Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
 
 

Maryland Civil War Trails Historical Markers

212 markers matched your search criteria. The first 200 markers are listed. Next 12
 
Clarysville General Hospital Marker image, Click for more information
By J. J. Prats, June 7, 2006
Clarysville General Hospital Marker
Maryland (Allegany County), Clarysville — Clarysville General HospitalCenter for Healing
The Clarysville Inn once stood in front of you to the right. In this tavern, and in a complex of buildings constructed around it, the United States established a general hospital during the Civil War. On March 6, 1862, U.S. soldiers commandeered the . . . — Map (db m37540) HM
Maryland (Allegany County), Cresaptown — Brady's CrossingPartisan Ranger Raid
In the early morning darkness on February 21, 1865, Lt. Jesse McNeill and his 66 Partisan Rangers (Confederate guerrillas) descended Knobly Mountain and stopped briefly at the residence of Felix R. Seymour, a Southern sympathizer. They then forded . . . — Map (db m4680) HM
Maryland (Allegany County), Cumberland — Civil War in Allegany CountyStrategic Location
During the Civil War, thousands of United States soldiers were stationed here in Cumberland and Allegany County to guard against raids and incursions by Confederate forces. Located only about 130 miles from the capital at Washington. . . . — Map (db m1049) HM
Maryland (Allegany County), Cumberland — CumberlandStrategic Center
In 1860, Cumberland was a small town of 7,302 residents, most of whom lived in the valley of Will’s Creek. The town was an important stop on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad and the western terminus of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal. When the Civil . . . — Map (db m14038) HM
Maryland (Allegany County), Cumberland — CumberlandStrategic Center
In 1860, Cumberland was a small town of 7,302 residents, most of whom lived in the valley of Will’s Creek. The town was an important stop on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad and the western terminus of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal. When the Civil . . . — Map (db m17674) HM
Maryland (Allegany County), Cumberland — Folck's MillConfederate Raid
Late in July 1864, Confederate Gen. John C. McCausland led his two cavalry brigades (about 2,800 men) northward into Pennsylvania and Maryland to capture Chambersburg and Cumberland and either collect a ransom or burn the towns. McCausland burned . . . — Map (db m19328) HM
Maryland (Allegany County), Cumberland — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion & Retreat
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . — Map (db m1051) HM
Maryland (Allegany County), Cumberland — McNeill’s RaidCapture of Crook and Kelly
In the predawn darkness of February 21, 1865, Confederate Lt. Jesse McNeill and his partisan (guerrilla) rangers rode into Cumberland from the west on this road. Unlike most raiders who targeted the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad for attack, McNeill . . . — Map (db m716) HM
Maryland (Anne Arundel County), Annapolis — John Wilkes BoothEscape of an Assassin — War on the Chesapeake Bay
Divided loyalties and ironies tore at Marylander's hearts throughout the Civil War: enslaved African-Americans and free United States Colored Troops; spies and smugglers; civilians imprisoned without trial to protect freedom; neighbors and families . . . — Map (db m72089) HM
Maryland (Anne Arundel County), Annapolis — Sandy Point FarmWilliam Evans, Soldier and Sailor
William Evans, a slave of Capt. Thomas Mezick, the owner of Sandy Point Farm here, enlisted in the 30th Regiment, United States Colored Troops, in March 1864. The 22-year-old, thereby, gained his freedom. He joined 122 other area slaves who had been . . . — Map (db m72087) HM
Maryland (Anne Arundel County), Lothian — Pvt. Benjamin Welch OwensAn Outstanding Example of Courage
This monument, dedicated on June 17, 1999, honors the memory of a local man, Benjamin Welch Owens, who left his nearby West River farm to join Confederate forces during the Civil War. Owens was among the tens of thousands of men from Maryland who . . . — Map (db m22146) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Baltimore Regional TrailA House Divided — War on the Chesapeake Bay
During the Civil War, Baltimore and its environs exemplified the divided loyalties of Maryland's residents. The city had commercial ties to the South as well as the North, and its secessionist sympathies erupted in violence on April 19, 1861, when . . . — Map (db m37537) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Baltimore Riot TrailDeath at President Street Station
Baltimore – A house Divided In 1861, as the Civil War began, Baltimore secessionists hoped to stop rail transportation to Washington and isolate the national capital. On April 19, the 6th Massachusetts Regiment arrived here at the . . . — Map (db m2418) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Baltimore Riot Trail"Keep back ... or I Shoot"
Baltimore - A House Divided On April 19, 1861, Confederate sympathizers attacked the 6th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment as it changed trains en route to Washington, which the secessionists hoped to isolate. To learn more about the . . . — Map (db m6151) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Baltimore Riot TrailFlag Waving at Fawn Street — Baltimore – A House Divided
(Preface): On April 19, 1861, Confederate sympathizers attacked the 6th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment as it changed trains en route to Washington, which the secessionists hoped to isolate. To learn more about the Baltimore Riot, the . . . — Map (db m6208) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Baltimore Riot TrailBarricade at Jones Falls Bridge — Baltimore – A House Divided
(Preface): On April 19, 1861, Confederate sympathizers attacked the 6th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment as it changed trains en route to Washington, which the secessionists hoped to isolate. To learn more about the Baltimore Riot, the . . . — Map (db m6209) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Baltimore Riot TrailLast Shots at Camden Station — Baltimore – A House Divided
(Preface): On April 19, 1861, Confederate sympathizers attacked the 6th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment as it changed trains en route to Washington, which the secessionists hoped to isolate. To learn more about the Baltimore Riot, the city’s . . . — Map (db m37538) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Baltimore Riot TrailCombat on Pratt Street — Baltimore – A House Divided
(Preface:) On April 19, 1861, Confederate sympathizers attacked the 6th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment as it changed trains en route to Washington, which the secessionists hoped to isolate. To learn more about the Baltimore Riot, the . . . — Map (db m71978) HM WM
Maryland, Baltimore — Camp CarrollFrom Plantation to Federal Camp
This land was part of a 2,568-acre tract named Georgia Plantation, that Charles Carroll purchased in 1732. By 1760, his son Charles Carroll, a lawyer, had constructed a Georgian summer home, Mount Clare. the Carroll family lived here until 1852. . . . — Map (db m2537) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Church Home and Hospital“I am a Massachusetts woman”
Church Home and Hospital, formerly Washington Medical college, was where Edgar Allan Poe died on October 7, 1849, and where many doctors were trained who served in the Union and Confederate armies during the Civil War. On April 19, 1861, Adeline . . . — Map (db m2427) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Crimea MansionThe Arrest of Ross Winans
On May 11, 1861, Union Gen. Benjamin F. Butler's troops occupied the railroad depot southwest of Baltimore at Relay, where a spur of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad's main line turned south to Washington. The seizure of Relay yielded a surprise . . . — Map (db m6403) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Druid HillStrategic Union Encampment
Within a year of the April 1861 Baltimore Riots, the first of several U.S. Army camps and fortifications began encircling Druid Hill, and important location high above the city and adjacent to the Northern Central Railroad. The 114th and 150th New . . . — Map (db m7594) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — Federal HillBuilding the Fort
On the evening of May 13, 1861, U.S. General Benjamin E. Butler’s troops occupied Federal Hill and brought their guns to bear on Baltimore. For the next four years the hill, garrisoned by 10 different regiments, served as a strategic Union strong . . . — Map (db m2560) HM
Maryland, Baltimore — USS ConstellationFlagship of the Anti-Slave Trade
Though the Civil War was a period of great innovation for the navy, with widespread use of steam power and the innovation of ironclads there was still a place in the fleet for sailing ships. Built at the Gosport yard in Portsmouth, Virginia, in . . . — Map (db m6153) HM
Maryland (Baltimore County), Catonsville — Baltimore Regional TrailA House Divided
During the Civil War, Baltimore and its environs exemplified the divided loyalties of Maryland’s residents. The city had commercial ties to the South as well as the North, and its secessionist sympathies erupted in violence on April 19, 1861, when . . . — Map (db m71334) HM
Maryland (Baltimore County), Cockeysville — Gilmor's RaidCapturing Cockeysville — Early's 1864 Attack on Washington
(preface) In June 1864, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee and Gen .Jubal A. Early’s corps from the Richmond battlefields to the Shenandoah Valley to counter Union Gen. David Hunter’s army. After driving Hunter into West Virginia, Early invaded . . . — Map (db m75286) HM
Maryland (Baltimore County), Lansdowne — Lansdowne Christian ChurchHull Memorial
This church is a monument to one Civil Wary veteran’s love for his comrades. Charles W. Hull and his wife, Mary A. Hull, gave the land and the building as a memorial to the men who fought to preserve the Union. The deed stipulated that a memorial . . . — Map (db m95823) HM
Maryland (Baltimore County), Phoenix — Glen EllenMaj. Harry Gilmor's Childhood Home — Early's 1864 Attack on Washington
(preface) In June 1864, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee and Gen .Jubal A. Early’s corps from the Richmond battlefields to the Shenandoah Valley to counter Union Gen. David Hunter’s army. After driving Hunter into West Virginia, Early . . . — Map (db m75287) HM
Maryland (Caroline County), Denton — John Wilkes BoothEscape of an Assassin — War on the Chesapeake Bay
Divided loyalties and ironies tore at Marylander’s hearts throughout the Civil War: enslaved African-Americans and free United States Colored Troops; spies and smugglers; civilians imprisoned without trial to protect freedom; neighbors and families . . . — Map (db m3390) HM
Maryland (Caroline County), Denton — Revolution or Fraud?Emancipation in Caroline Co.
Maryland slaves were not freed by the Emancipation Proclamation of 1863, which excluded states that remained in the Union from its provisions. It was Maryland's new constitution, adopted by the narrow margin of 291 votes of almost 60,000 cast on . . . — Map (db m3389) HM
Maryland (Caroline County), Greensboro — Letter to LincolnChaos on the Eastern Shore
The war divided communities in Maryland, pitting neighbor against neighbor. During Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee's first invasion of the North, which ended at Antietam, a Greensboro resident wrote to President Abraham Lincoln for assistance on . . . — Map (db m3398) HM
Maryland (Caroline County), Preston — The Underground RailroadSeed of War
Among the factors that contributed to the coming of the Civil War was the increasing animosity between Southerners and Northerners over the issue of slavery. The operation of the Underground Railroad to help slaves escape to the free North and . . . — Map (db m5411) HM
Maryland (Carroll County), Manchester — ManchesterMeade's Pipe Creek Plan — Gettysburg Campaign
On June 29, 1863, Union Gen. George G. Meade ordered the Army of the Potomac to Pipe Creek to counter any move toward Washington or Baltimore by Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia and to engage the Confederates in battle. Meade was . . . — Map (db m75696) HM
Maryland (Carroll County), Middleburg — MiddleburgMeade's Pipe Creek Plan — Gettysburg Campaign
On June 29, 1863, Union Gen. George G. Meade ordered the Army of the Potomac to Pipe Creek to counter any move toward Washington or Baltimore by Gen. Robert E Lee's Army of Northern Virginia and to engage it in battle. Meade was uncertain of Lee's . . . — Map (db m29498) HM
Maryland (Carroll County), Mount Airy — Mount AiryUnder the Barrels — Gettysburg Campaign
In 1839, the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad extended its line through Mount Airy Cut, and a village soon developed here. During the Civil War, Co. K, 14th New Jersey Infantry, guarded the railroad and National Road at Mount Airy. Pine Grove Chapel, . . . — Map (db m12493) HM
Maryland (Carroll County), New Windsor — New WindsorVillage by Moonlight
Gettysburg Campaign. In June 1863, as Gen. Robert E. Lee and the Army of Northern Virginia marched north, Gen. J. E. B. Stuart’s Confederate cavalry rode east of the main army. Soon, Federal cavalry hunted Stuart. Gen. David McM. Gregg’s . . . — Map (db m3019) HM
Maryland (Carroll County), Taneytown — TaneytownMeade’s Pipe Creek Plan — Gettysburg Campaign
On June 29, 1863, Union Gen. George G. Meade ordered the Army of the Potomac to Pipe Creek to counter any move toward Washington or Baltimore by Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia and to engage the Confederates in battle. Meade . . . — Map (db m3002) HM
Maryland (Carroll County), Union Bridge — Union Bridge - Reynolds’ Last Journey
Gettysburg Campaign Union Gen. John E. Reynolds was killed at Gettysburg on July 1, 1863 while directing his command along the Chambersburg Turnpike in the early fighting. His body was carried to a house in town. Orderlies searched for a coffin . . . — Map (db m3017) HM
Maryland (Carroll County), Union Mills — Defiance at Union Mills
“I’m a Union man!” Gettysburg Campaign. In 1863, brothers Andrew K. and William Shriver resided on either side of the Littlestown Turnpike here and likewise were divided in their loyalties, with William supporting the . . . — Map (db m2992) HM
Maryland (Carroll County), Union Mills — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion and Retreat
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . — Map (db m2994) HM
Maryland (Carroll County), Union Mills — Union Mills
“Shining lights.” Gettysburg Campaign. At daybreak on June 30, 1863, Gen. J. E. B. Stuart arrived here from his bivouac at the Orendorff farm north of Westminster. He then gathered his brigade commanders to discuss Union . . . — Map (db m2995) HM
Maryland (Carroll County), Uniontown — Uniontown“Patriotic, but Paralyzed” — Gettysburg Campaign
On June 27, 1863, Union Gen. Winfield S. Hancock’s II Corps, Army of the Potomac camped at Monocacy Junction near Frederick. The next day, Gen. George G. Meade assumed command of the army and devised a plan to march it through Frederick and Carroll . . . — Map (db m3014) HM
Maryland (Carroll County), Westminster — Aftermath of BattleHospitals and Graves — Gettysburg Campaign
After the cavalry engagement here on June 29, 1863, Westminster’s citizens cared for dozens of wounded of both sides. Besides the human toll, shattered and broken cannons, gun carriages, and caissons lined both sides of Court Street to Main Street . . . — Map (db m13848) HM
Maryland (Carroll County), Westminster — Corbit's Charge“Suicidal Bravery” — Gettysburg Campaign
In June, 1863, as Gen. Robert E. Lee’s infantry marched through Maryland on its second invasion of the North, Lee lost contact with Gen. J.E.B. Stuart as the cavalry commander led his force east and north around the Union army. Here, on the . . . — Map (db m13832) HM
Maryland (Carroll County), Westminster — Divided LoyaltiesThe Neal Family — Gettysburg Campaign
A block away, at what is now 71 East Main Street, stood the Abner Neal house. In August 1862, Federal soldiers arrested sixteen Westminster residents as Southern sympathizers and escorted them to Baltimore for questioning. The group, soon released, . . . — Map (db m13829) HM
Maryland (Carroll County), Westminster — Divided LoyaltiesA U.S. Flag Goes South
During the Civil War, some Westminster families supported the Confederacy while others stood by the Union. Among the latter was Mary Ann “Mollie” Huber, who organized a dozen other like minded ladies into a sewing circle that met at her . . . — Map (db m13849) HM
Maryland (Carroll County), Westminster — Engagement at WestminsterWar at the Almshouse — Gettysburg Campaign
On June 29, 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee’s infantry was in Pennsylvania, and Gen. J.E.B. Stuart’s cavalry arrived here on the outskirts of Westminster. Gen. Fitzhugh Lee’s division led the column, which numbered 6,000 including cavalrymen . . . — Map (db m13826) HM
Maryland (Carroll County), Westminster — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion & Retreat
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . — Map (db m75738) HM
Maryland (Carroll County), Westminster — Westminster DepotPressed into Service — Gettysburg Campaign
During the Civil War, railroads for the first time attained strategic importance for transporting troops and equipment. On July 1, 1863, Gen. Herman Haupt, chief of U.S. Military Railroads, assumed control here of the Western Maryland Railroad to . . . — Map (db m13828) HM
Maryland (Cecil County), Perryville — PerryvilleOne Week After the War Began
On April 18-19, 1861, a week after the bombardment of Fort Sumter, South Carolina, Confederate sympathizers attacked U.S. Army forces en route to Washington in Baltimore, 35 miles southwest of here. On the second day shots were fired and soldiers . . . — Map (db m1484) HM
Maryland (Cecil County), Perryville — The Perryville Mule SchoolObstinate Recruits
Main Text Soon after the Civil War erupted in April 1861, Perryville became an important Union staging area. Adjacent to Fort Dare here, a riverside plantation was confiscated from Confederate sympathizers and immediately transformed into . . . — Map (db m101604) HM
Maryland (Cecil County), Port Deposit — Snow's BatteryBattery B, 1st Maryland Light Artillery
In the summer of 1861, in prosperous Port Deposit, men volunteered for an artillery battery to fight for their beloved Union. Cant. Alonzo Snow led the approximately 155-man unit. Organized in September, Snow's Battery left the Eastern Shore in May . . . — Map (db m102453) HM
Maryland (Charles County), Bel Alton — Pine Thicket“the instrument of his punishment” — John Wilkes Booth – Escape of an Assassin
After assassinating President Abraham Lincoln on April 14, 1865, John Wilkes Booth and his accomplice, David A. Herold, fled Washington for Southern Maryland, a hotbed of Confederate sympathizers. After leaving the home of Dr. Samuel A. Mudd near . . . — Map (db m39528) HM
Maryland (Charles County), Bel Alton — Rich HillThe Fugitives Seek Shelter — John Wilkes Booth - Escape of an Assassin
After leaving Dr. Samuel A. Mudd's house on April 15, 1865, John Wilkes Booth, the assassin of President Abraham Lincoln, and his accomplice David E. Herold avoided Zekiah Swamp and made a wide arc around the village of Bryantown. Unsure of their . . . — Map (db m4460) HM
Maryland (Charles County), Benedict — Camp StantonTraining Post for USCT
Nearby stood Camp Stanton, a Civil War-era recruiting and training post for African American Union soldiers. Named for Secretary of War Edwin Stanton, the camp was established in August 1863. Although black soldiers had served in the nation’s armed . . . — Map (db m15699) HM
Maryland (Charles County), Bryantown — St. Mary’s Church and CemeteryMudd Meets Booth — John Wilkes Booth – Escape of An Assassin
On November 13, 1864, here at St. Mary’s Catholic Church, Dr. Samuel A. Mudd was introduced to John Wilkes Booth, the future assassin of President Abraham Lincoln. Booth had come to Charles County to contact the Confederate underground here and . . . — Map (db m924) HM
Maryland (Charles County), Bryantown — Village of BryantownCommercial Center — John Wilkes Booth - Escape of an Assassin
This building in the Bryantown Tavern, constructed about 1815. On April 15, 1865, the morning after President Lincoln’s assassination, Lt. David D. Dana made it his headquarters while pursuing John Wilkes Booth, the assassin, with a detachment of . . . — Map (db m4500) HM
Maryland (Charles County), Newburg — Crossing the PotomacOff into the Darkness — John Wilkes Booth – Escape of an Assassin
After assassinating President Abraham Lincoln on April 14, 1865, John Wilkes Booth and his accomplice, David A. Herold, fled Washington for Southern Maryland, a hotbed of Confederate sympathizers. Concealed for several days in a pine thicket two . . . — Map (db m4476) HM
Maryland (Charles County), Newburg — John Wilkes BoothEscape of an Assassin — War on the Chesapeake Bay
Divided loyalties and ironies tore at Marylander’s hearts throughout the Civil War: enslaved African-Americans and free United States Colored Troops; spies and smugglers; civilians imprisoned without trial to protect freedom; neighbors and families . . . — Map (db m24540) HM
Maryland (Charles County), Port Tobacco — John Wilkes BoothEscape of an Assassin — War on the Chesapeake Bay
Divided loyalties and ironies tore at Marylander’s hearts throughout the Civil War: enslaved African-Americans and free United States Colored Troops; spies and smugglers; civilians imprisoned without trial to protect freedom; neighbors and families . . . — Map (db m1104) HM
Maryland (Charles County), St. Charles — Dr. Samuel A. MuddTreating an Assassin — John Wilkes Booth – Escape of An Assassin
This house was the home of Dr. Samuel Alexander Mudd and his wife, Sarah Frances Dyer. Early on the morning of April 15, 1865, John Wilkes Booth arrived here with a companion, David E. Herold, and asked Mudd to set Booth’s broken leg. Afterward, as . . . — Map (db m921) HM
Maryland (Charles County), St. Charles — John Wilkes BoothEscape of an Assassin — War on the Chesapeake Bay
Divided loyalties and ironies tore at Marylanders’ hearts throughout the Civil War: enslaved African-Americans and free United States Colored Troops; spies and smugglers; civilians imprisoned without trial to protect freedom; neighbors and families . . . — Map (db m922) HM
Maryland (Dorchester County), Cambridge — Maryland's Eastern ShoreHundreds of Enslaved and Free Black Men Enlisted
Although isolated from Maryland's largest population centers, the Eastern Shore was important to the state's role in the Civil War and exemplified the citizens' divided loyalties. In the years before the war, enslaved African-Americans here began . . . — Map (db m8331) HM
Maryland (Dorchester County), Woolford — Anna Ella CarrollUnofficial Cabinet Member
Anna Ella Carroll was born on Maryland's Eastern Shore in 1815. Often called an unofficial member of President Abraham Lincoln's cabinet, she was a Unionist author and newspaper reporter who had traveled extensively throughout the South and Midwest . . . — Map (db m45304) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Adamstown — Carrollton ManorGreen Corn March — Antietam Campaign 1862
On Saturday, September 6, 1862, the Army of Northern Virginia was spread along the entire length of Buckeystown Turnpike all the way to Frederick. The soldiers camped in the fields on either side of the road on the evenings of September 5-6, and by . . . — Map (db m1738) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Bolivar — 1862 Antietam CampaignLee Invades Maryland
Fresh from victory at the Second Battle of Manassas, Gen. Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia crossed the Potomac River on September 4-6, 1862, to bring the Civil War to Northern soil and to recruit sympathetic Marylanders. Union Gen. George . . . — Map (db m1520) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Bolivar — 19th Century BackpackerThe Civil War Soldier — Antietam Campaign 1862
An unnamed citizen of Frederick City said the following of the Confederates he had beheld marching through his hometown: “I have never seen a mass of such filthy strong-smelling men. Three in a room would make it unbearable, and when marching . . . — Map (db m1521) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Bolivar — Battle at South MountainA Natural Barrier — Antietam Campaign 1862
The Battle of South Mountain erupted on September 14, 1862, when elements of the Union army tried to drive the Confederate rear guard from Crampton’s, Fox’s, and Turner’s Gaps and break through to the western side of the mountain to attack . . . — Map (db m1519) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Brunswick — BrunswickFormerly Berlin — Gettysburg Campaign
Union troops pursuing the Confederate army to Virginia after the Battle of Gettysburg in July 1863 crossed the Potomac River here. Called Berlin at the time of the Civil War, this town truly experienced the challenges of life on the border. Both the . . . — Map (db m1863) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Burkittsville — 1862 Antietam CampaignLee Invades Maryland
Fresh from victory at the Second Battle of Manassas, Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia crossed the Potomac River on September 4-6, 1862, to bring the Civil War to Northern soil and to recruit sympathetic Marylanders. Union Gen. George . . . — Map (db m1958) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Burkittsville — Battle for Crampton’s Gap“Sealed With Their Lives” — Antietam Campaign 1862
The Battle of South Mountain struck Crampton’s Gap late in the afternoon of September 14, 1862, when Union Gen. William B. Franklin finally ordered an attack against Confederate Gen. Lafayette McLaws’s force here. As the Confederate defensive line . . . — Map (db m1909) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Burkittsville — BurkittsvilleHouses of Worship Become Houses of Misery — Antietam Campaign 1862
Union surgeons turned Burkittsville, a quiet rural village of some 200 people, into a hospital complex after the September 14, 1862, Battle of Crampton’s Gap. The building in front of you, the German Reformed Church, was Hospital D. Twenty-year-old . . . — Map (db m1864) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Burkittsville — George Alfred TownsendA Man and His Mountain — Antietam Campaign 1862
None of the structures you see here in Crampton’s Gap existed during the battle on September 14, 1862. George Alfred Townsend constructed all the stone buildings and walls, as well as the Correspondents’ Arch, between 1884 and 1896. Townsend, . . . — Map (db m1931) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Dickerson — 1862 Antietam CampaignLee Invades Maryland
Fresh from victory at the Second Battle of Manassas, Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia crossed the Potomac River on September 4–6, 1862, to bring the Civil War to Northern soil and to recruit sympathetic Marylanders. Union Gen. . . . — Map (db m4028) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Dickerson — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion & Retreat
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . — Map (db m4033) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Emmitsburg — Daughters of Charity"O, it was beyond description" — Gettysburg Campaign
Elizabeth Ann Bayley Seton founded the Roman Catholic community of the Sisters of Charity of Saint Joseph's here in 1809 (after 1850, called Daughters of Charity). The sisters played a prominent role during the Civil War as nurses and human service . . . — Map (db m9483) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Emmitsburg — EmmitsburgRoad to Gettysburg
President Abraham Lincoln replaced Army of the Potomac commander Gen. Joseph Hooker with Gen. George G. Meade on June 28, 1863, as the army pursued Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia. Meade placed Gen. John F. Reynolds, I Corps . . . — Map (db m1546) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Emmitsburg — Gen. John F. Reynolds"Dear Kate" — Gettysburg Campaign
On the last day of June 1863, Emmitsburg became a Union army supply base. Union Gen. John F. Reynolds, commanding the left wing of the Army of the Potomac (I, III, and XI Corps), arrived as I Corps came into Emmitsburg to obtain needed supplies, . . . — Map (db m9489) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Emmitsburg — St. Joseph's Valley Camp"I did not see it multiplied, but saw it there!" — Gettysburg Campaign
About 80,000 Union troops settled here in Saint Joseph's Valley as June 1863 drew to a close, "until the grounds around were actually covered with Soldiers." Emmitsburg was placed under martial law, and the Vincentian priests at Saint Joseph's . . . — Map (db m9485) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — 1862 Antietam CampaignLee Invades Maryland
Fresh from victory at the Second Battle of Manassas, Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia crossed the Potomac River on September 4–6, 1862, to bring the Civil War to Northern soil and to recruit sympathetic Marylanders. Union Gen. . . . — Map (db m2708) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — 1862 Antietam CampaignLee Invades Maryland
Fresh from victory at the Second Battle of Manassas, Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia crossed the Potomac River on September 4–6, 1862, to bring the Civil War to Northern soil and to recruit sympathetic Marylanders. Union Gen. . . . — Map (db m18382) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — 1862 Antietam CampaignLee Invades Maryland
Fresh from victory at the Second Battle of Manassas, Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia crossed the Potomac River on September 4–6, 1862, to bring the Civil War to Northern soil and to recruit sympathetic Marylanders. Union Gen. . . . — Map (db m97907) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — B & O Railroad Station"No malice in my heart" — Antietam Campaign
At this intersection, President Abraham Lincoln spoke from a railroad car platform to Frederick residents assembled in the street on October 4, 1862. He had just returned from viewing the battlefields of South Mountain and Antietam and had called on . . . — Map (db m60166) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Barbara Fritchie House“Shoot if you must this old gray head, but spare your country’s flag.” — Antietam Campaign 1862
As the Confederate army marched through Frederick on September 10, 1862, feisty local Unionists—mostly women—showed their defiance by waving the Stars and Stripes. The poet John Greenleaf Whittier immortalized one of them in “The . . . — Map (db m2693) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Battle of Frederick"Best little battle of the war" — Early's 1864 Washington Raid
(preface) Confederate Gen. Jubal A. Early drove Union Gen. David Hunter into West Virginia after the Battle of Lynchburg, Va., clearing the Shenandoah Valley of Federal forces. To draw Union troops from Petersburg, Early launched a raid . . . — Map (db m76651) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — City HallFormer Frederick County Courthouse — Antietam Campaign 1862
Connections with the Civil War abound around this Courthouse Square, where the first official act of defiance against the British crown - the 1765 Stamp Act Repudiation - occurred almost a century earlier. In 1857, Roger Brooke Taney, Chief Justice . . . — Map (db m2815) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion & Retreat
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . — Map (db m2792) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Hospitals in FrederickCaring for the Wounded
In this building, soldiers who died in one of the many area hospitals following the battles of South Mountain, Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy were embalmed and prepared for interment at nearby Mount Olivet Cemetery or for shipment home. James . . . — Map (db m97908) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Market & Patrick Streets"Scarcely any possibility of crossing the street" — Gettysburg Campaign
Frederick found itself occupied alternatively by Confederate and Union armies during the Civil War. Citizens who frequented this "Square Corner" of Market and Patrick Streets saw Gen. Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia march west from here on . . . — Map (db m2808) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Meade Takes Command"Come to give me trouble."
Near this spot, on the grounds of Prospect Hall, Union Gen. George Gordon Meade replaced Gen. Joesph "Fighting Joe" Hooker as commander of the Army of the Potomac on Sunday, June 28, 1863. Meade took command reluctantly because he was concerned . . . — Map (db m2775) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — North Market Street"Now I shall see Cousin J. — Gettysburg Campaign
On June 28, 1863, Gen. John F. Reynolds rode into Federick to visit his cousin Catherine Reynolds Cramer and her sisters near the intersection of North Market and Second Streets. She would have much to write the rest of her family on July 1 about . . . — Map (db m2814) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Richfield“The Boy General of the Golden Lock”
It was here that George Armstrong Custer was first introduced as a general to the troops he would command. The first order signed by Gen. George G. Meade as the newly appointed commander of the Army of the Potomac on June 28, 1863 promoted three . . . — Map (db m1539) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — Rose Hill ManorUnion Artillery Reserve
You are on the grounds of Rose Hill Manor, the final home of Maryland's first governor, Thomas Johnson. During its stay near Frederick, the Army of the Potomac's large Artillery Reserve occupied these grounds. Created after the Battle of . . . — Map (db m2803) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Frederick — The Lost OrderShrouded in a Cloak of Mystery — Antietam Campaign 1862
After crossing the Potomac River early in September 1862, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee reorganized the Army of Northern Virginia into three separate wings. On September 9, he promulgated his campaign strategy - to divide his army, send Gen. Thomas . . . — Map (db m18381) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Jefferson — JeffersonProwling Confederates and Pretty Girls
In June 1863, Federal troops marched through Jefferson as the Army of the Potomac pursued Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia, a menacing force to the west—but where was it headed? Fearing that Lee would push through the gaps in . . . — Map (db m2100) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Lewistown — LewistownI Corps’ Muddy March
Gettysburg Campaign When the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia Invaded Maryland in June 1863, the Army of the Potomac headed north in pursuit. On Monday, June 29, a “rainy, miserable day,” the 15,000 men, 2,900 horses and mules . . . — Map (db m4120) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Libertytown — LibertytownHot, Humid, and Worn Out
Gettysburg Campaign On June 29, 1863, the Army of the Potomac's II Corps, commanded by Gen. Winfield S. Hancock, broke camp south of Frederick near the Monocacy River, marched into Frederick, and turned eastward on the road to Liberty . . . — Map (db m4017) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Middletown — Christ Reformed ChurchJust Before the Battle — Antietam Campaign 1862
Eight thousand Confederates under Gen. Lafayette McLaws marched by this church on September 10-11, 1862, heading south to Harper’s Ferry. Since no Federals were in the area, McLaws expected no encounters with the enemy. Unknown to him, however, . . . — Map (db m796) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Middletown — MiddletownUnion Left Flank — Gettysburg Campaign
Late in June 1863, the Union Army of the Potomac pursued Gen. Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia as it invaded the North for the second time. The Federal left flank under Gen. John F. Reynolds occupied the Middletown Valley, June 25–27, . . . — Map (db m418) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Middletown — MiddletownEnemies and Friends — Antietam Campaign 1862
When Gen. Robert E. Lee and part of the Army of Northern Virginia passes through Middletown on September 10–11, 1862, they encountered a chilly reception. The inhabitants of this single-street hamlet on the National Road loved the Union, and . . . — Map (db m21911) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Middletown — MiddletownRansom Demands — Early's 1864 Attack on Washington
(preface) In June 1864, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee sent Gen. Jubal A. Early’s corps from Richmond battlefields to the Shenandoah Valley to counter Union Gen. David Hunter’s army. After driving Hunter into West Virginia, Early invaded . . . — Map (db m76668) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Myersville — 1862 Antietam CampaignLee Invades Maryland
Fresh from victory at the Second Battle of Manassas, Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia crossed the Potomac River on September 4-6, 1862, to bring the Civil War to Northern soil and to recruit sympathetic Marylanders. Union Gen. George . . . — Map (db m5923) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Myersville — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion & Retreat
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . — Map (db m5922) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), New Market — New MarketRoads to Gettysburg
Gettysburg Campaign Late in June 1863, the Union Army of the Potomac pursued Gen. Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia as it invaded the North less than a year after the Antietam Campaign. On Monday, June 29, the Federal corps marched north . . . — Map (db m4008) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Point of Rocks — Point of RocksConfederates Capture Train — Gettysburg Campaign
In mid-June 1863, with rumors of a pending reinvasion of Maryland by Confederate forces, most Baltimore and Ohio trains stopped running past here. As tension mounted, the New York Times reported that no trains were departing Baltimore, “except . . . — Map (db m743) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Point of Rocks — Point of RocksPoint of Rocks During the War
The rail line immediately before you served as an important means of supply and communication during the Civil War (the station, and tracks to Washington, D.C., on the southern or right side of the station were built later). Here at Point of Rocks, . . . — Map (db m744) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Thurmont — Catoctin Iron FurnaceNo Time For War
Gettysburg Campaign When Union Gen. John F. Reynolds’ I Corps marched by here on June 29, 1863, en route to Emmitsburg and soon to Gettysburg, his men were progressing “swimmingly.” The workers of the Catoctin Furnace had little time . . . — Map (db m1545) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Thurmont — ThurmontFormerly Mechanicstown — Gettysburg Campaign
On June 29, 1863, Mechanicstown was full of the noise of an army on the move as Union Gen. John F. Reynolds marched I Corps to Emmitsburg. Until then, residents had only heard rumors of the advancing Confederates as nervous farmers hurried horses . . . — Map (db m1540) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Urbana — Landon HouseFrom Hospitality to Hospital — Antietam Campaign 1862
Constructed in 1754 on the banks of the Rappahannock River in Virginia, this building was reconstructed here in 1846 and became Landon Female Academy. Early in September 1862, while infantry of Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia rested . . . — Map (db m1739) HM
Maryland (Frederick County), Urbana — UrbanaCapture and Escape — Early's 1864 Attack on Washington
(preface) In June 1864, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee and Gen. Jubal A. Early’s corps from the Richmond battlefields to the Shenandoah Valley to counter Union Gen. David Hunter’s army. After driving Hunter into West Virginia, Early . . . — Map (db m76643) HM
Maryland (Garrett County), McHenry — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion & Retreat
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . — Map (db m2170) HM
Maryland (Garrett County), Oakland — Fort AliceRailroad Bridge Destroyed
On April 26, 1863, during the Confederate occupation of Oakland, a detachment of Confederate Capt. John H. McNeill's partisan rangers attacked the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad bridge here over the Youghiogheny River. They were part of a larger group . . . — Map (db m481) HM
Maryland (Garrett County), Oakland — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion & Retreat
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . — Map (db m484) HM
Maryland (Garrett County), Oakland — OaklandConfederate Railroad Raid
On Sunday, April 26, 1863, a detachment of Confederate Capt. John H. McNeill's partisan rangers under Col. A. W. Harman attacked the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad facilities here in Oakland. They were part of Confederate Gen. William E. . . . — Map (db m485) HM
Maryland (Garrett County), Swanton — Altamont – Confederate Railroad Raid
On April 26, 1863, a detachment of Confederate Capt. John H. McNeill’s partisan rangers attacked the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad facilities here at Altamont. They were part of a larger group that entered Oakland that Sunday as Confederate Gen. . . . — Map (db m37544) HM
Maryland (Harford County), Bel Air — Bel AirSouthern Sympathizers Sought
On July 31, 1861, 300 men from the 12th Pennsylvania Infantry under Capt. Daniel Leasure marched into Bel Air to arrest Southern sympathizers and confiscate weapons from local militia units. The troops halted at the courthouse square, then dispersed . . . — Map (db m1227) HM
Maryland (Harford County), Havre de Grace — Alfred B. HiltonMedal of Honor Recipient
After the Emancipation Proclamation was issued in 1863, the U.S. Army recruited both free blacks and slaves. In August 1863, freedman Alfred B. Hilton and his brothers Aaron and Henry enlisted in the 4th U.S. Colored Troops (USCT) in Havre de Grace. . . . — Map (db m92020) HM
Maryland (Harford County), Joppatowne — Gilmor's RaidBurning the Gunpowder River Bridge
On July 6, 1864, Confederate cavalryman cross the Potomac River into Maryland as part of a 12,000 man force under Gen. Jubal A. Early, who planned to attack lightly defended Washington, DC., and draw off part of the Union army menacing Richmond and . . . — Map (db m73766) HM
Maryland (Howard County), Elkridge — Elkridge Furnace Inn"Neighborhood Parlor" for Healing
On May 5, 1861, U.S. Gen. Benjamin F. Butler occupied Relay, Maryland, with the 8th New York and 6th Massachusetts Infantry Regiments and Cook's Boston Battery of light artillery. Their mission was to prevent Confederate sympathizers from sabotaging . . . — Map (db m5876) HM
Maryland (Howard County), Ellicott City — B&O Railroad StationKeep Supplies Moving
One of the first railroads in the country, constructed in 1830 of wooden rails that carried horse-drawn cars, extended from Baltimore to Ellicott's Mills. This station was built the next year, and soon steel rails replaced wooden ones as the . . . — Map (db m29961) HM
Maryland (Howard County), Ellicott City — Baltimore Regional TrailA House Divided
During the Civil War, Baltimore and its environs exemplified the divided loyalties of Maryland's residents. The city had commercial ties to the South as well as the North, and its secessionist sympathies erupted in violence on April 19, 1861, when . . . — Map (db m192) HM
Maryland (Howard County), Ellicott City — Decatur DorseyCivil War Hero
Howard County native Decatur Dorsey was one of only sixteen African American soldiers to received the Medal of Honor for courage under fire during the Civil War. Sgt. Dorsey, of Company B, 39th United States Colored Troops, earned his medal at the . . . — Map (db m5756) HM
Maryland (Howard County), Ellicott City — Ellicott’s MillsA Town Divided
By the 1850s, a prosperous community was located here around the Ellicott family gristmills and ironworks established in the 1770s. When the Civil War began in 1861, the town's population exceeded 2,000. Although the mill workers and merchants of . . . — Map (db m37545) HM
Maryland (Howard County), Ellicott City — Patapsco Female InstituteClasses and Camps
The stabilized ruin above you - the Patapsco Female Institute - served the young ladies of the North and South from 1837 to 1891. Amelia Hart Lincoln Phelps, a renowned author and educator, headed the school between 1841 and 1855. Concerned with the . . . — Map (db m74252) HM
Maryland (Howard County), Savage Mill — Savage MillVital Service to the Union
The mill town of Savage served a vital need for the United States Army after the Civil War began in 1861. William Baldwin who had purchased the mills in 1859 manufactured canvas for cannon covers and tents. Although cotton was in short supply, . . . — Map (db m22462) HM
Maryland (Kent County), Chestertown — Baltimore Regional TrailA House Divided
War on the Chesapeake Bay. During the Civil War, Baltimore and its environs exemplified the divided loyalties of Maryland’s residents. The city had commercial ties to the South as well as the North, and its secessionist sympathies erupted in . . . — Map (db m62758) HM
Maryland (Kent County), Chestertown — John Leeds BarrollPublisher Accused of Treason and Exiled
John Leeds Barroll first walked these courthouse grounds, as a prominent Kent County lawyer before becoming a newspaper publisher. He was admitted to the bar in 1852 and served as the county State’s Attorney, 1854–1856, then founded the . . . — Map (db m3066) HM
Maryland (Kent County), Chestertown — Senator George VickersHelped Acquit President Andrew Johnson
At the outbreak of the Civil War in 1861, George Vickers opposed secession and used his influence to keep Maryland in the Union. He became a major general of the 2nd Division, Maryland Militia, and helped form the 2nd Regiment Eastern Shore . . . — Map (db m69845) HM
Maryland (Kent County), Chestertown — White & Black, Blue & GraySocial Battlefield Split Kent Families
In June 1917, Judge James A. Pearce commemorated the Civil War soldiers of Kent County by erecting a monument to honor the patriotism and valor of a once divided, but now reunited country. The rough-cut and polished granite monument behind you . . . — Map (db m5585) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Barnsville — Barnesville“... a bad night of it...” — Gettysburg Campaign
The advance of Union Gen. John F. Reynolds’ I Corps began slogging through Barnesville on the morning of Friday, June 26, 1863, having crossed the Potomac River the afternoon before and camped west of town. Continuous heavy rain made marching muddy . . . — Map (db m1678) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Barnsville — Barnesville“Before night our town changed hands five times!” — Antietam Campaign 1862
On the evening of September 5, 1862, Gen. Wade Hampton’s and Gen. Fitzhugh Lee’s Confederate cavalry brigades bivouacked around Barnesville. They rode the next day to their base camp at Urbana, leaving the 9th Virginia Cavalry to guard Barnesville. . . . — Map (db m1679) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Beallsville — BeallsvilleSquabble at the cemetery: Whose flag flies today? — Antietam Campaign 1862
On September 9, 1862, the running engagement between Illinois, Indiana, and Virginia cavalry units that began the day before in Poolesville continued in Beallsville when two Federal regiments forced the single regiment of Virginia cavalrymen posted . . . — Map (db m1681) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Brookeville — BrookevillePrisoners Paroled
On June 28, 1863, Confederate Gen. J.E.B. Stuart left Rockville with three cavalry brigades, 125 captured Union supply wagons, and more than 400 military and civilian prisoners, arriving in Brookeville that night. At every opportunity, prisoners . . . — Map (db m366) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Comus — Mt. Ephraim CrossroadsSharpshooters Hold the Line — Antietam Campaign 1862
You are looking at Sugarloaf Mountain, where the running cavalry fight that began in the late afternoon on September 9, 1862, in Barnesville came to a halt. By the next morning, the 7th and 9th Virginia Cavalry had been brought to bay here at the . . . — Map (db m1683) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Darnestown — DarnestownConfederate Visit — Gettysburg Campaign
On June 25-27, 1863, the Federal Army of the Potomac used two temporary pontoon bridges to cross the Potomac River from Virginia back into Maryland at Edwards Ferry. On the evening and morning of June 27-28, Confederate Gen. J.E.B. Stuart led 5,000 . . . — Map (db m1684) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Dickerson — 1862 Antietam CampaignLee Invades Maryland
Fresh from the victory at the Second Battle of Manassas General Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia crossed the Potomac River on September 1-6, 1862, to bring the Civil War to Northern soil and to recruit sympathetic Marylanders. Union Gen. . . . — Map (db m809) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Dickerson — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion & Retreat
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . — Map (db m808) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Dickerson — Monocacy AqueductToo Tough To Crack — Antietam Campaign 1862
Confederate Gen. D. H. Hill’s division crossed the Potomac at Point of Rocks on September 4, 1862, and marched south to clear Union forces from the area. His men breached and drained the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal at several places, burned canal . . . — Map (db m65210) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Dickerson — White’s FerryInvasion or Liberation. — Antietam Campaign 1862
The serenity of the Maryland countryside was shattered on September 4-6, 1862, as 35,000 Confederate soldiers of the Army of Northern Virginia waded across the Potomac River. Gen. Robert E. Lee, hoping to rally support in the divided state, sent . . . — Map (db m807) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Dickerson — White’s FordCrossing the Potomac — Antietam Campaign 1862
A wing of Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia commanded by Gen. James Longstreet, as well as part of Gen. J.E.B. Stuart’s cavalry, crossed into Maryland just south of here on September 5-6, 1862. Other parts of the 40,000-man force, . . . — Map (db m812) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Gaithersburg — GaithersburgSummit Hall Farm — Gettysburg Campaign
On Sunday, June 28, 1863, Confederate Gen. J.E.B. Stuart and an estimated 5,000 cavalrymen arrived in Rockville en route to Gettysburg. Armed with a list of Union supporters, Stuart’s men planned to arrest John T. DeSellum as he left Presbyterian . . . — Map (db m1709) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Hyattstown — HyattstownUninvited Guests — Antietam Campaign 1862
The roadside village of Hyattstown became the front line when Confederate cavalry stationed to the north in Urbana clashed with Union cavalry reconnoitering from Clarksburg to the south. On the evening of September 8, 1862, Maj. Alonzo W. Adams and . . . — Map (db m1727) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Poolesville — Edwards FerryStrategic Crossing — Gettysburg Campaign
Gen. Joseph Hooker’s 75,000-man, seven-corps Army of the Potomac crossed the Potomac River here, June 25-27, 1863, on the way to Gettysburg. The army crossed on two 1,400-foot-long pontoon bridges. Heavy rains during those three days made the single . . . — Map (db m33741) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Poolesville — PoolesvilleWarm Reception — Antietam Campaign 1862
Located at the intersection of the two main roads, mid-19th century Poolesville was Montgomery County’s second-largest town. Its residents had decidedly secessionist tendencies and many sons fighting for the South. In the fall of 1862, as the . . . — Map (db m1729) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Poolesville — PoolesvilleStrategic Union Encampment — Gettysburg Campaign
During the Civil War, more soldiers passed through Poolesville than any other Montgomery County town. Union forces occupied this bustling village throughout most of the war, protecting the strategic road network, lines of communication and supplies. . . . — Map (db m1730) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Beall-Dawson HouseSlavery in Rockville
Gettysburg Campaign In April 1862, Congress abolished slavery in Washington, D.C. District slaveholders were eligible for monetary compensation when they manumitted (freed) their slaves. Because the Beall sisters held several slaves who worked . . . — Map (db m5416) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Christ Episcopal ChurchVestrymen Arrested — Gettysburg Campaign
Early Sunday morning, June 28, 1863, 5,000 of Confederate Gen J.E.B. Stuart's cavarlymen rode into Rockville and arrested Union supporters. They sought merchant John H. Higgins at his home, but he had already left for Christ Episcopal Church (across . . . — Map (db m37574) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Court House Square"Burning with Enthusiasm" — Gettysburg Campaign
Confederate Gen. J.E.B. Stuart and an estimated 5,000 cavalrymen arrived in Rockville, the Montgomery County seat, on June 28, 1863, to a boisterous reception. One soldier described “a spectacle which was truly pleasing . . . It was Sunday, . . . — Map (db m65) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion & Retreat
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . — Map (db m73) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Higgins HouseArresting Civilians
Early Sunday morning, June 28, 1863, Confederate cavalrymen arrived at merchant John Higgins' house to arrest him, but he had already left for Christ Episcopal Church. Instead they captured Eblen, a 17 year-old Union soldier recuperating here. When . . . — Map (db m102790) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Prettyman HouseConfederates in Rockville — Gettysburg Campaign
From his home, E. Barrett Prettyman, a prominent Rockville citizen and educator, watched approximately 5,000 Confederate cavalrymen ride into Rockville in three columns on Sunday, June 28, 1863. Like many other Montgomery County residents, Prettyman . . . — Map (db m37575) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Rockville — Stonestreet Medical MuseumConflicting Loyalties
Of the four presidential candidates in 1860, Abraham Lincoln received only 50 of Montgomery County's 2429 votes. Some of Rockville's 365 residents surrendered government jobs in Washington, refusing to sign the Oath of Loyalty, rather than face . . . — Map (db m102181) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Seneca — Rowser’s Ford5,000 Confederate Cavalrymen Crossed — Gettysburg Campaign
On June 24, 1863, Gen. J.E.B. Stuart, leaving 3,000 cavalrymen in Rectortown, Virginia, to monitor Federal activity, led three Confederate cavalry brigades to Haymarket. Encountering Union Gen. Winfield S. Hancock’s corps marching north, Stuart sent . . . — Map (db m761) HM
Maryland (Montgomery County), Stronghold — Sugarloaf MountainA Signalman’s Lot — Antietam Campaign 1862
You are at the foot of Sugarloaf Mountain, where on September 5-6, 1862, Union observers watched the Army of Northern Virginia cross the Potomac River to invade Maryland. A signal station had been established here in the summer of 1861, one in a . . . — Map (db m1749) HM
Maryland (Prince George's County), Clinton — John Wilkes BoothEscape of an Assassin — War on the Chesapeake
Divided loyalties and ironies tore at Marylanders’ hearts throughout the Civil War: enslaved African-Americans and free United States Colored Troops; spies and smugglers; civilians imprisoned without trial to protect freedom; neighbors and families . . . — Map (db m60164) HM
Maryland (Prince George's County), Clinton — Surratt TavernConfederate Safe House — John Wilkes Booth - Escape of an Assassin
Owned and operated by the ardently pro-Southern Surratt family, this building was used by Confederate agents as a safe house during the Civil War. Built in 1852, the structure was a tavern, hostelry and post office. Surratt's son, John, Jr., a . . . — Map (db m4188) HM
Maryland (Queen Anne's County), Chester — Maryland's Eastern ShoreHundreds of Enslaved and Free Black Men Enlisted
Although isolated from Maryland's largest population centers, the Eastern Shore was important to the state's role in the Civil War and exemplified the citizens' divided loyalties. In the years before the war, enslaved African-Americans here began . . . — Map (db m8329) HM
Maryland (Queen Anne's County), Queenstown — QueenstownDivided Loyalties
Queenstown, like most of the Eastern Shore in 1861, was a slaveholding community, and the impending conflict was regarded with concern and fear. When war erupted, families were torn apart because of their conflicting loyalities. It was not uncommon . . . — Map (db m3113) HM
Maryland (St. Mary's County), Chaptico — ChapticoA History of Rebellion
Tiny Chaptico was home to many daring men, beginning with John Coode who led Maryland's 1689 Protestant Rebellion. During the Civil War, Chaptico's blockade runners carried medicin and other supplies at night across the Potomac River past Union . . . — Map (db m17426) HM
Maryland (St. Mary's County), Coltons Point — St. Clement's Island Lighthouse"None of the Lighthouses ... are Safe"
On May 19, 1864 Confederates raided St. Clement's Island to destroy the 1851 lighthouse. Capt. John Goldsmith, a county residence who had once owned the island, led the attack, having joined the Confederate army in Virginia. In a thirty-foot . . . — Map (db m9181) HM
Maryland (St. Mary's County), Leonardtown — LeonardtownSpies, Intriguers and Blockade Runners
When the white citizens of St. Mary’s County voted here in the 1860 presidential election, John Breckenridge, the secessionist candidate who carried Maryland, got 920 votes. Abraham Lincoln received 9 percent of the popular Maryland vote; the . . . — Map (db m955) HM
Maryland (St. Mary's County), Piney Point — Piney Point LighthouseThe Potomac Flotilla
In 1861, the U. S. created the Potomac Flotilla (gunboats and other armed vessels) to patrol the river and intercept Confederate blockade runners. Nevertheless, St. Mary's County residents frequently ferried supplies and men across to Virginia. A . . . — Map (db m65046) HM
Maryland (St. Mary's County), Scotland — John Wilkes BoothEscape of an Assassin
War on the Chesapeake Bay Divided loyalties and ironies tore at Marylanders’ hearts throughout the Civil War: enslaved African-Americans and free United States Colored Troops; spies and smugglers; civilians imprisoned without trial to . . . — Map (db m1000) HM
Maryland (St. Mary's County), Scotland — Point Lookout State ParkHammond General Hospital
Hammond General Hospital, opened at Point Lookout, Maryland, in August 1862, was named for Surgeon General William A. Hammond. The massive structure, built to accommodate 1,400 amen, was set on piles about two to three feet above ground and . . . — Map (db m1001) HM
Maryland (Talbot County), Oxford — Oxford WharfRecruiting United States Colored Troops
The Emancipation Proclamation, issued January 1, 1863, authorized the recruiting of African Americans as United States soldiers. Blacks on the Eastern Shore of Maryland and Delaware sought freedom for themselves and their families in return their . . . — Map (db m34451) HM
Maryland (Talbot County), Trappe — Nathaniel HopkinsSoldier from Trappe
This was the home of Nathaniel Hopkins, known affectionately in Talbot County as "Uncle Nace." He was born a slave near here in 1831. After leaving his owner, Percy McKnett, and serving in the United States Colored Troops during the Civil War, . . . — Map (db m3332) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Big Pool — Fort FrederickA Witness to War
Built by the Maryland colony in 1756 during the French and Indian War, Fort Frederick’s stone walls surrounded three large buildings. The colonists abandoned the frontier fort in 1759, when the threat of Indian raids subsided. During the . . . — Map (db m821) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Big Pool — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion & Retreat
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . — Map (db m32675) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Big Pool — Nathan WilliamsA Prosperous Farm
Nathan Williams was the son of Samuel “Big Sam” Williams, a slave who in 1826 bought freedom for himself, his wife, and his four children. In 1839, the elder Williams purchased a farm near Four Locks, about 3.5 miles east of Fort . . . — Map (db m5571) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — Battle of BoonsboroBuying Time — Gettysburg Campaign
Confederate Gen. J.E.B. Stuart faced a difficult assignment: to locate the Union cavalry and prevent it from severing Gen. Robert E. Lee’s avenue of retreat to Williamsport and the Potomac River after the Battle of Gettysburg. The result was the . . . — Map (db m1630) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — BoonsboroLee's Headquarters — Antietam Campaign 1862
After Gen. Robert E. Lee issued Special Order 191 near Frederick dividing the Army of Northern Virginia into four columns, Gen. Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson’s command marched across South Mountain on September 10, 1862. His column . . . — Map (db m1872) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — Deaths of Two Generals“Hallo, Sam, I’m dead!” — Antietam Campaign 1862
The fight for Fox’s Gap on September 14, 1862, claimed the lives of two generals, one from each side. Confederate Gen. Samuel Garland, a Lynchburg, Virginia native, attended the Virginia Military Institute at Lexington and later obtained his law . . . — Map (db m455) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion & Retreat
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . — Map (db m1913) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — The Battle for Fox’s Gap“Hell is empty and all the devils are here.” — Antietam Campaign 1862
As Confederate Gen. D.H. Hill’s division struggled to hold the gaps of South Mountain on September 14, 1862, the fighting here at Fox’s Gap raged throughout the day. About 9 a.m., Gen. Jesse L. Reno’s corps attacked Confederate Gen. Samuel Garland’s . . . — Map (db m454) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Boonsboro — Washington MonumentSignal Station — Antietam Campaign 1862
During the Antietam Campaign, the U.S. Signal Corps used the stone structure in front of you and to your left as a signal station. On July 4, 1827, citizens of the town of Boonsboro paraded to the top of the mountain here and began building this . . . — Map (db m1161) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Brownsville — Battle of Maryland HeightsMaryland's First Civil War Battle — Antietam Campaign 1862
(Preface): After Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee's smashing victory over Union Gen. John Pope at the Second Battle of Manassas, Lee decided to invade the North to reap the fall harvest, gain Confederate recruits, earn foreign recognition, and . . . — Map (db m59630) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Cascade — War Returns to South MountainBattle of Monterey Pass — Gettysburg Campaign
(Preface):After a stunning victory at Chancellorsville in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee led the Army of Northern Virginia through Maryland into Pennsylvania, marching next to threaten Philadelphia, Baltimore, and Washington, D.C. . . . — Map (db m31048) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Cearfoss — Crossing the Mason and DixonPennsylvania, at Last! — Gettysburg Campaign
Four thousands of Confederates in Gen. Robert E. Lee's invasion of the North in 1863, the rate of march exceeded thirty miles a day. Since this part of Maryland is so narrow, splashing across the Potomac River in the morning and crossing the Mason . . . — Map (db m11608) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Cearfoss — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion & Retreat
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . — Map (db m11609) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Clear Spring — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion & Retreat
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . — Map (db m695) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Clear Spring — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion & Retreat
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . — Map (db m60555) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Clear Spring — Vital CrossroadsClear Springs in the Civil War
This was a lively Unionist community on the important National Road during the war. In nearby Four Locks on January 31, 1861, local residents raised a 113-foot-high “Union Pole” with a streamer proclaiming the “Union . . . — Map (db m60553) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Conococheague — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion & Retreat
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . — Map (db m5925) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Funkstown — Battle of FunkstownAt Bay another Day — Gettysburg Campaign
The Confederate presence at Funkstown threatened any Union advance against Gen. Robert E. Lee’s position near Williamsport and the Potomac River as he retreated to Virginia after the Battle of Gettysburg. Gen. J.E.B. Stuart’s cavalry, posted at . . . — Map (db m1158) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — First Battle of HagerstownVicious Fighting in the Streets — Gettysburg Campaign
Combat raged here in the town square and in adjoining city blocks for six hours on Monday, July 6, 1863. Holding Hagerstown was crucial to Gen. Robert E. Lee's retreat to Virginia after the Battle of Gettysburg. If the Confederates lost this . . . — Map (db m6533) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion & Retreat
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . — Map (db m6531) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hagerstown — Second Battle of HagerstownCuster Captures the Town — Gettysburg Campaign
Six days had passed since the Federals had failed in their first attempt to seize Hagerstown as they pursued Gen. Robert E. Lee's Confederate army retreating to Virginia after the Battle of Gettysburg. On Sunday morning, July 12, 1863, a decisive . . . — Map (db m6534) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion & Retreat
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . — Map (db m718) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion & Retreat
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . — Map (db m719) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion & Retreat
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . — Map (db m831) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Major James Breathed"Hardest artillery fighter the war produced"
Maj. James Breathed was born near present-day Berkeley Spring, W. Va., on December 15, 1838, and moved while young with his family to Washington Co., Md. He attended St. James School in Lydia, where his father John Breathed was headmaster. At age . . . — Map (db m5932) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — St. Thomas Episcopal ChurchUnintended Target
Before you, at the top of Church Street, stands St. Thomas Episcopal Church, which became an unintended target of Gen. Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson’s artillery on January 5-6, 1862. Jackson had led his force from Winchester, Virginia to . . . — Map (db m832) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Keedysville — KeedysvilleHeadquarters and Hospital Town — Antietam Campaign 1862
After the Battle of South Mountain ended around nightfall on September 14, 1862, many Confederates marched by here. The next day, Gen. George B. McClellan’s Army of the Potomac arrived, and McClellan established his headquarters here in the German . . . — Map (db m1640) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Lappans — Jones’s CrossroadsForts Facing Forts
For the first time since the Battle of Gettysburg, most of the Union army faced Gen. Robert E. Lee on July 12, 1863. The Federals were firmly entrenched on a ridge parallel to the Sharpsburg-Hagerstown Turnpike a quarter mile west. Less than a mile . . . — Map (db m1990) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Lappans Crossroads — Council of WarShould We Attack?
Gen. George G. Meade gathered his generals near here at his “Antietam Bridge” headquarters on the evening of July 12, 1863, to decide whether to assault the Confederate defenses near Williamsport protecting Gen. Robert E. Lee’s escape . . . — Map (db m1982) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Leitersburg — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion & Retreat
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . — Map (db m4732) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Leitersburg — Retreat into Maryland"Asleep and at the same time walking"
Gettysburg Campaign It was a miserable night, and an even more miserable journey. As 3 a.m. neared on July 5, 1863, the van of the Confederate retreat from Gettysburg arrived here at Leitersburg. The men had marched nonstop for nearly twelve . . . — Map (db m4730) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Myersville — 1862 Antietam CampaignLee Invades Maryland
Fresh from victory at the Second Battle of Manassas, Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia crossed the Potomac River on September 4-6, 1862, to bring the Civil War to Northern soil and to recruit sympathetic Marylanders. Union Gen. . . . — Map (db m674) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Myersville — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion & Retreat
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . — Map (db m670) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Sharpsburg — 1862 Antietam CampaignLee Invades Maryland
Fresh from victory at the Second Battle of Manassas, Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia crossed the Potomac River on September 4-6, 1862, to bring the Civil War to Northern soil and to recruit sympathetic Marylanders. Union Gen. George . . . — Map (db m1967) HM

212 markers matched your search criteria. The first 200 markers were listed. Next 12
Paid Advertisement