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Virginia (Page County), Luray — The Chapman-Ruffner HouseBoyhood Home of the “Fighting Chapmans” — Mosby
Immigrant Peter Ruffner built this house about 1739. Before the Civil War, William A. Chapman bought it, and three sons reared here later fought for the Confederacy. For their exploits as members of Col. John S. Mosby’s Rangers, two of them, Lt. Col. William Henry Chapman and Capt. Samuel Chapman, became known as the “Fighting Chapmans.” After the war began, they and their brother Edmond Gaines Chapman served in the local Dixie Artillery. When it disbanded in October 1862, they . . . — Map (db m15904) HM
Virginia (Page County), Shenandoah — Catherine FurnaceUnderground Railroad for Union Soldiers
Built in 1846, Catherine Furnace was one of three Page County furnaces in operation during the Civil War. The 30-foot-tall main stack is nearly all that remains of the cold blast furnace and once-huge operation here, when 22,500 acres supplied wood for charcoal, iron ore, and limestone, and food. With labor scarce, local whites, free blacks and slaves worked here to furnish the Confederacy with pig iron. Wagons transported the pig iron to Tredegar Iron Works in Richmond, the . . . — Map (db m15892) HM
Virginia (Page County), Shenandoah — Shenandoah Iron WorksPage Valley Iron Industry
In 1836, brothers Daniel and Henry Forrer, in partnership with Samuel Gibbons, purchased land here for an ironworks and built a cold-blast furnace, called Furnace #1. Some 6,249 acres provided trees for charcoal, quarries and mines for limestone and ore, and crops to feed the workers. The Forrers later built Catherine Furnace near Newport and Pitt Springs and Furnace #2 on Naked Creek. Each furnace consumed an acre of wood per day for charcoal production to stay in blast. In September 1862, a . . . — Map (db m16641) HM
Virginia (Page County), Luray — Calendine
Calendine was built in the early 1850s by Townsend Young. The adjacent one story building served as a general store and stage stop on the Sperryville-New Market turnpike. The store was also a social gathering place for exchange of news and gossip. Calendine was one the home of sculptor Herbert Barbee (1848-1936) who used the store as a studio. Mr. Barbee may be best known for creating the Confederate Monument located on East main St., Luray. Purchased by Page County Heritage Association in . . . — Map (db m16642) HM
Virginia (Page County), Stanley — Stonewall Jackson's Marches
The Shenandoah Valley below was the scene of much of Confederate General Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson's activity, during the first two years of the Civil War. His swift and secret marches earned his troops the name of "foot cavalry." Jackson's Valley Campaign supplied the lean Confederacy with captured materials of war. His victories resulted in many Union troops being withheld from the first sustained campaign against Richmond, for the defense of Washington, D.C. — Map (db m13183) HM
Virginia (Page County), Grove Hill — The Burning of Red BridgeThe "Last Straw" Between Jackson and Ashby — 1862 Valley Campaign
Nearly a month after the battle of Kernstown, Gen. Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson's command had worked its way south "up" the Valley to join Gen. Richard S. Ewell's division near Conrad's Store (Elkton). To secure this haven for reorganization, on April 19, 1862, Jackson dispatched his mapmaker Jedediah Hotchkiss, to burn the three bridges over the South Fork of the Shenandoah River in Page County. From the onset, Hotchkiss' chore was plagued with problems. In addition to heavy rains, a number . . . — Map (db m12085) HM
Virginia (Page County), Grove Hill — Somerville HeightsA "most terrific fire from the enemy" — 1862 Valley Campaign
Early in May 1862, Gen. Stonewall Jackson moved most of his army east over the Blue Ridge toward Charlottesville, leaving Gen. Richard S. Ewell's division at Conrad's Store (present day Elkton) to hold the Federals in the Shenandoah Valley. The Union commanders suspected that Jackson was en route to Richmond. They did not know, however, that he had turned back on May 3 and four days later was west of Staunton. On May 8, he defeated Federal forces at the Battle of McDowell. During the period of . . . — Map (db m12086) HM
Virginia (Page County), Luray — White House BridgeCritical Crossing — 1862 Valley Campaign
On May 21, 1862. Confederate Gen. Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson’s Valley Army plodded north along this road to threaten Front Royal and out flank Union Gen. Nathaniel Bank’s position at Strasburg. With the addition of Gen. Richard S. Ewell’s division, Jackson’s command numbered nearly 17,000 men and 50 guns. Philip Kauffman, a young man at the time, remembered the Confederates as they crossed the Shenandoah River on the White House Bridge and: “...Stonewall himself . . . — Map (db m799) HM
Virginia (Page County), Luray — Mauck Meeting House
Built for religious purposes by the “Neighbors”, mainly Mennonites from Switzerland and southern Germany. The outside of the one log walls were covered in 1851 with white weatherboards and the structure was roofed with chestnut shingles. A central heating chimney and tin roof were installed later. Heat was provided by a large six-plate stove made at the local iron furnace and inscribed D. Pennebacker – 1799. Early Mennonite ministers were john Roads; Martin, David and . . . — Map (db m16643) HM
Virginia (Page County), Luray — C-3 — Cavalry Engagement
In mid-June 1862, after Maj. Gen. Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson’s Shenandoah Valley campaign, Brig. Gen. Beverly H. Robertson’s cavalry screened from Union observation Jackson’s movement east to join the Army of Northern Virginia near Richmond. Robertson posted two companies of cavalry here, half a mile north of Luray. On 29 June, a Federal reconnaissance force of Maine, Michigan, and Vermont cavalry rode south from Front Royal to locate Jackson. About 9:00 A.M. on 30 June, the . . . — Map (db m591) HM
Virginia (Page County), Verbena — Shield's Advance & RetreatJackson Divides and Conquers — 1862 Valley Campaign
Having successfully driven Gen. Nathaniel Bank's Union army from the Shenadoah Valley in late May 1862, Gen. Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson's "foot cavalry" had little time to reset. While one Union army under Gen. John C. Frémont was bearing down from the north, another under Gen. James Shields was passing toward the Page Valley. If Shields could move quickly enough to overtake Jackson's force in the main valley, he and Frémont could unite and attack with a superior force. Accordingly, Jackson . . . — Map (db m12079) HM
Virginia (Page County), Luray — White House Ferry
Operated from 1870–1910 about ¼ mile north of U.S. 211 over the South Fork of the Shenandoah River with its approach road close to the existing White House. You can easily see the White House, on the east side of the river, as you drive to the west. A cable ferry 10 feet wide by 20 feet long pulled back and forth by four horse teams. Fares: “Man and horse, 25 cents. Man or a horse alone 12½ cents, except as to the present or any future post rider, who shall pay for . . . — Map (db m573) HM
Virginia (Shenandoah County), New Market — Jackson’s 2nd Corps EstablishedStonewall Dons a New Uniform
Having remained with his command in the vicinity of Winchester since the Battle of Sharpsburg/Antietam, by November 22, 1862, Gen. Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson was again on the march. With more than 32,000 soldiers, Jackson’s force made its way up the snow-covered Shenan doah Valley toward New Market and then toward Columbia Bridge by way of this gap. On reaching a point atop Massanutten Mountain, sometime late in the evening on November 23, Jackson took the rare . . . — Map (db m16453) HM
Virginia (Page County), Stanley — Graves’ ChapelJackson’s Last Glimpse of the Shenandoah Valley
On November 24, 1862, Gen. Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson moved through Page County toward Fisher’s Gap to rejoin the main body of the Army of Northern Virginia, then near Fredericksburg. Jackson was in command of the newly organized Second Corps, with more than 32,000 troops. Crossing the South Fork of the Shenandoah River at Columbia Bridge, the long columns of gray took nearly four days to move along the facing road (New Market-Gordonsville Turnpike) before exiting the Page . . . — Map (db m15896) HM
Virginia (Page County), Stanley — Jackson's Last Mountain Crossing
In November, 1862, Stonewall Jackson moved his 25,000 troops from Antietam to Fredericksburg. The army came through the deep notch (New Market Gap) in the first mountain range to the west (Massanutten Mountain). They followed the course of the Old Gordonsville Turnpike, which crossed the Shenandoah (Page) Valley, near the present town of Stanley, below here. They then struggled up and over the Blue Ridge, through Fishers Gap on your left and down the eastern slope to the Fredericksburg area. . . . — Map (db m13184) HM
Virginia (Page County), Luray — Pass Run and Thornton GapBetween Campaigns — Gettysburg Campaign
Nearly three weeks after the Battle of Gettysburg, and in the wake of a sharp fight near Front Royal at Wapping Heights (Manassas Gap) on July 23, 1863, Confederate troops from Gen. Richard S. Ewell’s corps withdrew to the Page Valley. On July 25, Gen. Robert E. Rodes’ division camped near Bethlehem Lutheran Church (otherwise known as Brick Church) and along Pass Run. Gen. Edward “Allegheny” Johnson’s division camped near Rodes, while Gen. Jubal A. Early’s division spent the night . . . — Map (db m13111) HM
Virginia (Page County), Luray — Fisher’s Hill and Yager’s Mill“We would have captured the entire rebel army.” — 1864 Valley Campaigns
In September 1864, Union Gen. Philip H. Sheridan detached two cavalry divisions under Gen. Alfred T. A. Torbert to move into the Page Valley. While the bulk of Sheridan’s army would strike Gen. Jubal A. Early’s Confederates at Fisher’s Hill, Torbert was to cross Massanutten Mountain and cut off Early’s avenue of retreat. This maneuver first met resistance from well-entrenched Confederate cavalry at Milford (present-day Overall) on September 22. Unsuccessful at breaking the line, Torbert . . . — Map (db m801) HM
Virginia (Page County), Luray — Willow Grove MillBurning the Bread Basket
On October 2, 1864, elements of the 2nd U.S. Cavalry Division under Col. William H. Powell reached this area near Luray and quickly laid waste to the Willow Grove Mill. Amanda Moore, wife of the mill’s owner, later recalled, "We had the Mill, Saw Mill, barn ... and all the stabling, granary, corn crib, and everything burnt ... the barns were full of wheat and also there was a great deal in the Mill.” In addition to Willow Grove, several other flour mills, barns, sawmills, stables, . . . — Map (db m11034) HM
Virginia (Page County), Shenandoah — J-95 — Execution of Summers and Koontz
On 22 May 1865, after the Civil War ended, Capt. George W. Summers, Sgt. I. Newton Koontz, and two other armed veterans of Co. D, 7th Virginia Cavalry, en route to obtain their paroles, robbed six Federal cavalrymen of their horses near Woodstock. The horses were returned the next day to the 192d Ohio Volunteer Infantry at Rude's Hill in Shenandoah County. Despite assurances that all was forgiven, Lt. Col. Cyrus Hussy, temporarily commanding the 192d, later ordered the men arrested at their . . . — Map (db m15902) HM
Virginia (Page County), Luray — Confederate Heroes Monument
(Left Side):Would it not be a blame for us if their memories part from our land & heart and a wrong to them & a shame for us the glories they won shall not wane for us in legend & lay our heroes in gray shall forever live over again for us. Ryan (Back):To the heroes both private and chief of the Southern Confederacy is this tribute affectionately inscribed. (Right):Glory Crowned 1861 - 1865. — Map (db m16457) HM
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