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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Frederick in Frederick County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Burning of the Bridge

 
 
Burning of the Bridge Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 9, 2007
1. Burning of the Bridge Marker
Inscription. 12:00 noon July 9, 1864

Confederates wearing captured blue uniforms had killed or wounded several Union skirmishers who had been sent across the Monocacy River to hold the Georgetown Turnpike and B&O Railroad bridges "at all hazards."

The two sides traded shots all morning, but about noon Union Maj. Gen. Lew Wallace could see that the Confederates were about to overwhelm his troops. He ordered the wooden covered bridge set ablaze. Wallace had delayed the enemy, but he also had trapped his own men across the river.

Previously, men of the company had gathered sheaves of wheat from the nearby field, and had stacked them under the bridge's southeast corner. The combustibles were fired ...and the bridge was soon engulfed in flames.
Pvt. Alfred S. Roe, New York Heavy Artillery
 
Erected by Monocacy National Battlefield
National Parks Service.
 
Location. Marker has been reported missing. It was located near 39° 22.154′ N, 77° 23.293′ W. Marker was near Frederick, Maryland, in Frederick County. Marker could be reached from Urbana Pike (State Highway 355), on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Located along a walking trail at the Gambrill Mill (stop five on the driving
Trail Stop Overlooking the River image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 9, 2007
2. Trail Stop Overlooking the River
tour of Monocacy Battlefield), which on a lane off the right side (east) of Urbana Pike. The marker is located on an overlook of the Monocacy River. Marker was in this post office area: Frederick MD 21704, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this location. Burning the Bridge (here, next to this marker); Desperate Escape (within shouting distance of this marker); Monocacy National Battlefield (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named Monocacy National Battlefield (about 700 feet away); Gambrill Mill (about 700 feet away); Retreat (about 800 feet away); A Bold Plan (approx. 0.2 miles away); Monocacy Battlefield (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Frederick.
 
More about this marker. A background painting depicts the burning of the Wooden Bridge.
 
Also see . . .
1. Battle of Monocacy. National Parks Service site. (Submitted on November 2, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Monocacy Battlefield Markers. This marker is among several describing the battle of Monocacy, to "tour" the battlefield see the related markers. (Submitted on November 4, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
The Marker and the Modern Bridge image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 9, 2007
3. The Marker and the Modern Bridge
This photo was taken close to the anniversary of the battle (compared to the photo below of the bridge as seen in the winter).
 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Present Day Urbana Pike Bridge image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, January 29, 2007
4. Present Day Urbana Pike Bridge
The modern truss bridge crosses the river near where the wooden bridge stood at the time of the battle.
Burning the Bridge image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, May 1, 2017
5. Burning the Bridge
The “Burning of the Bridge” marker has been replaced by the “Burning the Bridge” marker.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 2, 2017. This page originally submitted on November 2, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,508 times since then and 97 times this year. Last updated on May 31, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on November 2, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   5. submitted on May 31, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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