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Augusta County and City of Staunton Civil War related markers and sites. Use the “First >>” button above to see these markers in sequence.
Virginia (Augusta County), Mount Solon — D 40 — Mossy Creek
Colonists first settled Mossy Creek in the 1740s. Mossy Creek Iron Works was founded by 1775, when partners Henry Miller and Mark Bird began operating an iron furnace, forge, and mills here. The ironworks became an important industrial enterprise and produced pig iron and finished pieces that were sold throughout western Virginia. Bird sold his interest in the ironworks to Miller in 1779. A community grew up around the ironworks, which likely ceased operation during the Civil War. By 1852 the . . . — Map (db m1841) HM
Virginia (Augusta County), New Hope — Piedmont Battlefield
Here on June 5, 1864, was fought the Battle of Piedmont for the possession of Staunton. Union Forces under Gen. David Hunter 12,015 men and suffered a loss of 130 killed and 650 wounded. Confederate forces numbering 5,600 men under Gen. W.E.Jones defeated with loss 460 killed, 1450 wounded and 1,000 prisoners. Gen Jones was killed near this spot. — Map (db m4237) HM
Virginia (Augusta County), New Hope — Battle of PiedmontFinal Action at New Hope
The Battle of Piedmont, fought on June 5, 1864 between Union Gen. David Hunter and Confederate Gen. William E. "Grumble" Jones. ended here. It began more than a mile northeast when the 12,000-man strong Federal army, whose mission was to scour the Shenandoah Valley of Confederates and then destroy the rail center at Charlottesville, encountered Jones's combined force of 6,000 infantry and cavalry. The third Union assault uphill against Jones's fortified line ended in Confederate disaster when . . . — Map (db m8250) HM
Virginia, Staunton — I-16 — The Virginia School for the Deaf and the BlindFounded 1839
A state residential school created by an act of the General Assembly of the Commonwealth of Virginia on March 31, 1838 for the purpose of educating the deaf and the blind children of the state. — Map (db m11797) HM
Virginia, Staunton — The Wesleyan Female Institute
The Wesleyan Female Institute stood on this site from 1850–1870. — Map (db m11803) HM
Virginia (Augusta County), Fort Defiance — A-100 — Augusta Military Academy
Soon after the Civil War ended in 1865, Confederate veteran Charles S. Roller began teaching at the Old Stone Church nearby at Ft. Defiance. By 1874 he had founded Augusta Male Academy and incorporated military discipline into its classical curriculum by 1880. Roller renamed it Augusta Military Academy in 1890; it was the first military preparatory school in Virginia. In 1919, the Academy was among the first schools in America to adopt a Junior Reserve Officers’ Training Corps program. The . . . — Map (db m11900) HM
Virginia, Staunton — I-17 — Mary Baldwin College
The oldest college for women related to the Presbyterian Church, U. S. Founded 1842 by Rufus W. Bailey as Augusta Female Seminary; renamed in 1895 to honor Mary Julia Baldwin, pioneer woman educator and Principal, 1863–1897. — Map (db m12366) HM
Virginia, Staunton — I-21 — Stuart Hall
Chartered on 13 January 1744 as the Virginia Female Institute, Stuart Hall is Virginia’s oldest college preparatory school for girls. The Rev. Dr. Richard H. Phillips headed the school from 1848 until 1880. Flora Cooke Stuart, “Mrs. General” J.E.B. Stuart, for whom the school was renamed in 1807, was principal from 1880 until 1899. Two of General Robert E. Lee’s daughters attended Stuart Hall, and Lee served as president of the school’s board of visitors from 1865 until 1870. — Map (db m12372) HM
Virginia (Augusta County), Swoope — West ViewConfederate Camps — 1862 Valley Campaign
In 1862, West View was a village of about 15 buildings including a flour mill, post office, store, wagon shop and saw mills. About 3,000 soldiers camped in the surrounding fields from April 20 to May 6. Confederates under Gen. Edward “Alleghany” Johnson withdrew to this area in April 1862, after they abandoned Camp Allegheny, 58 miles west of here at the present-day West Virginia border. Federals under Gen. Robert Milroy followed Johnson on the Staunton-to-Parkersburg Turnpike, . . . — Map (db m15788) HM
Virginia (Augusta County), West Augusta — W 149 — Fort Edward Johnson
Confederate troops, the remnant of the Army of the Northwest commanded by Brig. Gen. Edward “Allegheny” Johnson, constructed this fortification about 1 Apr. 1862 to protect the Shenandoah Valley, the “Breadbasket of the Confederacy.” Federal troops briefly occupied the fort after he withdrew to West View near Staunton later that month. With Maj. Gen. Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson’s Army of the Shenandoah, Johnson’s command confronted Union forces under Brig. . . . — Map (db m15791) HM
Virginia (Augusta County), Churchville — W-156 — James Edward Hanger
Born near Churchville on 25 Feb. 1843, Hanger joined the Churchville Cavalry at Phillipi, W.Va., on 2 June 1861, where the next morning he was wounded. The resulting amputation of his leg was probably the first of the Civil War. He convalesced at his parents' house, which stood nearby. Within three months he had invented the first artificial limb modeled on the human leg and hinged at the knee. Hanger constructed factories in Staunton and France and England. On 15 June 1919 he died and was buried in Washington, D.C., his home since 1906. — Map (db m15905) HM
Virginia, Staunton — StauntonVital Link — 1864 Valley Campaigns
Near this site on April 17, 1861, approximately one hundred local citizens, many of whom had just enlisted in The Staunton Artillery, met to board trains for Harpers Ferry. They were led by prominent local citizen John D. Imboden, who would remain an active figure throughout the war during which he served as a Confederate General. This neighborhood was the commercial heart of Staunton, with numerous warehouses and factories located close to the railroad station of the Virginia Central . . . — Map (db m16436) HM
Virginia (Augusta County), Fishersville — W-155 — Tinkling Spring Church
This was first the Southern Branch of the “Triple Forks of Shenandoah” Congregation, which called John Craig as pastor in 1741. A church was completed here about 1748; two other buildings have succeeded it. Beginning with 1777, James Waddel, the noted blind preacher, was supply for some years. R.L. Dabney, of Stonewall Jackson’s staff, was the minister here, 1847-1852. — Map (db m16437) HM
Virginia (Augusta County), Dooms — JD-14 — Jarman's Gap
Five miles east, formerly known as Woods’ Gap. Michael Woods, his three sons and three Wallace sons-in-law (Andrew, Peter, William), coming from Pennsylvania via Shenandoah Valley, crossed through this pass into Albemarle County in 1734 – pioneers in settling this section. In 1780-81 British prisoners taken at Saratoga went through this gap en route to Winchester. In June 1862 part of Jackson’s army, moving to join Lee at Richmond, used this passage — Map (db m16644) HM
Virginia, Staunton — The Barger HouseThe War's Lasting Effects
Relocated from its original site approximately fifty miles to the south on Little Patterson’s Creek in Botetourt County, Virginia, the Barger home, immediately in front of you, is an operational pre-Civil War farmstead from the Valley of Virginia. It is representative of the average agricultural livelihoods of common soldiers and noncombatant farmers in this region. Because of his age, John Barger did not serve in the war, but two of his sons and a brother did fight for the Confederacy. His . . . — Map (db m16653) HM
Virginia (Augusta County), West Augusta — Mountain HouseJackson's March — 1862 Valley Campaign
The Battle of McDowell began three miles to the southeast (near the intersection of Routes 629 and 716) when Confederates were fired upon by Union cavalry on May 7, 1862. After skirmishing, Federals rushed to the base camp here, sounding the alarm as they rode through. A Northern cavalryman wrote, “Our company was the only company in the fight. They were the furthest company out – five miles beyond Shenandoah Mountain. They were cut off by Johnson’s force, and the only way they had . . . — Map (db m62920) HM
Virginia (Highland County), West Augusta — “The Shenandoah Mountain Pass is grand indeed…”
As “Stonewall” Jackson’s Army passed through the gap on their way down to McDowell, Virginia one soldier wrote: Tuesday 13th May 1862 I have been struck with the wild & mountain scenery. The Shenandoah Mt. Pass is grand indeed, you asend to the very top of the mountain & from there you see as far as the eyes can reach, Mtn. after Mtn. in every variety of shape & grandeur whilst away down below a little valley & stream with winding road, winding around from Mt. to Mt. to descend . . . — Map (db m16771) HM
Virginia (Highland County), West Augusta — Confederate Breastworks Interpretive Trail
You are standing in the middle of what was once Fort Edward Johnson. Confederate soldiers built this fort in 1862 under the command of Brigadier general Edward Johnson, a career officer from Virginia. Look to your right, and then left across the highway for what remains of the mile of trench and breastworks. They were built by Confederate soldiers to defend the Shenandoah Valley from an invasion by Union Troops marching from the west. In the early spring of 1862, this fort was garrisoned by . . . — Map (db m16772) HM
Virginia (Highland County), West Augusta — Welcome to Fort Edward Johnson
My name is Shepherd Green Pryor, but my friends and family call me “Shep.” I was elected First Lieutenant of the Muckalee Guards, Company A, 12th Regiment, Georgia Volunteer Infantry. We’ve just survived a cold Virginia winter on the top of Allegheny Mountain – a long way from our warm homes in Sumter County, Georgia. Walk with me on this 0.5-mile trail while I share with you my experiences guarding Fort Johnson during the spring of 1862. Through my letters home to my dear . . . — Map (db m16773) HM
Virginia (Highland County), West Augusta — Fort Edward Johnson
On April 19, 1862, General Johnson, with General Lee’s approval, moved our regiment from Allegheny Mountain to Shenandoah Mountain. To protect ourselves from Yankee bullets, we dug about a mile of trench in this rocky ground. We then opened our field of fire by cutting down trees on the western slopes – the direction the Union Army was coming from. We made breastworks by first piling logs laid on the downhill side of the trench, and then piling dirt on the outside of the logs. Our . . . — Map (db m16775) HM
Virginia (Augusta County), West Augusta — “It was cold business”
February 23, 1862 My Dear Penelope, I write a few lines this morning to let you know that I am well & doing as well as I have since Iv been in the service. Well, Dear, wee had an alarm Friday knight about two oclock, and the way wee got around quick untwill we were all way ready was a site. The regiment formed & was ready in ten minutes. March up to the intrenchments, got in the ditches and they were hald full of snow. It was cold business, sure. I marked time for three hours to keep my . . . — Map (db m16776) HM
Virginia (Augusta County), West Augusta — “Wee are faring badly…”
Camp Shenandoah April 9th, 1862 My Dear Penelope, I take the opportunity this morning to write you a few lines to let you know that I am yet in the land of the living and enjoying good health. I thought last week that it was done snowing up here, but wee are now having an awful time certain. The citazens say this is about the last snow that will be here this spring. It is sleeting now fast & sleet is about 4 inches deep now. Wee are faring badly now in tents, I assure you. Cant stay by the . . . — Map (db m16777) HM
Virginia (Highland County), West Augusta — “... tolerable well fortified”
My Dear Penelope Wee are now tolerable well fortified; got 12 pieces of cannon and places all fixed for the men to shoot from; that is, fortifications for cannon with openings to shoot through so the men can man the cannon and not be exposed to the enemy while doing it. Wee also have ditches for our infantry to get in so the enemy can’t use their long ranged guns to any advantage over our short ranged guns, for they cant hurt us untill they get as close as wee want them. Give my love to all. I am yours, Shep — Map (db m16780) HM
Virginia (Augusta County), West Augusta — “Wee are now looking out for a fight…”
Camp Shenandoah April 18th, 1862 My Dear Penelope, I take the opportunity this evening to write you a few lines to let you know that I am yet in the land of the living &, thank God, enjoying good health. Wee are now looking out for a fight here; wee had yesterday morning an alarm. Wee had to march up to the top of the mountain about ten oclock – it was quite warm – it is four miles, I think. I never suffered so much with heat before in my life. They on the top have a signal when . . . — Map (db m16781) HM
Virginia (Augusta County), West Augusta — “… to go wee did not know where”
On April 20, 1862, the Confederate garrison left Fort Johnson to protect Staunton, and to avoid being cut off from the rear by another advancing Union Army. Lt. Pryor describes the retreat from the mountain. Camp at Westview, 7 mil N, Of Staunton My Dear Penelope, I take the opportunity this morning to let you know what weev been doing since I last wrote you. Wee were lying quietly at Camp Shenandoah. Gen. Jackson dispatched to Gen. Johnson to meet him at Harrisonburg. Johnson went in 6 . . . — Map (db m16783) HM
Virginia (Augusta County), West Augusta — “We had a hardscrabble up…”
Union forces now occupied Fort Johnson and were moving to capture Staunton. “Stonewall” Jackson, moving with speed and secrecy, had arrived at the foot of Shenandoah Mountain and moved west to defeat Union Generals John C. Fremont and R.H. Milroy at the Battle of McDowell two days later on May 9, 1862. Major Jedediah Hotchkiss, Jackson’s mapmaker, tells how he led an attack on Fort Johnson up the steep slopes below it: Wednesday, May 7th. The General and part of the staff . . . — Map (db m16784) HM
Virginia (Augusta County), West Augusta — Healing the Wounds
After surviving the Battle of McDowell, in which he lost many comrades, Lt. “Shep” Pryor was later wounded in battle near Culpepper, Virginia. He survived the war, returned to his beloved Penelope, and became Sheriff of Sumter County, Georgia. Lt. Pryor died on May 2, 1911 at the age of 82. The 12th Georgia Volunteer Infantry fought with honor in Jackson’s Shenandoah Valley Campaign and then moved on to fight with the Army of Northern Virginia, General Early’s Shenandoah Valley . . . — Map (db m16785) HM
Virginia, Staunton — United States National Military Cemetery - Staunton
United States National Military Cemetery Staunton. Established 1867. Internments 753. Known 232. Unknown 521. — Map (db m16786) HM
Virginia, Staunton — Confederate Dead Monument - Thornrose Cemetery
West Panel: Honor to the Brave 870 Lie Here Recorded by Name, Company & Regiment: From Virginia 385, N. Carolina 176, S. Carolina 59, Georgia 208, Alabama 49, Florida 8, Mississippi 11, Louisiana 19, Tennessee 12, Arkansas 20, Texas 3, And 207 Recorded by Name Only Confederate Dead South Panel: “There is True Glory and a True Honor The Glory of Duty Done, The Honor of the Integrity of Principle” Robert E. Lee North Panel: Weigh Not . . . — Map (db m53666) HM
Virginia, Staunton — Augusta County Confederates Plaque
This Bronze Commemorates, To Generations Which Knew Then Not, The Virginia Volunteers From Augusta In The Army Of The Confederate States. Twenty-Two Companies From Here Followed By Jackson And Stuart, With Many In Other Commands. No Rebels They, But Worthy Sons Of Patriotic Sites, Who Took Arms In The Hour Of Their State’s Extremity, When Argument For Peace Was Ended, To Defend The Soil, The Homes And The Consti- Tutional Rights Won By Their Fathers. The World Has Seen . . . — Map (db m16790) HM
Virginia, Waynesboro — W 160 — Early’s Last Battle
On the ridge west of Waynesboro occurred the last engagement of Confederate forces commanded by Lt. Gen. Jubal A. Early. Portions of Maj.Gen. Philip H. Sheridan's army, including cavalry led by Maj.Gen.George A. Custer attacked and routed Confederate troops under Brig.Gen. Gabriel C. Wharton. Early and the remnants of his army retreated, leaving Sheridan in control and ending the Shenandoah Valley Campaigns. — Map (db m4238) HM
Virginia, Waynesboro — William H. Harman Monument
William H. Harman Colonel, C.S.A. Born Feb. 17, 1828 Killed in action at Waynesboro Mar 2, 1865. He was a lieutenant of a com- pany from Augusta County in the Mexican War; after- wards Brig. General in the Virginia Militia; appointed Lieut Col. 5th Virginia Inft. C.S.A. May 7, 1861; Col. and A.D.C. on staff of Maj. Gen- eral Edward Johnson. May 17, 1862. A Gallant Soldier. — Map (db m16645) HM
Virginia, Waynesboro — Plumb HouseThe Valley is Lost — 1864 Campaigns
The Plumb House was built between 1802 and 1806 on what was then the western edge of Waynesboro. While fighting did not occur here until late in the war, the community felt its impact early on. Henry Plumb, who lived here, was mortally wounded at the First Battle of Manassas and died in July 1861. Stonewall Jackson’s army passed through Waynesboro by train on its way to the Battle of McDowell early in his famous Valley Campaign of 1862. Confederate successes during that year left Waynesboro . . . — Map (db m16649) HM
Virginia, Waynesboro — Q-2-b — Waynesboro
Settlers began to arrive to present day Augusta County in the 1730s and by the Revolutionary War a small hamlet existed here. By 1797, it was known as Waynesborough, for Revolutionary War hero Brig. Gen. Anthony Wayne. It became a town in 1801 and was incorporated in 1834. The last battle fought in the Shenandoah Valley took place in Waynesboro on 2 March 1865, near the end of the Civil War, when Union Maj. Gen. Philip H. Sheridan defeated Confederate Lt. Gen. Jubal A. Early. Basic City . . . — Map (db m4032) HM
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