Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
 
 

El Camino Real de Tierra Adentro Historical Markers

El Camino Real de Tierra Adentro (Spanish for "The Royal Road of the Interior Land") was a 1,600 mile (2560 kilometer) long trade route between Mexico City and San Juan Pueblo, New Mexico, from 1598 to 1882. The 404 mile (646 kilometer) section of the route within the United States was proclaimed as a National Historic Trail on October 13, 2000.
 
El Camino Real de Tierra Adentro Marker image, Click for more information
By J. Makali Bruton, October 28, 2015
El Camino Real de Tierra Adentro Marker
Mexico, Querétaro (Municipality of Querétaro), Santiago de Querétaro — El Camino Real de Tierra AdentroThe Royal Inland Road
El Camino Real de Tierra Adentro ha sido inscrito en la Lista del Patrimonio Mundial en virtud de la Convención para la Protección del Patrimonio Mundial Cultural y Natural. La inscripción en esta Lista consagra el Valor Universal Excepcional del . . . — Map (db m90407) HM
New Mexico (Bernalillo County), Albuquerque — Alameda
This 18th century Spanish settlement was established on the site of an ancient Tiwa Indian Pueblo that was destroyed following the Pueblo Revolt of 1680. The pueblo was reestablished in 1702, but in 1708 the Spanish moved its Tiwa inhabitants to . . . — Map (db m45435) HM
New Mexico (Bernalillo County), Albuquerque — AlbuquerqueOn the Camino Real — Population 331,767 ~ Elevation 5,310
Spanish settlers had lived here before the Pueblo Revolt of 1680, but the area was resettled when the "Villa de Alburquerque" was founded in 1706. In addition to promoting colonization, the new town was intended to provide protection from attacks by . . . — Map (db m8504) HM
New Mexico (Bernalillo County), Albuquerque — Albuquerque
In 1706, New Mexico Governor Francisco Cuervo y Valdes founded the new Villa de Albuquerque (now Albuquerque), which became the principal settlement of the Rio Abajo, or lower river district. Here, the Camino Real wound its way through a series of . . . — Map (db m45231) HM
New Mexico (Bernalillo County), Albuquerque — Dominguez y Escalante Expedition“Jornada De Paz” — 1776 – 1976
(side one) “Jornada De Paz” Meaning "Journey of Peace" as the party made their expedition peaceful by not carrying weapons In 1692 - 12 years following the 1680 Pueblo Revolt in New Mexico, the . . . — Map (db m45444) HM
New Mexico (Bernalillo County), Albuquerque — La Jornada
On January 26, 1598, amid embraces and farewells, Governor Juan de Oñate left Santa Barbara, in present day Chihuahua, leading an expedition bound for New Mexico. Nearly 600 settlers accompanied him, along with Mexican Indian allies and Franciscan . . . — Map (db m45443) HM
New Mexico (Bernalillo County), Albuquerque — Old Town History
Front of Marker - English: 1706-The Villa of "Alburquerque" was founded by Don Francisco Cuervo y Valdes, Governor of the Spanish province of New Mexico. It stood on the Camino Real (Royal Road), which ran between Mexico City and . . . — Map (db m45278) HM
New Mexico (Dona Ana County), Anthony — Brazito Battlefield
One of the few battles of the Mexican War to be fought in New Mexico occured near here on Christmas Day, 1846. U.S. troops under Colonel Alexander W. Doniphan defeated a Mexican army commanded by General Antonio Ponce de León. Two days later, . . . — Map (db m6552) HM
New Mexico (Dona Ana County), Anthony — Butterfield Trail/Espejo's Expedition/On the Camino Real
Stagecoaches of the Butterfield Overland Mail Co. began carrying passengers and mail from St. Louis to San Francisco, across southern New Mexico, in 1858. The 2,795-mile journey took 21-22 days. In 1861 the service was re-routed through Salt Lake . . . — Map (db m6553) HM
New Mexico (Dona Ana County), Anthony — Oñate’s Route On the Camino Real
Juan de Oñate, first governor of New Mexico, passed near here with his colonizing expedition in May, 1598. Traveling north, he designated official campsites (called parajes) on the Camino Real, used by expeditions that followed. In Oñate's . . . — Map (db m6549) HM
New Mexico (Dona Ana County), Dona Ana — Doña Ana(On the Camino Real)
This site, named after the legendary woman, Doña Ana, is first mentioned as a paraje along the Camino Real. Spanish rested near here as they retreated from New Mexico following the Pueblo Revolt of 1680. The community was founded in 1843 as the Doña . . . — Map (db m38178) HM
New Mexico (Dona Ana County), Dona Ana — Doña Ana (1604–1680)
The name of the county Doña Ana originates from Doña Ana Robledo, who died near here while fleeing south with other settlers during the 1680 Pueblo Revolt. She was buried below the peak that now bears her surname in the Robledo Mountains, so named . . . — Map (db m38176) HM
New Mexico (Dona Ana County), Hatch — HatchPopulation 1,028  -  Elevation 4,055
Originally established as Santa Barbara in 1851, Apache raids drove the settlers away until 1853 when nearby Fort Thorn was established. Abandoned again in 1860 after the fort closed, it was reoccupied in 1875 and re-named for General Edward Hatch, . . . — Map (db m24745) HM
New Mexico (Dona Ana County), Las Cruces — Fort Selden State Monument1865-1891
Fort Selden was established to protect settlers and railroad construction crews in the Mesilla Valley and the Jornada del Muerto from Apaches. The first regular army troops to garrison it were four companies of the black 125th Infantry. General . . . — Map (db m45085) HM
New Mexico (Dona Ana County), Las Cruces — Jornada del MuertoOn the Camino Real
This stretch of the Camino Real leaves the Ríó Grande and cuts across 90 miles of desert with little water or shelter. Despite its difficulty, the dreaded “Journey of the Deadman” was heavily used by Spanish, Mexican, and Anglo travelers . . . — Map (db m45083) HM
New Mexico (Dona Ana County), Las Cruces — La Mesilla
On November 16, 1854, a detachment from nearby Fort Fillmore raised the U.S. flag here confirming the Gadsden Purchase; thus the Gadsden territory was officially recognized as part of the United States. In 1858, the Butterfield stage began its run . . . — Map (db m38149) HM
New Mexico (Dona Ana County), Las Cruces — Paraje San Diego
This paraje, or stopping place, provided travelers along the Camino Real with a final opportunity to water their stock and prepare their caravans before leaving the Rio Grande Valley and entering the desolate Jornada del Muerto. Caravans on . . . — Map (db m45084) HM
New Mexico (Dona Ana County), Mesilla — La Mesilla
After the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, which concluded the Mexican War in 1848, the Mexican government commissioned Cura Ramón Ortiz to settle Mesilla. He brought families from New Mexico and from Paso del Norte (modern Ciúdad Juárez) to populate . . . — Map (db m6986) HM
New Mexico (Dona Ana County), Radium Springs — Jornada del MuertoOn the Camino Real
This stretch of the Camino Real leaves the Río Grande and cuts across 90 miles of desert with little water or shelter. Despite its difficulty, the dreaded “Journey of the Deadman” was heavily used by Spanish, Mexican, and Anglo travelers . . . — Map (db m38205) HM
New Mexico (Dona Ana County), Radium Springs — Jornada del Muerto
High plains of the Jornada del Muerto, elevation 4,340 feet, lie 400 feet above the Rio Grande Valley. It is a transitional area from the Basin and Range region to the west into tilted mountain ranges, such as the San Andres Mountains to the east, . . . — Map (db m38206) HM
New Mexico (Dona Ana County), Radium Springs — Paraje de Robledo
This paraje or resting place was named for Pedro Robledo, a member of the Juan de Oñate expedition, who was buried nearby on May 21, 1598. This camping place was a welcome sight for caravans entering or exiting the dreaded Jornada del . . . — Map (db m38200) HM
New Mexico (Dona Ana County), Radium Springs — Paraje San Diego
This paraje, or stopping place, provided travelers along the Camino Real with a final opportunity to water their stock and prepare their caravans before leaving the Rio Grande Valley and entering the desolate Jornada del Muerto. Caravans on their . . . — Map (db m38204) HM
New Mexico (Dona Ana County), Sunland Park — El Paso Del Rio Del Norte
This canyon cut here by the Rio Grande marks the crossing of the historic Camino Real, or Royal Road, to La Tierra Adentra. Trackers and traders crossed the river here to begin the arduous journey north to Santa Fe. Permanent settlement of this area . . . — Map (db m38103) HM
New Mexico (Dona Ana County), Valdo — Paraje de los Brazitos
Here the Camino Real between Santa Fe and El Paso passed along the eastern bank of the Rio Grande near a brazito, or small branch of the river that created a small island. At this paraje, or stopping place, American troops defeated a . . . — Map (db m38148) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), Chimayo — Chimayo
Indians occupied the Chimayo valley centuries before the arrival of the Spaniards. The village of Chimayo, founded in the early 18th century, shortly after the reconquest of New Mexico, has been a center of the Spanish weaving tradition for over 250 . . . — Map (db m32819) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), Chimayo — Santuario de Chimayó
In 1816, Bernardo Abeyta and the other residents of El Potrero, then a separate community, finished this massive adobe chapel honoring Nuestro Señor de Esquípulas. It is noted for its 6-foot crucifix and its tradition of healing the sick. The . . . — Map (db m32817) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), Espanola — Española Valley
When it was described by Gaspar Castano de Sosa in 1591, the Española Valley contained about ten Tewa-speaking pueblos, several of which are still occupied today. Juan de Oñate established New Mexico’s first colony here in 1598. Long on the northern . . . — Map (db m45671) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), San Juan Pueblo (Ohkay Owingeh) — San GabrielOn the Camino Real
Governor Juan de Oñate set up his headquarters in San Juan Pueblo in 1598, but by 1601 he had moved the Spanish capital across the Rio Grande to Yuque-Yunque Pueblo. Named San Gabriel, it served as the seat of government until 1610, when Oñate's . . . — Map (db m32877) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), Santa Clara Pueblo — Pueblo of Santa Clara
Founded around the fourteenth century, Santa Clara traces its ancestry to Puye, an abandoned site of cave dwellings on the Pajarito Plateau. Increasing tensions with the Spanish led to its participation in the Pueblo Revolt of 1680. The mission . . . — Map (db m45664) HM
New Mexico (Rio Arriba County), Velarde — VelardeOn the Camino Real
Founded in 1875, this small farming community was named La Jolla. It was once famous for finely woven blankets. Here the Camino Real left the Rio Grande and followed a canyon northeast to Embudo Creek where it began a climb over the mountains to . . . — Map (db m43810) HM
New Mexico (Sandoval County), Algodones — La Angostura
Near here the Rio Grande Valley closes into a narrow pass (angostura). Control of this pass was critical to the safety of the trade along the Camino Real, so this area has been the focus of fortifications since the early 17th century. The 18th . . . — Map (db m32800) HM
New Mexico (Sandoval County), Bernalillo — BernalilloOn the Camino Real — Population 2,763 - Elevation 5,050
The Pueblo Indian province of Tiguex, in the area of Bernalillo, served as winter headquarters for Francisco Vásquez de Coronado in 1540-42 during his explorations of the Southwest. Bernalillo was founded after the Spanish reconquest of New Mexico . . . — Map (db m45440) HM
New Mexico (Sandoval County), Bernalillo — Bernalillo
Archaeological research indicates that this fertile valley has been the focus of human occupation for at least 10,000 years. Soon after the Spanish colonized New Mexico in 1598, a series of estancias, or farming and ranching communities, flanked the . . . — Map (db m45441) HM
New Mexico (Sandoval County), Bernalillo — Pueblo of Santa Ana
The Keres-speaking pueblo of Santa Ana was established on its present site in 1693, as part of Diego de Vargas' reconquest of New Mexico. The spot, exposed to flooding, was poorly suited for farming, and today the residents live on their farms along . . . — Map (db m32843) HM
New Mexico (Sandoval County), Corrales — CorralesPopulation 2,791 - Elevation 5,097
(front of marker) Spanish colonization of this region, once the location of many Tiwa Indian pueblos, began in the 17th century. Corrales is named for the extensive corrals built here by Juan González, founder of Alameda. In the 18th . . . — Map (db m45436) HM
New Mexico (Sandoval County), Santo Domingo Pueblo — Pueblo of Santo Domingo Kiua
The Keresan people of Santo Domingo have occupied the area of the Rio Grande Valley since prehistoric times despite several floods that have forced relocation and reconstruction of the original pueblo. Strategically located along the roads that have . . . — Map (db m45476) HM
New Mexico (Sandoval County), Zia Pueblo — Vasquez de Coronado's Route
In 1541 an expedition from the army of Francisco Vasquez de Coronado, New Mexico's first explorer, marched south 80 leagues to investigate the pueblos along the lower Rio Grande. The group reached that part of the infamous Jornada del Muerto, now . . . — Map (db m32826) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Agua Fria Village — Agua Fria
Caravans entering and leaving Santa Fe on the Camino Real wound their way through scattered agricultural settlements south of the capital. Although this section of the Santa Fe River Valley was initially utilized as pasture for livestock, in the . . . — Map (db m40451) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Agua Fria Village — San Isidro Catholic Church
This 19th century adobe church is dedicated to San Isidro, ploughman, patron saint of farmers and protector of crops. Christian tradition maintains that in order to allow San Isidro time for his daily prayers an angel plowed his fields. Agua Fria . . . — Map (db m40452) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), San Ildefonso Pueblo — Pueblo of San Ildefonso
In the 1500’s, migrants from the Pajarito Plateau joined their Tewa-speaking relatives at San Ildefonso. The pueblo is famous as the home of the late María Martínez and other makers of polished black pottery. The modern church, a replica of that of . . . — Map (db m45659) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Cruz — Santa Cruz de la Cañada / Santa Cruz Plaza on the Camino Real
(side one) Santa Cruz de la Cañada In 1695, Governor Diego de Vargas founded his first town, Santa Cruz de la Cañada, designed to protect the Spanish frontier north of Santa Fe. The church, which still stands, was constructed in . . . — Map (db m45673) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — Maria Gertrudis BarcelóDoña Tules — (c. 1800-1852)
(side one) Maria Gertrudis Barceló or Doña Tules, a notorious gambler and courtesan, operated a gambling house and saloon on Burro Alley in Santa Fe. She traveled up El Camino Real from Sonora, Mexico in 1815. Bishop Jean-Baptiste Lamy . . . — Map (db m45479) HM
New Mexico (Santa Fe County), Santa Fe — Santa FeOn the Camino Real — Population 58,000 - Elevation 7,045
Santa Fe, the oldest capital city in the United States, was established in 1610 as the seat of the Spanish colonial government for the Province of New Mexico. The Palace of the Governors, used by the Spanish, Mexican, and Territorial governors, has . . . — Map (db m45575) HM
New Mexico (Sierra County), Caballo — Caballo Mountains
To the east beyond Caballo Reservoir are the rugged Caballo Mountains, uplifted about 3 miles above the downdropped Río Grande trough, along the fault scarp at the edge of the mountains. Lowest slopes are ancient granites. Black ironstone beds are . . . — Map (db m45107) HM
New Mexico (Sierra County), Truth or Consequences — Truth or ConsequencesPopulation 7,289 – Elevation 4,576
In 1581, Capitán Francisco Sánchez Chamuscado took possession of this region for the King of Spain, naming it the Province of San Felipe. Significant European settlement of the area, however, did not occur until the mid-1800s. Once called Hot . . . — Map (db m45108) HM
New Mexico (Sierra County), Truth or Consequences — Truth or ConsequencesElevation 4,576 ft.
In 1581, Capitan Franciso Sanchez Chamuscado took possession of this region for the King of Spain naming it Ojo de Zoquete (mud spring) in the province of San Felipe. Native Americans first used these springs for healing; in early 20th century, . . . — Map (db m45122) HM
New Mexico (Socorro County), La Joya — Acomilla
The Camino Real wound its way below the black basaltic buttes of San Acacia, seen to the southeast. Named Acomilla, or Acomita (little Acoma) by the Spanish, these buttes form the walls of a narrow passage for the Rio Grande, along which hostile . . . — Map (db m45215) HM
New Mexico (Socorro County), La Joya — La Joya de Sevilleta
Present-day La Joya is located near the site of an ancient Piro Indian Pueblo that the Spanish named Nueva Sevilla, or Sevilleta. During the eighteenth century, this was the southernmost settlement along the Camino Real before the travelers ended . . . — Map (db m67105) HM
New Mexico (Socorro County), Lemitar — Sabino y Lemitar
The Camino Real passed near here below the bluffs on the east bank of the Rio Grande. Apache raids prevented permanent Spanish settlement of this area until the early 1800s, when the village of Sabino was established on the east bank of the river . . . — Map (db m45178) HM
New Mexico (Socorro County), Magdalena — Espejo's Expedition(On the Camino Real)
In 1582 and 1583, Antonio de Espejo and his party followed the Rio Grande north to the Bernalillo area. Espejo was trying to learn the fate of two Franciscan friars who stayed with the Pueblo Indians after the Rodriquez – Sanchez/Chamuscado . . . — Map (db m68057) HM
New Mexico (Socorro County), Magdalena — Fort Craig Rest Area
Fort Craig is on alluvial gravelly sands, derived from the mountains to the west, sloping toward Rio Grande to east. Magdalena Mountains to northwest and San Mateo Mountains to west are mainly thick piles of volcanic rocks. San Andres Mountains on . . . — Map (db m68055) HM
New Mexico (Socorro County), Magdalena — Paraje De Fra Cristobal
The mountain range seen along the east bank of the Rio Grande is named after Father Cristobal de Salazar of the 1598 Juan de Onate expedition. The northern edge of the twenty-one mile range is said to resemble the profile of the good friar. This . . . — Map (db m68056) HM
New Mexico (Socorro County), San Antonio — Carthage-Tokay-Farley
In the 1860s, a coal field east of San Antonio was occasionally mined by soldiers for heating fuel and to fire their blacksmith ovens. In 1883, the Santa Fe railroad built a bridge across the Rio Grande at San Antonio and laid track to the new coal . . . — Map (db m45175) HM
New Mexico (Socorro County), San Antonio — San AntonioOn the Camino Real
Established in the mid 1600s, the mission of San Antonio de Senecú was the last outpost on the Camino Real before the Mesilla Valley to the south. Around 1820 Hispano settlers from the north re-occupied the area after the Pueblo Revolt. Conrad . . . — Map (db m45172) HM
New Mexico (Socorro County), San Antonio — San Pedro
Established in the 1840s on the east bank of the Rio Grande, San Pedro became an important trading center along the Camino Real. The sister village of San Antonio, it was once known for its extensive vineyards and other agricultural produce. The . . . — Map (db m45174) HM
New Mexico (Socorro County), Socorro — Fort Craig
Fort Craig was established in 1853 and garrisoned in 1854 with troops from Fort Conrad located about nine miles north. Named after Capt. Louis S. Craig, it was used to control Indian raids along the Jornada del Muerto. Troops from Fort Craig were . . . — Map (db m45130) HM
New Mexico (Socorro County), Socorro — Paraje De Fra Cristobal
The mountain range seen along the east bank of the Rio Grande is named after Father Cristobal de Salazar of the 1598 Juan de Oñate expedition. The northern edge of the twenty-one mile range is said to resemble the profile of the good friar. This . . . — Map (db m45132) HM
New Mexico (Socorro County), Socorro — Socorro
The Piro Indian pueblo Teypana was visited by Juan de Oñate in 1598. The people of the village reportedly supplied corn to Oñate who bestowed the name Socorro ("aid" in Spanish) on the pueblo. In 1626, the mission of Nuestra Señora de Socorro was . . . — Map (db m38462) HM
New Mexico (Socorro County), Socorro — Socorro
In 1598, Juan de Oñate's Spanish colonization expedition arrived here at the Piro Indian Pueblo of Pilabo, They renamed it Socorro owning to the food and shelter provided by Pilabo's inhabitants. The pueblo and its Spanish mission were destroyed . . . — Map (db m45177) HM
New Mexico (Socorro County), Socorro — Vásquez de Coronado’s Route
In 1541 an expedition from the army of Francisco Vásquez de Coronado, New Mexico’s first explorer, marched south 80 leagues to investigate the pueblos along the lower Río Grande. The group reached that part of the infamous Jornada del Muerto, now . . . — Map (db m45129) HM
New Mexico (Socorro County), Socorro — Women of the Camino Real
Front of Marker In 1598 the first Spanish settlers in New Mexico traveled up the Camino Real from north-central Mexico. Of the 560 people so far identified on that expedition, at least 20 percent were women. They came on foot, on wagons or . . . — Map (db m45131) HM
New Mexico (Socorro County), Veguita — Las Nutrias
During the late 17th century, this area had become well known to the Spanish. Called La Vega de Las Nutrias, or meadow of the beavers, it was a welcome paraje, or stopping place, for caravans on the Camino Real. Eighteenth century attempts at . . . — Map (db m67080) HM
New Mexico (Valencia County), Los Lunas — Tomé
For centuries, the prominent cerro, or steep hill, of Tomé was a significant landmark for travelers along the Camino Real. Settled as early as 1650, this area was abandoned following the Pueblo Revolt of 1680 and remained uninhabited until the Tomé . . . — Map (db m67077) HM
New Mexico (Valencia County), Los Lunas — Valencia
This community traces its beginnings to the hacienda established by Captain Francisco Valencia along this section of the Camino Real by the mid-17th century. Abandoned during the Pueblo Revolt of 1680, the area was resettled in 1740 by Christian . . . — Map (db m67073) HM
New Mexico (Valencia County), Peralta — Peralta
One of the last skirmishes of the Civil War in New Mexico took place here on April 15, 1862. The Sibley Brigade, retreating to Texas, camped at the hacienda of Governor Henry Connelly, a few miles from Peralta. Here the Confederates were routed by . . . — Map (db m24314) HM
Texas (El Paso County), El Paso — 642 — Camino Real
For more than 200 years the Camino Real, or Royal Road, was the major route for transporting commercial goods from Mexico City and Chihuahua to Santa Fe and Taos. First traveled by Juan de Oñate during his 1598 expedition to New Mexico, the Camino . . . — Map (db m38040) HM
Texas (El Paso County), El Paso — 15207 — El Camino Real(The King's Highway)
The regal highway extending between his Catholic majesty's far flung kingdoms of New Spain, from Mexico City to the Kingdom of New Mexico, passed here. From 1581 onward it was the route followed by conqueror, padre, merchant, adventurer and settler. . . . — Map (db m37802) HM
Texas (El Paso County), El Paso — 1067 — First Mission and Pueblo in TexasCorpus Christi de la Ysleta
. . . — Map (db m37959) HM
Texas (El Paso County), El Paso — Fray García de San FranciscoFounder of the Pass of the North, 1659 — By Sculptor John Houser
English: Fray García was born in Old Castile, Spain and traveled to Mexico in 1629 where he became a Franciscan priest serving in the Province of New Mexico. In 1659 he established the Manso Indian Mission of Our Lady of Guadalupe at the . . . — Map (db m37913) HM
Texas (El Paso County), San Elizario — San Elizario
San Elizario was established in 1789 on the former site of Hacienda de Los Tiburcios as a Spanish Colonial Fort known as the Presidio of San Elceario. The Presidio was moved from its former location (approx. 37 mi.S) in response to requests from . . . — Map (db m38015) HM
Texas (El Paso County), San Elizario — San Elizario Chapel(Capilla de San Elzeario)
Named for the 13th-century French patron of the military, St. Elzear, Capilla de San Elzeario was established as part of the Spanish military garrison of Presidio de San Elzeario (also Elceario, later Elizario) when it . . . — Map (db m38018) HM
Texas (El Paso County), San Elizario — The Camino Real
For more than 200 years the Camino Real, or Royal Road, was the major route for transporting commercial goods from Mexico City and Chihuahua to Santa Fe and Taos. First traveled by Juan de Oñate during his 1598 expedition to New Mexico, the Camino . . . — Map (db m37995) HM
Texas (El Paso County), Socorro — Camino Real
For more than 200 years the Camino Real, or Royal Road, was the major route for transporting commercial goods from Mexico City and Chihuahua to Santa Fe and Taos. First traveled by Juan de Oñate during his 1598 expedition to New Mexico, the Camino . . . — Map (db m37983) HM
Texas (El Paso County), Socorro — 4972 — Socorro
Site of the mission and pueblo of Nuestra Señora de la Concepción del Pueblo de Socorro established by Don Antonio de Otermín and Father Fray Francisco Ayeta, O.F.M. in 1683. Maintained by Franciscan missionaries for the civilizing and . . . — Map (db m37984) HM

74 markers matched your search criteria.
Paid Advertisement