Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Abbeville in Abbeville County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Abbeville Opera House (1908)

 
 
Abbeville Opera House (1908) Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, February 16, 2003
1. Abbeville Opera House (1908) Marker
Inscription.
Abbeville was a railway stopover for "road companies" traveling eastern seaboard from New York to Atlanta so town included an Opera House in its new municipal building designed by Edwards & Walter of Atlanta.

• Dedicated October 1st, 1908 along with Court House

• October 10th "The Great Divide" opened on its 7500 square foot stage

• Many well known artists appeared in 250 live performances staged by traveling companies including dramas, minstrel shows, vaudeville

• 1910 "moving pictures" began playing weekly alongside stage shows

• Live theatre ceased in the late 1920s when "talkies" arrived

• Closed its doors early 1960s

• Fully restored in 1968 by Abbeville Community Theatre with live performances staged year round again

Designated "State Rural Drama Theatre of South Carolina" in 2002

 
Erected by Abbeville Historical Society.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the South Carolina, Abbeville County Historical Society/Commission, and the South Carolina, Abbeville Historical Sites Tour marker series.
 
Location. 34° 10.64′ N, 82° 22.703′ W. Marker is in Abbeville, South Carolina, in Abbeville
The Abbeville Opera House (1904)<br>Northwest Corner image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, February 16, 2003
2. The Abbeville Opera House (1904)
Northwest Corner
County. Marker is at the intersection of Court Square (State Highway 20) and East Pickens Street, on the right when traveling north on Court Square. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 100 Court Square, Abbeville SC 29620, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Belmont Inn (1903) (a few steps from this marker); Lynching of Anthony Crawford / Racial Violence in South Carolina (a few steps from this marker); Abbeville County Courthouse (1908) (a few steps from this marker); Humane Society Alliance Fountain (1912) (a few steps from this marker); Abbeville County Veterans Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); Operation Desert Shield / Storm Monument (within shouting distance of this marker); The Law Offices of John C. Calhoun (within shouting distance of this marker); Old Bank Building (ca. 1865) (within shouting distance of this marker); Abbeville County Confederate Monument (within shouting distance of this marker); "Big Bob" (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Abbeville.
 
Regarding Abbeville Opera House (1908). The Abbeville Opera House has twice been awarded the South Carolina Governor's Travel Award for Tourism. During the 1940s, Paramount Pictures listed the Abbeville Opera House as one of its motion picture theatres. This
Abbeville Opera House<br>Front (Southwest) Side image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, December 23, 2008
3. Abbeville Opera House
Front (Southwest) Side
lasted well into the 50s and was operated under the name of Wilby-Kincey.
 
Also see . . .
1. Abbeville Opera House. Official Website of the historic Abbeville Opera House. (Submitted on April 17, 2008, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.) 

2. Abbeville Opera House. The Abbeville Opera House, also known as the Abbeville Opera House and Municipal Office Building is an historic building located in Abbeville, South Carolina. (Submitted on August 5, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

3. Abbeville Opera House. Abbeville Opera House opened its doors in 1904 and served as a cultural center for theatrical productions, public speeches, and other town events. (Submitted on August 5, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

4. SC-EVT Roadshow - The Abbeville Opera House (youtube.com). Beginning with the appearance of moving pictures as early as 1910, Opera House audiences enjoyed a unique companionship between live theater and motion pictures. (Submitted on November 14, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

5. A Grand Old Lady Turns 100 (pdf). Sandlapper Publication celebrating the Opera House's 100 Anniversary. (Submitted on November 14, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

6. Abbeville Opera House Known for 'ghost chair'. 2005 news article about the infamous "ghost chair" in the Abbeville Opera House.
Abbeville Opera House<br>Cornerstone image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 10, 2010
4. Abbeville Opera House
Cornerstone
A.D. 1908
A.L. 5908
J.L. Michie
G.M.A.F.M.
(Submitted on August 5, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

7. Haunted Spots: Abbeville Opera House. More on the ghosts of the Opera House. (Submitted on August 5, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

8. SC-EVT Roadshow - The Ghosts of Abbeville (youtube.com). Includes the haunts of the Opera House. (Submitted on November 14, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

9. William Vaughn Moody - Biography. When William Vaughn Moody's The Great Divide was produced in New York in 1906 it was for a time hailed as the great American drama. (Submitted on November 8, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

10. The Clansman. The Clansman: An Historical Romance of the Ku Klux Klan is the title of a novel published in 1905. (Submitted on November 8, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

11. Michael Genevie. Michael Genevie (September 30, 1959-) is an American stage, film and television actor who is currently the Executive and Artistic Director of the Abbeville Opera House, the official drama state theatre of South Carolina. (Submitted on November 8, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. The Thespian Corps
Nearly ½ a century before the opening of the Abbeville Opera
Abbeville Opera House Entrance image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, December 23, 2008
5. Abbeville Opera House Entrance
House, the village was home to a group of amateur actors known as the Thespian Corps. They performed on a stage in the Marshall house and charged 0.50 per ticket and were written about in 1865.

Independent Press
October 17, 1865

The Thespian Corps. We are sorry that our limited space in the present issue restricts us to a brief notice of the performance of the amateur company, during the past week. She Stoops to Conquer and The Irish Lion; Pizarro and The Stage Struck Yankee; The Gamester and The Rough Diamond were performed on three successive nights to crowded houses and much to the gratification of a highly intelligent audience. We have heard but one opinion expressed of the character of the performances.
    — Submitted September 29, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

2. New City Hall and Opera House
Abbeville Medium
October 1, 1908

The City Hall is a large three story building and is made up of twenty offices for renting purposes, a mayor’s office, a clerk’s office, a council chamber, the Opera House, a box office, fourteen stage dressing rooms, a basement to be used for heating purposes, a number of toilets, and several baths.

The woodwork in the hallways of the
Abbeville Opera House Interior<br>Left Ground Level Box Seat image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, December 23, 2008
6. Abbeville Opera House Interior
Left Ground Level Box Seat
municipal building is of bog oak and is of heavy substantial appearance. The wainscoting is about three feet deep and is of red quarry tile, imported from Wales.

The Opera House is a handsome affair. The seating capacity is about one thousand, the dress circle seating about four hundred. The boxes are six in number and have a seating capacity of ten each. The stage is one of the finest in the State, being forty two by seventy feet. About fifteen sets of curtains and scenery have been put in position and are ready for opening night. An asbestos curtain has been put up for fire protection.

The colorings of the Opera House are most handsome. The walls and ceiling being canary while the wood work is old ivory. In the offices and hallways, rich ochres and siennas with contrasting woodwork have been used.

Five hundred lights will be used in the Opera House alone. The hallways of the buildings will have large bowl globes while the offices will have drop cord lights, something over a hundred lights being used. The offices are all communicating rooms, the average being sixteen by sixteen.

Six fire escapes of the latest improved design are a part of the municipal building. The entrance to the stage is from the court which separates the two buildings. There are also two fire escapes which open on this court.

The city government at present is composed
Abbeville Opera House Interior<br>Stage Left Box Seats image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, December 23, 2008
7. Abbeville Opera House Interior
Stage Left Box Seats
of the following gentlemen: James L. McMillan, mayor, Albert Henry, mayor pro tem, J.C. Ellis, H.G. Smith.
    — Submitted September 29, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

3. The Great Divide - The Opera House's Opening Production
Abbeville Medium
October 14, 1908

The Great Divide. The first show to be given in the Opera House was The Great Divide. The show was far above the average show that hails this way. The plot is an interesting one, and the acting was high class in every detail. The starts were backed by the best actors in minor parts.

The staging in the second act was superb. It was a graphic representation of the Great Divide. The scenery in the second act approached the sublime.
    — Submitted September 29, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

4. The Clansman
Abbeville Medium
October 21, 1908

The Clansman. The play was presented last Thursday night at the Opera House. Every seat was sold and some would-be buyers of tickets were turned away. The play was not in any sense offensive, as we thought it would be. The atrocities of what we believe to be the facts of
Abbeville Opera House Interior<br>Orchestra Seating image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, December 23, 2008
8. Abbeville Opera House Interior
Orchestra Seating
the Ku Klux Klan were so slightly presented as to be rather pleasing – pleasing to us to get off so lightly. The play kept up the interest of hearers and spectators throughout.

The tickets, as we understand, were as follows: In the pit or first floor, $1.50; in the first gallery, $1.00; in the third gallery, 75 cents; in the boxes, $2.00.

No colored people attended, as far as we are informed.

The show people are pronounced in their admiration for our opera house. One man said that he had been in many parts of the country, and he had not seen a better opera house or court house than ours.
    — Submitted September 29, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

5. Abbeville Opera House - National Register Nomination Form
Description

Located on Abbeville's Court Square in the City Municipal Building. This building is part of a government complex that was built in 1904 and also included the county Court House next door.

Brick building, three stories; unusual brick work on main floor includes brick sunburst around keystones; elaborate entrance crowned by large diminishing stone slabs; masonry quoins; large entablature with dantils and fretwork; parapet above has raised central portion.

Opera House interior is
Abbeville Opera House Interior<br>Stage from Orchestra Seating image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, December 23, 2008
9. Abbeville Opera House Interior
Stage from Orchestra Seating
on three levels: orchestra section, balcony and upper gallery. Box seats on each corner of proscenium reach from orchestra floor to ceiling and are flanked by Corinthian columns. Stage area is 7,500 square feet with a full "fly loft," cat walks around stage area and from dressing room area to orchestra pit; 12 dressing rooms. Completely new lighting system (the old lighting panel is still in the building as a conversation piece). Restoration project started in May 1968 and still in progress, has repaired most of the structural decay and provided modern staging facilities. Present seating capacity is 420: 300 seats in orchestra, 120 in first balcony and boxes. Potential seating is 1,000. Elaborately decorated: seats upholstered in red; red carpeting; red velvet curtain with gold trim. Gilt trim conforms with turn of century rococo tastes.

Significance
As well as being a plush reminder of the period when Old Abbeville was the center of culture for this entire Piedmont district, the restored Abbeville Opera Rouse provides a historic setting for a modern community theater which involves a wide surrounding area. Restored and renovated in an exceptionally distinguished manner, the Opera House is a valuable memento of a colorful and typically American era. One of the very few such opera houses remaining in South Carolina, its value is increased both by the integrity
Abbeville Opera House Interior<br>Rope-Pulled System for Set Changes image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 10, 2010
10. Abbeville Opera House Interior
Rope-Pulled System for Set Changes
of its restoration and its modern usage.

The Abbeville Opera House first opened in 1904 with a production of The Clansman, and during the heyday of circuit theater, shows like The Great Divide and Ben Hur (with horses) played continuously. American theater's most prominent attractions -- such as the Ziegfie1d Follies, George White Scandals, Jimmy Durante, Fannie Brice -- played here. For the traveling road companies, on the way from Richmond to Atlanta, Abbeville Opera-House was 'a' regular one night stand. It was the only theater in the area which could accommodate the elaborate productions. (Its companion, the Opera House in Columbia, was demolished long ago). Theatrical nights in Abbeville were gala, white-tie, evening gown affairs; the Southern Railroad ran special trains to accommodate the hundreds of patrons who came from surrounding towns.

In addition to the theater, Abbeville Opera House was a center for other major Abbeville events. According to local sources, William Jennings Bryan spoke from this stage during a campaign for President of the United States.

The Abbeville Opera House is now the home of the Abbeville Community Theater, which produced eight major shows during its first 1968-69 season in the building. Ranging from Shakespeare's King Lear to Sound of Music, the year's roster included two productions
Abbeville Opera House Interior<br>Stage from Balcony image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 10, 2010
11. Abbeville Opera House Interior
Stage from Balcony
from nearby colleges: Lander College in Greenwood and Erskine College in Due West. This indicates its district importance. The newly renovated facilities also enabled the Community Theater to host the American Community Theater Association Festival for the 10 Southeastern States in 1969. The American College Theater, also representing 10 southeastern states, will hold its Drama Festival there in January, 1971.

Location of the Opera House on the Town's historic Court Square further solidifies its importance as part of Abbeville's heritage.
    — Submitted November 8, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

6. Abbeville Opera House: Lady in White Still Loves a Good Show
The Abbeville Opera House is one of the cultural gems of South Carolina. It has been listed on the National Register of Historic Places since the 1970s. The Opera House was dedicated on October 1, 1908, as was the county courthouse. A few months later, Thomas Dixon's plat The Clansman, later inspiration for D.W. Griffith's epic silent film classic Birth of a Nation, was the venue's first show, and it opened to rave reviews. The building hosted all the greats of vaudeville, including Jimmy Durante, the Ziegfeld Follies, Sarah Bernhardt and several traveling road shows. By the 1920s,
Abbeville Opera House Interior<br>Second & Third Balconies & Box Seats image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 10, 2010
12. Abbeville Opera House Interior
Second & Third Balconies & Box Seats
Third Level Seating No Longer Used
silent films had largely replaced vaudeville and the Opera House became a movie theater. though the stage was left intact. The Opera House remained a movie theater until the late 1950s. In 1958, the Abbeville Community Theatre decided to restore the building to its original purpose as a home for plays. The rear wall of the building is one of the tallest free-standing brick walls in the state. The wall is eighteen inches thick from top to bottom and is built entirely of handmade brick; no steel beams or timber framing holds the wall in place. The rear wall was once the scene of a stunt by the famous magician Harry Houdini. He was handcuffed, bound with ropes, placed in a straight jacket and suspended from the roof in front of the sheer face of the rear wall. Naturally, he escaped with minimal difficulty. However, the nest known feature of the Abbeville Opera House is its ghost.

The haunting at the opera house has two different versions. The first is found on several different websites. It centers on a lone chair located in the second balcony, which is where the figure of a young lady has been seen. The fact that the upper balcony was formerly the seating for black patrons has allowed speculation to flourish that the ghost is a victim of a racially motivated crime. However, according to this version, no crime has occurred that can be linked to the sightings of an apparition
Abbeville Opera House Interior<br>Stage from Right Box image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, December 23, 2008
13. Abbeville Opera House Interior
Stage from Right Box
or any other paranormal activity involving the chair. The only known violent death in this area of the building was the shooting of a black suspect who escaped from the custody of the sheriff around 1915. The black man ran through the lobby and lower balcony of the opera house, only to meet his pursuer just outside the exit. Notice the suspect ran through the lower balcony and never entered the upper balcony.

The second and more likely version is easily obtained by contacting the executive director of the Abbeville Opera House, Michael Genevie. He explains that the second balcony has been cleared of all furniture except for one chair, as in the other version. However, he claims that following a successful performance, during the standing ovation the figure of a white lady dressed in a white Edwardian-era gown rises from that chair and joins the living audience below in showing her appreciation for a job well done. Of course the upper balcony was cleared of all other furniture at the request of the fire marshall shortly after the reopening of the building, and for this same reason, no one living is allowed on the second balcony during rehearsals and shows. No one currently connected to the opera house knows of any unattended lady who died in the building, and the literature on the site also mentions no deaths. Mr. Genevie has not seen or heard the ghost himself, but people
Abbeville Opera House Interior<br>Orchestra Seating from Right Box image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, December 23, 2008
14. Abbeville Opera House Interior
Orchestra Seating from Right Box
he trusts have. (Source: Ghosts of the South Carolina Midlands by Tally Johnson (2007) pg 16-17.)
    — Submitted November 8, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

7. History of the Abbeville Opera House
In the early 1900's there were many "road companies" producing shows in New York City. Once the production was assembled, the show travelled throughout the country. One of the more popular tours went from New york to Richmond, Virginia to Atlanta. For a number of years, Abbeville was an overnight stop for the entire touring company. Several members of the community decided that if this area had a facility, since the travelling companies were coming through here anyway, Abbeville could sponsor some of these touring productions.

On October 1, 1908, what was then the Abbeville District dedicated a new Court House and City Hall. The grand old theatre now known as the Abbeville Opera House was a part of the splendid pair of buildings, "equal in beauty of architecture and modern conveniences of any in the state," according to regional newspaper accounts of the day. Some months later the great stage -- 7500 square feet with it's wonderful fly loft, cat walk and auditorium -- was officially used for its intended purpose. The show was called "The Great Divide"
Abbeville Opera House Interior<br>Main Lobby image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, December 23, 2008
15. Abbeville Opera House Interior
Main Lobby
and it was a gala occasion that set the entire area buzzing with excitement.

From that time on, all the "greats and near-greats" played on the magnificent Opera House stage. The Ziegfeld Follies, George White's Scandals, Jimmy Durante, Sarah Burnhart, Quo Vadis, Ben-Hur, and many other memorable productions and performers were presented as the big road shows moved down the eastern seaboard. Vaudeville was in its "hayday" as was the Abbeville Opera House.

As the road shows began to fade, the silent movies moved in. These early motion pictures carried full crews of musicians and sound effects men. They were impressive and still carried the saw of "live" show business. Then came The Jazz Singer and the "talkies" came to the Opera House. But the old lustre was gone. Vaudeville was dying and the theatre was changing. Concurrently, Abbeville's influence as a cultural center faded. The Opera House was converted into a movie theater and the films became more and more automated.

It remained a movie theatre until the late fifties. With the decline of movies, even the once grand "movie house" degenerated, lost money and finally closed. The Abbeville Community Theatre had long wanted a home of its own, so in 1968 mounted a community-wide campaign as the first step in restoring this grand old theatre. Since then many people have
Landmark of American Music Award -<br>Located on Rear Lobby Door Leading Into Theatre image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, December 23, 2008
16. Landmark of American Music Award -
Located on Rear Lobby Door Leading Into Theatre
The Opera House
Opened in 1908 - Reopened 1968
During the early years major artists and touring companies performed at the Opera House on their rail route from New York to Atlanta. Since its reopening it has served as a center for the performing arts.
taken part in the effort to keep the Opera House open and in good repair.

In 1978, with the increase of tourism in this region, the Opera House began a Summer Theatre Season. A professional touring theatre company established residence at the Opera House that year -- the first since 1917. Since then the professional summer stock season under the direction of Michael Genevie, has gained recognition throughout the southeast. The winter and summer seasons combined produce over 36 weeks of live theatre a year. Once again, this "grand old lady" is being used for its original and intended purpose -- to house live theatre. (Source: Abbeville Opera House 100th Anniversary Centennial Season Program.)
    — Submitted February 28, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

8. 'Bully, bully': Abbeville Opera House staging its 100th season
By L.C. Leach III
The Spartanburg Herald-Journal
March 23, 2008

They have been coming since the days of Teddy Roosevelt - some from nearby, some from far away - and more new faces than ever before are expected in the months to come.

This year marks the 100th anniversary of the opening of the Abbeville Opera House - if you've never been, a pick of shows in the grand Victorian style awaits.

Located on
Historic Postcard<br>Abbeville County Courthouse<br>and City Hall/Opera House image. Click for full size.
Abbeville County by Abbeville County Historical Society, circa 1900
17. Historic Postcard
Abbeville County Courthouse
and City Hall/Opera House
the historic town square, the Opera House - which staged its first play in 1908 - was created in the fashion of a Manhattan playhouse, with four floors of dressing rooms, four box seating areas, a balcony, and an interior and exterior done in turn-of-the century architecture and feel.

Even though the seating capacity is only 350, patrons come for every one of the House's 10 to 12 annual productions and ever-popular summer seasons.

"We had 17,000 attend last year just for the summer season," said Michael Genevie, now in his 29th season as Opera House executive director. "And 85 percent of our audience comes not only from outside Abbeville, but from outside the state."

Heady attention to be sure, but Genevie has no trouble staying grounded, considering that he still remembers when …

"I came here in 1979 to start the summer theater season," he said. "In those days we were fortunate to have 40 people show up."

Genevie had intended to stay only for the one summer, but "one thing led to another and by the mid-1980s I was here full time."

"Our attendance started to grow and built steadily over the years," he said. "Now it's common for us to sell out all our shows."

And that's without name actors. In the past, the Opera House has featured both nighttime and daytime TV stars because "people used to like seeing a soap opera actor,"
Abbeville Fire Department<br>In Front of the Abbeville Opera House image. Click for full size.
Abbeville County by the Abbeville County Historical Society, 1915
18. Abbeville Fire Department
In Front of the Abbeville Opera House
Genevie said.

"But now the shows themselves attract the audience," he said. "We've never had to have open auditions for our summer season, because so many of our past actors come back to perform."

Terry Gilchrist is one. Having acted professionally for the past 25 years, Gilchrist, who lives in Greenwood, doesn't plan to retire anytime soon.

"I've done 75 to 100 shows here," said Gilchrist, 53, who doubles as an accountant during the day. "And I like it because you meet so many different people."

Open auditions are held frequently for new blood and talent, which Genevie welcomes - especially when a lot of rehearsal is needed.

"The majority of the new people coming in play younger roles," Genevie said.

Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the Abbeville Opera House uses the same rope-pulled rigging systems as in 1908, and it is the only "hemp house" remaining in South Carolina, according to records. When you put the ropes, the architecture, the high seating and high stage together with the mix of new and veteran actors and a packed audience, something magical happens with every show on both sides of the stage.

"Sometimes (during past rehearsals) I've wondered 'why am I doing this?' " Gilchrist said. "But when the curtain goes up and you see the crowds, you remember why - and at that point, it makes it all worthwhile."
    — Submitted April 4, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

9. Abbeville Opera House
From Reconstruction to well into he 1920s, traveling troops of actors, musicians, and vaudevillians passed through Abbeville, where the citizens has an insatiable thirst for entertainment. The town's location on the rail line between New York and Atlanta made it a natural stopover. Many a one-night-stand production was performed in the town square alfresco or in a tent. Then the citizens got the bright idea of combining the need for a municipal office building with the desire for an opera house. The result, completed in 1908, is the handsome brick building that provides space for both.

The building's modest two-story facade fronts on the square and doesn't prepare you for the spacious interior. Because the lot slops down in the back, the performance space is actually six stories tall and qualifies as an opera house because the stage area extends the seating area. The small but elegant theater provides seating for 350 on the main floor, a balcony, and four impressive boxes.

An orchestra pit is recessed under the stage. Backstage, three floors of dressings rooms have a hallway window onto the stage so that the performers could follow the action and not miss a cue. The brick wall of the building stands more than 100 feet tall. Built four bricks thick without restraining rods, it is believed to be one of the tallest freestanding brick walls in the western hemisphere.

Sets were changed with a rope-pulled system of counterweights balanced by sandbags on hemp rope - hence the name "hemp house." This system is still in place. Abbeville's Opera House is the only remaining hemp house in South Carolina. (Source: Recommended Country Inns: The South, 8th Edition by Carol Thalimer and Dan Thalimer (2001), pg 296.)
    — Submitted November 21, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

 
Categories. Entertainment
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on April 17, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 4,520 times since then and 249 times this year. Last updated on August 17, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page was the Marker of the Week February 15, 2009. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on April 17, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   3. submitted on November 8, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   4. submitted on September 11, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   5, 6. submitted on November 8, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   7, 8, 9. submitted on December 26, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   10, 11, 12. submitted on September 11, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   13, 14. submitted on November 21, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   15, 16. submitted on December 26, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   17. submitted on November 21, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   18. submitted on November 7, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement