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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Franklin in Williamson County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Battle of Franklin

Artillery Hellfire

 
 
Battle of Franklin Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Stahl, April 26, 2017
1. Battle of Franklin Marker
Inscription. Several Federal gun crews delivered relentless fire to this portion of the Franklin battlefield late in the afternoon of November 30, 1864. At least fourteen of the Unionís thirty-six fieldpieces engaged at Franklin could hit the Eastern flank here. The Confederate side was at a distinct disadvantage in terms of artillery because most batteries were still on the road from Columbia, unable to reach the battle in time to counter the Federal shot and shell.
 
Erected by Tennessee Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Tennessee Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 35° 54.404′ N, 86° 51.653′ W. Marker is in Franklin, Tennessee, in Williamson County. Marker can be reached from Eastern Flank Circle 0.4 miles south of Lewisburg Pike (Business U.S. 431), on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Located in Eastern Flank Battlefield Park. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1345 Eastern Flank Cir, Franklin TN 37064, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Battle of Franklin, Eastern Flank (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named Battle of Franklin, Eastern Flank (within shouting distance of
Battle of Franklin Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Stahl, April 26, 2017
2. Battle of Franklin Marker
this marker); Battle of Franklin, Aftermath (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named Battle of Franklin, Eastern Flank (about 400 feet away); A Dream Postponed (about 400 feet away); Confederate Reunions at McGavock's Grove (about 400 feet away); The Long Road to Recovery (about 400 feet away); a different marker also named Battle of Franklin, Eastern Flank (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Franklin.
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Civil War Artillery Battery image. Click for full size.
Library of Congress
3. Civil War Artillery Battery
An artillery battery usually consisted of four to six guns. Moving and “serving” (loading, aiming firing, and cleaning) them was often a monumental task involving about 100 officers and men, scores of draft animals, and several ammunition caissons in each battery. A Union battery of four ordnance guns, with its men and horses, is shown here. Made of iron, with rifled 3-inch-diameter bores, ordnance guns were among the most popular and accurate artillery pieces of the war.
12 Pounder Napoleon image. Click for full size.
Library of Congress
4. 12 Pounder Napoleon
The bronze 12-pounder napoleon smoothbore was one of the most common artillery pieces in the Civil War and at the Battle of Franklin. Named after Emproer Louis Napoleon III of France, this mobile, versatile piece could launch a projectile almost a mile. It was not as accurate as a rifled cannon, but its smoothbore barrel made it especially effective as a quick-loading weapon at close range.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 19, 2017. This page originally submitted on May 18, 2017, by Brandon Stahl of Fairfax, Virginia. This page has been viewed 71 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on May 18, 2017, by Brandon Stahl of Fairfax, Virginia. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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