HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
            “Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
  Home  — My Markers  — Add A Marker  — Marker Series  — Links & Books  — Forum  — About Us
Click First to browse through the results shown on this page.   First >> 
Click to map all markers shown on this page.
Related Markers
Markers related to the 1862 Antietam Campaign in West Virginia Use the “First >>” button above to see these markers in sequence.
West Virginia (Jefferson County), Shepherdstown — 1862 Antietam CampaignLee Invades Maryland
Fresh from victory at the Second Battle of Manassas, Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia crossed the Potomac River on September 4-6, 1862, to bring the Civil War to Northern soil and to recruit sympathetic Marylanders. Union Gen. George B. McClellan’s Army of the Potomac pursued Lee, who had detached Gen. Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson’s force to capture the Union garrison at Harpers Ferry. After the Federals pushed the remaining Confederates out of the South Mountain . . . — Map (db m1957) HM
West Virginia (Jefferson County), Shepherdstown — Shepherdstown“The Whole Town was a Hospital” — Antietam Campaign 1862
In September 1862, after the Maryland Battles of South Mountain and Antietam, Shepherdstown became a scene of indescribable suffering. “The whole town was a hospital,” wrote resident Mary Bedinger Mitchell. “There was scarcely a building in town that could not with truth seek protection under that plea.” The wounded Confederates streaming into Shepherdstown after the South Mountain actions of September 14 became a flood totaling 2,000–3,000 by the 18th, the day . . . — Map (db m1939) HM
West Virginia (Jefferson County), Shepherdstown — Civil War Hospital SiteMoulder Hall
Civil War Hospital Site Moulder Hall was used as a hospital during the Maryland Campaign 1862. Private Property courtesy of S.H.A.F. — Map (db m1947) HM
West Virginia (Jefferson County), Shepherdstown — Civil War Hospital SiteR.D. Shepherds Town Hall
Civil War Hospital Site R.D. Shepherds Town Hall was used as a hospital during the Maryland Campaign 1862 courtesy of S.H.A.F. — Map (db m1948) HM
West Virginia (Jefferson County), Shepherdstown — B.F. 1 — Boteler’s Ford Tablet B. F. 1
This crossing of the Potomac was known as Boteler’s, Blackford’s or the Shepherdstown Ford. By it five Divisions of the Army of Northern Virginia, coming from Harpers Ferry, crossed into Maryland, September 16 and 17, 1862, and marched to the field of A.ntietam. Jackson’s and Ewell’s Divisions crossed the Ford on the morning of the 16th; McLaws’ and R. H. Anderson’s Divisions before sunrise on the 17th, and A. P. Hill’s Division about noon of the same day. During the night of the 18th, and . . . — Map (db m1950) HM
West Virginia (Jefferson County), Shepherdstown — B.F. 2 — Boteler’s Ford Tablet B. F. 2
September 19, 1862 The Army of Northern Virginia, Gen. R. E. Lee Commanding, crossed Blackford’s Ford during the night of September 18, 1862, and on the morning of the 19th took up its line of march in the direction of Williamsport. Lawton’s and Armistead’s Brigades were left to guard the Ford and 44 guns were placed on the bluffs, north and south of this point, to check the Union pursuit. Heavy Artillery firing and Infantry sharpshooting continued during the day, by which some of the . . . — Map (db m1959) HM
West Virginia (Jefferson County), Shepherdstown — B.F. 3 — Boteler’s Ford Tablet B. F. 3
(September 20, 1862) Early in the morning of September 20, movements were made by General McClellan to ascertain the position of the Army of Northern Virginia. Maj. Charles S. Lovell’s Brigade (1st and 6th, 2d and 10th, the 11th and 17th U. S. Infantry) Sykes’ Division, 5th Corps, crossed the Ford and pushed out on the Charlestown Road. Barnes' Brigade, Morell’s Division, was ordered to cross and move on Shepherdstown. Lovell had gone about a mile and a half on the Charlestown Road when . . . — Map (db m1951) HM
West Virginia (Jefferson County), Shepherdstown — B.F. 4 — Barnes' Brigade
Barnes’ Brigade Col. James Barnes, 18th Massachusetts Infantry, Commanding Organization 2d Maine, 18th and 22d Massachusetts, 1st Michigan, 13th and 25th New York, 118th Pennsylvania Infantry, 2d Company Massachusetts Sharpshooters (September 20, 1862) Barnes’ Brigade of Morell’s Division, Fifth Corps, crossed the Potomac at the Ford 420 yards south of this at 9 A. M., September 20, under orders to march on the River Road to Shepherdstown. When it became known that A. P. Hill’s . . . — Map (db m1960) HM
West Virginia (Jefferson County), Shepherdstown — B.F. 5 — 118th Pennsylvania Infantry
118th Pennsylvania Infantry (Corn Exchange Regiment) Colonel Charles M. Prevost, Commanding (September 20, 1862) The 118th Pennsylvania Infantry (737 officers and men) crossed the river by the Ford south of this and was ordered into position on the bluff running north from this point. The Regiment ascended the bluff and had not completely formed line—375 to 425 yards north of this and about 125 yards west of the river road—when it was attacked in front and on both flanks by A. . . . — Map (db m1961) HM
West Virginia (Jefferson County), Shepherdstown — Pack Horse Ford
Early settlers crossed the Potomac here. “Stonewall” Jackson and A.P. Hill used this ford on the way to Battle of Antietam. Here Lee’s army crossed after the battle, with the Corn Exchange Regiment, other Federals in pursuit. — Map (db m62778) HM
West Virginia (Jefferson County), Bakerton — A.P. Hill’s March“Not a moment too soon” — Antietam Campaign 1862
About two o’clock in the afternoon of September 17, 1862, Confederate Gen. A.P. Hill’s 3,000-man division began crossing the Potomac River at Boteler’s Ford about two miles northwest of here, en route to the battle raging at Antietam Creek near Sharpsburg, Maryland. Two days earlier, Stonewall Jackson had captured Harpers Ferry. When Jackson’s command was ordered to rejoin Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia in Maryland, Hill’s division remained behind to parole Federal prisoners and . . . — Map (db m1955) HM
West Virginia (Berkeley County), Martinsburg — Martinsburg RoundhouseJackson and the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad — Antietam Campaign
In April 1861, as the Civil War erupted, Confederate forces seized the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad from Harpers Ferry west. On May 24, Gen. Joseph E. Johnston ordered Col. Thomas J. (later “Stonewall”) Jackson to destroy the rolling stock here at Martinsburg, a Unionist stronghold. Jackson began his task on June 13, soon burning 300 cars and destroying 42 locomotives. “It was sad work,” Jackson wrote his wife Anna, “but I had my orders and my duty was to . . . — Map (db m1200) HM
12 markers matched your search criteria.
Click to map all markers shown on this page.
Click First to browse through the results shown on this page.   First >> 


•••
More Search Options
 
Markers
Near You

 
Categories

 
States & Provinces

 
Counties
Click to List


 
Countries

Page composed
in 55 ms.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
To search within this page, hold down the Ctrl key and press F.
On an Apple computer,
hold down the Apple key and press F.