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Related Historical Markers

Markers for Fort Stevens and related sites.
MGen Isaac Ingalls Stevens image, Click for more information
Wikipedia
MGen Isaac Ingalls Stevens
District of Columbia (Washington), Northwest — Fort Stevens
Civil War Defenses of Washington 1861-1865 The partial reconstruction of Fort Stevens that you see today was done by the Civilian Conservation Corps in 1937. No visible evidence of the original fort remains. Battle of Fort Stevens July 11-12, . . . — Map (db m3028) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Northwest — Lincoln Under Fire at Fort Stevens
July 12, 1864. — Map (db m901) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Brightwood — 16 — “Get Down You Fool” Battleground to Community Brightwood Heritage Trail
Hearing those words, President Abraham Lincoln ducked down from the Fort Stevens parapet during the Civil War battle that stopped the Confederates from taking Washington. On July 9, 1864, some 15,000 Rebels led by General Jubal A. Early defeated . . . — Map (db m72829) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Brightwood — 17 — Aunt Betty's Story Battleground to Community Brightwood Heritage Trail
Elizabeth Proctor Thomas (1821-1917), a free Black woman whose image appears on each Brightwood Heritage Trail sign, once owned 11 acres in this area. Known, respectfully in her old age as "Aunt Betty," Thomas and her husband James farmed and kept . . . — Map (db m72830) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Brightwood — Fort Slocum Civil War Defenses of Washington 1861-1865
No visible evidence remains of Fort Slocum, which stood here and across Kansas Avenue to your left. Cannon mounted at Fort Totten helped repulse a Confederate attack on Fort Stevens, July 11-12, 1864. — Map (db m3012) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Fort Totten — Fort Totten Civil War Defenses of Washington 1861-1865
Earthworks of Fort Totten are visible within the wooded area 50 yards at the top of this hill. Cannon mounted at Fort Totten helped repulse a Confederate attack on Fort Stevens, July 11-12, 1864. — Map (db m2993) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Fort Totten — Fort Totten
One of the Civil War defenses of Washington construction of Fort Totten was begun in August 1861, named after Gen. Joseph G. Totten the fort contained 20 guns and mortars including eight 32-pounders. United States Department of the Interior . . . — Map (db m2999) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Northwest — Site of a Tulip Tree
Used as a signal station by Confederate soldiers under Gen. Jubal A. Early during the attack on Washington July 11 and 12, 1864 Also used by Confederate Sharpshooters The lower plaque reads: Two cannon balls . . . — Map (db m42698) HM

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