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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Atlanta in DeKalb County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

The March to the Sea

 
 
The March to the Sea Marker image. Click for full size.
By Christian Belena, November 10, 2014
1. The March to the Sea Marker
Inscription. On November 15, 1864, during the Civil War, U.S. forces under Gen. William T. Sherman set out from Atlanta on the March to the Sea, a military campaign designed to destroy the Confederacy's ability to wage war and break the will of its people to resist. After destroying Atlanta's industrial and business (but not residential) districts, Sherman 62,500 men marched over 250 miles, reaching Savannah in mid-December. Contrary to popular myth, Sherman's troops primarily destroyed only property used for waging war - railroads, train depots, factories, cotton gins, and warehouses. Abandoning their supply base, they lived off the land, destroying food they could not consume. They also liberated thousands of enslaved African Americans in their path. Sherman's "hard hand of war" demoralized Confederates, hastening the end of slavery and the reunification of the nation.
 
Erected 2014 by Georgia Historical Society and Georgia Battlefields Association. (Marker Number 60-13.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Georgia Historical Society/Commission, and the Shermans March to the Sea marker series.
 
Location. 33° 46.238′ N, 84° 20.926′ W. Marker is in Atlanta, Georgia, in DeKalb County. Marker is at the intersection of
The March to the Sea Marker image. Click for full size.
By Jay Sandhaus, April 18, 2017
2. The March to the Sea Marker
Wider view with Freedom Park in background
Moreland Avenue NE (U.S. 23) and North Avenue NE, on the right when traveling north on Moreland Avenue NE. Touch for map. Located in Freedom Park. Marker is at or near this postal address: 602 Moreland Ave NE, Atlanta GA 30307, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Old Williams Mill Rd. (approx. 0.3 miles away); The Battles for Atlanta (approx. half a mile away); Stanley's Sector (approx. half a mile away); Augustus Hurt Plantation (approx. half a mile away); Augustus Hurt House (approx. half a mile away); Alpha Delta Pi (approx. half a mile away); Sightless Among Miracles (approx. half a mile away); Restoring the Line (approx. 0.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Atlanta.
 
More about this marker. This marker was moved in 2015 from 33 46.017′ N, 84 21.317′ W, at the parking lot of the Jimmy Carter Presidential Library and Museum near the location of the Augustus Hurt plantation (441 Freedom Pkwy NE near Albion Avenue, Atlanta GA 30307). This former location was in Fulton County.
 
Additional comments.
1. Atlanta Residences Burned by Sherman
There are many historians who dispute a number of the statements on the marker and use of the word "myth." Sherman's army not only burned a number
The March to the Sea Marker image. Click for full size.
By Jay Sandhaus, April 18, 2017
3. The March to the Sea Marker
Wider view with North Avenue in the background
of residences in Atlanta but all outbuildings -- barns, smokehouses and similar structures as well as plantation houses on The March to the Sea.

Franklin Garrett's three-volume Atlanta and its Environs on pages 655-658 of Volume I includes a list of a number of specific residences burned, naming the owner and location. He also quotes General W.P. Howard's report to Governor Joseph E. Brown. One statement from the report: "By the failure of the fire fiends to perform the task assigned to them of destroying private dwellings, nearly one out of three escaped, while the whole of the real estate of the city fully five-sixths in values have been laid in ashes."

Franklin Garrett (1906-2000) was the official Atlanta City Historian.
    — Submitted October 17, 2017, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia.

 
Categories. African AmericansWar, US Civil
 
The March to the Sea Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, November 16, 2014
4. The March to the Sea Marker
The marker in its original location at the Carter Center.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 18, 2017. This page originally submitted on November 11, 2014, by Christian Belena of Atlanta, Georgia. This page has been viewed 517 times since then and 179 times this year. Last updated on April 19, 2017, by Jay Sandhaus of Atlanta, Georgia. Photos:   1. submitted on November 11, 2014, by Christian Belena of Atlanta, Georgia.   2, 3. submitted on April 19, 2017, by Jay Sandhaus of Atlanta, Georgia.   4. submitted on October 17, 2017, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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