the city’s defensive earthworks. Lee is gambling. While a small force holds these entrenchments, Lee intends to use most of his army to spring a counterattack. Across the Chickahominy River, near Mechanicsville, begins the second in the . . . — Map (db m14972) HM
Virginia (Henrico County), Richmond — O 5 — Outer Fortifications
On the hilltops here ran the outer line of Richmond fortifications, 1862-1865. — Map (db m14971) HM
Virginia (Henrico County), Richmond — 1 — Richmond DefencesIntermediate Line
Here ran the intermediate line of Richmond defences. Built in 1862-64, these defences included 25 inner forts and batteries, beyond which this continuous earthwork encircled the city. The third or outer line was distant from the capitol 4 to 7 miles. Out this road the two divisions of D.H. Hill and of James Longstreet followed Gen. R.E. Lee on June 26, 1862, for the opening battle of the Seven Days' Campaign. — Map (db m14218) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — E 11 — The Chickahominy River & Seven Days' Battles
During the Civil War's Seven Days' Battles from 25 June to 1 July 1862, many engagements occurred along and near the Chickahominy River. Union Maj. Gen. George B. McClellan led the Army of the Potomac. His goal was to capture the Confederate capital city of Richmond, defended by Gen. Robert E. Lee. Battles fought near the river include Beaver Dam Creek (Mechanicsville) on 26 June, Gaines's Mill on 27 June, and Savage's Station on 29 June. These and other battles encouraged McClellan to retreat . . . — Map (db m15212) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — PA 2 — Seven Days BattlesMechanicsville
Mechanicsville was held by Union outposts when, in the early afternoon of June 26, 1862, A. P. Hill reached it coming from the north. The Unionists were quickly driven back to their position on Beaver Dam Creek. Then D. H. Hill, followed by Longstreet, crossed the Chickahominy on this road and joined A. P. Hill. — Map (db m15211) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — 2 — Mechanicsville
Near this village on June 26, 1862, Confederate troops under General R.E. Lee attacked and drove eastward the right wing of the Federal army commanded by Major-General George B. McClellan. This action began the Seven Days' Battle. — Map (db m14219) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — O 6 — Seven Days’ BattlesBattle of Beaver Dam Creek
The Civil War battle of Beaver Dam Creek (Mechanicsville) began on the afternoon of 26 June 1862. Confederate Maj. Gen. Ambrose P. Hill’s division crossed the Chickahominy upstream at Meadow Bridges and encountered Union skirmishers. The Federals fell back to a strong position east of Beaver Dam Creek at Ellerson’s Mill. There the Confederates attacked along a two-mile front, but were repulsed by Maj. Gen. Fitz John Porter’s V Corps. That night Union forces abandoned their position and occupied . . . — Map (db m14988) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — PA 4 — Seven Days BattlesMechanicsville
Down this slope in the late afternoon of June 26, 1862, A. P. Hill moved to attack the Unionists holding the east side of Beaver Dam Creek. Pender’s Brigade was on the left, Ripley’s on the right. Exposed to a terrible fire from entrenched troops, Pender and Ripley were driven back, though some men reached the stream. — Map (db m14985) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — 3 — Beaver Dam Creek
Confederate troops pursuing Federals retreating eastward from Mechanicsville here came under heavy fire from across Beaver Dam Creek and were halted with loss in the late afternoon of June 26, 1862. — Map (db m14220) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — Beaver Dam CreekRichmond Battlefield — Richmond Nat’l Battlefield Pk – 1862/64
General Robert E. Lee’s plan on June 26, 1862 did not anticipate a direct assault on the Union position here at Beaver Dam Creek. He hoped to maneuver instead of force to drive Fitz John Porter’s troops away from their powerful entrenchments. But Lee’s carefully crafted plan fell apart. Poor coordination among his various columns caused delays. Gen. Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson’s 20,000 men were not able to get into position north of here, above Beaver Dam Creek, before sunset. . . . — Map (db m14983) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — The Creek Runs RedBeaver Dam Creek – 1862
June 26, 1962 On this ground raged the heaviest fighting of the battle of Beaver Dam Creek. Fourteen Union cannon on the ridge beyond the creek blasted Dorsey Pender’s and Roswell Ripley’s Confederates as they charged across the fields behind you. Federal infantry – Pennsylvanians shielded by earthworks and a mill race – ravaged they gray lines with bullets as they waded into the waist-deep stream. “To take the works,” wrote a Southern officer, “was . . . — Map (db m14978) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — The Pennsylvanians Stand Firm
Five regiments of Pennsylvania troops, supported by artillery, held the high ground in front of you. In 1862 the slopes were open with no trees to block the view. Lieutenant Colonel A. J. Warner of the 10th Pennsylvania Reserves was entrenched with his unit on the hill just upstream from Ellerson’s Mill. After the war Warner reminisced about the Confederate attacks: As soon as they reached rifle range our men opened upon them such a destructive fire from the rifle pits and the old mill dam . . . — Map (db m15224) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — The Confederates Attack
A. P. Hill initiated the action on June 26, 1862, by sending his division across the Chickahominy River. His troops drove the Union outposts through Mechanicsville and back beyond Beaver Dam Creek. A brigade led by Roswell Ripley supported Hill closely. As Ripley’s Georgians and North Carolinians reached this ground they encountered a withering fire. Private Edgar A. Jackson of Ripley’s brigade, writing after the battle, described the fighting here in a letter to his mother: As we . . . — Map (db m23788) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — The Creek Runs RedBeaver Dam Creek – 1862
June 26, 1962 On this ground raged the heaviest fighting of the battle of Beaver Dam Creek. Fourteen Union cannon on the ridge beyond the creek blasted Dorsey Pender’s and Roswell Ripley’s Confederates as they charged across the fields behind you. Federal infantry – Pennsylvanians shielded by earthworks and a mill race – ravaged they gray lines with bullets as they waded into the waist-deep stream. “To take the works,” wrote a Southern officer, “was . . . — Map (db m14978) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — Site of Ellerson’s Mill
The foundation of the mill was located in the depression below the road bed. The millrace that supplied water to power the mill was built along the base of the hill and remnants can be seen today. The mill pond was located just beyond the modern Route 156 bridge. Grist mills were essential elements of the 19th-century farming community, and their remains can be found throughout the Seven Days Battlefields. — Map (db m15220) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — Historic Cold Harbor Road
In this location ran the original road from Mechanicsville to Cold Harbor. The bridge that crossed Beaver Dam Creek was destroyed by Union troops prior to the June 26, 1862, battle. — Map (db m15219) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — 4 — Ellerson's Mill
From this main position above Ellerson's Mill, the Federal regulars who had stopped the Confederate advance of June 26, 1862 withdrew during the night, having discovered that "Stonewall" Jackson was turning their right flank. — Map (db m14198) HM
Virginia (Hanover County), Mechanicsville — PA 8 — Seven Days BattlesPorter’s Withdrawal
Along this road Fitz-John Porter withdrew from Beaver Dam Creek in the early morning of June 27, 1862. McClellan, having learned that Stonewall Jackson was approaching Porter’s rear, late at night ordered the withdrawal to another position. This was on Boatswain Creek, not far from New Cold Harbor. — Map (db m14994) HM
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