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Close Up View - First Kernstown Battle Map image, Click for more information
By Craig Swain, August 25, 2007
Close Up View - First Kernstown Battle Map
Virginia (Frederick County), Winchester — Kernstown Battles
Around this site and a mile to the west occurred two major battles of the Civil War. First Kernstown March 23, 1862 Stonewall Jackson attacked what appeared to be a withdrawing federal force led by federal Br. Gen. Shields. Desperate fighting . . . — Map (db m2632) HM
Virginia (Frederick County), Winchester — Battle of Kernstown ó March 23, 1862
General James Shields with 7,000 Federals defeated Stonewall Jackson with 3,500 Confederates. Jackson's object was to create a diversion which would prevent troops being sent to McClellan for the attack on Richmond. He arrived south of Kernstown in . . . — Map (db m33024) HM
Virginia (Frederick County), Winchester — A 9 — Battle of Kernstown
On the hill to the west, Stonewall Jackson late in the afternoon of March 23, 1862 attacked the Union force under Shields holding Winchester. After a fierce action, Jackson, who was greatly outnumbered, withdrew southward, leaving his dead on the . . . — Map (db m3150) HM
Virginia, Winchester — The First Battle of Kernstown ó The Beginning of “Stonewall” Jacksonís Valley Campaign
The First Battle of Kernstown, fought by 10,000 Americans on March 23, 1862, was the first battle waged in the Shenandoah Valley. Throughout the morning, sixteen Union cannon crowned the knolls of Pritchardís Hill (the high ground immediately north . . . — Map (db m2169) HM
Virginia, Winchester — The Pritchard House ó A Family Caught in the Midst of War!
The large brick dwelling before you is the Pritchard House, built by Steven C. Pritchard, Jr. and his son Samuel R. Pritchard. During the Civil War, Samuel, his wife Helen, and their two small children occupied the house. Fighting swirled around the . . . — Map (db m2295) HM
Virginia, Winchester — The Second Battle of Kernstown ó Mulliganís Final Stand
Late in the afternoon on July 24, 1864, 1,800 Union soldiers led by Colonel James A. Mulligan fell back to this lane. Major General John B. Gordonís Confederate force attacked from the ground beyond Opequon Church. Mulligan held off Gordon briefly, . . . — Map (db m2190) HM
Virginia, Winchester — The First Battle of Kernstown ó Fulkersonís Virginians Attack!
The low, marshy ground stretching from here to the distant road lay uncontested through the five-hour artillery duel that opened the First Battle of Kernstown. The scene changed dramatically at 2:00 P.M. when 900 Virginians marched toward this . . . — Map (db m2195) HM
Virginia, Winchester — The First Battle of Kernstown ó An Unheralded Commanderís Unique Victory
At 9:00 A.M. on March 23, 1862, Confederate artillery unlimbered near the Valley Turnpike and fired on this height, called Pritchardís Hill, to begin the First Battle of Kernstown. Union artillery rolled onto these knolls and responded by . . . — Map (db m2197) HM
Virginia, Winchester — The Second Battle of Kernstown ó Two Future U.S. Presidents Fought at Kernstown
Colonel James A. Mulliganís Union command of 1,800 men encamped on these heights on the night of July 23-24, 1864. When Confederate cavalry drove Union cavalry back toward Kernstown on the morning of the 24th, Mulligan deployed two cannon on this . . . — Map (db m2199) HM
Virginia (Frederick County), Winchester — First Battle of Kernstown
Was fought here Sunday, March 23, 1862 Confederates under Gen. T.J. “Stonewall” Jackson attacked Federals under Gen. James Shields. The fighting was chiefly west of the road and continued from early afternoon until nightfall. When . . . — Map (db m2635) HM
Virginia (Frederick County), Winchester — Rose Hill ó “I do not recollect having ever heard such a roar of musketry.” ó 1862 Valley Campaign
The First Battle of Kernstown, on March 23, 1862, was also the first major Civil War battle fought in the Shenandoah Valley. Throughout the morning, 16 Union cannons on Pritchardís Hill held off Gen. Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jacksonís . . . — Map (db m2646) HM
Virginia (Frederick County), Winchester — War in the Backyard
At the beginning of the Civil War, the third generation of the Scots-Irish Glass family lived at Rose Hill. The household consisted of Thomas Glass (age 67), and his wife Margaret (age 51), his son William (age 25) and fifteen slaves, most of them . . . — Map (db m3495) HM
Virginia (Frederick County), Winchester — How To See the Battlefield
On March 23, 1862, the opening conflict of the famous Valley Campaign began on the adjoining Glass and Pritchard farms. You are visiting the Glass Farm called Rose Hill. The neighboring Pritchard Farm is 1½ miles to the southeast (right) of . . . — Map (db m3496) HM
Virginia (Frederick County), Winchester — Fight for the High Ground
The Shenandoah Valley's strategic location and rich farmland caused it to be the scene of two major Civil War campaigns that comprised hundreds of battles and skirmishes. Many Valley farms, like Rose Hill, became battlefields or campgrounds . . . — Map (db m3498) HM
Virginia (Frederick County), Winchester — The Advance of Tylerís Brigade
Northern Colonel Nathan Kimball saw the position of his troops on nearby Pritchard's Hill (1.5 miles left and in front of you) becoming indefensible. Southern artillery recently placed on the higher elevation of Sandy Ridge (just in front of you) . . . — Map (db m3501) HM
Virginia (Frederick County), Winchester — The Defense of the Stone Wall
Southern General Thomas Jackson was already going by the nickname "Stonewall" when he directed his troops to this location to support the Southern artillery on Sandy Ridge. Ironically, his troops' retreat from this stone wall led to Jackson's only . . . — Map (db m3502) HM
Virginia (Frederick County), Winchester — The Order for Retreat
Northern commander Colonel Nathan Kimball 1.5 miles away (over the hill on your right) on Prichard's Hill faced the threat of defeat. He decided to seize the initiative and order a second assault against the Southern artillery atop Sandy Ridge. At . . . — Map (db m3504) HM
Virginia (Frederick County), Winchester — Northern Victory, Southern Defeat
As Southern units retreated and resistance fell apart, Northern victory was assured. Jackson found himself surrounded by a disorderly retreat of his soldiers. In the growing dark, a few fresh Southern units made gallant attempts to cover the . . . — Map (db m3507) HM

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