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Hancock, Maryland Historical Markers

 
“Old Mr. Flint’s” Home Marker image, Click for more information
By J. J. Prats, August 26, 2006
“Old Mr. Flint’s” Home Marker
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — “Old Mr. Flint’s” Home
George Washington’s diary (while he visited Berkley Springs in 1769) states: “Aug. 30 Old Mr. Flint dined with us” and on Sept. 4: “Rid to the Potomac where my horses were. From thence to Mr. Flint’s and to the Pennsylvania Line, . . . — Map (db m61485) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — A New BeginningWestern Maryland Rail Trail
On this site a pedestrian park was constructed to provide access to Hancock's main street from the Western Maryland Rail Trail and to provide a comfortable rest area for bikers and walkers of the Rail Trail. The park was dedicated on April 11, 1998. . . . — Map (db m96130) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — A Work of ArtChesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park
Looking at the remaining iron railings and graceful arch of the Tonoloway Aqueduct, it is easy to see why canal company officials referred to the eleven aqueducts along the canal as “works of art.” Built between 1835 and 1839, Aqueduct 7 . . . — Map (db m61165) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Discover the TrailWestern Maryland Rail Trail
1. Big Pool Junction The Big Pool Train Station was constructed in 1892 to make a connection with the B&O Railroad across the river at Cherry Run, WV. The Western Maryland Railroad was in a boom stage of growth with the 18 miles of rail . . . — Map (db m96129) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Discover the TrailWestern Maryland Rail Trail
1. Big Pool Junction The Big Pool Train Station was constructed in 1892 to make a connection with the B&O Railroad across the river at Cherry Run, WV. The Western Maryland Railroad was in a boom stage of growth with the 18 miles of rail . . . — Map (db m96131) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Fort Coombe
Fort Coombe, a Maryland stockaded fort of 1755–56 located north of this point. One of the frontier forts during the French and Indian War. The survey of the Mason and Dixon Line during 1763–68 placed it in Pennsylvania instead of . . . — Map (db m833) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion & Retreat
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . — Map (db m718) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion & Retreat
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . — Map (db m719) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Gettysburg CampaignInvasion & Retreat
After stunning victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, Virginia, early in May 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee carried the war through Maryland, across the Mason and Dixon Line and into Pennsylvania. His infantry marched north through . . . — Map (db m831) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — HancockThe Busiest Village on the Road
“After the exhilaration of a gallop down the mountain without breaks, what appetite would not be set on edge, what refinement of palate displeased by venison cutlets, or even ham and eggs?” Harper’s Magazine, 1879 By . . . — Map (db m5931) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — HancockChesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historic Park
Situated on the Potomac River at the narrowest point in the state of Maryland the town of Hancock is rich in history. The town is named for Joseph Hancock, Jr., who ferried travelers, traders, and commerce across the Potomac. In 1818, the . . . — Map (db m96126) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — HancockA Canal Town Community — History of the Town
1700’s Hancock is a settlement that was once on the frontier edge of Maryland. Early maps show European settlers here in the 1730s. As an outpost on the frontier, the area known as “Tonoloway Settlement” was subject to . . . — Map (db m96139) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — HancockA Canal Town Community — History of the Town
1700’s Hancock is a settlement that was once on the frontier edge of Maryland. Early maps show European settlers here in the 1730s. As an outpost on the frontier, the area known as “Tonoloway Settlement” was subject to . . . — Map (db m96140) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Hancock in the Canal EraChesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park
Construction of the C&O Canal was completed through Hancock by the late 1830s. The network between the coal mines, dealers, merchants, canal company, and tidewater shipping became economically strong. As a result of the increasing prosperity in . . . — Map (db m96128) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Hancock Station
The Cumberland Extension of the Western Maryland Railway reached Hancock by December of 1904. The Hancock Station was a combination passenger and freight station that was constructed in 1904–1905. Passenger service was discontinued in . . . — Map (db m736) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Hancock's Orchard Industry
Hancock and its surrounding area during the main span of the 20th century was one of the largest fruit producers in the nation. In 1886 Edmund Pendleton Cohill began the cultivation of fruit crops. Over the years his planted acreage increased, and . . . — Map (db m5933) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Interstate 68 Maryland Vietnam Memorial
Interstate Route 68 is dedicated in recognition and memory of those Marylanders who served in the Vietnam War 1959 - 1975 - Dedicated August 2, 1991 - This plaque is donated to the State of Maryland by Chapter 172 Vietnam Veterans of . . . — Map (db m67091) WM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Little PoolWestern Maryland Rail Trail
Little Pool was part of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal which connected Cumberland to Georgetown and ran parallel to the Potomac River. The principal cargo hauled on the canal heading east was coal. Westbound boats hauled various cargoes such as . . . — Map (db m96155) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Major James Breathed"Hardest artillery fighter the war produced"
Maj. James Breathed was born near present-day Berkeley Spring, W. Va., on December 15, 1838, and moved while young with his family to Washington Co., Md. He attended St. James School in Lydia, where his father John Breathed was headmaster. At age . . . — Map (db m5932) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Millstone & Moffet StationWestern Maryland Rail Trail
A small community originally called Millstone Point, but later changed to just Millstone, grew up along the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal. Andrew Jackson (General and later U.S. President) met a committee from Hancock here. Harpers Monthly relates the . . . — Map (db m96154) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — National Pike Toll HouseCirca 1822
The significance of this structure lies both in its history and architecture. It is one of the few remaining “toll houses” along the old National Road. The National Road was chartered between Hancock and Cumberland in 1819 and completed . . . — Map (db m5799) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Railroad Siding & Coal TrestleWestern Maryland Rail Trail
A railroad siding was constructed near here to allow the train's coal cars to unload their cargo at the coal trestle. From the trestle the coal cars would dump the coal to load the trucks that were waiting down below. The trucks would then deliver . . . — Map (db m96156) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Round Top Cement MillChesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historic Park
Across the canal bed are the remains of the once prosperous Round Top Cement Mill. The abundance of high calcium limestone drew cement manufacturers to this area in 1838. A useful material, limestone can be cut into building blocks or burned and . . . — Map (db m96123) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Round Top Cement MillWestern Maryland Rail Trail
The Round Top Hydraulic Cement Company operated at this site from 1863 to 1909. The mill, which was powered by a 16 foot water wheel and eight coal fired kilns, produced 2200 barrels of hydraulic cement per week. The raw materials for the mill were . . . — Map (db m96160) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Round Top GeologyChesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park
The layers of red sandstone, siltstone, shale and limestone beneath the limekilns on the other side of the canal are like pages in a book to geologists. These folded, even rock layers indicate that millions of years ago this area was covered by a . . . — Map (db m96125) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Round Top Heritage AreaWestern Maryland Rail Trail
Round Top Hill is ecologically sensitive due to its unique geology and topography. These characteristics have resulted in the formation of unique natural habitats (often referred to as natural communities which support a variety of unusual plants . . . — Map (db m96161) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Round Top Sand CompanyWestern Maryland Rail Trail
The Round Top Sand Company and the Maryland Glass Company mined sand in this area during the early 1900's. On the ridge overlooking this area lies a thick bed of Oriskany Sandstone. This sedimentary rock formation yielded a fine, white sand that was . . . — Map (db m96162) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Sideling Hill and Town Hill Mountains
Rainwater enters the outcropping sandstones of Sideling Hill and collects in what is termed an aquifer. In this highway cut, the water runs out at the bottom of the fractured sandstone layers because it cannot go through the dense claystone below. . . . — Map (db m5543) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Sideling Hill Cut North Bench
The sweep of geologic time exposed by this 380 foot slice into Sideling Hill spans about 20 million years. From the dark gray marine rocks at the far end of the north slope which are about 36 million years old, to the white continental sandstones at . . . — Map (db m826) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Sideling Hill Cut South Bench
Across the highway, you have a clue to the past. The slanting tan sandstone was the bed of a river which scoured out the curved place you see. The river meandered away and left a marshy area or lake which was filled with dark gray mud or claystone. . . . — Map (db m827) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Siding and Packing House SiteWestern Maryland Rail Trail
A siding track, two and one half miles long, ran through the town of Hancock. This track allowed local businesses to load and off load materials and supplies. Typical materials included lumber, timber, agricultural supplies, sand, coal, aggregate . . . — Map (db m96159) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — St. Thomas ChurchFounded 1835
During 1861–62 the church was used as a hospital by Union troops of 39th Illinois Regiment Volunteers, 5th Connecticut Regiment Volunteers, 46th Pennsylvania Regiment Volunteers, and 28th New York Regiment Volunteers, under Colonel Williams. . . . — Map (db m739) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — St. Thomas Episcopal ChurchUnintended Target
Before you, at the top of Church Street, stands St. Thomas Episcopal Church, which became an unintended target of Gen. Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson’s artillery on January 5-6, 1862. Jackson had led his force from Winchester, Virginia to . . . — Map (db m832) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — The Apple IndustryWestern Maryland Rail Trail
For well over one hundred years the Hancock area has been at the heart of the Maryland Apple Industry. At the first part of the 20th Century, the gently rolling hills and vast open territories hosted over twelve major orchards. Some of the more . . . — Map (db m96163) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — The C&O Canal: Serving the Potomac ValleyChesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park
The Chesapeake and Ohio Canal was a crucial strand in an economic web stretching from the mountain town of Cumberland to the tidewater ports of Georgetown and Alexandria. The canal depended on the prosperity of the nearby towns, businesses and . . . — Map (db m96127) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — The Challenge of Sideling Hill
“Our pleasure trips usually stopped at the top of the mountain because of the hairpin turn to the right that dropped into a severely sharp curve.” This route is an ancient one. Our traveling ancestors pushed across, . . . — Map (db m825) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — The Historic Bowles HouseHancock Visitor Center — Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park
Built in the 1780’s this farm house witnessed the arrival of the C&O Canal in the mid-1830’s. Located at the east side of Hancock, the house residents catered to canawlers who passed through Lock 52 and the Tonoloway Aqueduct, selling goods and . . . — Map (db m61164) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — The National RoadThe Road that Built the Nation
“. . . so many happy people, restless in the midst of abundance.” —Alexis de Tocqueville, 1840. Americans are an adventurous people. From past to present, they have used feet, horses, wagons, stagecoaches, canals, . . . — Map (db m824) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — The National RoadThe Road that Built a Nation
“. . . so many happy people, restless in the midst of abundance.” —Alexis de Tocqueville, 1840. Americans are an adventurous people. From past to present, they have used feet, horses, wagons, stagecoaches, canals, . . . — Map (db m830) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — The TonolowaysWestern Maryland Rail Trail
Big Tonoloway and Little Tonoloway Creeks empty into the Potomac River nearby. The Native American translation for Tonoloway is "long tail" or "wildcat". People of English, German, and Scots-Irish descent, who came down from present day Fulton . . . — Map (db m96157) HM
Maryland (Washington County), Hancock — Tonoloway Fort
Lieut. Stoddert and twenty men erected and garrisoned a block house and stockaded fort near here on the property of Evan Shelby in 1755 after Braddock’s defeat. It was abandoned in 1756-7 after Fort Frederick was completed. — Map (db m508) HM

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