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William Bartram Trails Historical Markers

William Bartram traveled the Southeast United States from 1773 through 1777. He published observations of plants, animals, geography and people in 1791. Bartram's Travels remains in print to the present.
 
Bartram’s Trail Marker image, Click for more information
By TRCP Alliance, June 22, 2013
Bartram’s Trail Marker
Alabama (Baldwin County), Stockton — Bartram’s Trail
William Bartram, America’s first native born artist - naturalist, passed through Baldwin County during the Revolutionary era, making the first scientific notations of its flora, fauna and inhabitants. As the appointed botanist of Britain’s King . . . — Map (db m81855) HM
Alabama (Clarke County), Rockville — Bartram's Trail
William Bartram, America’s first native born artist-naturalist, passed through Clarke County during the Revolutionary era, making the first scientific notations of its flora, fauna and inhabitants. As the appointed botanist of Britain’s King George . . . — Map (db m101568) HM
Alabama (Elmore County), Wetumpka — Bartram's Trail
William Bartram, America’s first native born artist-naturalist, passed through Elmore County during the Revolutionary era, making the first scientific notations of its flora, fauna and inhabitants. In 1776 the appointed botanist of Britain’s King . . . — Map (db m69431) HM
Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee — Bartram's Trail
William Bartram, America's first native born artist - naturalist, passed through Macon County during the Revolutionary era, making the first scientific notations of its flora, fauna and inhabitants. As the appointed botanist of Britain's King George . . . — Map (db m99676) HM
Alabama (Mobile County), Grand Bay — William Bartram TrailTraced 1773-1777 — Deep South Region
In 1775, William Bartram, Colonial naturalist, visited Mobile and environs recording flora, fauna, land areas, and rivers. — Map (db m102188) HM
Alabama (Russell County), Phenix City — Bartram's Trail
William Bartram, American's first native born artist - naturalist, passed through Russell County during the Revolutionary era, making the first scientific notations of its flora, fauna and inhabitants. As the appointed botanist of Britain's King . . . — Map (db m48433) HM
Florida (Alachua County), Hawthorne — F- 212 — Hawthorne
(Front text) In 1774, noted botanist William Bartram travelled across what is now the southeastern corner of Alachua County following an old Indian and trading trail. In Florida's territorial period, English-speaking settlers used the same . . . — Map (db m41100) HM
Florida (Alachua County), Micanopy — F-75 — William Bartram Trail1739 ~ 1823
The great Quaker naturalist of Philadelphia made a long journey through the southeastern states in the 1770's collecting botanical specimens. In May, 1774, he visited the Seminole Chief, Cowkeeper, at the Indian village of Cuscowilla located near . . . — Map (db m48676) HM
Florida (Alachua County), Newberry — William Bartram TrailTraced 1773 - 1777 — Deep South Region
Blue Sink Visited by William Bartram, America's first naturalist, in 1774. Erected by Newberry Garden Club in cooperation with Dist. V. FFGC National Council of State Garden Clubs, Inc. Fla. Dept. of Transportation — Map (db m65202) HM
Florida (Escambia County), Pensacola — William Bartram TrailTraced 1773-1777 — Deep South Region
In 1775 William Bartram described Pensacola and the hospitality he received when even Gov. Chester urged him to be his houseguest. — Map (db m91130) HM
Florida (Marion County), Salt Springs — William Bartram TrailTraced 1773 - 1777 — Deep South Region
In 1774, William Bartram visited Salt Springs, his six-mile springs, and proclaimed it a "Paradise of Fish" — Map (db m48682) HM
Florida (Nassau County), Fernandina Beach — William Bartram TrailTraced 1773-1777 — Deep South Region
In 1774, William Bartram, famed Colonial Naturalist, visited Amelia Island and recorded the flora and fauna of the area. — Map (db m58405) HM
Florida (Putnam County), East Palatka — William Bartram TrailDeep South Region — Traced 1773 - 1777
William Bartram, botanist, artist, naturalist, explored St. Johns River area while headquartered near this site in 1774. Erected by Palatka Daily News in cooperation with Garden Club of Palatka, Tillandsia Wildflower Club and Florida Federation . . . — Map (db m56639) HM
Florida (Putnam County), Palatka — William Bartram TrailTraced 1773-1777 — Deep South Region
William Bartram, botanist, artist, naturalist, humanist, explored this area and headquartered near here in 1774. — Map (db m3248) HM
Florida (Putnam County), Welaka — F-411 — The Mount Royal Site
Mount Royal has been a favored location for people to live for thousands of years. Archaeological sites include a Native American burial mound, earthworks, village area, and evidence of a British plantation, as well as the remains of a Spanish . . . — Map (db m60469) HM
Florida (Saint Johns County), Green Cove Springs — F-514 — William Bartram's Plantation
In 1766 on the banks of the St. Johns River at Little Florence Cove, William Bartram attempted to farm a 500-acre land grant. Bartram had spent much of the previous year exploring the new British Colony of East Florida with his father, John Bartram, . . . — Map (db m48683) HM
Florida (Saint Johns County), Picolata — William Bartram TrailTraced 1773-1777 — Deep South Region
At Fort Picolata, Nov. 18, 1765, William Bartram and his father John saw Creek Indian Treaty signed and began their Florida plants survey. Erected by The Wildflower Garden Club of District IV In loving memory of Lorraine Ridge . . . — Map (db m42235) HM
Florida (Saint Johns County), Switzerland — William Bartram Scenic Highway
   Within a mile and a half of this marker are numerous prehistoric sites, several of which date from 2000 BC Native Americans occupied the Northern river section from about 4000 BC until the arrival of Europeans after 1500 AD.    Riverbank . . . — Map (db m61973) HM
Florida (Saint Johns County), Switzerland — William Bartram TrailTraced 1773 - 1777 — Deep South Region
My chief happiness consisted in tracing and admiring the infinite power, majesty, and perfection of the Creator. — Map (db m61818) HM
Florida (Seminole County), Longwood — William Bartram TrailTraced 1773-1777 — Deep South Region
"In 1774, William Bartram, famed Naturalist, camped near here and identified a wide variety of native plants and wildlife." — Map (db m52356) HM
Florida (Volusia County), Volusia — William Bartram TrailTraced 1773-1777 — Deep South Region
Wm. Bartram, Famed Naturalist, classified flora and fauna for shipment, here, at Spalding's Upper Store, May and June 1774. — Map (db m31450) HM
Georgia (Bibb County), Macon — William Bartram TrailTraced 1773–1777 — Deep South Region
In 1775 William Bartram wrote of viewing “Old Okmulgee Fields” and remains of the power and grandeur of ancients of area. — Map (db m419) HM
Georgia (Bibb County), Macon — William Bartram TrailTraced 1773-1777
During his 1775 visit, Bartram noted this area “exhibited a delightful diversified rural scene and promises a happy, fruitful, and salubrious region.” — Map (db m49588) HM
Georgia (Burke County), Waynesboro — 25 B-4 — Shell Bluff
Shell Bluff on the Savannah River 15 miles northeast has been famous since Indian days because of its outcrops of fossil shells including those of giant oysters. These lived in the Eocene sea that covered this part of Georgia some 50 million years . . . — Map (db m13134) HM
Georgia (Chatham County), Savannah — William Bartram TrailTraced 1773-1777 — Deep South Region
In 1765 John and William Bartram, naturalists, began an extended trail from Savannah through Georgia and left a legacy of impressions. — Map (db m5087) HM
Georgia (Clarke County), Athens — William Bartram TrailTraced 1773-1777 — Deep South Region
Eminent artist -- naturalist. Described numerous species of flora including Franklinia. Explored local area in 1773. — Map (db m9147) HM
Georgia (Crawford County), Knoxville — William Bartram TrailTraced 1773-1777 — Deep South Region
In July 1774 William Bartram camped nearby at “a beautiful large brook”, Sweet Water, on a trek from Augusta to Cusetta. — Map (db m12266) HM
Georgia (Crawford County), Roberta — William Bartram TrailTraced 1773-1777 — Deep South Region
In 1774 William Bartram passed through what is now Roberta, after camping at Sweetwater and finding a new hydrangea. — Map (db m12265) HM
Georgia (Crawford County), Sandy Point — William Bartram TrailTraced 1773-1777 — Deep South Region
In July 1774 William Bartram entered Crawford County here, site of Marshall's Mill, going on to Knoxville, Roberta, and Cusetta. — Map (db m59559) HM
Georgia (Effingham County), Rincon — William Bartram TrailTraced 1773-1777 — Deep South Region
John and William Bartram, naturalists, explored Ebenezer and Effinham County on their Savannah~ Augusta Travels. — Map (db m7376) HM
Georgia (Glynn County), St. Simons Island — William Bartram TrailTraced 1773-1777 — Deep South Region
In 1774 William Bartram came to Frederica. He explored St. Simons Island and noted the flora and beautiful live oaks. — Map (db m11639) HM
Georgia (Liberty County), Riceboro — William Bartram TrailTraced 1773-1777 — Deep South Region
In 1773 William Bartram, here viewed Woodmanston Plantation, later the home of his friend, Naturalist John E. LeConte. — Map (db m8994) HM
Georgia (Lincoln County), Lincolnton — William Bartram TrailTraced 1773-1777 — Deep South Region
In 1775 took William Bartram to Fort James on the "Petersburg Road" and passed through Lincoln County, parts now covered by Clark Hill Reservoir — Map (db m11509) HM
Georgia (Madison County), Danielsville — William Bartram TrailTraced 1773 – 1777 — Deep South Region
Naturalist ~ Artist ~ Historian Described the rare native plant Nestronia umbellate. Explored local area in 1773. — Map (db m58490) HM
Georgia (Marion County), Buena Vista — William Bartram TrailTraced 1773-1777 — Deep South Region
In 1774 William Bartram trekked Old Federal Road through Fort Perry, going on to camp at Pintchlucco (Pine Knot Creek). — Map (db m11384) HM
Georgia (McDuffie County), Thomson — William Bartram TrailTraced 1773-1777 — Deep South Region
1773 the Treaty of Augusta Bartram visited Wrightsborough He described the view of high hills and rich vales. He took on supplies. — Map (db m9810) HM
Georgia (McIntosh County), South Newport — William Bartram TrailTraced 1773-1777 — Deep South Region
Donald McIntosh welcomed William Bartram to his home in 1773, giving him shelter from "A Tremendous Thunderstorm." — Map (db m31646) HM
Georgia (Muscogee County), Columbus — William Bartram TrailTraced 1773-1777 — Deep South Region
William Bartram crossed the Chattahoochee (Chata Uche) River January 5, 1778 to Chehaw and Usseta now Columbus. — Map (db m42160) HM
Georgia (Oglethorpe County), Arnoldsville — William Bartram TrailTraced 1773-1777 — Deep South Region
On this site in 1773, William Bartram with Indians and Traders concluded the western boundary of “Treaty of Augusta”. — Map (db m25905) HM
Georgia (Rabun County), Clayton — William Bartram TrailTraced 1773-1777 — Deep South Region
In 1775, William Bartram wrote in “Travels” of the flora and fauna of this area as he gathered specimens to ship to London. — Map (db m27943) HM
Georgia (Richmond County), Augusta — William Bartram TrailTraced 1773-1777 — Deep South Region
William Bartram Visits Augusta 1773 for Indian Ceded Lands Treaty. 1775 said . . . ."Augusta would become the Metropolis of Georgia" — Map (db m9762) HM
Georgia (Richmond County), Augusta — 121-7 — William Bartram Visited Augusta, 1773.
"The village of Augusta." wrote the celebrated American naturalist and botanist of his visits in 1765 and 1773, "is situated on a rich and fertile plain of the Savanna River; the buildings are near its banks and extend two miles. The site of Augusta . . . — Map (db m9761) HM
Georgia (Talbot County), Talbotton — William Bartram TrailTraced 1773-1777 — Deep South Region
On March 21, 1970 H. Grady Bell and friends founded the "Bartram Trail Society of Georgia" at Zion Episcopal Church. — Map (db m11529) HM
Georgia (Taliaferro County), Crawfordville — 131-9 — The Common Road of the English Following Old Indian Trail
The colonial road from Charleston to Vicksburg followed the highway at this point. The route, used by Col. Langdon Welch on his expedition to the Mississippi in 1698, was thereafter followed by British traders. Through Taliaferro Co., it followed . . . — Map (db m15242) HM
Georgia (Taylor County), Butler — William Bartram TrailTraced 1773-1777 — Deep South Region
In 1775 during the travels of botanist William Bartram he first discovered golden St. John’s wort (his Hypericum aureum) near this site on Patsiliga Creek — Map (db m28057) HM
Louisiana (East Baton Rouge Parish), Baton Rouge — William Bartram TrailTraced 1773-1777
In 1775, Bartram noted an "arborescent aromatic vine" and "a new and beautiful species of Verbena" growing near here. — Map (db m92561) HM
Louisiana (East Baton Rouge Parish), Zachary — William Bartram TrailTraced 1773-1777
In 1775, Bartram made a special trip by horseback to "White plains" noting "grassy fields of many miles extent." — Map (db m93330) HM
Mississippi (Harrison County), Biloxi — William Bartram Trail
William Bartram, noted naturalist and journalist, traveled down the Mississippi and along the Gulf Coast in 1777. His observations of plant life, geography and inhabitants were published in 1791. — Map (db m79087) HM
North Carolina (Macon County), Topton — Q-44 — William Bartram
Philadelphia naturalist, author, exploring this area, met a Cherokee band led by their chief, Atakullakulla, in May 1776, near this spot. — Map (db m57728) HM
South Carolina (Abbeville County), Abbeville — William Bartram TrailTraced 1773-1777 — South Atlantic Region
In 1775, William Bartram visited several days at "Lough-Abber" home of A. Cameron, en route north to the Cherokee country. — Map (db m44723) HM
South Carolina (Horry County), Myrtle Beach — William Bartram TrailTraced 1773–1777 — South Atlantic Region
In 1776, naturalist William Bartram traveled through this area, noting the “cliffs of rocks” now known as Hurl Rocks. — Map (db m852) HM
South Carolina (Oconee County), Salem — 37-3 — The Cherokee Path
[Front Side]: The main trading path to the Cherokee Nation paralleled the route of Highway 11 for several miles at this point. This section of the path was used by travelers going from Keowee, the main Lower Town of the Cherokees, across . . . — Map (db m14383) HM

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