HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
            “Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
  Home  — My Markers  — Add A Marker  — Marker Series  — Links & Books  — Forum  — About Us
Click First to browse through the results shown on this page.   First >> 
Click to map all markers shown on this page.
Related Markers
Surrender at Appomattox Virtual tour by markers. Use the “First >>” button above to see these markers in sequence.
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox — K 158 — Appomattox Court HouseNew and Old
This building, erected in 1892 when the county seat was moved to this location, should not be mistaken for the original, built in 1846 and destroyed by fire in 1892. Three miles northeast is old Appomattox Court House and the McLean House where Lee surrendered to Grant on April 9, 1865, thus ending the War Between the States. The village of Old Appomattox Court House is now preserved as a National Shrine by the Federal Government. — Map (db m15514) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox — MG 2 — The Last Positions
On 8 Apr. 1865, Gen. Robert E. Lee and his Army of Northern Virginia, retreating from Petersburg toward Pittsylvania County, reached the hills to the northeast. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant and his Federal army, pursuing Lee to the south, blocked him here. At dawn on 9 April, Palm Sunday, Maj. Gen. John B. Gordon's corps, with Maj. Gen. Fitzhugh Lee's cavalry, assaulted the Union line. Initially successful, the attempted breakout failed when additional Union infantry arrived on the field. That . . . — Map (db m10224) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox Court House — Grant’s Pursuit
The four-year effort to vanquish the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia came to its climax in the fields before you. “Legs will win the battle men …. They can’t escape, if you will keep up to it.” Maj. Gen. E.O.C.Ord, Commander, Union Army of the James, to his men on April 8, 1865 Since the fall of Petersburg the week before, Grant and his armies had pursued Lee relentlessly. One Union column slashed at Lee’s rear guard. Another moved along Lee’s left flank, trying to . . . — Map (db m15516) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox Court House — “Message of Peace”
From near his headquarters atop the rise in front of you, Lt. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant sent a message that jolted a nation. After finishing his meeting with Lee at the McLean House, Grant paused along the road and scribbled an unassuming note announcing the surrender (see below). Within hours, the message reached Washington. By midnight bells tolled in celebration throughout the North. Amidst the small gathering of tents here, General Grant spent his last night in the field. The next day he . . . — Map (db m5914) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox Court House — Raine Cemetery and Monument
The 30-foot obelisk marks the Raine family cemetery. Erected in 1912 by C. Hunter Raine, the monument honors past family members, including C. Hunter’s father, Charles James Raine, who served as a captain in the Lee Battery of Virginia Artillery. Captain Raine was killed in action on November 30, 1863, near Mine Run – east of Culpeper, Virginia. A total of nine known graves are associated with the Raine Cemetery. The Raine family’s only connection to the surrender is the McLean House . . . — Map (db m36257) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox Court House — Raine Memorial
(Front):Erected by C. Hunter Raine in loving memory of his father Chas. J. Raine captain of Lee Battery, Co. A, Virginia Artillery, C. S. A. Killed in the Battle of Mine Run Va., November 30th, 1863 and the members of the family buried here. (Left Side):John F.W. Raine Born Dec. 20, 1853 Died Oct. 5, 1861 ____ Raine daughter of J.A. & Hannah E. Raine Born Apr. 16, 1855 Died Aug. 16, 1856 (Back):Sarah Ann Eliza Wife of Robert W. Horner Born Apr. 12, 1828 Died June 16, . . . — Map (db m15520) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox Court House — Sears Lane
General Grant used this lane to reach the McLean House where General Lee was waiting to discuss the turns of surrender. April 9, 1865. — Map (db m30096) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox Court House — MG 1 — Appomattox Court House Confederate Cemetery
Here are buried eighteen Confederate soldiers who dies April 8 and 9, 1865 in the closing days of the War Between the States. The remains of one unknown Union soldier found some years after the war are interned beside the Confederate dead. About 500 yards east of this cemetery is the McLean House where Lee and Grant signed the surrender terms. — Map (db m5987) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox Court House — A Strategic DelayAppomattox Court House Nat’l Hist Park
As Lee’s Confederate Army retreated west, Federal forces blocked their way. Near this spot, Union artillery pieces commanded by Lieutenant James H. Lord and a cavalry brigade led by Brevet Brigadier General Charles Smith proved a strategic delay to the Confederate retreat – allowing time for other Federal units to move into position and ensure General Robert E. Lee’s surrender on April 9, 1865. — Map (db m15524) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox Court House — North Carolina
The last Federal battery taken by the Confederates was captured by the North Carolina cavalry brigade of Brig. Gen. W.P. Roberts at this place. — Map (db m5972) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox Court House — Appomattox
Here on Sunday April 9, 1865, after four years of heroic struggle in defense of principles believed fundamental to the existence of our government, Lee surrendered 9000 men, the remnant of an army still unconquered in spirit. — Map (db m6005) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox Court House — Confederate Cemetery
Buried here are nineteen men (out of perhaps 100) killed during the last two days of war in Virginia. These men were at first buried where they died – at hospitals or in farm fields and woodlots around Appomattox Court House. But in 1866, the Ladies Memorial Association of Appomattox recruited volunteers to collect the eighteen Confederate bodies for reburial. The lone Union soldier was later found nearby and reburied here. The identities of just seven of the dead are known. Of these, . . . — Map (db m5990) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox Court House — Wartime Landscape
The road trace in front of you is the remnant of the Richmond-Lynchburg Stage Road – on April 9, 1865, the most important road in Virginia to Robert E. Lee. Along this road he planned to escape west, hoping eventually to turn south and join Joe Johnston’s army in North Carolina. When the Federals blocked this route, Lee had no choice but to surrender. To your right is the village of Appomattox Court House, looking much as it did when Grant arrived here the afternoon of April 9. He met . . . — Map (db m5984) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox Court House — Appomattox Court House
Here, amidst the once-quiet streets and lanes of Appomattox Court House, Lee, Grant, and their tired armies enacted one of the great dramas in American history. “General, this is deeply humiliating; but I console myself with the thought that the whole country will rejoice at this day’s business.” - A Confederate during the surrender ceremony April 12, 1865 Appomattox was first called Clover Hill – just a stage coach stop along the Stage Road linking Richmond and . . . — Map (db m15530) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox Court House — McLean House
At midday on April 9, 1865, General Robert E. Lee rode into this yard, dismounted, and disappeared into the McLean House. Grant, surrounded by generals and staff officers, soon followed. Dozens of officers, horses, and onlookers waited outside. After 90 minutes, Lee and Grant emerged. To the silent salutes of Union officers, Lee rode back through the village – to his defeated army. The home that hosted the surrender meeting was one of the best in Appomattox. Built in 1848, it had since . . . — Map (db m5962) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox Court House — Clover Hill Tavern
Built in 1819, this was the first building in what would become the village of Appomattox Court House. The Clover Hill Tavern served travelers along the Richmond-Lynchburg Stage Road. For several decades, it offered the village’s only restaurant, only overnight lodging, and only bar. Its presence helped prompt the Virginia legislature to locate the Appomattox County seat here. In 1846, the courthouse was built across the street. By 1865, the tavern had come on hard times – a “bare . . . — Map (db m5989) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox Court House — Last Artillery Shots
From this spot was fired last shot from the artillery of the Army of Northern Virginia on the morning of April 9th, 1865. — Map (db m15534) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox Court House — Final Combat
“It seems to me every one was more scared than ever, from the fact that we knew the war was nearly over, and we did not want to be killed at the end of the war.” Private John L. Smith, 118th Pennsylvania Late on the morning of April 9, 1865, the Army of Northern Virginia engaged in its final combat. Before the flags of truce passed along the entire line – and as the Confederates withdrew through the village – the two sides exchanged scattered last shots. Some of . . . — Map (db m5970) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox Court House — The Surrender Ceremony
“As my decimated and ragged band with their bullet torn banner marched into its place, someone in the blue line…called for three cheers for the last brigade to surrender… [F]or us this soldierly generosity was more than we could bear. Many of the grizzled veterans wept like women, and my own eyes were as blind as my voice was dumb.” Major Henry Kyd Douglas, CSA Throughout the day on April 12, 1865, shattered Confederate divisions marched into the village to surrender their . . . — Map (db m5965) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox Court House — Lee and Grant Meet
On the knoll before you, Lee and Grant held the second of their two meetings at Appomattox Court House. They met here on the morning of April 10. Grant hoped to enlist Lee’s support in urging the surrender of other Confederate armies, and Lee was intent on working out the final details of surrender. Lee refused Grant’s request to exert his influence with other armies. But the two officers did resolve details of the surrender. Grant agreed to provide the Confederates with individual parole . . . — Map (db m5966) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox Court House — “Salute of Arms”
On April 12, 1865, Union Brig. Gen. Joshua Chamberlain watched the distant ridge as the Confederates prepared for the surrender. They formed into column, marched into the valley, then up the Richmond-Lynchburg Stage Road toward the village. As the column approached this knoll, Chamberlain ordered his men to honor them. The Federals snapped to “carry arms” – the “marching salute.” A surprised Maj. Gen. John B. Gordon instantly ordered his men to return the salute. . . . — Map (db m5968) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox Court House — Grant and Lee Meeting
On this spot Lieutenant General Ulysses S. Grant, U.S.A. and General Robert E. Lee, C.S.A. met on the morning of May 10th, 1865. — Map (db m15535) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox Court House — Appomattox River
Near this site General Lee crossed the Appomattox River and proceeded up the hill to the McLean House where he met General Grant to draft the terms of surrender. April 9, 1865. — Map (db m6006) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox Court House — Lee's Apple Tree
Near this spot stood the apple tree under which General Robert E. Lee rested while awaiting the return of a flag of truce sent by him to General U.S. Grant on the morning of April 9, 1865. — Map (db m30077) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox Court House — After the Surrender
The depression before you is the trace of the old Richmond-Lynchburg Stage Road. Gen. Robert E. Lee rode this route both to and from his meeting with Grant on April 9, 1865. His return to the army – as he passed towards his headquarters atop the ridge in front of you – turned poignant when hundreds of Confederate soldiers surged around him. “…shouts sank into silence, every hat was raised, and the bronzed faces of the thousands of grim warriors were bathed with tears… . . . — Map (db m6004) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox Court House — Historic Vegetation 1865
Most fields that surrounded Appomattox Court House were cleared of trees and were used for small grain or tobacco cultivation. — Map (db m30089) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox Court House — Confederates TrappedAppomattox Court House Nat’l Hist Park
For most of the war, Lee and his army had tormented their Northern enemies – at Gaines’ Mill, Manassas, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville. But here, on April 9, 1865, the once-mighty Army of Northern Virginia found itself trapped. Lee faced the most difficult decision of his life. “… there is nothing left me to do but to go and see General Grant, and I would rather die a thousand deaths.” Gen. Robert E. Lee, CSA April 9, 1865 The tortuous final journey began with the . . . — Map (db m15526) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox Court House — Lee’s Last Headquarters
A short distance inside these woods stood Robert E. Lee’s last headquarters. Here on April 8, 1865, he held his final council of war. Here on April 10 he issued his farewell order to his army. And from here, on April 12, he departed for home – across a devastated landscape to war-ravaged Richmond. Maj. Gen. John B. Gordon described Lee’s last council, the night of April 8: “There was no tent there, no chairs, and no camp stools. On blankets spread upon the ground or on . . . — Map (db m5960) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox Court House — ANV Headquarters
On this spot were established the headquarters of the Army of Northern Virginia, General Robert E. Lee, C.S.A, commanding, from April 8th to April 11th, 1865. — Map (db m15533) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox — K 157 — Surrender at Appomattox
At the McLean house at Appomattox, two miles north, took place the meeting between Lee and Grant to arrange terms for the surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia. This was at 1:30 P.M. on Sunday, April 9, 1865. — Map (db m34478) HM
Virginia (Appomattox County), Appomattox — K 156 — The Last Fight
Two miles north, at sunrise of April 9, 1865, Fitz Lee and Gordon, moving westward, attacked Sheridan's position. The attack was repulsed, but a part of the Confederate cavalry under Munford and Rosser broke through the Union line and escaped. This was the last action between the Army of Northern Virginia and the Army of the Potomac. — Map (db m34477) HM
31 markers matched your search criteria.
Click to map all markers shown on this page.
Click First to browse through the results shown on this page.   First >> 


•••
More Search Options
 
Markers
Near You

 
Categories

 
States & Provinces

 
Counties
Click to List


 
Countries

Page composed
in 86 ms.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
To search within this page, hold down the Ctrl key and press F.
On an Apple computer,
hold down the Apple key and press F.