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North Carolina Markers
2279 markers matched your search criteria. Markers 501 through 751 are listed. Previous 250 Next 1529
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — I-53 — Babe Ruth
Hit his first home run in professional baseball, March, 1914, 135 yds. N.W. In this town George Herman Ruth acquired the nickname "Babe." — Map (db m24633) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — I-80 — Bank of the United States
Second national bank opened branch in 1818 in Fayetteville. Bank operated, 1820-1835, in house one block east. — Map (db m30882) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — Burning of Clarendon BridgeConfederates Evacuate Fayetteville — Carolinas Campaign
(preface) The Carolinas Campaign began on February 1, 1865, when Union Gen. William T. Sherman led his army north from Savannah, Georgia, after the March to the Sea. Sherman’s objective was to join Gen. Ulysses S. Grant in Virginia to crush Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia. Scattered Confederate forces consolidated in North Carolina, the Confederacy’s logistical lifeline, where Sherman defeated Gen. Joseph E. Johnston’s last-ditch attack at Bentonville. After Sherman was . . . — Map (db m70380) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — I-63 — C. M. Stedman1841 - 1930
Last Confederate officer in Congress, 1911-1930; lawyer & lt.-governor. Grave is 2 blks. east. — Map (db m30905) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — I-54 — Campbelton
Colonial river port, incorporated in 1762. Later merged with Cross Creek to form the town of Fayetteville. — Map (db m30872) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — I-32 — Charles W. Chesnutt1858 - 1932
Negro novelist and short story writer, teacher and lawyer. Taught in a school which stood here. — Map (db m30892) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — I-70 — Charter of the University of N. C.
William R. Davie's bill to charter the University was adopted by the General Assembly meeting nearby, Dec. 11, 1789. — Map (db m24399) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — Confederate War Memorial
In memory of the Confederate Dead On Fames eternal camping ground Their silent Tents are spread. Rest on embalmed & sainted dead Dear as the blood ye gave. Nor shall your glory be forgot While Fame her record keeps Or honor points the hallowed spot Where valor proudly sleeps. Woman's record to the Heroes in the dust. — Map (db m30896) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — Confederate Women's Home
Built in 1915 for the widows and daughters of state's Confederate veterans. Closed, 1981. Cemetery 300 yds. W. — Map (db m30822) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — I-9 — Cornwallis
Marching to Wilmington after the Battle of Guilford Courthouse, stopped with his army in this town in April, 1781. — Map (db m30899) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — I-10 — Cross Creek
Colonial village and trading center, merged in 1778 with town of Campbelton and in 1783 renamed Fayetteville. — Map (db m24394) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — Cross Creek CemeteryConfederate Burial Grounds
This is the oldest public cemetery in Fayetteville, begun in 1785. Mrs. Anne K. Kyle, who served as a nurse in the hospital here during the Civil War, established the Confederate Burial Ground soon after Union Gen. William T. Sherman and his army left Fayetteville in March 1865. She and Fayetteville Mayor Archibald McLean selected a spot in the back section of the cemetery overlooking Cross Creek to inter the soldiers. The Rev. Joseph C. Huske of St. John's Episcopal Church officiated at a . . . — Map (db m30940) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — Cross Creek Linear ParkOur Pathway to the Future
1. Cool Spring Cool Spring is located on the south bank of Cross Creek, which winds its way through downtown Fayetteville. The spring was the primary soucre of water first for Native Americans and subsequently for the European pioneers. It was the center for social, political and religious gatherings. During the 19th Century, a large stone enclosure, recessed into the creek bank, was built around the spring. Steps led down to the water, which collected in the floor of the structure. . . . — Map (db m31149) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — Cumberland County Confederate Memorial
The Women of Cumberland to their Confederate Dead May 20, 1861 - May 10, 1902 They died in defence of their Rights For they should fall the tears of a nation's grief. Lord God of Hosts be with us yet, Lest we forget; lest we forget. [Inscriptions on stones near the monument follow] This monument was restored through the generous efforts of concerned citizens and the groups represented here, and was rededicated on May 10, 1992 . . . — Map (db m31143) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — Edward J. Hale HouseCivil War Publisher — Carolinas Campaign
Across the street is the Hale-Williams House, notable for the variety of architectural styles it incorporates as well as for the prominence of its builder, Edward Jones Hale. Hale bought this property in 1847 and constructed the house in the 1850s. Hale born in Chatham County on September 9, 1802, received an education in journalism on the Raleigh Register and the National Intelligencer in Washington, D.C. From 1825 to 1865, he published the Fayetteville Observer, . . . — Map (db m70360) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — Engine House (1838 - 1848)Arsenal Park
The engine house received its first engine in 1859 and served as the power source for the smith and gun carriage shops. — Map (db m24419) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — Fayetteville Arsenal"Batter . . . into piles of rubble" — Carolinas Campaign
[Preface at top left] The Carolinas Campaign began on February 1, 1865, when Union Gen. William T. Sherman led his army north from Savannah, Georgia, after the “March to the Sea.” Sherman's objective was to join Gen. Ulysses S. Grant in Virginia to crush Gen. Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia. Scattered Confederate forces consolidated in North Carolina, the Confederacy's logistical lifeline, where Sherman defeated Gen. Joseph E. Johnston's last-ditch attack at . . . — Map (db m24355) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — I-31 — Fayetteville State University
Est. 1867 as Howard School. State-supported since 1877. A part of The University of North Carolina since 1972. — Map (db m24385) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — First Presbyterian Church
Organized in 1800. The original building, begun in 1816, rebuilt on same walls after fire of 1831, stands one block west. — Map (db m24390) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — I-28 — First Presbyterian Church
Organized in 1800. The original building, begun in 1816, rebuilt on same walls after fire of 1831, stands one block east. — Map (db m24392) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — Flora MacDonald
Scottish heroine resided here 1774 - 1775 — Map (db m24445) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — Flora Macdonald
Near this spot the Scottish heroine bade farewell to her husband Allan MacDonald of Kingsburgh, and his troops during the march-out of the Highlanders to the Battle of Moore's Creek Bridge, February 1776 — Map (db m30983) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — Forging and Casting [and] Smith's Shops (1839 - 1842)Arsenal Park
The lighter brick in this pad outlines the foundations of two shops, the smiths and the forging and casting. These shops were built simultaneously between 1839 and 1842. During Confederate occupation, these shops, along with the engine house, were the central areas for repairing and modernizing arms. — Map (db m24420) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — I-60 — Frank P. Graham1886 - 1972
First president of Consolidated U.N.C., 1932-1949. U.S. senator; U.N. mediator, India & Pakistan. Birthplace was 50 yds. W. — Map (db m30894) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — Gun Carriage and Turning Shop (1842 - 1849)Arsenal Park
This area is where most woodworking operations took place. It was also known as the carpenter's shop. Wagon and gun carriage wheels, as well as other wooden parts, were made here. — Map (db m24421) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — I-62 — Henry Evans
Free black cobbler & minister. Built first Methodist church in Fayetteville. Died 1810. Buried 2 blocks north. — Map (db m30884) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — Highsmith-Rainey Memorial Hospital
Highsmith Hospital opened in 1901 on Green Street in downtown Fayetteville as the first private hospital in North Carolina. In 1926 the hospital was relocated to the corner of Hay Street and Bradford Avenue. The hospital opened on its present site in 1983. Highsmith-Rainey Memorial Hospital is named after its founder, Dr. Jacob F. Highsmith, Sr., and Dr. William T. Rainey, who devoted 40 years of service to the hospital. — Map (db m70361) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — I-86 — Hiram R. Revels1822 - 1901
First African American to serve in Congress, he represented Mississippi in Senate, 1870-1871. Born in Fayetteville. — Map (db m24402) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — I-4 — James C. Dobbin
Secretary of United States Navy, 1853-57. Helped found State Hospital for Insane. Home one block north. — Map (db m24330) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — James Dobbin McNeill
President Emeritus North Carolina State Firemen's Association Born in Asheboro, N.C. March 4, 1850 Died in Fayetteville, N.C. February 9, 1927 A beloved citizen and courageous statesman Six times Mayor of Fayetteville Thrice President of the National Firemen's Association Re-organizer of the Fayetteville Fire Department and for 40 years its Chief State Senator Captain and Commander of the Faytteville Division North Carolina Naval Reserves Captain of the Red Shirts . . . — Map (db m24448) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — I-79 — John England1786 - 1842
Bishop of Charleston. He organized Roman Catholics in N.C. at Fayetteville Convention, & consecrated St. Patrick Church, 1829. Present church 4/10 mi. E. — Map (db m24634) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — I-12 — Lafayette
On March 4-5, 1825, was guest of Fayetteville (named for him 1783), staying at home of Duncan McRae, on site of present courthouse. — Map (db m24377) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — Liberty Point
This historic structure, circa 1791, is the oldest known commercial building in Fayetteville. It was restored as a community service by Fayetteville's hometown newspaper. — Map (db m24432) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — Liberty Point Declaration of Independence
At or near this place ever since known as “Liberty Point” was promulgated in June 1775, by patriots of the Cape Fear A Declaration of Independence of the British Crown. ————— Declaration of Independence June 20, 1775 [Roll Call of Signers] “We stand ready to sacrifice our lives to secure her freedom.” Map (db m24431) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — I-13 — MacPherson Church
Presbyterian. Founded by early Scottish settlers. Graves of Alexander MacPherson and T. H. Holmes, a Confederate general, 1 1/2 miles N. — Map (db m30814) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — I-55 — Methodist University
Chartered 1956 as four-year liberal arts college. Opened September 1960. University since 2006. — Map (db m30572) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — North CarolinaCivil War Trails
North Carolina's Civil War stories are as diverse as its landscape. The Outer Banks and coastal rivers saw action early in the war, as Union forces occupied the region. Stories abound of naval battles, blockade running, Federal raids, and the Confederacy's struggle to supply its armies. Other tales are told in the western mountains, a sometimes-lawless region where Unionists and Confederates fought a war within a war. In the rolling central piedmont, memories linger of Union Gen. William T. . . . — Map (db m24357) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — North Carolina Arsenal
The courses of lighter colored brick found in this brick pad represent foundations uncovered while preparing the area for construction. The walls were part of the main arsenal building which was started in 1838 and completed in fall of 1839. The building was used as a storage facility for small arms, rifles and muskets. — Map (db m70359) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — I-14 — Old Town Hall
Built on site of the "State House," burned 1831, where the North Carolina Convention of 1789 ratified the Federal Constitution. — Map (db m24397) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — Parade GroundFayetteville Independent Light Infantry
The Fayetteville Independent Light Infantry is North Carolina's oldest military unit and the second-oldest militia organization in the U.S. At the start of the Civil War, after North Carolina seceded, the company enrolled in active service for six months on April 17, 1861, as Company H, 1st North Carolina Infantry. It seized the U.S. arsenal here and occupied it until the Confederate government took control. In May, the company departed for the camp of instruction in Raleigh. The ladies of . . . — Map (db m31109) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — I-21 — Plank Roads
Fayetteville was the focal point for five plank roads, chartered 1849-52. The longest was built to Bethania, 129 miles northwest. — Map (db m24395) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — Plummer Bridge
This bridge dedicated in memory of Lenox Eugene Plummer 1914 - 1979 Fayetteville City Councilmember for twenty four years who encouraged this city to “Always feed everyone out of the same spoon” John W. Hurley, Mayor City Council J. L. Dawkins • Mildred Evans Aaron Johnson • Jimmie Jones Milo McBryde • Milton Wofford John P. Smith, City Manager March 3, 1983 — Map (db m31202) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — Saint Patrick Catholic Church
First parish to be established under the North Carolina Catholic Church Constitution February 4, 1824 First Catholic Church consecrated in North Carolina March 17, 1829 Original location Bow Street Fayetteville, North Carolina — Map (db m24636) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — Scotch Spring
Located one block to the north, on the north side of Maiden Lane, Scotch Spring was owned by two prominent citizens, Robert Cochran and John Hay, and was a major water source for Fayetteville in the late eighteenth century. Throughout the nineteenth century, it continued to operate as a primary water source, eventually to be abandoned during the early 1900's. — Map (db m30998) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — Settlement of the Upper Cape Fear
[Thistle symbol] Commemorating the settlement of the Upper Cape Fear by the Highland Scotch Two Hundredth Anniversary — Map (db m31148) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — I-18 — Sherman's Army
Invading North Carolina, Sherman's army occupied Fayetteville, Mar. 11-14, 1865, destroying the Confederate Arsenal, which stood 1 mile W. — Map (db m57295) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — Southwest Tower (1849 - 1856)Arsenal Park
This was the last of the four arsenal towers to be built. In the original plans, this tower was to be the guard and prison rooms. — Map (db m24415) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — The "Ghost" TowerArsenal Park
The northwest tower (1) was the first of the arsenal's four towers to be built (1839-1840) and initially served as the facility's temporary office. The three-story octagonal towers protruded beyond the corners of the main compound and were a defensive feature that allowed flanking fire along the exterior wall. The "ghost" tower is a semblance of the original brick tower and enables visitors to understand the scale of these structures. — Map (db m24365) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — The Battle of BentonvilleMarch 19, 20, and 21, 1865
At Bentonville, General William T. Sherman's Union Army, advancing from Fayetteville toward Goldsboro, met and battled the Confederate Army of General Joseph E. Johnston. General Robert E. Lee had directed the Confederates to make a stand in North Carolina to prevent Sherman from joining General U.S. Grant in front of Lee's Army at Petersburg, Virginia. Johnston had been able to raise nearly 30,000 men from South Carolina, Alabama, Mississippi, Tennessee, and eastern North Carolina. His army . . . — Map (db m20535) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — The Fayetteville Independent Light Infantry CompanyF. I. L. I. — 1793 - 1993
[Front] Whereas in obedience to President George Washington's Militia Act and the threat of war with European powers, the F.I.L.I. was organized on or near this spot on August 23, 1793, under the leadership of Captain Robert Adam, Lieutenant John Winslow and Ensign Robert Cochran, and Whereas the F.I.L.I. served as an active independent military company from the time of its organization through the First World War having been bestowed with wreaths of laurel and having . . . — Map (db m31112) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — I-61 — The Fayetteville Observer
Oldest N.C. newspaper still being published. Begun 1816 as weekly; daily since 1896. E. J. Hale, editor, 1824-1865. — Map (db m24635) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — The Market HouseSite of a Shootout — Carolinas Campaign
On Saturday morning, March 11, 1865, a brief skirmish took place here at the Market House as Confederate forces evacuated Fayetteville while Union Gen. William T. Sherman's army entered the town. A rear guard detachment under Gen. Wade Hampton surprised a Union cavalry patrol after one of the Federals came around the corner from Russell Street and then fired at Hampton on the south side of the Market House. In the ensuing engagement, several Union cavalrymen were killed or captured. Within a . . . — Map (db m24442) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — The Sandford HouseBarracks for Union Troops — Carolinas Campaign
Duncan McLeran constructed this two-story Federal-style dwelling in 1797. In 1820, the property was sold and remodeled to accommodate the Bank of the United States, the first federal bank in North Carolina. The house is named for John Sanford, a cashier there who purchased the property for a residence for his family in 1832 after the bank closed. According to local tradition, the residence was used as a barracks for Union troops during Gen. William T. Sherman’s occupation of Fayetteville in . . . — Map (db m70374) HM WM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — Town House
Lafayette was escorted from the Clarendon Bridge to the Town House, which stood at this site. A spacious stage had been erected in front of the Town House. The various military units formed lines on each side of the street, and Lafayette's carriage passed between them amidst the discharge of artillery, to the east door of the Town House. Here Lafayette was welcomed on behalf of the citizens of Fayetteville by Judge John D. Toomer. At the completion of Judge Toomer's remarks, Lafayette . . . — Map (db m24449) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — I-2 — U.S. Arsenal
Authorized by Congress 1836. Taken over by Confederacy, 1861. Destroyed March 1865, by Sherman. Ruins stand 2 blocks S.W. — Map (db m24328) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fayetteville — I-65 — Warren Winslow1810 - 1862
Acting Governor, 1854; Congressman, 1855-1861. Negotiated surrender of local U.S. arsenal in 1861. Grave 40 yds. SE. — Map (db m30871) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fort Bragg — 15cm Medium Field Howitzer, M18
Standard howitzer for German divisions. This gun captured in Normandy, France during June 1944. — Map (db m31229) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fort Bragg — 307th Airborne Engineer Battalion
To commemorate the 50th Anniversary of the Crossing of the Waal River Honoring our KIA's - MIA's September 20, 1944 “C” Company, 307th Engineer Battalion was in the assault wave with the Third Battalion, 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment that crossed the Waal River to capture the Nijmegen Bridge in what was one of the most heroic actions of World War II — Map (db m31508) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fort Bragg — 328th Infantry Rock
Carved in 1919 by a Georgia stonesmason to pay tribute to the 82D Division's 328th Infantry. Moved from Camp Gordon, Georgia first home of the 82D, to Fort Bragg in the 1950s [Rock Inscription reads] Dedicated to the memory of the men of the 328th Infantry, 82nd Division A.E.F. who made the supreme sacrafice [sic] for America in the World War — Map (db m31495) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fort Bragg — 4th Battalion, 325th Airborne Infantry Regiment
In honor and memory of the paratrooopers of the 4th Battalion, 325th Airborne Infantry Regiment, “The Gold Falcons” — Map (db m31493) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fort Bragg — 82d Infantry Division
Activated 25 August 1917 Reactivated 25 March 1942 Reorganized and redesignated an airborne division 15 Augus 1942 To Our Honored Dead Campaigns Lorraine • St. Mihiel • Meuse-Argonne Sicily • Naples-Foggia • Anzio Normandy • Holland • Ardennes Central Europe Dominican Republic Vietnam Grenada • Panama Persian Gulf Afghanistan • Iraq …There will always be an 82d Airborne Division, because it lives in the hearts of men. And somewhere young men . . . — Map (db m31179) WM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fort Bragg — Airlifter's Memorial
Base In honor of airlifters past, present and future Back This memorial dedicated by members of Air Force Sergeants Association Chapter 367 and Noncommissioned Officers Open Mess, Pope Air Force Base, North Carolina, 12 June 1981 — Map (db m43998) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fort Bragg — Bastogne Gables
This housing area is named in memory of courageous airborne troops of the U.S. Army who refused to surrender during the intense and bitter fighting against a numerically superior enemy, 19 December 1944 - 15 January 1945, in the area of Bastogne Belgium. 5 Mar 53 — Map (db m43972) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fort Bragg — Braxton BraggCamp Bragg, N.C.
In honor of Braxton Bragg Lieutenant Colonel, USA General, CSA Born: Warrenton N.C. 22 March 1817 Died: Galveston, Texas 27 September 1876 War Department General Order No. 77, 21 August 1918, established Camp Bragg, N.C. in honor of “Capt. Braxton Bragg, who, while commanding Battery C, Third Field Artillery, rendered signal service at the battle of Buena Vista, Mexico.” Thus, Fort Bragg bears the name of a brave, resourceful, fighting man...A soldier . . . — Map (db m62493) HM WM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fort Bragg — C-119 "Packet"
(top) C-119C, Serial Number 50-33182. This aircraft was originally Serial Number 50-0128. On loan from the U.S. Air Force Museum Program. (middle) The Fairchild C-119, better known as the "Flying Boxcar", was capable of carrying 42 troops or up to 10,000 lbs of cargo. A versatile aircraft, it could also be used to tow up to a 30,000 lb glider. The C-119 was stationed at Pope AFB from 1952 to 1958. Engines 2 3500 hp, radial, F&W R-4360 Crew: 2 pilots, 1 . . . — Map (db m44001) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fort Bragg — C-123 "Provider"
(top) C-123K, Serial Number 54-0372. This aircraft was originally Serial Number 54-0669. It is on loan from the U.S. Air Force Museum Program. (middle) The Fairchild C-123 was capable of carrying 60 fully equipped troops while operating from short airfields. The C-123 was stationed at Pope AFB from 1958 to 1964. Engines: 2 2500 hp, radial, P&W R-2800 Crew: 2 pilots, 1 flight mechanic, 1 loadmaster Length: 76 feet Wing Span: 110 feet Cruise: 190 mph . . . — Map (db m44002) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fort Bragg — C-130 "Hercules"
The mission of the Lockheed C-130 is to provide rapid transportation of personnel or cargo for delivery by air-drop or by air-land. The aircraft can be used as a tactical transport carrying 92 ground troops or 64 paratroopers and equipment. It can be readily converted for ambulance or aerial delivery missions. Engines: 4 Allison T-56 turboprops Crew: 5 Length: 99 feet 6 inches Cruise: 295 knots Max Gross Weight: 155,000 pounds Wing Span: 132 feet 7 inches Range: 2130 . . . — Map (db m44003) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fort Bragg — C-7 "Caribou"
First flown by the Army in the 1960s, the C-7 was used to provide logistic support, particularly in Vietnam. Used to support airborne training through the 1970s. This aircraft was used by the U.S. Army Parachute Demonstration Team, the Golden Knights. — Map (db m31236) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fort Bragg — Curtis C-46 "Commando"
First aircraft with jump doors on both sides of fuselage. Used for airborne operations in 1945 to early 1950s. — Map (db m31230) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fort Bragg — DC-3/C-47 "Skytrain"
(top) C-47D, Serial Number 44-118427 This aircraft was originally serial number 44-76462. It is on loan from the U.S. Air Force Museum Program. (middle) The Douglas C-47 Skytrain, the military version of the DC-3, was the most commonly used transport in the allied air forces during WW II. The C-47 was stationed at Pope AFB under the Air Transport Command from 1942-1946. Engines: 2 1200 hp, turbo-charged, P&W Twin Wasps Crew: 2 pilots, 1 radio operator . . . — Map (db m43999) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fort Bragg — Douglas C-47
Known as the “Skytrain”, the C-47 was the workhorse of the Army Air Corps transport units. Carried 82D troopers into battle at Sicily, Salerno, Normandy, and Holland — Map (db m31231) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fort Bragg — Enlisted Personnel Memorial
As enlisted men and women of our great nation, nothing captures our professionalism more than the Oath of Enlistment. It states... "I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; and that I will obey the orders of the President of the United States and the orders of the officers appointed over me, according to the regulations and the Uniform Code of Military Justice. So help me God" Lest we forget who we are... — Map (db m44007) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fort Bragg — Fairchild C-119 "Flying Boxcar"
Used to support airborne operations from the 1940s through the 1960s. First aircraft to handle large parachute loads containing 3/4 ton trucks and 105-mm howitzers. — Map (db m31492) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fort Bragg — Fairchild C-123-K Provider
Developed in the 1950s as an assault transport. The fullsection rear ramp door made this an ideal aircraft for support of airborne operations from the 1950s into the 1970s. — Map (db m31234) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fort Bragg — I-17 — Fort Bragg
Established 1918 as U.S. field artillery training center. Named for N.C. native Braxton Bragg, Lt. Col., USA; Gen., CSA. — Map (db m30973) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fort Bragg — Iron Mike[The Airborne Trooper]
In honor of Airborne Troopers whose courage, dedication, and traditions make them the world's finest fighting soldiers — Map (db m31176) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fort Bragg — Lt. Harley H. Pope
Aviation Pioneer 1879-1918 Presented by citizens of Bedford, Indiana — Map (db m43971) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fort Bragg — M-551A1 Sheridan Armored Reconnaissance/Airborne Assault Vehicle
. . . — Map (db m31476) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fort Bragg — M-56 Scopion Self-Propelled Antitank Gun
A fully-tracked 90mm gun developed in the 1950s to provide airborne troops with a mobile antitank weapon. Used by airborne armored battalions and airborne infantry tank companies in the 1960s. — Map (db m31491) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fort Bragg — Meadows Memorial Parade FieldIn Memory of Major Richard J. Meadows — 16 June 1931 – 29 July 1995
During his long and illustrious career, Major Meadows embodied all of those qualities that mark the unique individuals serving in Special Operations Forces. Major Meadows’ extraordinary achievements throughout his dedicated service with Army Special Forces and Ranger units contributed to our nation’s security for nearly four decades. His service included combat action in the Korean War, clandestine operations in Laos, exchange duty and troop command with the British 22nd Special Air Service, . . . — Map (db m31484) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fort Bragg — Pope Air Force Base Air Park
Dedicated to the men and women who flew and maintained these aircraft. Responding to the call to arms, they embraced the difficult challenges and held high the proud heritage of the United States Air Force. This monument stands guard at Pope's entrance in tribute to our airmen, serving as the bridge that spans our present and past. This air park was made possible by the generous contributions of the Pope Special Activities Committee, 23d Civil Engineer Squadron, and the Fort Bragg Corps of . . . — Map (db m44004) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fort Bragg — Pope Airmen Memorial
Front In honor of those Pope airmen who have given their lives for their country while performing flying duties * * * * * * Dedicated to the memory of those who were killed in a C-130 accident on November 30, 1978 Robert J. Caton • Bernie C. Finch III • Daniel K. Morris • Samuel P. Eskew • Mark D. Greer • Robert M. VanWinkle Back Dedicated to the memory of the crew of "Even 91" who lost their lives in a C-130 accident at Blewett Falls, NC on April 28, 1992 Flt Lt Mark . . . — Map (db m44005) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fort Bragg — Pope Airmen Memorial
Dedicated to the memory of those Pope airmen who lost their lives in a C-130 accident at Sicily extraction zone on July 1, 1987 Capt. Garry M. Bardo, Jr. • A1C Albert G. Dunse • Capt. John B. Keiser, III • TSgt Timothy J. Matar — Map (db m44006) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fort Bragg — Stang Field
Named in honor of Colonel Arthur C. Stang III 13 Mar 37 - 2 Sep 80 Former commander of the 3d Brigade and Chief of Staff, 82d Airborne Division who was awarded the Distinguished Service Medal for outstanding contributions to America's Guard of Honor — Map (db m31184) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fort Bragg — T-8 90mm Antitank Gun
Developed late in World War II, the 90mm was the most powerful American antitank weapon of that conflict. It was used by the 82nd Airborne Division in the postwar era between 1946 and 1956. — Map (db m31475) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fort Bragg — UH-1A Iroquois Utility Helicopter
Nicknamed the Huey, helicopters of this type supported Division airmobile operations in the 1960s and 1970s. The UH-1 was also capable of dropping paratroopers or sling loading heavy equipment — Map (db m31465) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Fort Bragg — USASOC Memorial WallIn Memory of Our Fallen Special Operations Soldiers — United States Army Special Operations Command
Welcome Kinsman, Comrade, Friend. Recorded here on this humble Wall are the names of our fallen Heroes. They were and will always be cherished Soldiers of Army Special Operations, our comrades in arms. Know that they eagerly sought and accepted our Nation's most difficult missions against our most dangerous enemies. Know that they willingly endured hardship and danger and, at the end, sacrificed all for us. With solemn pride, know that in doing so they proved true to their oath to the . . . — Map (db m31488) WM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Godwin — Battle of AverasboroConfederate First Defensive Line — Carolinas Campaign
(Preface): The Carolinas Campaign began on February 1, 1865, when Union Gen. William T. Sherman led his army north from Savannah, Georgia, after the March to the Sea. Sherman's objective was to join Gen. Ulysses S. Grant in Virginia to crush Gen. Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia. Scattered Confederate forces consolidated in North Carolina, the Confederacy's logistical lifeline, where Sherman defeated Gen. Joseph E. Johnston's last-ditch attack at Bentonville. After Sherman was . . . — Map (db m42002) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Godwin — I-81 — David M. Williams1900-1975
"Carbine" Williams, designer of short stroke piston, which made possible M-1 carbine rifle, widely used in WWII. Lived 2 mi. S. — Map (db m31793) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Grays Creek — I-59 — Dunn’s Creek Quaker Meeting
Started about 1746; joined yearly meeting, 1760; discontinued about 1781. Site and cemetery are 2.5 miles S.E. — Map (db m1946) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Grays Creek — I 42 — Moore's Camp
Prior to the Battle of Moores Creek Bridge, forces of Gen. James Moore, Whig commander camped, Feb.15~21,1776, 1 ½ miles northeast. — Map (db m4588) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Hope Mills — I-27 — Cape Fear Baptist Church
Constituted in 1756 as Particular Baptist. Stephen Hollingsworth, first minister. Present (1859) building 2 mi. E. — Map (db m864) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Linden — I-52 — Rev. James Campbell
One of early Presbyterian ministers in N.C., 1757-1780. Organized Bluff, Barbecue, and Longstreet churches. Grave is 8 mi. east. — Map (db m42003) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Wade — Colonel Alexander McAllisterPatriot and Revolutionary Hero
Near this spot at Old Bluff Church is buried Colonel Alexander McAllister; Patriot and Revolutionary Hero; Colonel of Cumberland County Militia; Representative First Assembly in Newbern, December 1773; Representative Second Assembly in Newbern, March 1774; Member of Provincial Congress held at Hillsboro, Aug. 1775; Member of Provincial Congress held at Halifax, April 1776; Member of Comittee of Safety for Wilmington District; Member of committee appointed by Provincial Congress, August 23, . . . — Map (db m31594) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Wade — I-1 — Old Bluff ChurchPresbyterian
Organized in 1758 by Rev. James Campbell. Present building erected about 1858. N.W. 1 mi. — Map (db m31592) HM
North Carolina (Cumberland County), Wade — Old Bluff ChurchThe Muddy Road to Averasboro — Carolinas Campaign
(Preface): The Carolinas Campaign began on February 1, 1865, when Union Gen. William T. Sherman led his army north from Savanna, Georgia, after the "March to the Sea." Sherman's objective was to join Gen. Ulysses S. Grant in Virginia to crush Gen. Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia. Scattered Confederate forces consolidated in North Carolina, the Confederacy logistical lifeline, where Sherman defeated Gen. Joseph E. Johnston's last-ditch attack at Bentonville. After Sherman was . . . — Map (db m31593) HM
North Carolina (Currituck County), Coinjock — A-76 — Albemarle and Chesapeake Canal
Constructed 1855~59 by steam dredges to assist commerce. Now part of Intracoastal Waterway. N.C. Cut 5 miles long. — Map (db m11313) HM
North Carolina (Currituck County), Coinjock — Albemarle and Chesapeake CanalMilitary Supply Route
After the Battle of Elizabeth City and the destruction of the Confederate Mosquito Fleet in February 1862, the Confederates scuttled ships to block the North Carolina cut. The Federals had the same idea to stall Confederate traffic and sent five vessels to the North River “with prize schooners in tow to obstruct the Chesapeake and Albemarle Canal,” only to find that their adversaries had already begun the task. After the Union occupation of Norfolk, the removal of the obstructions . . . — Map (db m56979) HM
North Carolina (Currituck County), Corolla — Boathouse
With its gracious proportions, unusual pink color, and sloping rooflines, the Corolla Island boathouse built by Edward Collings Knight Jr. and his wife complemented their main house. Even more than the main house, the boathouse was the center of activity for the waterfowl hunting that drew guests here. Decoys and hunting skiffs were stored inside, along with corn to lure the waterfowl into gunning range. While the Knights and their guests slept in the main house, hunting guides in the . . . — Map (db m10433) HM
North Carolina (Currituck County), Corolla — Corolla Historic Village
Twiddy & Company began preservation in Corolla Village in 1986. The first effort was the Kill Devil Hills Lifesaving Station built in 1878. Relocation from the original oceanfront site was a requirement of the sale, so the station was moved to Corolla. Further preservation occurred in 1998 as other properties became available. The Lewark/Gray home and the Parker home were first. These old homes now host merchants and nonprofits to include Lovie’s Kitchen Table and the Corolla Wild Horse . . . — Map (db m76660) HM
North Carolina (Currituck County), Corolla — Corolla Island Bridges
When Edward Collings Knight Jr. and his wife, Marie-Louise leBell, purchased this property in 1922, the Lighthouse Club, a hunting club, already existed on land just to the south. After the Knights completed a new private residence in 1925, they demolished the club, dredged a waterway completely around the house site, and renamed the property Corolla Island. A pair of bridges spanned the waterway. Since there was no public road to Corolla Island until 1984, access was a challenge. Visitors . . . — Map (db m10437) HM
North Carolina (Currituck County), Corolla — Corolla SchoolhouseC. 1900
Restoration began in the fall of 1999, revealing wonderful insights into life in this isolated coastal village. Upon raising the building to repair rotten sills, workers discovered ship timbers in the foundation that were salvaged from shipwrecks on the beach. Underneath the steeple was found a century-old collection of stones and other objects from the schoolyard. The old bell was badly deteriorated, so a new one was installed. Once again a bell tolls in this village to celebrate great occasions. — Map (db m10434) HM
North Carolina (Currituck County), Corolla — Corolla Schoolhouse
Establishing the First Unified Corolla School The Corolla Schoolhouse was built circa 1890 by residents Sol Sanderlin and Val Twiford and established as the first unified Corolla school in 1905. The County's one-room schoolhouse accepted children of all grade levels and provided a teacher, textbooks and standardized grading. Students from the nearby villages of Wash Woods, Seagull and Penny's Hill were bused down the beach. In winter, the schoolhouse was heated by a big coal . . . — Map (db m76658) HM
North Carolina (Currituck County), Corolla — Currituck Beach Light Station
On December 1, 1875, the beacon of the Currituck Beach Lighthouse filled the remaining "dark spot" on the North Carolina coast between the Cape Henry light to the north and Bodie Island to the south. To distinguish the Currituck Beach Lighthouse from the other regional lighthouses, its exterior remains unpainted and today gives visitors a clear picture of the multitude of bricks used to form the structure. The lighthouse was automated in 1939 when the United State Coast Guard assumed the duties . . . — Map (db m10685) HM
North Carolina (Currituck County), Corolla — Duck Blinds
When the last inlet to Currituck Sound closed in 1828, the water began to change. As rain, rivers, and streams poured in to the sound, the water became less salty and tall-grass marsh and wild celery attracted large flocks of migratory waterfowl in winter. The Currituck Sound became a hunters' paradise. Due to incredibly good hunting conditions, the Knights, avid waterfowl hunters and conservationist, chose this site for a private residence. Experienced local guides ensured the hunters' . . . — Map (db m10686) HM
North Carolina (Currituck County), Corolla — First Swimming Pool on the Outer Banks
The Whalehead Club has always been associated with wealth and leisure pursuits. When Edward Collings Knight Jr. and his wife, Marie-Louise LeBel, built their residence here in the 1920s, they made it as opulent as possible. The estate included the first swimming pool built on the Outer Banks. Mr. Knight's wealth was derived from sugar and railroads. He and his wife, Marie-Louise Lebel Knight, also had grand homes in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and Middletown, Rhode Island. From 1922 . . . — Map (db m10687) HM
North Carolina (Currituck County), Corolla — Ray T. Adam's Landing Strip
When Ray T. Adams bought this estate for just $25,000 in 1940, he dreamed of opening a hunt club and selling parcels of land for real estate. He changed the name to the Whalehead Club and invited potential investors, politicians (including Dwight Eisenhower), and public figures (including boxing champion Jack Dempsey) to enjoy hunting on the property. He built a landing strip on a man-made finger of land beginning in the sound (approximately where the red channel marker is today) and . . . — Map (db m10688) HM
North Carolina (Currituck County), Corolla — The Caretaker's Residence
Architectural drawings suggest that the caretaker's residence dates to the 1920s and was designed to house two families who worked for the Knights. Cleveland lewark, chief hunting guide and superintendent of the property, lived in one side of the house while his father Tilman, who fished the area, lived in the other. When the caretaker's residence burned to the ground in 1948, the two families living here worked for Whalehead Club owner Ray T. Adams. George and Gladys Smith lived in one . . . — Map (db m10689) HM
North Carolina (Currituck County), Corolla — The Knights
Due to excellent wildfowl hunting conditions in the second half of the 19th century, private hunt clubs owned most of the land on the Currituck Outer Banks. In 1874 a group of wealthy Northeaster industrialists build the Lighthouse Club just south of here. In the 1920s Edward Collings Knight Jr. and his new wife, Marie-Louise Lebel, purchased the Lighthouse Club property and, for $383,000, built the house you see today. The Knights had the old club house torn down and a waterway dredged around . . . — Map (db m10690) HM
North Carolina (Currituck County), Corolla — The Whalehead Club Restoration
After second owner Ray T. Adams died in 1957, the Whalehead Club was used as a summer boy's school, housed a rocket fuel testing facility, and was proposed for resort development. With restoration in mind, Currituck County purchased the club in 1992, and by 1994 owned the surrounding 39 acres. By the time the county acquired the property, the main house had holes in the roof and the flooded basement teemed with snakes. Aggressive restoration began in the spring of 1999. The copper roof . . . — Map (db m10691) HM
North Carolina (Currituck County), Corolla — Waterfowl Resting Area
The Knights did not choose this location for their hunting retreat randomly. It sits on the Atlantic Flyway, a primary migratory route for waterfowl. Currituck, as in Currituck County, comes from the Native American work carotank or "land of the wild goose". The Currituck Sound is eight miles wide in places, very shallow, and ringed with reeds that give shelter and aquatic grasses that provide food for migrating birds. In the past the number of waterfowl attracted here each winter soared . . . — Map (db m10719) HM
North Carolina (Currituck County), Corolla — A-33 — Wreck Of The Metropolis
Steamer ran aground, Jan. 31, 1878, killing 85. Tragedy prompted improvements in the U.S. Lifesaving Service. Remains are 3/5 mi. SE. — Map (db m9668) HM
North Carolina (Currituck County), Currituck — Currituck County CourthouseConfederate Recruiting Center
Currituck has been the county government seat since 1723. The core of the present courthouse to the right and jail in front of you were here when the Civil War began. On March 31, 1862, the “Currituck Light Cavalry” began enlisting on the grounds under Capt. Demosthenes Bell. The company was assigned as Co. G to Col. Dennis D. Ferebee’s 4th North Carolina Cavalry, 59th Regiment North Carolina State Troops. Because of the importance of water for military transportation and the . . . — Map (db m2764) HM
North Carolina (Currituck County), Currituck — Currituck County Old Jail
Thursday the 31st December 1767 "On motion the following Bills were ordered to be read ... A Bill to impower the justices of Currituck County to build a prison pillary and stocks in the said county on the lot were the Court House stands for the use of the said county, in the Upper House read the third time and passed. Ordered to be engrossed." The construction date of the "Old Currituck Jail" remains uncertain. Though there was mention of a jail as early as 1767 when the general . . . — Map (db m9468) HM
North Carolina (Currituck County), Jarvisburg — A-6 — Thomas J. Jarvis
Governor, 1879 - 1885; Minister to Brazil; U.S. Senator; was born in a house which stood here. — Map (db m9498) HM
North Carolina (Currituck County), Knotts Island — A-15 — Dividing Line — ···
Commissioners drove the first stake for the Virgina - Carolina boundary, Mar. 18, 1728, three miles N. E. across Currituck Sound. — Map (db m11286) HM
North Carolina (Currituck County), Knotts Island — Knotts IslandSalts Works Center
During the Civil War, salt—essential for the preservation of meat—was vitally important to the massive Union and Confederate armies. Currituck County's location was ideal for salt works, and Knotts Island's residents made salt both here and across the sound on the Outer Banks. Local resident Henry Ansell wrote of accompanying his uncle, John Beasley, to recover two salt pans that a storm had buried and later uncovered. Beasley claimed that he had boiled salt under the islands cedar . . . — Map (db m76552) HM
North Carolina (Currituck County), Maple — Maple LeafA Great Escape
Currituck County played a vital role in a prisoner-of-war escape in 1863. At 1:30 P.M. on June 10, the troop-transport steamer Maple Leaf sailed from Fort Monroe, Va., for Fort Delaware, carrying 97 captured Confederate officers bound for the prisoner-of-war camp at Johnson’s Island in Ohio. Two hours later, the prisoners overpowered the twelve-man guard and took over the ship, then escaped in small boats south of Cape Henry. About thirty officers, most of them wounded, remained aboard . . . — Map (db m56981) HM
North Carolina (Currituck County), Moycock — MoycockShingle Landing
Currituck Sound and the surrounding area were under Union control by 1863. Local farmers and merchants sought permission from Federal authorities to sell their produce in Norfolk. They followed this route to the city. Union Gen. Henry M. Naglee, commander of the military district, was willing to accommodate them, but he also wanted to eliminate “guerilla” activity in the area and prevent the smuggling of contraband supplies to the Confederates. He issued orders in July and August . . . — Map (db m56982) HM
North Carolina (Currituck County), Moyock — A-16 — Dividing Line
In 1728 the Virginia-Carolina boundary was first surveyed from the Atlantic coast to a spot two hundred twenty miles west of here. — Map (db m2762) HM
North Carolina (Currituck County), Moyock — A-59 — Joseph Pilmoor
Preached first Methodist sermon in colony, 1772, at Currituck Courthouse. Pilmoor Memorial Methodist Church is near the site. About 300 ft. north. — Map (db m2763) HM
North Carolina (Currituck County), Point Harbor — Currituck SoundAvenue of War
For many years before the war, Currituck Sound was a busy avenue of commerce sheltered from the Atlantic Ocean by the Outer Banks. Vessels carried produce and goods between North Carolina and Virginia. After hostilities began, the sound became strategically important for both the Union and Confederate navies and armies. On June 9, 1861, Confederate Gen. Walter Gwynn, commander of the coastal defenses, urged Currituck County’s citizens to send both enslaved and free black laborers to build . . . — Map (db m56980) HM
North Carolina (Currituck County), Shawboro — A-62 — Henry M. Shaw
Member N.C. Assembly and U.S. Congress. Confederate colonel. Killed in attack on New Bern, Feb. 1, 1864. Home & grave about 150 feet West. — Map (db m9507) HM
North Carolina (Currituck County), Shawboro — IndiantownChasing “Guerrillas”
Indiantown, a commercial center with a shipyard, store, and mill, became a focal point for military activity during the Civil War. On June 10, 1862, U.S. Navy Lt. Charles W. Flusser led several gunboats up the North River to capture a prominent secessionist here and seize the schooner Scuppernong with a load of oak timber bound for a Confederate shipyard. He burned the vessel and its cargo nearby. John Boushell had built the ship in 1853 as a Dismal Swamp Canal schooner. Under owner S.S. . . . — Map (db m56814) HM
North Carolina (Currituck County), Shawboro — A-66 — McKnight’s Shipyard
Thomas McKnight, colonial merchant and legislator; Loyalist during Revolution. Operated large shipyard which stood near here. — Map (db m2765) HM
North Carolina (Currituck County), Shawboro — A-47 — Yeopim
Reservation established for Yeopim Indians in 1704; sold after 1739. Northern boundary nearby; village was 2 miles S.E. — Map (db m2766) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Buxton — B32 — Billy Mitchell
Brigadier general of the Army Air Service, demonstrated air power by bombing battleships off coast, Sept. 5, 1923. Landing field was here. — Map (db m20347) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Buxton — B-54 — Cape Hatteras Lighthouse — ···
Tallest brick lighthouse in nation at 208 feet. Constructed, 1869~1870, to mark Diamond Shoals. Replaced 1802 structure. — Map (db m29950) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Buxton — B-41 — Diamond Shoals — ···
"Graveyard of Atlantic." German submarines sank over 100 ships here, 1941~ 42, in the "Battle of Torpedo   Junction." Shoals are 3 mi. south. — Map (db m11400) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Buxton — Life at the Light
There have been words written to the effect that the lighthouse keepers and their families had a very lonely life; however, we did not have this experience. In fact, just the opposite would be more apt to apply. The lighthouse was always a favorite place to visit by the village folk so we would have lots of company, especially on Sunday afternoons and the evening hours, when the heat of summer was unbearable in the wooded areas of the villages. Swimming, baseball games, croquet, chasing wild . . . — Map (db m32225) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Buxton — PaukenschlagOperation Drumbeat
"The losses by submarines off our Atlantic seaboard and in the Caribbean now threaten our entire war effort." Chief of Staff George C. Marshall, 19 June, 1942 During the first six months of 1942, these beaches revealed crude oil, twisted metal, and corpses from the Atlantic Ocean. The grisly flotsam was evidence of War's toll imposed by Unterseeboote ("U-boats") of the German Navy. Paukenschlag was the first of these campaigns undertaken by Germany to strike a devastating blow on the . . . — Map (db m32129) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Buxton — B-53 — Radio Milestone — ···
From near here in 1902 R. A. Fessenden sent the first musical notes ever relayed by radio waves. Received 48 miles north. — Map (db m11402) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Buxton — B-50 — U.S.S. Monitor — ···
Fought C.S.S. "Virginia" ("Merrimac")   in   first battle of ironclad ships. Lost Dec. 31, 1862, in gale 17 miles southeast. First marine sanctuary. — Map (db m11401) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Duck — Powder Ridge Club
This club stands as one of the last traces of Duck's rich waterfowl heritage. Built by Wall Street brokers in the 1920's and operated through the 1940's. Distinctive to this club was a unique set of whalebones adorning the front; garnering it the nickname "The Whalebone Club." Betty and Duck Braithwaite purchased the club and it became known as Duck's Cottage. Their children preserved it as a testament to the great era of waterfowl hunting along the shores of the Carrituck Sound. — Map (db m75374) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Frisco — Mitchell Demonstrates Air Power
In September 1923, Brigadier General Mitchell provided a chilling view of the effectiveness of aerial bombardment on surface vessels to skeptical government and military observers. Taking off from his temporary Hatteras Village airfield, Mitchell rendezvoused with Martin Bombers from Langley Field, Virginia. Equipped with newly developed bombsights and supercharged engines, the bombers quickly sank the obsolete battleships "Virginia" and "New Jersey" anchored just 20 miles off the Hatteras . . . — Map (db m20353) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Hatteras — America's 1st Attempt at Civil War Reunification
Orchestrated by Union Colonel Rush C. Hawkins, the Hatteras Convention was held nearby on November 18, 1861. The state's secession was declared null and void, Hatteras was proclaimed the capitol and Marble Nash Taylor became provisional governor. Taylor called for a special Congressional election held November 28 but, Charles Henry Foster's unanimous election by the four island precincts was ignored by the 37th United States Congress. Abraham Lincoln's May 28, 1862 selection of Edward Stanley . . . — Map (db m46095) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Hatteras — Burnside's Expedition Crossing Hatteras Bar/The Burnside Expedition at Hatteras Inlet
Side A:Burnside's Expedition Crossing Hatteras BarOn January 11, 1862, the Burnside Expedition left for Fort Monroe, Virginia destined for Hatteras Inlet 120 miles to the south. Two days later, the fleet of over eighty vessels was struck by a strong Northeaster while crossing Hatteras Bar. Reassembling the fleet in Pamlico Sound was delayed until the month's end due to frequently stormy weather. Among the ships lost were the Pocohontas, Grapeshot and City of New York. The . . . — Map (db m46171) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Hatteras — B-38 — Confederate Forts
Fort Hatteras and Fort Clark, 2 miles s.west, fell to Union troops on Aug. 29, 1861, after two days of heavy naval bombardment. — Map (db m67576) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Hatteras — Flagship USS Minnesota/Hotel de Afrique
Side A:Flagship USS MinnesotaUSS Minnesota, a wooden steam frigate built in 1855, was the flagship for the Atlantic Blockading Squadron commanded by Flag Officer Silas H. Stringham. Seven United States Navy warships bombarded Forts Hatteras and Clark, August 28-29, 1861. This was the first time the United States Navy employed the tactic of having ships sail in a single oval formation. Using Stringham's innovative maneuver, the fleet rained down a continuous barrage of several . . . — Map (db m46190) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Hatteras — Fort Clark/The Bombardment of Fort Hatteras
Side A:Fort ClarkHatteras Inlet, defended by Forts Clark and Hatteras, was a strategic port of entry for troops and supplies providing deep water access to the vital intercoastal waterways. In later May of 1881, the Federal Blockade Board of Strategy began implementing General Winfield Scott's "Anaconda Plan" intending to constrict the South's warfare capability. Initially, they regarded the "...sterile, half drowned shores of North Carolina" as unimportant; less than one month . . . — Map (db m46298) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Hatteras — Maritime Casualties of the American Civil War/Loss of the USS Monitor
Side A:Maritime Casualties of the American Civil WarAfterJan. 15, 1862 - The Graveyard of the Atlantic claims the lives of Colonel J.W. Allen and Surgeon Weller, officers of the 9th N.J. Volunteers, and the second mate of the Ann E. Thompson. Dec. 31, 1862 - USS Monitor: N.K. Attwater, G. Frederickson, R.W. Hands, S.A. Lewis, W. Allen, W. Bryan, R. Cook, W.H. Eagan, J.R. Fenwick, R.H. Howard, T. Joyce, G. Littlefield, D. Moore, J. Nicklis, J. Stocking, R. Williams. USS Rhode . . . — Map (db m32134) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Kill Devil Hills — 12 Seconds that Changed the World
After more than four years of hard work and experimentation, it only took the Wright brothers 12 seconds to change the world. On December 17, 1903, at 10:35, Orville Wright made the world’s first controlled, powered, heavier-than-air flight. The photograph that documented the Wrights’ success was taken by John T. Daniels, a Kill Devil Hills Life Saving Station surfman, who had never used a camera before. It was not until the Wright brothers returned to Dayton, Ohio, that they developed the . . . — Map (db m10181) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Kill Devil Hills — A hospitable people...
If you decide to try your machine here...you will find a hospitable people... William J. Tate, Kitty Hawk Postmaster, in a letter to Wilbur Wright dated August 18, 1900 Wilbur and Orville Wright accepted Tate’s invitation and found that the Outer Banks of North Carolina not only provided hospitable people but also the conditions that they needed to fly – wind, sand, and solitude. While solitude was important to get the work done, the Wrights did not work . . . — Map (db m10183) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Kill Devil Hills — Big Kill Devil Hill26 Acres of Shifting Sand
Before construction of the memorial could begin, it would be necessary to stabilize the dune from which the Wright Brothers conducted their glider experiments. Twenty-five years of steady winds had moved Big Kill Devil Hill 450 feet southwest of its 1903 location. The U.S. Army Engineers, using exotic and native grasses and a covering of wood mold, succeeded in stabilizing the "shifting" dune. The Hill stands still now - supporting a monument to man's greatest dream. — Map (db m9768) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Kill Devil Hills — Dare County's Tribute to Veterans
[Center Panel]: “By your courage in tribulation, by your cheerfulness before the dirty devices of this world, you have won the love of those who have watched you.” - Guy Chapman Dedicated: November 11, 1991. [Left Panel]: To all who’ve stood tall for freedom Those of us who’ve never served can’t truly understand the sacrifices that you made protecting life and land. You were called from homes and jobs. You never turned around. You did more . . . — Map (db m9631) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Kill Devil Hills — Experiments
On the slope of Kill Devil Hill to the left, the Wright brothers experimented with gliders in the period 1900 - 1903. Here also Wilbur Wright failed in an attempted power-driven flihgt, December 14, 1903. After just 3½ seconds in the air the Wrights' flying machine stalled and settled to the ground. Two days were needed for repairs. Then the stage was set for the successful flight of December 17. — Map (db m10179) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Kill Devil Hills — Field for Flight
"Isn't it astonishing that all these secrets have been preserved for so many years just so that we could discover them!!" Orville Wright, June 7, 1903 — Map (db m9770) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Kill Devil Hills — Four Powered Flights
The Wright brothers made four successful sustained powered flights the morning of December 17, 1903. The commemorative granite boulder and replica monorail mark the lift-off point of those four flights, the numbered markers the terminating point. Since soft sand prohibited launching with conventional wheels, the Wright Flyer was placed on a 60-foot monorail with its landing skids resting on a wheeled truck. Once the engine started, the Flyer was released and slid down the rail until . . . — Map (db m9769) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Kill Devil Hills — Kill Devil Hills
"...the sand fairly blinds us. It blows across the ground in clouds. We certainly can't complain of the place. We came down here for wind and sand, and we got them." Letter from Orville Wright to Katharine Wright, October 18, 1900 "The practice ground at the Kill Devil Hills consists of a level plain of bare sand, from which rises a group of detached hills or mounds formed of sand heaped up by the winds. These hills are constantly changing in height and slope, . . . — Map (db m10146) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Kill Devil Hills — Kill Devil Hills Fire Rescue Memorial
This memorial is placed in tribute and to honor all of the Kill Devil Hills fire and rescue personnel who have and continue to faithfully and honorably serve the citizens and visitors of Kill Devil Hills Dedicated this 11 day of September 2002 — Map (db m9595) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Kill Devil Hills — Monument to the Impossible
The Best Design Design competition among 35 entrants was won by Rogers and Poor, a New York Architectural firm. The 60-foot tower, similar to those used to mark courses in air races, embellished with wings on its side and a five-point star serving as the base, was to symbolize man’s conquest of the air. No Simple Task Designed with paper and pencil, it became an entirely different matter to carve 80 tons of solid granite. Using hand and pneumatic tools, the Mount Airy . . . — Map (db m9715) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Kill Devil Hills — Pitch, Roll and Yaw
At the turn of the century, this large hill and the three hills surrounding it were known as the Kill Devil Hills. Wilbur and Orville Wright performed thousands of experimental glider flights here between 1900 and 1903. The culminatino of those tests, a glider performing a simple turn, unlocked the secrets of controlled flight. With this flight, the three axes of control were mastered and the age of aviation was at hand. — Map (db m9767) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Kill Devil Hills — The 1901 Glider
"Our first experiments were rather disappointing. The machine ... at times seemed to be entirely beyond control." Orville Wright in a letter to his sister Katharine, July 28, 1901 The 1901 experiments at Kill Devil Hills were considered a failure. Orville later recalled Wilbur, on the trip back home to Dayton, stating in frustration, "Not within a thousand years would man ever fly!" Map (db m10149) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Kill Devil Hills — The 1902 Glider
"Our new machine is a very great improvement over anything we had built before and over anything any one has built." Letter from Wilbur Wright to his father, October 2, 1902 The Wrights' experiments with the successful 1902 Glider solved most of the problems in achieving stability, lift and control, and set the course for the 1903 first powered flight. Their basic paten was on the control mechanisms of this glider. — Map (db m10150) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Kill Devil Hills — The 1903 Flyer
"A couple of small boys, who had come with the men from the station, made a hurried departure over the hill for home on hearing the engine start." Orville Wright, diary D. December 14, 1903 Determined to achieve powered flight before returning to Dayton, the Wright brothers focused on the assembly of the Flyer. A cracked propeller shaft, constant repairs to the machine, and lack of winds delayed their trials at powered flight. — Map (db m10151) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Kill Devil Hills — The Camp
"We intend to be comfortable while we are here." Wilbur Wright, November 23, 1903 These replica buildings mark the location of the Wright brothers' hangar (left) and living quarters (right) of their 1903 Kill Devil Hills Camp. They also established camps at this spot in 1901 and 1902. — Map (db m32120) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Kill Devil Hills — The Conquest of the Air
In commemoration of the conquest of the air… Excerpt from the inscription on the monument atop Big Kill Devil Hill From its establishment as a national monument in 1927 to the First Flight Centennial of 2003, the local people of the Outer Banks have shown “dauntless resolution and unconquerable faith” in honoring and recognizing the first flight of the Wright brothers. The Kill Devil Hills Memorial Association, later to become the First Flight . . . — Map (db m10185) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Kill Devil Hills — The First Flight
"The flight lasted only 12 seconds, but nevertheless the first in the history of the world in which a machine carrying a man had raised itself by its own power into full flight, had sailed forward without reduction of speed, and had finally landed at a point as high as that from which it had started." Orville Wright, 1903 The first flight, December 17, 1903, 10:35 a.m., 120 feet in 12 seconds. Orville Wright is at the controls, lying prone on the lower wing. Running alongside to . . . — Map (db m31994) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Kill Devil Hills — The First Flight
The First Flight-From a 60-foot wooden track laid on these sands Orville Wright rose into the wind on the morning of December 17, 1903. It was the first time in history that “a machine carrying a man had raised itself by its own power into the air in full flight, had sailed forward without reduction of speed, and had finally landed at a point as high as that from which it started.” The flight lasted about twelve seconds. — Map (db m62511) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Kill Devil Hills — The First Successful Flight of an Airplane
was made from this spot by Orville Wright December 17, 1903, in a machine designed and built by Wilbur Wright and Orville Wright This tablet was erected by the National Aeronautic Association of the U.S.A. December 17, 1928 to commemmorate the twenty-fifth anniversary of this event — Map (db m9745) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Kill Devil Hills — B-4 — Wright Brothers
On December 17, 1093, from site near foot of Kill Devil Hill, Orville and Wilbur Wright made first successful powered flight 1/5 mile west. — Map (db m9714) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Kill Devil Hills — Wright Brothers National Memorial
Wilbur Wright Orville Wright In commemoration of the conquest of the air by the brothers Wilbur and Orville Wright. Conceived by Genius. Achieved by dauntless resolution and unconquerable faith. — Map (db m10380) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Kitty Hawk — Monument to a Century of Flight
[Marker Front]: Dedicated on November 8, 2003 In celebration of the soaring of the human spirit Created by artists Glen Eure, Hanna Jubran, Jodi Hollnagel Jubran Architect - Benjamin B. Cahoon and presented as an enduring legacy by Icarus International, Inc. Founders: Glen Eure • Denver Lindley, Jr. • Nancy Tarnai Board of Directors: President - William J. Kealy • Vice President - Ellen Kealy • Treasurer - Donald W. Bryan • Secretary - Pat . . . — Map (db m10126) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Kitty Hawk — Take a Boy Fishing in North Carolina
945 lb. Atlantic Blue Marlin 6th largest on record when caught on July 28, 1983 aboard the Carolinian Oregon Inlet, NC Captain Tony Tillett, Mate Bull Tolson Angler Zak Garcia, age 14 of Southern Shores, NC Time of fight: Approximately 1 hour Length: 14’2” Girth: 72” Zak's Crew: Mickey Hayes · Southern Shores, NC Ralph English · Altavista, VA Dave Farkas · Fort Lauderdale, FL Lou Thomason · Virginia Beach, VA — Map (db m76650) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Kitty Hawk — Wright Brothers' Memorial
[Marker Front]: On this spot Sept. 17, 1900 Wilbur Wright began the assembly of the Wright Brothers' first experimental glider which led to man's conquest of the air. [Marker Back]: Sept. 17, 1987 This is a reproduction of the Wright Brother's Memorial Marker placed on this site by the Citizens of Kitty Hawk on May 2, 1928 — Map (db m9625) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Manns Harbor — B-52 — Fort Forrest — ···
Confederate, mounting seven guns. Protected west side of Croatan Sound. Destroyed on Feb. 8, 1862. Earthworks stood 1 mile N. — Map (db m11339) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Manns Harbor — Purple Martin Bridge Roost
(panel 1) Welcome to Manns Harbor Purple Martin Bridge Roost The Outer Banks of North Carolina are famous for beautiful beaches and other natural attractions, including a fascinating roost of purple martins here at William B. Umstead Memorial Bridge. East of the Rocky Mountains, martins are completely dependent on people to provide them with nesting structures in which to raise their young. Without their caring “landlords,” these birds would likely become very . . . — Map (db m57094) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Manteo — B-44 — Andrew Cartwright
Agent of the American Colonization Society in Liberia, founded the A. M. E. Zion Churches in Albemarle area. His first church, 1865, near here. — Map (db m9462) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Manteo — BB-4 — Battle of Roanoke Island
At 3 P.M. February 7, 1862, Union forces under Gen. Ambrose Burnside landed at Ashby Harbor (A). By midnight 7,500 Federals were ashore. A Confederate force of 400 men and 3 field-pieces was sent to resist the Federal landing. The Confederates were driven away by gunfire from the Federal fleet in Croatan Sound (B). The Confederates withdrew north along the only road on the island (C), situated a little to the west of the present State Highway 345 (D), across which a line of breastworks had . . . — Map (db m11386) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Manteo — Bondage
and they made their lives bitter with hard bondage           Exodus 1:14 For the millions of immigrants to this land, America has not been so much a destination as a promise: a promise of equality, a promise of self-determination and a promise of a better life for self and children. Not so for the slave. With their arrival at the Jamestown colony in August of 1619, twenty captive Africans began a legacy of chattel bondage that by 1860 would include 15 states, 4 . . . — Map (db m9670) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Manteo — Bowser Family Cemetery
This marker recognizes the final resting place of Spencer Bowser, the patriarch of a prominent African American family in North Carolina. Also buried here are several other members of the Bowser family, including J.P. Bowser, Lloyd B. Bowser, Q.B. Bowser, L.C. Bowser, Naomi Augusta Collins, Reginald Mahew Collins, and William C. Bowser, who was a "surfman" at the Pea Island Station of the United States Life Saving Service, the only station manned entirely by African Americans in this division of the United States Coast Guard. — Map (db m57026) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Manteo — Burnside Expedition of 1862
Much of coastal North Carolina fell to Union forces in 1862. For the duration of the Civil War Northern troops kept a sizable presence in the area. The peculiar geography of the Outer Banks and the sounds region, a damper to antebellum trade, proved indefensible for the outnumbered and poorly equipped Confederates. Under Maj. Gen. Ambrose Burnside, a Rhode Islander, Union forces swept across the region, rolling up one victory after another. In August 1861 Confederate Forts Hatteras and . . . — Map (db m56925) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Manteo — BBB 3 — Confederate Channel Obstructions
Wood pilings placed to stop Federal fleet in Croatan Sound, still visible at low tide. Remains are 2½ mi. W. — Map (db m4875) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Manteo — Deliverance
Thus saith the Lord, Let my people go.           Exodus 8:1 The bloodbath called the Civil War had begun and would cost the lives of over 600,000 Americans. As the Union armies advanced south, refugee slaves followed. After the Northern capture of Roanoke Island in February 1862, more than 3,000 ex-slaves arrived on the island. At the direction of Maj. Gen. John G. Foster, Army chaplain Horace James organized a formal colony with one-acre lots provided for about 600 . . . — Map (db m9669) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Manteo — B-1 — First English Colonies
Explored in 1584. Site of first English settlements in new world, 1585-1587. Birthplace of Virginia Dare, first child born of English parents in America. — Map (db m11343) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Manteo — First Light of FreedomThe Freedmen’s Colony of Roanoke Island — National Underground Railroad - Network To Freedom
[obverse:]First Light of Freedom Former slaves give thanks by the creek’s edge at the sight of the island - “If you can cross the creek to Roanoke Island, you will find ‘safe haven’.” [rendering of Edwin Forbes' "The Sanctuary"] [reverse:] The Freedmen’s Colony of Roanoke Island 1862–1867 A year after the Civil War began, Roanoke Island fell to Union Forces. Word spread throughout North Carolina that slaves could find “safe . . . — Map (db m46990) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Manteo — BBB 2 — Fort Bartow
Confederate earth fort mounting nine guns. Bombarded by Federal fleet February 7, 1862. Earthworks 2 ½ mi. W. — Map (db m4874) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Manteo — B-64 — Fort Blanchard
Confederate earth fort mounting four guns. Smallest on Roanoke Island. Surrendered on Feb. 8, 1862. Earthworks are 300 yds. S. — Map (db m4863) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Manteo — B-2 — Fort Huger
Principal Confederate fort on Roanoke Island. Mounted twelve guns. Surrendered Feb. 8, 1862. Earthworks are 100 yards south. — Map (db m4862) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Manteo — Naval Battle of Roanoke Island
During late January, 1862, a Federal land-sea expedition assembled at Hatteras Inlet to take Roanoke Island and capture control of the North Carolina Sound region. This force was under the joint command of General Ambrose Burnside and navy Flag-Officer Louis Goldsborough. After several delays due to bad weather, the Union fleet, consisting of numerous troop transports and more than 20 war vessels, arrived at the southern end of Roanoke Island. On February 7, 1862, Federal warships (O) bombarded . . . — Map (db m4828) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Manteo — B-26 — R. A. Fessenden
Inventor. Pioneer in radio communication, conducted wireless experiments, 1901-02, from a station, 600 yds. S. W. — Map (db m9513) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Manteo — Red Wolf Country
(panel 1) Welcome to Red Wolf Country Northeastern North Carolina is Famous for the Outer Banks with its beautiful beaches, but the region has plenty of other natural attractions. Just a short drive inland, you’ll find many more places to appreciate nature and the areas diverse wildlife – including a fascinating animal found nowhere else in the world, the red wolf. Hearing is Believing Red wolves are shy and tend to avoid humans, so your best bet for . . . — Map (db m57095) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Manteo — Roanoke Marshes LighthouseCelebrating Manteo's Centennial, 1899 - 1999
"In the years to come, as islanders mingle with visitors along the Manteo waterfront, let us remember that on this spot, where so many vessels have been built and launched, dreams still light the way. For how else can you explain how a lighthouse now casts its reassuring beam into the night sky, where the Town's wastewater treatment plant once stood? Safeguarding the environment, honoring our past, and dreaming of a brighter future is Manteo's shining path." - From a letter by Mayor John . . . — Map (db m47013) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Manteo — Spirit of Roanoke Island
Recreating History The Spirit of Roanoke Island, completed in 2000 by volunteers of the North Carolina Maritime Museum on Roanoke Island, is a fine example of the shad boat. A traditional work boat built of juniper (Atlantic white cedar) and fastened with copper rivets, she carries a sprit mainsail, jib and topsail. Volunteers and the public alike learned about this innovative design firsthand, by building the shad boat through a "hands-on history" experience. They used . . . — Map (db m47026) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Manteo — The New Fort in Virginia / Virginia Dare
On this site, in July – August, 1585 (O.S.), colonists, sent out from England by Sir Walter Raleigh, built a fort, called by them “The New Fort in Virginia” These colonists were the first settlers of the English race in America. They returned to England in July, 1586, with Sir Francis Drake. Near this place was born, on the 18th of August, 1587, Virginia Dare, the first child of English Parents born in America – daughter of Ananias Dare and Eleanor White, . . . — Map (db m9460) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Manteo — The Promised Land
I have caused thee to see it with thine eyes, but thou shalt not go over thither.           Deuteronomy 34:4 The Proclamation of Emancipation gave the military authority to enlist “Such persons of suitable condition…into the armed service of the United States” and the Bureau of Colored Troops was established. Many African-Americans served with distinction. Despite the promise and participation, African-Americans, in many instances, would continue to be . . . — Map (db m9671) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Manteo — USLSS/USCG Station Pea Island Memorial1880 - 1947 — [Richard Etheridge, 1842 - 1900]
Located south of Oregon Inlet, Lifesaving Station Pea Island was the only unit in the history of the Coast Guard manned by all Black crews. This marker is dedicated to the crews of Pea Island who risked their lives and endured so that others might live. — Map (db m48610) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Nags Head — Bodie Island Light Station
Bodie Island Light Station has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places by the United States Department of the Interior — Map (db m47028) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Nags Head — B-60 — Port Ferdinando — ···
Roanoke voyages, 1585~1590, based operations at inlet near here. Long closed, it was named for pilot Simon Fernandes. — Map (db m11395) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Nags Head — B-31 — The Wreck of the Huron
Near this spot, Nov. 24, 1877, the U.S.S. "Huron" ran ashore with loss of ninety-eight lives. — Map (db m9667) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Nags Head — B-31 — Wreck of the U.S.S. Huron
Steamer ran aground on November 24, 1877, near here, killing 98. Tragedy led to improvements in U.S. Lifesaving Service. — Map (db m67608) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Pea Island — B-66 — Pea Island Lifesavers
Only U.S. Lifesaving Station manned by black crew. Led by Richard Etheridge, 1880-1900. Operated near here. — Map (db m46140) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Rodanthe — B-30 — "Mirlo" Rescue — ···
A German submarine sank the British tanker "Mirlo" off coast nearby, Aug. 16, 1918. Coast Guard, led by J. A. Midgett, saved most of the crew. — Map (db m11394) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Rodanthe — The Chicamacomico Races / Exodus from Chicamacomico
The Chicamacomico Races Soon after the capture of Hatteras Inlet, Union Colonel Rush C. Hawkins anticipated an assault to dislodge his troops from their new foothold on Hatteras Island. He dispatched 600 troops of the 20th Indiana Regiment from Fort Hatteras to Camp Live Oak, two miles south of here. On October 1, 1861, Captain William A. Lynch of the Confederate Navy, commanding the "Mosquito Fleet," seized the USS Fanny in Pamlico Sound. Three days later, the fleet returned to . . . — Map (db m11489) HM
North Carolina (Dare County), Salvo — The FannyFirst Capture of a Federal Vessel During the Civil War
Late in the afternoon of October 1st, 1861, the Confederate steamers Raleigh, Junaluska and Curlew engaged and seized the Union tug Fanny three miles west of here. Her ammunition and supplies, intended for 600 Union soldiers camped at Chicamacomico near Loggerhead Inlet, were instead delivered to the Confederate troops at Roanoke Island. Pressed into Confederate service, the Fanny returned to the Union camp three days later as part of the “Mosquito . . . — Map (db m20426) HM
North Carolina (Davidson County), Churchland — Trading Ford
General Nathanael Greene in his masterly retreat from the British army under Lord Cornwallis, crossed the Yadkin at Trading Ford, one-half mile southeast of this spot, February 2-3, 1781. A sudden rise in the river prevented the passage of the British and permitted the American army to escape and prepare for the Battle of Guilford Court House. — Map (db m43430) HM
North Carolina (Davidson County), Lexington — Captain Benjamin Merrill
Sacrificed his life for the cause of regulators. Was executed by officials of the Crown, June 19, 1771. Home was 8 miles south. — Map (db m34379) HM
North Carolina (Davidson County), Lexington — City of LexingtonIncorporated 1828
Named during the Revolutionary War in 1775 after the Battle of Lexington. — Map (db m34388) HM
North Carolina (Davidson County), Lexington — Daniel Boone and Gen. Nathanael Greene
In 1750, Daniel Boone, age 16, came with his father from Pennsylvania and settled near Boone’s Ford on Yadkin River, then in Rowan, now Davidson County. Near this spot, in 1781, the American Army under Gen. Nathanael Greene passed on its way from Trading Ford to fight the British under Lord Cornwallis at Guilford Court House. — Map (db m34377) HM
North Carolina (Davidson County), Lexington — Lexington in the Civil WarOccupation and Fire
President Jefferson Davis and his entourage paused here in Lexington on April 16-17, 1865, as the Confederate government fled south after the April 3 evacuation of Richmond, Virginia. While here, Davis telegraphed Gen. Joseph E. Johnston as to the whereabouts of Secretary of War John C. Breckinridge. The Civil War essentially ended after Johnston surrendered the forces under his command to Union Gen. William T. Sherman at Bennett Place near Durham on April 26, 1865. Officers belonging to the . . . — Map (db m34182) HM
North Carolina (Davidson County), Lexington — K 44 — Old Davidson County Courthouse
Completed 1858. Interior was burned, 1865, rebuilt ca. 1867. Fine example of Classical Revival style. — Map (db m34184) HM
North Carolina (Davidson County), Lexington — Our Confederate Dead
Erected by The Robert E. Lee Chapter Daughters of the Confederacy No. 324 Sept. 14, 1905. [ Back of Monument: ] Sleep sweetly in your humble graves. Sleep martyrs of a fallen cause. For lo, a marble column craves the pilgrim here to pause. 1861 – 65. — Map (db m34392) HM
North Carolina (Davidson County), Lexington — K 49 — Pilgrim Church
Established ca. 1757 as German Reformed. Known early as Leonard's Church. Fourth Building to occupy site stands 3/8 mi. NW. — Map (db m70026) HM
North Carolina (Davidson County), Lexington — The HomesteadUnexpected Houseguests
The Homestead was the home of Dr. William R. Holt, one of antebellum North Carolina’s most versatile and talented men, with interests in medicine, agriculture, education, religion, transportation, and manufacturing. In May 1865, when Dr. Holt learned that Federal forces were approaching Lexington, he left to secure his plantation, Linwood, while his wife, Louisa Holt, remained here with their children. Union Gen. H. Judson Kilpatrick and the 9th Pennsylvania Cavalry soon arrived in Lexington to . . . — Map (db m34190) HM
North Carolina (Davidson County), Lexington — K 56 — Wm. Rainey Holt
Physician. Advocate of scientific agriculture. His plantation “Linwood” was 6 miles southwest. Built home here, 1834. — Map (db m34193) HM
North Carolina (Davidson County), Linwood — K 15 — Stoneman’s Raid
Southern troops turned back Stoneman’s U. S. Cavalry, raiding through western North Carolina, at the Yadkin River Bridge, April 12, 1865 — Map (db m33927) HM
North Carolina (Davidson County), Reeds Crossroads — George Washington Boulder
George Washington Boulder On this rock President George Washington rested and ate dinner, enroute from Salisbury to Winston-Salem May 31, 1791 Erected by Gen Wm. Davidson Chapter D.A.R. Lexington N.C. 1926 — Map (db m55238) HM
North Carolina (Davidson County), Reeds Crossroads — K-24 — Yadkin College
A Methodist Protestant institution. Opened in 1856, made co-educational in 1878, closed in 1924. Building stands 1 mi. N — Map (db m55064) HM
North Carolina (Davidson County), Thomasville — K 16 — Jefferson Davis
President Davis, fleeing southward after Lee’s surrender, with members of his cabinet spent the night of Apr. 16, 1865, in a pine grove nearby. — Map (db m33917) HM
North Carolina (Davidson County), Thomasville — K 32 — John H. Mills
First head of Oxford Orphanage (1873-1884) and Thomasville Baptist Orphanage (Mills Home), president Oxford Female College. Grave 100 yds. S. — Map (db m70024) HM
North Carolina (Davidson County), Thomasville — K 35 — John W. Thomas1800-1871
Founder of Thomasville. As legislator led fight for N.C. Railroads; friend of education. His home, Cedar Lodge, was nearby. — Map (db m70002) HM
North Carolina (Davidson County), Thomasville — John W. Thomas
Site of the home place of John W. Thomas Founder of the city of Thomasville, 1857
"John W. Thomas, the founder of Thomasville, lived in “a grand mansion” in the center of town, across the street from the town commons. The house was far back from the street and surrounded by oaks, cedars, some cherry trees and an iron picket fence." —From 1921 Chairtown news article — Map (db m70005) HM
North Carolina (Davidson County), Thomasville — NC Vietnam Veterans Memorial
The North Carolina Vietnam Veterans Memorial Park Dedicated to the 216,000 North Carolinians who served and the over 1,600 who sere killed or missing in the Vietnam War Memorial Day 1991 — Map (db m63387) WM
North Carolina (Davidson County), Thomasville — ThomasvilleCaring for the Sick and Wounded
During the Civil War, Thomasville became a hospital center that treated the sick and wounded, civilian and soldier alike. From 1862 to 1865, a local doctor, D. W. Smith, operated a smallpox hospital just outside of town. In March 1865, Surgeon Simon Baruch arrived in Thomasville with orders to prepare a “hospital depot” to serve sick and wounded Confederate soldiers in North Carolina. The need for such services had grown acute as Confederate forces under Gen. Joseph E. Johnston . . . — Map (db m34232) HM
North Carolina (Davidson County), Thomasville — ThomasvilleA Key Stop & Refuge
John W. Thomas, who represented this area in the state legislature in the mid-1800s, laid out the town of Thomasville in 1852 on the proposed route of the North Carolina Railroad. Three years later, the line was completed to the new town, and the first train passes through January 20, 1856. By 1860, Thomasville was thriving with 308 residents, a female seminary and a shoe factory. During the war, two companies, including the renowned “Thomasville Rifles” (Company B, 14th North . . . — Map (db m70006) HM WM
North Carolina (Davidson County), Thomasville — Thomasville City CemeteryUnion of Combatants
(Preface): John W. Thomas, who represented this area in the state legislature in the mid-1800s, laid out the town of Thomasville in 1852 on the proposed route of the North Carolina Railroad. Three years later, the line was completed to the new town, and the first train passed through on January 20, 1856. By 1860, Thomasville was thriving with 308 residents, a female seminary and a shoe factory. After the war, the town became noted for its furniture-making industry, especially chair . . . — Map (db m34234) HM
North Carolina (Davie County), Advance — M-44 — Cokesbury School
Short lived. The first Methodist school in North Carolina. Began about 1790. Was two miles east. — Map (db m55022) HM
North Carolina (Davie County), Advance — The Advance Academy
The Advance Academy Property deeded by F.M. Potts and Daniel Orrell in 1892 Academy established in 1893 Later became a public school operating until 1924 It is the largest Academy building still standing in Davie County — Map (db m55186) HM
North Carolina (Davie County), Mocksville — Boone MemorialThis Memorial Erected To — Daniel Boone | Squire and Sarah Boone
Daniel Boone Hunter, Explorer Backwoodsman, Soldir Surveyor Roadbuilder Legislator, Magistrate He lived and learned woodcraft in Davie County 1750-65

Squire and Sarah Boone Parents of Daniel Boone Pioneers of the Yadkin whose remains are interred one mile N W. in Joppa Graveyard Coming from PA 1749 — Map (db m53211) HM

North Carolina (Davie County), Mocksville — M-47 — Boone Tract
In 1753 Lord Granville granted 640 acres on Bear Creek to Squire Boone who sold it in 1759 to his son Daniel. This was a part of the original Boone tract. — Map (db m53197) HM
North Carolina (Davie County), Mocksville — Colonel Thomas W. Ferebee
Family Homesite Colonel Thomas W. Ferebee Bombardier, Enola Gay Dropped Atomic Bomb on Hiroshima, Japan August 6, 1945 — Map (db m55184) HM
North Carolina (Davie County), Mocksville — M-3 — Daniel Boone's Parents
Squire and Sarah Boone are buried here. Daniel Boone, 1734-1820, lived many years in this region. — Map (db m53190) HM
North Carolina (Davie County), Mocksville — Davie County in the Civil WarStoneman in Mocksville — Stoneman's Raid
(Preface): On March 24, 1865, Union Gen. George Stoneman led 6,000 cavalrymen from Tennessee into southwestern Virginia and western North Carolina to disrupt the Confederate supply line by destroying sections of the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad, the North Carolina Railroad, and the Piedmont Railroad. He struck at Boone on March 28, headed into Virginia on April 2, and returned to North Carolina a week later. Stoneman's Raid ended at Asheville on April 26, the day that Confederate . . . — Map (db m53207) HM
North Carolina (Davie County), Mocksville — Davie County War Memorial
front center Dedicated in Honor of All Davie County Veterans and to the Memory of Those Who Made the Supreme Sacrifice for Our Freedom front left Spanish American War (?) World War I (18) Vietnam (9) front left World War II (53) Korean War (2) Beirut (1) back Civil War (259 + 36) ...They Gave the Last Full Measure of Devotion. 1861 - 1865 — Map (db m55909) HM
North Carolina (Davie County), Mocksville — H. Andrew LagleA Half-Century of Service
Employee and Town Supervisor Volunteer. Fireman and Fire Chief. His extensive knowledge, expertise, and resourcefulness - His dedication and compelling sense of duty ably served the citizens of Mocksville. — Map (db m54052) HM
North Carolina (Davie County), Mocksville — M-33 — Hinton R. Helper
Author of The Impending Crisis, a bitterly controversial book which denounced slavery; U.S. Consul at Buenos Aires, 1861-66. Born 150 yds. N. — Map (db m53186) HM
North Carolina (Davie County), Mocksville — The Boone Family in Davie County
On 04 October 1750, Squire Boone received a Land Warrant and Survey for a 640-acre tract "lying...upon Grant's Creek, alias Lickon (Licking) Creek" in present Davie County. He received a grant for this 640 acres on the present Elisha and Dutchman creeks 30 April 1753 and a second grant on Bear Creek 29 December 1753. (A roadside marker locates this Bear Creek site on Highway 64 west.)

Eleven children of Squire and Sarah (Morgan) Boone all came and lived in present Davie County. They were . . . — Map (db m53219) HM

North Carolina (Davie County), Mocksville — The British Army
The British Army led by General Cornwallis crossed Dutchman's Creek at this point Feb. 6, 1781 — Map (db m75950) HM
North Carolina (Davie County), Reeds Crossroads — M-41 — Cooleemee
Fine example of "Anglo-Grecian Villa." Built on 4,000 acre plantation by Peter W. Hairston in 1855. House stands 1 mi. south. — Map (db m55180) HM
North Carolina (Duplin County), Warsaw — Duplin Old Courthouse Site
Erected 1754. Stood one mile north. Served until Sampson County was created from Duplin County in 1784. — Map (db m55496) HM
North Carolina (Duplin County), Warsaw — F-63 — Henry L. Stevens, Jr.1896–1971
Veterans leader. National Commander of American Legion, 1931–32; Superior Court judge, 1939–62. He lived 2 blocks north. — Map (db m28610) HM
North Carolina (Duplin County), Warsaw — F-26 — James Kenan
Revolutionary leader, member Provincial Congresses, conventions 1788, '89; militia brigadier general; trustee of University. Grave 2 mi. N. — Map (db m55497) HM
North Carolina (Duplin County), Warsaw — Veteran’s Memorial
Warsaw, N.C. is home to the oldest, continuous Veterans Day celebration in America. First held November 11, 1921 This WWII 155mm howitzer is placed in honor of all veterans who sacrificed for our freedom Erected in remembrance by Duplin County American Legions and friends — Map (db m39651) HM
North Carolina (Durham County), Durham — G-80 — Bennett Place
Farm home of James Bennett, where Confederate Gen. Joseph E. Johnston surrendered his army to Gen. William T. Sherman, April 26, 1865. Johnston’s surrender followed Lee’s at Appomattox by 17 days and ended the Civil War in the Carolinas, Georgia, and Florida. — Map (db m1495) HM
North Carolina (Durham County), Durham — Bennett PlaceThe End of War — Carolinas Campaign
(Preface, upper left) : The Carolinas Campaign began on February 1, 1865, when Union Gen. William T. Sherman led his army north from Savannah, Georgia, after the “March to the Sea.” Sherman’s objective was to join Gen. Ulysses S. Grant in Virginia to crush Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia. Scattered Confederate forces consolidated in North Carolina, the Confederacy’s logistical lifeline, where Sherman defeated Gen. Joseph E. Johnston’s last-ditch attack . . . — Map (db m3635) HM
North Carolina (Durham County), Durham — G 116 — Black Wall Street
In the early decades of the 1900's Durham acquired national reputation for entrepreneurship. Businesses owned by African Americans lined Parrish Street. Among them were N.C. Mutual Life Insurance Co. (moved to Parrish, 1906), led by John Merrick. Dr. Aaron Moore, & C.C. Spaulding and Mechanics and Farmers Bank (1907), led by R.B. Fitzgerald and W.G. Pearson. — Map (db m69962) HM
North Carolina (Durham County), Durham — Brassfield StationA Path Both Traveled — Carolinas Campaign
(Preface): The Carolinas Campaign began on February 1, 1865, when Union Gen. William T. Sherman led his army north from Savannah, Georgia, after the “March to the Sea.” Sherman's objective was to join Gen. Ulysses S. Grant in Virginia to crush Gen. Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia. Scattered Confederate forces consolidated in North Carolina, the Confederacy's logistical lifeline, where Sherman defeated Gen. Joseph E. Johnston's last-ditch attack at Bentonville. . . . — Map (db m14710) HM
North Carolina (Durham County), Durham — G 85 — Bull City Blues
During the 1920s - 1940s, Durham was home to African American musicians whose work defined a distinctive regional style. Blues artists often played in the surrounding Hayti community and downtown tobacco warehouse district. Prominent among these were Blind Boy Fuller (Fulton Allen) (1907-1941) and Blind Gary Davis (1896-1972), whose recordings influenced generations of players. — Map (db m39611) HM
North Carolina (Durham County), Durham — G-63 — Duke Homestead
Birthplace of J. B. and B. N. Duke, tobacco and hydroelectric magnates, philanthropists (Duke University, the Duke Endowment), is 1 mi. S.W. — Map (db m30683) HM
North Carolina (Durham County), Durham — Duke HomesteadProsperity from War
When North Carolina became the last state to secede from the Union in May 1861, Washington Duke’s small farm and homestead here consisted of more than 300 acres. He grew typical crops such as corn, wheat, oats, and sweet potatoes, and had raised cotton as a cash crop until it failed in the 1850s, when he began cultivating bright-leaf tobacco. Drafted into the Confederate Navy in September 1863, Duke was soon captured and imprisoned in Richmond, Va. He was released after the war and sent to New . . . — Map (db m37834) HM
North Carolina (Durham County), Durham — Durham's StationPrelude To Peace — Carolinas Campaign
(Preface):The Carolinas Campaign began on February 1, 1865, when Union Gen. William T. Sherman led his army north from Savannah, Georgia, after the “March to the Sea.” Sherman's objective was to join Gen. Ulysses S. Grant in Virginia to crush Gen. Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia. Scattered Confederate forces consolidated in North Carolina, the Confederacy's logistical lifeline, where Sherman defeated Gen. Joseph E. Johnston's last-ditch attack at Bentonville. After . . . — Map (db m14674) HM
North Carolina (Durham County), Durham — G 57 — James E. Shepard
Negro educational and religious leader. Founder of a college (1910), now N.C. Central University, its president to 1947. Grave 1½ miles S.E. — Map (db m69967) HM
North Carolina (Durham County), Durham — G 109 — John Merrick1859 - 1919
Black business leader. In 1898 he founded what is now N.C. Mutual Life Insurance Company. His grave is 85 yds. N.W. — Map (db m39609) HM
North Carolina (Durham County), Durham — G 102 — John Sprunt Hill1869-1961
Banker and attorney. Leader in credit union movement. Benefactor, UNC Library. Lived here. — Map (db m69966) HM
North Carolina (Durham County), Durham — Meeting of the Generals
On April 17, 1865, Maj. Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman and Gen. Joseph Eggleston Johnston met on this section of the Raleigh to Hillsboro Road at the home of James and Nancy Bennett to negotiate a peace settlement to end the war. Staff officers, troopers, and news reporters accompanied them. Limited documentation makes it difficult to know who came to the Bennett Farm each day, but it is clear that several officers in attendance assisted the generals during the three meetings. After the . . . — Map (db m58322) HM
North Carolina (Durham County), Durham — North CarolinaCivil War Trails
North Carolina’s Civil War stories are as diverse as its landscape. The Outer Banks and coastal rivers saw action early in the war, as Union forces occupied the region. Stories abound of naval battles, blockade running, Federal raids and the Confederacy’s struggle to supply its armies. Other tales are told in the western mountains, a sometimes-lawless region where Unionists and Confederates fought a war within the war. In the rolling central piedmont, memories linger of Union Gen. William T. . . . — Map (db m37830) HM
North Carolina (Durham County), Durham — North CarolinaCivil War Trails
North Carolina’s Civil War stories are as diverse as its landscape. The Outer Banks and coastal rivers saw action early in the war, as Union forces occupied the region. Stories abound of naval battles, blockade running, Federal raids and the Confederacy’s struggle to supply its armies. Other tales are told in the western mountains, a sometimes-lawless region where Unionists and Confederates fought a war within the war. In the rolling central piedmont, memories linger of Union Gen. William T. . . . — Map (db m58392) HM
North Carolina (Durham County), Durham — North CarolinaCivil War Trails
North Carolina’s Civil War stories are as diverse as its landscape. The Outer Banks and coastal rivers saw action early in the war, as Union forces occupied the region. Stories abound of naval battles, blockade running, Federal raids and the Confederacy’s struggle to supply its armies. Other tales are told in the western mountains, a sometimes-lawless region where Unionists and Confederates fought a war within the war. In the rolling central piedmont, memories linger of Union Gen. William T. . . . — Map (db m63217) HM
North Carolina (Durham County), Durham — G 53 — North Carolina Central University
Founded 1910 by James E. Shepard for Negroes. State liberal arts college, 1925-1969. Now a regional university. — Map (db m39613) HM
North Carolina (Durham County), Durham — Rotary Bandstand
Erected by the Rotary Club of Durham as its first community gift in November, 1916. Originally located in Rotary Park in downtown Durham; Relocated to Bennet Place Memorial Park in1924. Refurbished and rededicated by the Rotary Club of Durham on October 8, 1990 on its 75th anniversary. — Map (db m63215) HM
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